Blog update — guest post invitation

Dwellers of an island on Lake Pskov, Russia (June 1992)

Dwellers of an island on Lake Pskov, Russia (June 1992)

I confess: some “blog fatigue” has set in here! Some of you may know what that’s like. In my case, I know that it’s definitely not permanent, but I am going to take a little break from regular posting to use that time to try my hand at indexing Russian records for the Family Search website. So that’s where I’ll be for the short-term, but I’ll still be reading others’ posts and answering any questions / comments / emails that come up.

Meanwhile, if anyone wants to contribute a guest post on an ancestor relevant to the family lines covered in this blog, please feel free to run the topic by me, and if it sounds like a good fit, you can put a post together, and I will publish it for you here. I can watermark any images you include, if need be. So keep that in mind.

So off I go to do some indexing. If I experience any highlights during the process, I’ll let you know! And, btw, Happy Halloween!

Snippet of map of Russia from David Rumsey Map Collection website (www.davidrumsey.com).Full Map Title:  Russia Part lII. Kourland, Vilna, Esthonia, Livonia, St. Petersburg, Pskov, Vitebsk. Published under the superintendence of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge. Engraved by J. & C. Walker. London, published by Baldwin & Cradock, 47 Paternoster Row, July 1st. 1834 (London: Chapman and Hall, 1844)

Pskov and Lake Pskov on map of Russia from David Rumsey Map Collection website (www.davidrumsey.com). Full Map Title: Russia Part lII. Kourland, Vilna, Esthonia, Livonia, St. Petersburg, Pskov, Vitebsk. Published under the superintendence of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge. Engraved by J. & C. Walker. London, published by Baldwin & Cradock, 47 Paternoster Row, July 1st. 1834 (London: Chapman and Hall, 1844)

(NOTE: The photo I’ve included above is among my favorites of the ones I took while living in Russia years ago. It’s not the best quality, I know, but I still enjoy looking at it. It was taken from a small ferry boat that departed from the ancient town of Pskov and made its way to this small island on Lake Psov before returning to town. I think all the villagers (and dogs) just gathered on the shore to ‘greet’ the boat and to see who emerged. None of them climbed aboard. Perhaps it was a highlight of the day; or a way for the grandmothers to keep the children occupied while their parents were at work. The man in the hat and woman in black are particularly interesting in their peasant dress; she looks a bit like a nun–or perhaps an ‘Old Believer‘)

Categories: Miscellaneous | Tags: , | 8 Comments

Halloween — a century ago

Halloween postcard, circa 1900-1910 (Contributed to Wikimedia Commons by Chordboard - public domain)

Halloween postcard, circa 1900-1910 (Contributed to Wikimedia Commons by Chordboard – public domain)

“DESPITE the high cost of living, the wave of political interest that has submerged the country and the many and varied forms of the “women’s movement,” there will doubtless be found time to indulge in a little old fashioned fun on Halloween night.

There is no doubt that this year the Halloween hostess has unequaled opportunities in the way of refreshments as well as mirth provoking ways of entertaining—so many, in fact, that she must choose from the time worn customs those best suited to the enjoyment of her particular company. A girl who hopes to give a very jolly party this year is sending out her invitations on pumpkin shaped postcards, and on them she is writing the following jingle:

At our house on Thursday night
You surely will see a sight.
Ghosts and goblins, witches, too.
Are busy preparing fates for you.
The hour is eight. Don’t be late,
But come—be brave at any rate.

This party, to give credit where it is due, has been arranged by three girls, who are to have a share of the entertaining and add mystery to the evening’s fun by taking the guests in turn to their three homes.

The guests are invited to dress in sheets and, pillowcases, with white masks, so that they will resemble ghosts. When they enter the door of the hostess in whose name the invitations are sent out a gloved hand will be stretched out to them in greeting.

All of the girls, and very likely all of the boys, will be unable to suppress a shriek when they grasp a cold, clammy kid glove that has been stuffed with sawdust and soaked in ice water.

None of the ghosts is supposed to talk loudly, and much merriment will be found in trying to guess identities.

Games will be played, including guessing contests in which prizes can be given, and when the lights are brightened cocoa, wafers and salted nuts will be served.

Each man chooses a partner, and the party then will go to the home of the second hostess, where other games are played and pumpkin pie and cheese will be the refreshments.

The black cat

The black cat

Partners are again changed when the home of the third girl is visited. This home is to be decorated with Jack-o’-lanterns and autumn leaves. Each guest is given a plate holding an apple with the center scooped out to hold a lighted candle, over which marshmallows are toasted.

One girl dressed as an old witch sits and tells fortunes. Prophecies are hidden in crape paper pumpkins and are to be given as souvenirs of the evening.

Masks are removed, and the party breaks up amid songs and general merrymaking.

favors

Halloween favors

In the illustration are shown some of the newest and most appropriate Halloween table decorations and favors. Especially attractive as supper table ornaments are the candlesticks and shades made of black pasteboard and yellow paper decorated with witches, eats, pumpkins and the like. The realistic elephant seen in the cut has squash legs, a carrot bead and a corncob trunk.

The historic black cat is in evidence this year as a dance favor, and the tabby pictured would provoke much laughter if used also on the supper table.

lady_and_gent

The dignified gentleman and lady

Inside the bed of green paper is hidden a box of candy. Do you recognize the two tall gentlemen pictured—Herr Gourd, with his trusty meerschaum, and the small one, Signor Carrot, a famous musician with truly temperamental hair. Both will serve at the Halloween dinner. The dignified gentleman and lady seen among the illustrations will make delightful place favors. Both are cleverly made of crape paper, and the lady has a corncob body.

men

Herr Gourd & Señor Carrot

All of these novelties would be charming to use at the Halloween frolic, and, by the way, a delightful ending for such a party is to have the best story teller of the crowd posted beforehand so that he may be prepared to tell a thrilling ghost tale. Then gather about a table on which is a plate of salt, pour alcohol on this, light it and extinguish all other lights and listen in silence. If the blue flame of the alcohol casting a deadly pallor over every face, the gruesome story, the unearthly silence, except for the hollow tones of the speaker, do not induce imaginative persons to read their fate in some of the tests of the evening, the party can hardly be called a success.”

(The above article appeared in the Mount Vernon, NY, Daily Argus newspaper, OCTOBER 1912, under the headline ‘A Progressive Party for Halloween with No Political Significance’)

Daily Argus (Mt. Vernon, NY) - October 1912 (www.fultonhistory,com)

CLICK TO ENLARGE – Daily Argus (Mt. Vernon, NY) – October 1912 (www.fultonhistory,com)

****SCROLL DOWN for more century-old Halloween clippings, including recipes for ‘Cauldron Punch,’ ‘Goblin Pie,’ ‘Witch Cake,’ and ‘Gnome Salad’!****

The Daily Argus, Mt. Vernon, NY, 29 Oct 14 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The Daily Argus, Mt. Vernon, NY, 29 Oct 14 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 19 Oct 1914 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 19 Oct 1914 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The Daily Argus,  Oct 1912 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The Daily Argus, Oct 1912 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 29 Oct 1914 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 29 Oct 1914 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 29 Oct 1914 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 29 Oct 1914 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 25 Oct 1914 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 25 Oct 1914 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Links:
Wikipedia – History of Halloween

Categories: Halloween, Miscellaneous | Tags: , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

A Florida Friday: Travelling back in time at Wakulla Springs

Wakulla Springs, Florida

Wakulla River, Florida

Wakulla spring head

Wakulla spring head

Wakulla Springs - springhead

Wakulla spring head

It’s fun to come across decades-old (or even better, centuries-old) descriptions of places you’ve visited or hope to visit some day. Once you have the opportunity to compare your experiences with those of your predecessors, you may find that much has changed. Then again, you may discover that things have barely changed at all.

Not long ago, I came across some descriptions of the majestic Wakulla Springs that appeared in an Illinois paper dated 1851, and three separate New York newspapers, one from 1855 when Florida’s total population was only about 87,000; one from 1866, when the population was roughly 180,000, and one from 1886, when that number was inching toward 390,000. Back then, few would have ventured further south than Orlando and the lake areas in the mid-section. (Note: The New York clippings are from Old Fulton NY Post Cards; the Illinois clipping is from Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections.) From the vantage point of 2014, these mid- to late-19th-century observations by some early Florida travelers are a treat to read.

Today’s Florida has 20 million people, many of whom have flocked to the southern reaches of the state, leaving northern Florida largely underpopulated, apart from the big cities, which really aren’t all that big. Here, one can find dozens of springs spread about the map, and we visited many of them a half decade ago when we went on a ‘springs binge.’ You see—once you’ve seen one, you’ll want to see them all! While each has its own magic, Wakulla remains our all-time favorite.

Wakulla Springs—to the  south of Tallahassee, Florida—is one of the world’s largest and deepest freshwater springs. This unspoilt landscape of breathtaking beauty has been captivating visitors for thousands of years.

It was a chilly February afternoon when we visited, and we were completely blown away by the crystal clear waters, abundance of wildlife—birds of all kinds—and the soul-penetrating peace that reverberates here.

Wakulla Springs, Florida

Wakulla River, Florida

Wakulla Springs is being preserved within the Florida State Park system as the Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park. An historic working 1930s lodge is the gateway to entering the springs. Had we known it existed, we probably would have spent at least one night there, especially for the purpose of sitting out on the veranda in the evening to listen to the gators and other night-time critters.

Right over the spring head is a platform for doing cannonballs and an area roped off for swimming. With gators not far away, I’m not sure I would venture forth, although I suppose the riskiest times are dawn and dusk, so day-time is probably okay.

Glass-bottom boats cruise from here, gently carried along by the power of the 1st magnitude spring waters that give rise to the nine-mile-long Wakulla River.

The cave system at the spring head is vast—one of the largest in the world—and professional cave divers have been busy over the years mapping its 12 miles and investigating the prehistoric artifacts found within it. For a wonderful interactive feature that lets you ‘explore’ the caves yourself, click here, and then on the image labelled ‘Exploring Wakulla.’ Be sure to use the ‘scroll’ feature along the bottom to get your diver to the end of the system. By the way, I recall a guide telling us that when located under the lodge, cave divers have been able to hear voices coming from within its dining room!

Well, now that you’ve heard my take on Wakulla Springs, I invite you to scroll down to read the 19th-century accounts below. As I read them, I tried to imagine Wakulla Springs without the lodge, the boats, the fencing, the platform, the swimming buoys, etc., and the reactions of those who simply chanced upon it—it must have been even more hauntingly beautiful, which hardly seems possible.

Wakulla Springs, Florida

Wakulla River, Florida

****************************************Sangamo Journal (Illinois), 3 Sept 1851***************************************

Sangamo Journal 3 Sept 1851

Sangamo Journal 3 Sept 1851

******************************************Niagara Falls Gazette, 28 Feb 1855******************************************

Niagara Falls Gazette, 28 Feb 1855

Niagara Falls Gazette, 28 Feb 1855

Niagara Falls Gazette, 28 Feb 1855

Niagara Falls Gazette, 28 Feb 1855

Niagara Falls Gazette, 28 Feb 1855

Niagara Falls Gazette, 28 Feb 1855

river2.

Section of the Wakulla River with its abundant cypress trees

*****************************************Syracuse Daily Standard, 16 Mar 1866******************************************

Letter from Florida, excerpt, by Miss Chloe Merrick, Syracuse Daily Standard, 16 March 1866

Letter from Florida, excerpt, by Miss Chloe Merrick, Syracuse Daily Standard, 16 March 1866

******************************************Watkins (NY) Gazette, 20 April 1886******************************************

Watkins Express (Watkins, NY), 29 Apr 1886

Watkins Express (Watkins, NY), 29 Apr 1886

Watkins Express 29 Apr 1886

Watkins Express 29 Apr 1886

boats

Glass bottom boats by the lodge

gator2

anhinga

gator

turtles

river

Wakulla Springs, Florida

Wakulla Springs, Florida

Lodge at Wakulla Springs, Florida

The Lodge at Wakulla Springs, Florida

Lodge interior

Lodge interior

*****************************************************************************************
Resources:
Friends of Wakulla Springs website
Wakulla Springs Lodge website
Wakulla River Adventure – YouTube video
An 1880’s canoe trip around Florida – PDF

Categories: Florida, Miscellaneous, Nature | Tags: , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Remembering the women: Elizabeth Depui Brodhead

1851 print by Nagel & Weingartner: Depiction of the women of Bryan Station getting water while Native Americans, who are about to besiege the settlement, watch. Famous event in Kentucky during the American Revolutionary War.

1851 print by Nagel & Weingartner: Depiction of the women of Bryan Station getting water while Native Americans, who are about to besiege the settlement, watch. Famous event in Kentucky during the American Revolutionary War (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain in USA)

While, the men who served in the Revolutionary War are remembered with profound gratitude for their heroic sacrifices, it’s easy to forget that behind them stood an army of highly productive and devoted women: wives, sisters, grandmothers and daughters—women who strove to support the War efforts of their beloved, while keeping the home fires burning. How comforted the men must have been by this knowledge.

One such woman was Elizabeth Depui Brodhead, wife of the famous Colonel Daniel Brodhead and sister-in-law to my fifth great-grandfather Garret. A wonderful bit of biographical detail about Elizabeth can be found on pages 22-23 of Some Pennsylvania Women during the War of the Revolution, by William Henry Engle, MD (Harrisburg, PA: Harrisburg Publishing Co., 1898), and I am including it below. While much has been written about the Colonel, this is the first information I’ve found that sheds a tiny bit of light on Elizabeth. If you are aware of other examples, please share in the comment box below.

The Birth of Old Glory, painting by Edward Percy Moran, ca. 1917 (Public Domain - Wikimedia Commons)

The Birth of Old Glory, painting by Edward Percy Moran, ca. 1917 (Public Domain – Wikimedia Commons)

Elizabeth Depui, youngest daughter of Nicholas Depui, was born in 1740* in what is now Monroe county Pa. She was a descendant from Nicholas Depui, a Huguenot who fled from France to Holland in the year 1685 at the time of the revocation of the Edict of Nantes. Little is known of her early childhood. She received a pretty fair education at one of the Dutch schools in New York, but the major portion of her youthful days were spent on the frontiers of civilization, the wily savage ever hovering around the settlements of the Minisink. On more than one occasion she was obliged to flee to either the blockhouses or the more populous settlements for safety.

Shortly after her marriage she accompanied her husband to the town of Reading where she made her home until after the promulgation of peace. During that trying period the care of a young family was hers, and yet among that coterie of bright and heroic women of the Revolution who were in exile in Reading she shone with lustre. Nothing was too great for her to undertake and her patriotic ardor was always aroused for the welfare of the soldier of the Declaration. She administered to the comfort of the sick and wounded who found their way after convalescence to their several homes upon the frontiers. In those days, the women kept many in clothing as well as the necessaries of life. Help was needed everywhere, and as we of the present day minister to our troops from our abundance, the women of the Revolution did the same out of their poverty. It is true they accomplished much more than we at this distance of time can either appreciate or calculate. Theirs was a day of self denial.

Thomas Eakins' Homespun, 1881 (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain)

Thomas Eakins’ Homespun, 1881 (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain)

They delighted in homespun dresses while luxuries were prepared only for the sick and loving who were battling for the rights of mankind and the independence of their country. And yet we must honor the women of all crises in the history of our beloved land who lead in every philanthropic work to alleviate distress. Their forbears during the struggle for independence were animated by that enlarged patriotic spirit which will enshrine their names to the latest posterity. It was so eminently characteristic of them that a British officer, a prisoner of war, remarked that no soldiers whose mothers, wives, and daughters were so devoted to the cause and so self sacrificing could ever be conquered. Mrs. Brodhead died in the city of Philadelphia toward the close of the year 1799*, but exact date with place of burial have not been ascertained.

I’d love to find more such biographical detail on other women relevant to the families covered within this blog. If anyone has other examples to share, please get in touch/leave a comment. Meanwhile, you can check the list below to see whether any of your female Pennsylvania ancestors were also featured in this book.

********************************************************************************************************************
*Note: According to p. 74 of The Brodhead Family, Volume I, published by the Brodhead Family Association (Port Ewen, NY: 1986), Elizabeth was born in 1739 and was the daughter of Samuel Depuy and Jane McDowell. Also, per their records, she died sometime before 16 May 1781 at Reading, Berks Co., PA. (Daniel married again–his second wife was Rebecca Edgill Mifflin. She died in Philadelphia and was buried there on 15 February 1788.)

NB: Depui is spelled in many different ways (visit Depuy Surname History for a rundown).

Resources:
Women in the American Revolution
The Roles of Women in the Revolutionary War
The Homespun Movement – interesting PDF

********************************************************************************************************************

Other women featured in this book:
Elizabeth Wilkins Allison, 9; Allison, John 9
Rebecca Lyon Armstrong, 11; Armstrong, John 12
Sarah Richardson Atlee, 15; Atlee, Samuel John 15
Mary Quigley Brady, 18; Brady, John 18
Elizabeth Depui Brodhead, 22; Brodhead, Daniel 23
Eleanor Lytle Brown, 26; Brown, Matthew 26
Mary Phillips Bull, 29; Bull, John 29
Sarah Shippen Burd, 33; Burd, James 34
Katharine Hamilton Chambers, 3; Chambers, James 39
Elizabeth Zane Clark, 42; Clark, John 44
Jane Roan Clingan, 45; Clingan, William Jr 46
Martha Crawford Cook, 47; Cook, Edward 47
Sarah Simpson Cooke, 49; Cooke, William 49
Margaret Cochran Corbin, 58; Corbin, John 52
Mary Kelsey Cutter Covenhoven, 55; Covenhoven, Robert 55
Hannah Vance Crawford, 58; Crawford, William 58
Catharine Martin Davidson, 62; Davidson, James 63
Annie Schenck Davies, 65; Davies, Hezekiah 60
Hannah Blair Foster, 67; Foster, William 67
Anne West Gibson, 70; Gibson, George 70
Rachel Marx Graydon, 73; Graydon, Alexander 74
Catharine Ewing Hand, 78; Hand, Edward 79
Margaret Alexander Hamilton, 81; Hamilton, John 81
Katharine Holtzinger Hartley, 83; Hartley, Thomas 83
Mary Ludwig Hays, 85; Hays, John 85
Ann Wood Henry, 87; Henry, William 87
Crecy Covenhoven Hepburn, 90; Hepburn, William 91
Sarah Harris Irvine, 92; Irvine, James 92
Anne Callender Irvine, 94; Irvine, William 95
Jean McDowell Irwin, 98; Irwin, Archibald 98
Alice Erwin Johnston, 100; Johnston, Francis 100
Martha Beatty Johnston, 103; Johnston, Thomas 103
Ann West Alricks Lowrey, 105; Lowrey, Alexander 105
Sarah Nelson McAlister, 108; McAlister, Hugh 108
Sarah Holmes McClean, 110; McClean, Alexander 112
Martha Sanderson McCormick, 113; McCormick, Robert 113
Margaret Lewis McFarland, 115; McFarland, Andrew 115
Martha Hoge McKee, 117; McKee, Thomas 117
Margaret Stout Macpherson, 119; Macpherson, William 120
Marritie Van Brunt Magaw, 122; Magaw, Robert 122
Susanna Miller Mickley, 124; Mickley, John Jacob 124
Sarah Morris Mifflin, 127; Mifflin, Thomas 128
Rachel Rush Boyce Montgomery, 130; Montgomery, Joseph 1
Elizabeth Thompson Moorhead, I34; Moorhead, Fergus 134
Mary White Morris, 137; Morris, Robert 13s
Margaret Mayes Murray, 140; Murray, James 141
Winifred Oldham Neville, I42; Neville, John 143
Mary Carson O’Hara, 14; O’Hara, James 146
Rosina Kucher Orth, I48; Orth, Balzer I48
Sarah McDowell Piper, 150; Piper, William 151
Margaret Lowrey Plumer, 152; Plumer, George I52
Elizabeth Potter Poe, 157; Poe, James 158
Margaret O Brien Pollock, 160; Pollock, Oliver 161
Elizabeth Parker Porter, I64; Porter, Andrew 166
Elizabeth Myer Kelly, 168; Kelly, John 168
Jane Ralston Rosbrugh, 171; Rosbrugh, John 171
Phoebe Bayard St Clair, 171; St Clair, Arthur 174
Margaret Murray Simpson, 178; Simpson, John 178
Maria Thompson Sproat, 180; Sproat, William 180
Martha Espy Stewart, 182; Stewart, Lazarus 182
Hannah Tiffany Swetland, I84; Swetland, Luke 185
Ursula Muller Thomas, 187; Thomas, Martin 187
Catharine Ross Thompson, I89; Thompson, William 190
Hannah Harrison Thomson, 192; Thomson, Charles 193
Elizabeth Grosz Traill, 195; Traill, Robert 19
Lydia Hollingsworth Wallis, 198; Wallis, Samuel 198
Jean Murray Watts, 201; Watts, Frederick 201
Mary Penrose Wayne, 204; Wayne, Anthony 205
Mary Agneta Bechtel Weygandt, 207; Weygandt, Cornelius 207

Categories: Brodhead, Monroe Co., Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Revolutionary War | Tags: , , , , , | 6 Comments

Another image of some ‘unknowns’

I’ve stared at this 1917 photo a number of times, trying to figure out who the two ladies on the left were. They are obviously good friends of my great grandmother Elizabeth Sargent* Trewin and her daughter Zillah of Jersey City, NJ, pictured on the right. Elizabeth’s husband William Trewin passed away the previous December, so mother and daughter were on their own at this point. Zillah was still single.

That hat is quite something. Its owner looks like a stern gal. I’ve wondered whether the lady second from left could be my great grandmother’s younger sister Sarah Sargent* Hemion, but maybe that’s just wishful thinking on my part. Apart from the gray hair, their facial features are quite different. Anyone out there with some thoughts, please get in touch!

*Note: The sisters were born in England with the surname Slaymaker. That name was changed to Sargent before they emigrated to the US after the Civil War.

Unknown ladies on the left, Elizabeth Sargent Trewin & daughter Zillah

Unknown ladies on the left, Elizabeth Sargent Trewin & daughter Zillah

Categories: Jersey City, Hudson Co., New Jersey, Sargent, Slaymaker, Trewin | Tags: , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Brodhead Creek postcard, pre-1952

Brodhead Creek postcard

Brodhead Creek postcard

I recently acquired another Brodhead Creek postcard on eBay. The year is not visible, but the one-cent stamp on it indicates that it was mailed before 1952 when the rate went up to an ‘outrageous’ two cents. So here’s another image that would have been nice to include in my post Fly Fishing the Brodhead in ages past.

The message on the reverse side is addressed to a Mr. & Mrs. Charles Mahan, Jr. of Baltimore, Maryland: Dear Arelyn & Charlie, What an ideal place for a honeymoon – it is perfect – the cool mountain air, the water close by and such lovely scenery. Thanks again for Sunday – maybe someday we can repay you. See you all soon. Love, Doris & Bill

US Geological Survey image - Public Domain

US Geological Survey image – Public Domain

In my search for the location of Paradise Creek, I came across the awesome US Geological Survey website. The detail it offers is amazing–obviously they are very good at what they do. Turns out that Paradise Creek is a tributary of Brodhead Creek:

Once again, if anyone out there has any other vintage images of the creek they’d like to share, please send them along and I will post them for you for other readers to enjoy. Have a good Sunday, everybody! (We’re having a two-day cool spell here — low 80’s!!!)

Categories: Brodhead, Miscellaneous, Monroe Co., Nature, Stroudsburg | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Trying to ‘find a grave’ for John Romeyn Brodhead (1849 – ?)

John Romeyn Brodhead

John Romeyn Brodhead (photo from my family’s private archives)

One of the great things about Find a Grave (sadly now owned by that behemoth Ancestry dot com) is that it allows you to link parents to children across generations. With the contributions of countless kindhearted individuals, many ‘trees’ are taking shape. Of course, mistakes happen, and I have seen a few, but overall, these connections offer tremendous value, apart from the fact that it’s just plain nice to see family members linked together.

In my family tree, the Andrew Jackson Brodhead and Ophelia Easton family members are now almost all linked together—quite wonderful considering there were 10 children. Only John Romeyn Brodhead (not to be confused with the famous historian of the state of New York) is missing. I’ve tried to find his burial place over the past few years, but without success. The last trace of him appears to be in Santa Monica, CA, according to the 1930 census. I know he died before 19 March 1936 as he is not listed among the surviving family members in his sister Charlotte Easton Brodhead Burk‘s obituary.

So where is he? If you know, please get in touch. It would be nice to get him (and his wife Mary Martha Holbert and sons Henry & Arthur) linked with the rest of the family on Find a Grave!

Link to Andrew Jackson Brodhead memorial on Find a Grave

P.S. I did find a small clipping in a San Diego newspaper dated Wednesday, October 24, 1934, that described one ‘Arthur J. Brodhead’ speeding to the aid of his dying father in Pasadena who was in desperate need of a blood transfusion. The father’s name is not given. John Romeyn Brodhead’s son was ‘Arthur S. Brodhead’. If the ‘J.’ is a typo, then perhaps this is a clue.

 

Categories: Brodhead | Tags: , , , , , | 4 Comments

Mary Rebecca Brodhead Pike (1815-1922) — New Hampshire DAR member — achieved age 106

DAR Magazine Vol52, pub. 1918 This striking black and white image of Mary Brodhead Pike comes from Daughters of the American Revolution Magazine, Volume 52 (Jan. 1918),  p. 678.

Mary, daughter of Reverend John Brodhead and Mary Dodge, died on May 17, 1922, at the age of 106, and was buried in Locust Grove Cemetery, Newfields, Rockingham Co., New Hampshire.

The photo was ...taken the day after her 101st birthday, and is a very good likeness, but it does not express the charm of this intellectual gentlewoman. For 101, she looks remarkable!

The article mentions a DAR meeting taking place at Mary’s house in July of Mary’s 103rd year. What an honor it would have been to be a guest in her home.

Volume 55, published several years later (December 1921), gives us an update on the amazing Mary Pike. The Granite Chapter reported:

Our July meeting was held at the home of our oldest member, Mrs. Mary R. Pike, widow of Rev. James Pike, of Newfields. [...]

Mrs. Pike at the age of 106 years is active in mind, keen and witty in conversation and gracious in manner. A few years ago this Magazine published a likeness of Mrs. Pike which holds good. She seems not to have changed mentally or physically except that a recent fall has confined her to her room.

Her health is good, she is cheerful and strong in her faith in God, and in her love for humanity. Granite Chapter would like to know if any other Chapter can claim so old a Daughter.

I, for one, would have loved to have been among those who got to sit down with Mary in her later years to hear her discuss her life experiences. As a member of the DAR, she would have been someone extremely interested in family history and the history of our great country.

As is often the case, this is an image I came across while searching for information about someone else. I was intrigued, and wanted to learn more about her. As it turns out, much has been written about Mary’s Brodhead family line, and I won’t go into too much detail here; I’ll just try to give you a sense of where she is located in the overall family tree:

Mary was a granddaughter of Revolutionary War Captain Luke Brodhead (1741-1806), youngest brother of my fifth great grandfather, Lt. Garret Brodhead (1733-1804). (Luke and Garret were sons of Dansbury (East Stroudsburg) founders Daniel Brodhead and wife Hester Wyngart.)

Luke* was wholeheartedly devoted to the cause of independence and was a devoted friend to General Lafayette. Wounds received in battle and in prison eventually forced him to retire from active duty after spending the winter in Valley Forge.

Luke’s June 28, 1806, obituary in the Northampton Farmer & Easton Weekly Advertiser described him as being: …an active patriot in the 1st Pennsylvania Rifle Regiment which marched on Boston in 1775, in opposition to tyranny. He was wounded, and made prisoner on Long Island, where he experienced savage cruelty in a British prison ship [Jersey], and afterwards [he was exchanged on December 8, 1776] served his country with reputation… [...] Justice and gratitude had induced his country to dignify him with an annuity for life, and his amiable simplicity of manners endeared him to his friends. He was a tender parent, and an affectionate husband, and an immatable friend...

Luke’s son Rev. John Brodhead**, an ordained Methodist minister, and Mary Dodge, were Mary Rebecca Brodhead Pike’s parents. In 1809, the parents ultimately settled in Newfields, New Hampshire, and that is where Mary was born.

Rev. John Brodhead served in the NH State Senate from 1817-1827, and was a member of Congress from 1829-1833. John and Mary Dodge Brodhead had twelve children: Daniel Dodge Brodhead, John Montgomery Brodhead, Elizabeth Harrison Brodhead, Ann Mudge Brodhead, Joseph Crawford Brodhead, Mehitabel Smith Brodhead, George Hamilton Brodhead, Mary Rebecca Brodhead, Olive Brodhead, Brevet Brigadier General Thornton Fleming Brodhead, Col. Josiah Adams Brodhead, and Almena Cutter Brodhead.

The Reverend was not the only parent who led a remarkable life. His wife Mary Dodge Brodhead’s September 5, 1875’s obituary in the New York Times stated that she conversed and shook hands with every President of the United States, from George Washington on down. With the martyr President Lincoln, she was on terms of great familiarity.

Brevet Brigadier General Thornton Fleming Brodhead, (1820-1862); Wikipedia (Public Domain--contributed by IcarusPhoenix)

Mary’s brother, Brevet Brigadier General Thornton Fleming Brodhead, (1820-1862); Credit: Wikipedia (Public Domain–contributed by IcarusPhoenix)

Of their children, Brig. Gen. Thornton Fleming Brodhead is particularly well known, for his service in the Civil War. He was mortally wounded at Bull Run after heroically leading his men into battle. George Hamilton Brodhead was once president of the NYSE. John Montgomery Brodhead served as second controller of the US Treasury, Joseph Crawford Brodhead was a Deputy Naval Officer, and Josiah Adams Brodhead was Paymaster in the US Army.

Mary Rebecca Brodhead (subject of this post) married Rev. James Pike***, who similarly to Mary’s father started out as a Methodist clergyman but later entered politics. James also served in the Civil War as a Colonel in New Hampshire’s 16th Infantry.

Mary and James had three children: James Thornton Pike (1841-1911), Anna Gertrude Pike Kendall (1844-1926), and Mary Brodhead Pike (1855-1855).

In closing, I’ll just say that there is a wealth of information available about this family line both online and in the Brodhead Family History volumes; I can’t really do justice to it here, and since it’s not my direct line, I don’t know how soon I will likely be returning to it. For anyone interested, the Brodhead Family History volumes may be available at your local library, particularly if you live in the Northeast, or through interlibrary loan. You can also purchase individual volumes from The DePuy / Brodhead Family Association (find them on Facebook).

Have a great day, all! As, always, comments, corrections, and additions welcome.

**************************************************************************************************************

*Source for Luke Brodhead & family: Vol. I of The Brodhead Family, published by the Brodhead Family Assn, 1986, pp. 80-84

**Source for Rev. John Brodhead & family: Vol. II of The Brodhead Family, published by the Brodhead Family Assn, 1986, pp. 143-153.

***Source for Rev. James Pike & family: Vol. IV of The Brodhead Family, published by the Brodhead Family Assn, 1986, pp. 311.

Categories: Brodhead, Civil War, Gen. Lafayette, Lincoln, President Abraham, New Hampshire, Obituaries, Pennsylvania, Revolutionary War | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Dr. Charles B. Jaques, assistant surgeon during the Civil War for 7th Regiment New Jersey (Post III)

Scan of the cover of my personal copy of the book

Scan of the cover of my personal copy of the book

In my first post on Charles B. Jaques, I wrote in paragraph #12 that the 1863 publication Report of Major-General John Pope. Letter from the secretary of war, in answer to resolution of the House of 18th ultimo, transmitting copy of report of Major General John Pope described Charles as being ‘missing’, last seen on the battlefield near Centreville, Virginia, tending to the wounded on August 29, 1862.

Well, I have since learned why Charles was described as missing thanks to the marvelous book Give It to Them, Jersey Blues! by John Hayward (Hightstown, NJ, Longstreet House, 1998, 355 pages—available on Amazon).

Page 69: “Assistant Surgeon Charles Jaques also returned after being captured at Bull Run. During the battle, Jaques had positioned himself just behind the firing line. When the Regiment withdrew, he elected to stay with the wounded who could not be brought back. … Lieutenant Colonel Francine thought that Jaques was wrong in staying behind, so he arrested the doctor upon his return. Francine felt that the doctor should have helped tend to the seventeen wounded men that had been brought from the field. No charges were ever brought against Jaques and he was released  after only a few days.”

Imagine positioning yourself just behind a firing line…I can’t imagine the courage that took.

Charles in mentioned fleetingly several more times in the book (pp. 91, 93, 151), and his photo appears on p. 209. (I have written to the publishers to request permission to include the image in this blog, but have not gotten a response yet.)

In one case (pp. 91, 93), Charles and Lt. Col. Price observe that Francine appears “so dry and parched that he could barely speak above a whisper.” On Charles’ advice, Francine turned the Regiment over to Price and moved to the rear.  In another (p. 151), when the number of sick men in the regiment was rising alarmingly, Charles is noted as expressing great concern about the lack of fresh water and fruits and vegetables for the men.

The book is a marvelous tribute to the men of NJ’s Seventh Regiment. It contains a wealth of information and a large photo gallery. If you have an ancestor who served in this regiment, you just may find their image here.

Categories: Civil War, Jaques, New Jersey | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Some ‘common sense’ beauty tips from 1910

Los Angeles Herald, 25 December 1910

CLICK to ENLARGE – Los Angeles Herald, 25 December 1910

I got a kick out of these 1910 Los Angeles Herald images showing an early 20th-century American woman really putting her long tresses through their paces.

Holy cow—there’s a lot of fussin’ goin’ on there! But long hair was the style back then, and I suppose caring for all that hair did require quite a lot of effort…

When I looked more closely at this photo assortment, something really struck me. Check out the third photo from the left, up top under the headline… What do you see? A blow dryer! Wow!—and I thought handheld blow dryers got their start in the 60s/70s.

A visit to Wikipedia informed me that the first hair dyer was invented in the late 19th century by a Frenchman named Alexander Godefroy. It was a sit-under version, the type you see at hair salons. Prior to that, apparently many women used vacuum cleaners (!) to dry their hair.

The year 1911 witnessed the first U.S. handheld blow dryer being patented; it was the invention of an Armenian-American named Gabriel Kazanjian. (Go Gabriel!). The first models for consumers, however, did not come out until 1915 (…which makes it hard to explain why this Christmas Day 1910 newspaper is carrying this image! Thoughts anyone?).

woodruff_sisters

Did Grandma and her sisters fight over who got to use the hair dryer first?

As you can imagine, the initial models were heavy (approx. 2 lbs.–real bicep-builders) and cumbersome, and not anywhere near as powerful as the blow dryers of today. It would have taken quite a while to dry tresses as long and thick as these. And the early dryers could be dangerous, overheating or (worst-case scenario) causing electrocution. Thankfully, they have come a long way since then. So next time you power up your blow dryer, which will likely be today or tomorrow (am I right?), say a little ‘thank you’ to Alexander and Gabriel!

To read the accompanying article, which contains all sorts of advice on hair care and growing old gracefully:

Click the newspaper image once and then use Ctrl + to enlarge to your preferred size; or, for a very enlarged view, click the image twice, and use the sliding bars to move to different sections of the page:

Los Angeles Herald, 25 December 1910

Los Angeles Herald, 25 December 1910

Credit: California Digital Newspaper Collection – “A Freely Accessible Repository of Digitized California Newspapers from 1846 to the Present” – California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside; All newspapers published before January 1, 1923 are in the public domain and therefore have no restrictions on use.

Categories: 1910s, Fashion & Beauty, Miscellaneous | Tags: , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

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