Beware of fading inscriptions

Not trying to panic anyone, but it’s good to remember that—over time—pencil and ink photo inscriptions can fade and become lost forever. Here’s one I just managed to salvage: my dad Charles Brodhead pictured with some of his Marine Corps buddies (Company A, 3rd Marine Division) on the island of Guam, 1944.  A bit of “Photoshopping” helped me pull out almost all that remains of his writing. Thanks to Dad for writing this down, we know who these good-looking young guys from the Greatest Generation were. Thank heavens we caught the fading inscription in time!

Reading from left to right standing: Northrop, Bob Palmer, yours truly, and Cal Downey from Cranford [NJ]. Kneeling from left to right: Jensen and Toney. Our eyes were focused on Lieutenant Waszak. Northrop is from NY state; Bob Palmer from Van Wert, Ohio; Jensen from NY state and Toney from NY State. With all my love for ….. from your … son Charles

 

Guam, August 1944

Guam, August 1944

Photo_description
Photo_description

Categories: Brodhead, Guam, WWII | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Another article of interest for family historians

I stumbled on this article yesterday. It’s probably old news to many of you, but in the event not, I thought I would share the link here: “A long obscured branch on John Kerry’s family tree: More Jewish forebears, more tragedy” by Michael Kranish (Boston Globe, October 13, 2013).

As tragic as they are, it’s so important to see stories such as this one coming out of the shadows and into the light so that family lines can be connected and the history of our ancestors remembered properly. Thank heavens for all those genealogists and family historians out there who are working so diligently to connect the dots.

The fact that some of our ancestors may have changed their names doesn’t always cross our minds. I’ve found one instance of this in my family tree (Slaymaker to Sargent, ca. 1870; so, no, dear family members, we can’t possibly be related to American painter John Singer Sargent (1856-1925)! :-(). How about you? Any surname surprises in your family tree?

PS: For another blog post in a similar vein, see this past post.

Categories: Miscellaneous | Tags: , | 6 Comments

Wealthy Angus’s Trendy Autographed Fan

Godey's 1870 Fashion: May (reprinted in Italy, purchased from McCall's magazine in 1970)

Godey’s 1870 Fashion: May (reprinted in Italy, purchased from McCall’s magazine in 1970)

I don’t know what it’s like where you are, but here it is blazing hot and way too humid. Thank heavens for air-conditioning. Most of our ancestors did not have it as good as we do in that regard. The earliest electric fans appeared in the early 1880s, but they weren’t manufactured for residential use until around 1910. And, of course, you can imagine that while fans offered relief, they were no substitute for the air-conditioners we enjoy today.

So, apart from serving as a fashion accessory, the handheld fan must have saved the day for many ladies, especially when you consider the fashions of the time. (For a history of the fan, visit Victoriana dot com.)

Wealthy Ann Angus

Wealthy Ann Angus

Wooden autographed fans gained popularity in the 1860s, and here is one that belonged to my great grandmother, Wealthy Ann Angus. The fan dates back to 1870-1871, before she married my great grandfather William Woodruff in 1872. It was common for the signers of these fans to leave some sort of verse or message. A couple of signatures appear to have been collected at an Armenian social club. Others, appear to have been collected while visiting Utica, NY, and traveling on some sort of pleasure cruise. A few are clearly from her home town of Elizabeth.

Wealthy wrote her address on the fan: 176 Elizabeth Avenue in Elizabeth, NJ. Somewhat puzzling is the fact that on the opposite side of the fan is written “The owner of this fan Jennie Angus, Elizabeth”.  I have no idea who this Jennie Angus was.  Wealthy’s dad James Angus had a cousin named Jane (b. 1805), but I don’t know if there is any connection there. Wealthy named her first daughter Jennie. Any thoughts, anyone? Well, I’ll leave you to enjoy the images of the fan. Stay cool, all!

Links:
Antique Fan Collectors Association – Museum

Categories: 1870s, Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., Fashion, New Jersey, Woodruff | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Brodhead Creek postcard, 1909

I recently acquired this postcard on eBay—it’s an image of Brodhead Creek taken from a hill above. Unfortunately, as luck would have it, I discovered the card after doing the July 8 post Fly Fishing the Brodhead in ages past. So, I will post the card here for you now. The message on the reverse side is addressed to a Mrs. Steve Reinhart, 729 Ann Street, Stroudsburg, Pa.; the postmark is dated August 24, 1909 (Bartonsville).

If anyone out there has any other vintage images of the creek they’d like to share, please send them along and I will post them for you for other readers to enjoy. Have a good day, everybody! Bye for now.

Brodhead Creek

Brodhead Creek Postcard, dated 1909

Categories: Brodhead, Monroe Co., Stroudsburg | Tags: , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Early 1900’s camping and hiking for women: the “dos & donts”

Dingman's Falls, Indian Ladder, 1907

Zillah Trewin, seated on the right (age 24), Dingman’s Falls, Indian Ladder, 1907

Grandma Zillah Trewin (b. 1883), seen in the photo above, was a city girl through and through, but like many city dwellers, both then and now, she loved to escape to the great outdoors, especially in the summer. In 1907, she took numerous photos with her little Brownie camera of her adventures in eastern Pennsylvania, in the verdant, waterfall-festooned landscape in and around Dingman’s Falls. Once married, the Great Smoky Mountains and New Hampshire‘s peaks became her summer playgrounds.

Photograph of Girl Scout Camp on Hungry Jack Lake Description.  Record creator  Department of Agriculture. Forest Service. Region 9 (Eastern Region).  Current location  National Archives and Records Administration (Wikimedia: public domain)

Photograph of Girl Scout Camp on Hungry Jack Lake. Current location National Archives and Records Administration (Wikimedia: public domain)

Did she ever “rough it”? I highly doubt it. I’m sure she never set foot in a pup tent, let alone slept out under the stars.

The late 1800s and early 1900s, however, saw lots of women wanting to get in on the action of what was, up until then, much more of a man’s activity—hiking out into the woods far away from civilization to truly get away from it all in a primitive camp setting. But one thing top of mind for women, something that was enough to hold them back from such rustic outdoor adventures, was “what to wear?”. Long skirts were highly impractical; short skirts verboten. So what was a girl to do? The answer was “knickers” (not the British variant, obviously)—loose-fitting short pants gathered just below the knee.

Camp Fire Girls of America at Sebago Lake in 1916;  Source  Library of Congress; Author: Bain (Wikimedia: public domain)

Camp Fire Girls of America at Sebago Lake in 1916; Source Library of Congress; Author: Bain (Wikimedia: public domain)

A visit to a couple of blogs that focus on all things vintage will give you a glimpse of what women were wearing for camping out and going hiking during the first part of the 20th century as they explored our nation’s scenic parks and other natural areas.

A woman’s first-hand account of her experiences making the switch from home-dweller to outdoor explorer can be found below, as can a lengthy article exploring the essentials a woman must consider when getting together a wardrobe suitable for camping. Both are worth a read if you have time.

For your convenience, I am including the relevant pages here. So I hope you will enjoy, and maybe even get a bit of a kick out of “A Woman’s Camping Outfit” by Sara Stokes Baxter (Outing magazine, Volume LIV, The Outing Publishing Company, 1909, pp. 634-638) and “A Woman on the Trail” by Rena N. Phillips (Outing magazine, Volume XLIV, The Outing Publishing Company, 1904, pp. 585-589)—both digitized by Google Books for Archives dot org. (Thank you, Google Books!)

CLICK TO ENLARGE AND VIEW AS A SLIDESHOW

Dingman's Falls, 1907

Dingman’s Falls, 1907

Categories: Nature, Trewin | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Eva Wilder McGlasson & Henry C. Brodhead – Part III

From the San Francisco Call Volume 72, No. 82, 21 Aug 1892 (Credit: California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu>. All newspapers published before January 1, 1923 are in the public domain and therefore have no restrictions on use)

Eva Wilder McGlasson – From the San Francisco Call Volume 72, No. 82, 21 Aug 1892 (Credit: California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu>. All newspapers published before January 1, 1923 are in the public domain and therefore have no restrictions on use)

Something that’s puzzled me for a long time is the surname “McGlasson”. Eva Wilder McGlasson’s father’s last name was most definitely Wilder, so had Eva been married previously? Or was this just a pen name? I’d seen her referred to in the press as both Mrs. and Miss McGlasson. An answer finally came today in an 1891 journal called Epoch (Vol. X, page 381), under the heading “Highways and By-ways” (the bold is mine):

For two or three years past, readers who keep well abreast of periodical literature, have been delighted with short stories and bits of dialect verse over the name of Eva Wilder McGlasson. Both the stories and the verses have won a wide audience, so it is no wonder that when a manuscript novel came to the Harpers over that signature, but without even the briefest letter of explanation. that great publishing house was not slow to accept it and publish it. The book Diana’s Livery was so successful that its writer has been encouraged to make New York her home. Though barely three and twenty, she is a Mrs. not a Miss. Eva Wilder McGlasson is a small, shy person, with all a child’s appeal in her soft, dark eyes. Like young Lochinvar, she comes from the West and has divided her short life between Ohio and Kentucky. It is of the latter State that she has written for the most part, and its good people are quite as proud of her as though she were to the manner born. No doubt with all New York before her from which to choose, she will find a field even more inviting for the exercise of the subtle insight and dramatic strength which has already so captivated editors and readers. The lady speaks with the faintest trace of Western accent, and has in full measure the simple, cordial charm of manner characteristic of her bringing-up and former environment. She hears her honors more than meekly, and though critics so competent as the author of Gallagher and The Woman About Town, expect and prophesy great things for her, she looks at you in naive wonderment at the mere suggestion that she is destined to become even the least bit of a celebrity.

"Wedding March"

“Wedding March,” Good Manners for All Occasions by Margaret E. Sangster (1904) – opposite page 112

I do love this wonderful description of Eva, but now, naturally, I am very curious as to what happened to her first husband! From 1891-1897, the divorce rate was 6%, so while uncommon, it did indeed happen. The thought also crossed my mind that because Eva started writing and presenting her work to publishers at such a young age, perhaps she invented the “Mrs. McGlasson” persona to make herself appear older. In any case, I am really perplexed; I’ve been unable to find any hint that a first husband existed.

Now, I’d planned to do a sequential installment and focus on Eva’s and Henry’s lives during the period from 1900 onwards, but that changed after I decided to check various misspellings of Eva’s and Henry’s surnames. It’s not something one is naturally inclined to do… but it’s well worth making those little intentional deviations, as I’m sure many of you know.  I was amazed at all the details I discovered using McGleason, McGlason, and McGlosson, not to mention Broadhead, Brodhed, and Broadhed. And leaving off McGlasson altogether and just searching under Eva Wilder also made a difference on numerous occasions.  So this post will offer additional details on the pre-1900 lives of Eva Wilder McGlasson and Henry C. Brodhead, the period on which the two previous posts focused (see June 10 and June 26).

So—what else did I find out? Well, a lot actually. I found many short stories and poems written by Eva, prior to her marriage, in newspapers from Oregon to South Carolina and South Dakota to Texas, many of them published when she was just 18 years old—quite a remarkable accomplishment. I can’t post them all here in one fell swoop, but, perhaps, over time, I will post a few of them separately. 

"Wedding Breakfast"

“Wedding Breakfast,” Good Manners for All Occasions by Margaret E. Sangster (1904) – opposite page 136

Of particular interest to me were engagement and wedding announcements I came across. The engagement announcement appeared in the Wilkes Barre Times on November 24, 1894, only 11 days before their wedding date. Perhaps, it was standard back then to leave little time between the proposal/announcement and the actual marriage. A search through the 1893 publication Manners, Culture and Dress of the Best American Society by Richard A. Wells revealed the following words of advice (p. 234): …protracted courtship, or engagements, are, if possible, to be avoided; they are universally embarrassing. Lovers are so apt to find imperfections in each other—to grow exacting, jealous, and morose. Well, I don’t know how to comment on that. Perhaps, indeed that was the thinking back then. Of course, co-habitation outside of marriage would never have been an option, so there were likely other reasons for keeping engagements short. ;-)

If so little time was allowed to prepare for weddings, it must have been quite a scramble to orchestrate the affair, especially if it was to be elaborate, with many guests. Was Eva’s and Henry’s wedding such an event? I had been wondering about that until I came upon a wedding announcement in December 9’s NY Herald. Here I learned that the NYC residence of a Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Moody provided the backdrop for the ceremony, and Rev. Dr. Charles Thompson of the Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church officiated, so it seems likely that it was a rather intimate affair involving family and close friends. We know that all of their parents were present as they (Daniel D. Brodhead and Mary Brodrick, and John Wilder and Mary Heidler) are listed on the marriage certificate, albeit with a few misspellings that likely occurred in the transcription process (the original is not available online).

Bound in Shallows (1897)

Bound in Shallows (1897)

The first post spoke of them sailing off on a European honeymoon. A recent search discovered a  New York Times clipping from December 9, giving the name of the ship they departed on the previous day—the Fürst Bismarck, a vessel used to bring immigrants to this country and well-heeled travelers from New York to Europe. (Speaking of “well-heeled,” now here’s something you may not know (I didn’t): many ascribe the expression “well-heeled” to Eva herself. She used the phrase “I ain’t so well-heeled right now” in her 1897 book Bound in Shallows, her last Kentucky-based novel which she dedicated to her husband.)

The  New York Times clipping speaks to Eva’s prominent place in the literary world and New York society at that time:

There sailed away from this port yesterday, bound for Europe, health and pleasure, three gifted women, each of whose individual absence will make a distinct and unusual void in her circle of friends and admirers. On the Fürst Bismarck, for Genoa, are Mrs. H. C. Brodhead, late Mrs. Eva Wilder McGlasson, and Miss Lillie Hamilton French, and on La Bourgogne, for Havre, Miss Georgia Gayvan.

When writing the first post on Henry and Eva, I’d wondered how long they were away—I suspected at least a couple of months.  Pennsylvania’s Wilkes-Barre Times of April 17, 1895, held the answer—they arrived from Europe on the La Gascogne on April 14, and were now visiting family in Henry’s hometown.

Bound in Shallows (1897) - dedication

Bound in Shallows (1897) – dedication

From Wilkes-Barre, it was no doubt on to Denver so that Henry could turn his attention back to his mining interests. (Henry would lose his younger brother William Hall Brodhead of Wilkes-Barre roughly seven weeks later to illness.)

A clipping from the Kentucky Post, dated Friday, July 12, 1895, gives a glimpse into Eva’s post-honeymoon whereabouts. She is described as being “most delightfully located on a ranch in Southern Colorado” and “busy writing.”

SS La Gascogne (US Library of Congress, no known usage restrictions)

SS La Gascogne (US Library of Congress, no known usage restrictions)

In 1896, her novelette One of the Visconti was published by Charles Scribner’s Sons, NY. Her extended honeymoon in Europe or a subsequent trip to Italy likely provided inspiration for the book. Set in Naples, the story focuses on a romance between a young woman from an old and distinguished Italian family and a young man from Kentucky.

So the first year or two of marriage was full of travel and new impressions, especially for Eva. It must have been exciting for her to set up her writing table in late 19th-century southern Colorado and to begin gathering material for all the characters she would subsequently bring to life in the pages of her verse and novels.

I’ve material enough for one last post (maybe, two) on Eva and Henry. Frankly, I’m not sure who “out there” is interested in learning about these distant family members of mine. My Eva and Henry posts have gotten very few views. That’s okay, of course–I’m completely aware that this is a very niche blog. For the sake of upcoming generations who may (fingers crossed) take up the mantle of “family historian” someday, I’ll continue to dig away. At the end of the day, I love piecing together these stories, so maybe that’s all that really matters.

As always, please feel free to chime in anytime if you have any corrections and / or additions to offer. Thanks for dropping by, and have a great day!

 

Categories: Brodhead, Brodhead, Colorado, Denver, McGlasson, Wilder, Wilkes-Barre Luzerne Co | Tags: , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The 1868 murder of Theodore Brodhead of Delaware Water Gap

George Inness (American, 1825-1894). On the Delaware River, 1861-1863. Oil on canvas. Current location: Brooklyn Museum of Art (Wikimedia Commons: Photographed February 2009 by Wikipedia Loves Art participant "shooting_brooklyn"; this file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.)

George Inness (American, 1825-1894). On the Delaware River, 1861-1863. Oil on canvas. Current location: Brooklyn Museum of Art (Wikimedia Commons: Photographed February 2009 by Wikipedia Loves Art participant “shooting_brooklyn”; this file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.)

Some Brodhead descendants may have heard of the murder of Theodore Brodhead which occurred on September 25, 1868, near the Delaware Water Gap hotel owned and managed by his brother Thomas Brodhead.

For those of you who have not, this post will refer you to two articles on this tragic topic.

Theodore was the son of Luke Brodhead (1777-1845) and Elizabeth Wills (1789-1873), and a grandson of Captain Luke Brodhead (1741-1806) of Revolutionary War fame.

Thomas Brodhead - Image from p. 1104 of History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886)

Thomas Brodhead – Image from p. 1104 of History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886)

Captain Luke Brodhead, a good friend of Gen. Lafayette, was one of Daniel Brodhead and Hester Wyngart‘s eight sons. He was the youngest brother of my 5th great grandfather (Garret Brodhead).

The above painting by famous landscape painter George Innes, which I absolutely love, gives a good glimpse of what the Delaware Water Gap area looked like on a glorious summer day in the early 1860s. Wish I could transport myself back there right now—the bucolic setting country is so peaceful-looking (apart from the steam locomotive bounding out of the left side of the canvas!). This is the Delaware Water Gap Theodore and his family members resided in close to the time of Theodore’s death.

Theodore had an older sister Elizabeth and seven brothers (William, Thomas, Lewis, Luke, Horace, Dewitt, and Benjamin Franklin – ‘Frank’)—amazingly, all the brothers grew to be over six feet tall. Their mother Elizabeth once joked that she had 48 feet of sons*! One of the below links will take you to a wonderful group photo of the brothers.

The Monroe County Historical Association of Stroudsburg, PA, posted these two articles on their website several years ago about the murder and its aftermath:

Brodhead Murder, Part I: The Crime

Brodhead Murder, Part II: Trial and Punishment

Due to the nature of this subject matter, I can’t really tell you to ‘enjoy the article’, but I do hope you find it of interest. If you have anything to add or share, please leave a comment below.

Theodore was buried at Delaware Water Gap Cemetery. His grave and those of other family members can be found on Find a Grave.

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How we are related

How my family is related to Theodore’s

CLICK TO ENLARGE –  Philadelphia Inquirer, 12 Aug 1869 (Credit: http://www.fultonhistory.com)
Brodhead_Theo

Brodhead_Theo

Philadelphia Inquirer, 12 Aug 1869 (Credit: www.fultonhistory.com)

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*p. 17 of Eastern Poconos: Delaware Water Gap to Bushkill by Maria J. Summa, Frank D. Summa, and Arthur Garris (Arcadia Publishing, 2005)

Categories: Brodhead, Crime & Punishment, Delaware Water Gap, Monroe Co. | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fly Fishing the Brodhead in ages past

Brodhead Creek Park, Stroud Township, Monroe County, near dusk. 28 March 2007 Source: Nicholas A. Tonelli (Wikimedia Commons:  This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Brodhead Creek Park, Stroud Township, Monroe County, near dusk. 28 March 2007
Source: Nicholas A. Tonelli (Wikimedia Commons: This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Photo of portrait of Capt. Daniel Brodhead (1693-1755), husband of Hester Wyngart, only child of Capt. Richard Brodhead & Magdalena Jansen, and grandson of Capt. Daniel Brodhead & Ann Tye Current location: Senate House, Kingston, NY; www.senatehousekingston.org

Photo of portrait of Capt. Daniel Brodhead (1693-1755), husband of Hester Wyngart, only child of Capt. Richard Brodhead & Magdalena Jansen, and grandson of Capt. Daniel Brodhead & Ann Tye Current location: Senate House, Kingston, NY; http://www.senatehousekingston.org. PHOTO CREDIT: Barbara & James Brodhead

Those of us descended from Daniel Brodhead and Hester Wyngart, who uprooted themselves and their children from Esopus, NY (present-day Kingston) to relocate to the wilds of Eastern Pennsylvania’s Minisink Valley in 1738*, can feel fairly confident that they (Daniel — a man of great energy and intrepidity**,  Hester, and “crew”) and their myriad descendants in this picturesque area spent time fishing—whether for the purpose of catching dinner or for the pure enjoyment of the sport.

Numerous creeks, brooks, and rivers are found in fair abundance here, in what is now Monroe County. Daniel’s vast estate (composed of an initial warrant of 600 acres and a later warrant of 150 acres, according to Mrs. Horace G. Walters’ Early History of East Stroudsburg, p. 21-22) was known locally as “Brodhead Manor” and gave birth to the settlement of Dansbury (better known today as the town of East Stroudsburg)**. The 21.9-mile creek that passed through Daniel’s property on its way to the Delaware came to be known as Brodhead Creek.

Having just recently done posts on the Hon. Richard Brodhead and his daughter and son-in-law (Rachael and John Linderman), I can easily imagine them fishing and otherwise enjoying a well-earned day of rest there on ‘the Brodhead.’ And can’t you just see Daniel and Hester’s sons Richard, Charles, Daniel, Garret (my 5th great grandfather), John, and Luke enjoying some friendly, brotherly creek-side competition when they were boys?

From American Fishes by Goode and Gill (1903)

“Brook Trout” from American Fishes by Goode and Gill (1903)

On eBay and other sites that sell and/or display antique and vintage postcards, you can sometimes come across old images of Brodhead Creek (sometimes referred to as “Broadhead’s Creek”). The oldest image I found dates back to 1796. It is an etching by John Scoles from a drawing by Jacob Hoffman. If you’d like to view it, you can do so by clicking here and visiting the Granger Collection website. I would display the image for you here, but their usage rules prohibit that.

I found mention of the Brodhead in the 1906 book The Determined Angler and the Brook Trout: An Anthological Volume of Trout Fishing, Trout Histories, Trout Lore, Trout Resorts, and Trout Tackle by Charles Bradford, and thought I would share a relevant chapter here with you today.

Small section of Brodhead Creek running through East Stroudsburg

Small section of Brodhead Creek running through East Stroudsburg (Image credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

By the way, having now shared “glorious stories” of Brodhead Creek trout fishing with family members, my husband—an avid fisherman—is suddenly keen to get out to eastern Pennsylvania to try his hand at it, which is saying quite a lot since we live a thousand miles away! So, dear reader, just between you and me, I have found a major carrot that will, I hope, someday soon take me back to the geographical setting in which many of my ancestors lived and worked, and where I myself once spent happy childhood moments! The lure of fishing and ‘catching the big one’ has once again cast (no pun intended) its magic spell. :-D

So I hope you will enjoy Chapter IX, “Trout and Trouting” of The Determined Angler and the Brook Trout. Chapter X (“Trouting in Canadensis Valley”) has references to Brodhead Creek as well, so be sure to click on the link to the book above if you’d like to read on.

1942 map of Stroudsburg (Wikipedia: Public Domain)

1942 map of Stroudsburg (Wikipedia: Public Domain)

P. S. I have put the word “Brodhead” in bold in case you don’t have too much time on your hands and want to hone in on those specific passages. Farther down this post you will find links to some good resources. I especially enjoyed the articles by Vic Attardo and Doug Vitale. Enjoy! Perhaps, after reading all this you will want to “Go, Fish!” And if you’ve already had the pleasure of fishing the Brodhead, by all means share your experiences in the Comment box below.

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p 93 of Outing magazine

p 93 of Outing magazine, Vol. XVIII, 1891

Chapter IX: “Trout and Trouting” (written in 1906 by Charles Bradford)

“A day with not too bright a beam;
A warm, but not a scorching, sun.”
—Charles Cotton

Where can I enjoy trout fishing amid good scenery and good cheer without its necessitating a lengthy absence from the city? That is a question which frequently rises in the mind of the toilers in the busy centers of the East, and it is one becoming daily more difficult to answer. Yet there are still nearby trout streams where a creel of from fifteen to fifty, or even more, in favorable weather, might be made. One such locality, which for years local sportsmen have proven, lies within a four hours’ ride of either Philadelphia or New York. All that is necessary is to take the railroad, which conveys you to Cresco, in Monroe County, Pa., and a ride or drive of five miles through the Pocono Mountains will land you in the little village of Canadensis, in the valley of the Brodhead; and within the radius of a few miles on either side fully a dozen other unposted streams ripple along in their natural state, not boarded, bridged, dammed, or fenced by the hand of man, thanks to the naturally uncultivatable condition of the greater part of this paradise for trout fishers. The villagers of Canadensis do their trading and receive their mail at Cresco, and it is an easy matter to obtain excellent food and lodgings for a dollar a day at one of the many farmhouses dotting here and there the valleys, and a seat when needful in one of the several private conveyances running every day between the two villages.

The open season for trout in Pennsylvania is from April 15th until July 15th [present-day regulations call for April-July], and there appears to be no particularly favored period during these three months, for the trout here afford sport equally well at all times, though they greatly vary in their tastes for the fly.

p. 92 Outing Magazine, Vol. XVIII, 1891

p. 92 Outing magazine, Vol. XVIII, 1891

If the angler goes there in the early part of the open season, when the weather is cold, he should engage a room and take his meals at the farmhouse selected; but if the trip is made in the early part of June or any time after that, during the open season, camp life may be enjoyed with great comfort.

Two favorite waters within walking distance from any of the farmhouses in Canadensis are Stony Run and the Buckhill. The great Brodhead, a famous old water in the days of Thaddeus Norris, and noted then and now for its big trout, flows in the valley proper, within a stone’s throw of the farmhouse at which I engaged quarters. Spruce Cabin Run, a mile distant, is a charming stream, but the trout here are not very large beyond the deep pools at the foot of Spruce Falls and in the water flowing through Turner’s fields and woods above the falls.

Any of these streams will afford plenty of sport, but if one wishes to visit a still more wild, romantic, and beautiful trout water, he has only to walk a little farther or take a buckboard wagon and ride to the mighty Bushkill, a stream that must not be confounded with the Buckhill, which lies in an opposite direction from Canadensis.

Trout traits, p. 110

Trout traits, The Determined Angler, p. 110

The Bushkill is the wildest stream in the region, and is fished less than any of the others named, one reason being that there are plenty of trout in the waters of Canadensis which can be fished without the Angler going so far. For those who like to camp, the Bushkill is the proper locality. I spent a day there with friends one season, and we caught in less than two hours, in the liveliest possible manner, all the trout five of us could eat throughout the day, and four dozen extra large ones which we took home to send to friends in the city.

“The trout in the Bushkill,” remarked one of my companions, “are so wild that they’re tame”–an expression based upon the greediness and utter disregard of the enemy with which fontinalis, in his unfamiliarity with man, took the fly. I remember having a number of rises within two feet of my legs as I was taking in my line for a front toss.

I know men who have many times traveled a thousand miles from New York on an angling trip to different famous waters who have not found either the sport or the scenery to be enjoyed on the Bushkill.

The lower Brodhead below the point at which this stream and Spruce Cabin Run come together is very beautiful. It is owned by a farmer who lives on its banks, and who has never been known to refuse Anglers permission to fish there when they asked for the privilege.

Image from p 46 of The Determined Angler and the Brook Trout by Charles Bradford (NY & London: GP Putnam's Sons, 1916)

Image from p 46 of The Determined Angler and the Brook Trout by Charles Bradford (NY & London: GP Putnam’s Sons, 1916)

There are four natural features in the scenery about Canadensis that are especially prized by the countrymen there–the Sand Spring, Buckhill Falls, Spruce Cabin Falls, and the Bushkill Falls.

The Sand Spring is so called because grains of brilliant sand spring up with the water. This sand resembles a mixture of gold and silver dust; it forms in little clouds just under the water’s bubble and then settles down to form and rise again and again. This effect, with the rich colors of wild pink roses, tiny yellow watercups, blue lilies, and three shades of green in the cresses and deer tongue that grow all about, produces a pretty picture. The spring is not over a foot in diameter, but the sand edges and the pool cover several feet. In drinking the water, strange to say, one does not take any sand with it.

Fair and foul angling, p. 119

Fair and foul angling, The Determined Angler, p. 119

Being located at one side of the old road between Cresco and Canadensis every visitor has an opportunity of seeing it without going more than a few feet out of his direct way. Some of the stories told about the old Sand Spring are worth hearing, and no one can tell them better or with more special pleasure than the farmers living thereabout. One man affirms that “more ‘an a hundred b’ar and as many deer have been killed while drinking the crystal water of the spring.”

Each of the falls is a picture of true wild scenery. Though some miles apart they may be here described in the same paragraph.

Great trees have fallen over the water from the banks and lodged on huge projecting moss-covered rocks; they are additional obstacles to the rushing, roaring, down-pouring water, which flows through and over them like melted silver. This against the dark background of the mountain woods, the blue and snow-white of the heavens, the green of the rhododendron-lined banks, and the streams’ bottoms of all-colored stones creates a series of charming and ever-varying views.

Wikimedia Commons (public domain) American brook trout. Lithograph, 1872, Currier & Ives

Wikimedia Commons (public domain) American brook trout. Lithograph, 1872, Currier & Ives

A half dozen trout, weighing from one to two pounds and a half, may always be seen about the huge rock at the point where the lower Brodhead and the Spruce Cabin Run come together, and hundreds may be seen in the stream below the Buckhill Falls. I do not know that fish may be actually seen in any other parts of the waters of Canadensis, but at these points the water is calm and the bottom smooth, and the specimens are plainly in view.

Do not waste time on the “flock” lying about the big rock at Brodhead Point. The trout there will deceive you. I played with them a half day, and before I began work on them I felt certain I would have them in my creel in a half-hour’s time. They are a pack of pampered idlers who do not have to move a fin to feed. All the trout food comes rushing down both streams from behind these big rocks into the silent water and floats right up to the very noses of these gentlemen of leisure. If you have any practicing to do with the rod and fly do it here. These trout are very obliging; they will lie there all day and enjoy your casting all sorts of things at them. This is a good place to prove to yourself whether you are a patient fisherman or not.

Nathan Currier lithograph of Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait's painting "Catching a Trout", 1854 - Depicts fishermen catching a brook trout near South Haven Church, Long Island, NY (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain)

Nathan Currier lithograph of Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait’s painting “Catching a Trout”, 1854 – Depicts fishermen catching a brook trout near South Haven Church, Long Island, NY (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain)

And now a few words about the proper tackle for mountain streams. Most anglers use rods that are too heavy and too long. During my first visit I used a rod of eight feet, four ounces, and I soon found that, while it was a nice weight, it was too long for real convenience, although there were rods used there nine and ten feet long. My rod was the lightest and one of the shortest ever seen in the valley. There are only a few open spots where long casts are necessary, and a long, ordinary-weight trout rod is of very little service compared with one of seven, seven and a half, or eight feet, four or three ounces, that can be handled well along the narrow, bush-lined, tree-branch-covered streams.

The greater part of the fishing is done by sneaking along under cover of the rocks, logs, bushes, and the low-hanging branches, as casts are made in every little pool and eddy. I use a lancewood rod, but of course the higher-priced popular split bamboo is just as good. I shall not claim my rod’s material is the better of the two, as some men do when speaking of their tackle, but I am quite sure I shall never say the split bamboo is more than its equal. I do not advise as to the material; I speak only of the weight and length. Let every man use his choice, but I seriously advise him to avoid the cheap-priced split bamboo rod.

p. 138 of The Determined Angler

p. 138 of The Determined Angler

If split bamboo is the choice, let it be the work of a practical rod-maker. Any ordinary wood rod is better than the four-dollar split bamboo affair.

The leader should be of single gut, but the length should be a trifle more than is commonly used. Twelve feet is my favorite amount. The reel should be the lightest common click reel; the creel, a willow one that sells for a dollar in the stores; and the flies–here’s the rub–must be the smallest and finest in the market. Large, cheap, coarse flies will never do for Eastern waters, and you must not fail to secure your list of the proper kind, as well as all your outfit, before you start on your trip. The only decent thing on sale in the village stores is tobacco.

Wikimedia Commons (public domain): Trout Anglers circa 1820 from Fishing and Shooting-Buxton (1902)

Wikimedia Commons (public domain): “Trout Anglers” circa 1820 from Fishing and Shooting by Sydney Buxton (1902)

When you buy your flies buy lots of them, for, be you a tyro or practical Angler, you will lose them easier on these streams than you imagine. Yes, you must be very careful about the selection of your flies. They must be small and finely made, high-priced goods. I wish I might tell you who to have make them, but I dare not, lest I be charged with advertising a particular house. Regarding the patterns touse, I will say that none are more killing than the general list, if they are the best made and used according to the old rule all are familiar with–dark colors on cold days and bright ones on warm days. The later the season the louder the fly–that is, when the season closes during hot weather, as it does in Canadensis. My favorite time here is from June 15th to July 15th, the closing day, but any time after the first two weeks of the open season is very charming. I avoid the first week or two because the weather is then cold and the trout are more fond of natural bait than the artificial fly. Men take hundreds of fish early in the season with worms and minnows.

I never wear rubber boots to wade in. An old pair of heavy-soled shoes with spikes in their bottoms, and small slits cut in the sides to let the water in and out, and a pair of heavy woolen socks comprise my wading footwear. The slits must not be large enough to let in coarse sand and pebbles, but I find it absolutely necessary to have a slight opening, for if there be no means for the water to run freely in and out, the shoes fill from the tops and become heavy. Rubber boots are too hot for my feet and legs, while the water is never too cold. I have often had wet feet all day, and have never yet experienced any ill effects from it.

Trout by Walter M. Brackett, ca. 1867 (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain)

Trout by Walter M. Brackett, ca. 1867 (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain)

I never use a staff in wading, but I should, for here in some places it is very hard to wade. I have often fallen down in water up to my waist, overbalanced by the heavy current, where the bottoms were rough, with sharp, slimy stones. If you carry a staff, follow the custom of the old Anglers and tie it to your body with a string to keep it out of the way and allow your hands to be as free as possible for a strike. Your landing-net should be a small one, minus any metal, with a foot and a half handle, and a string tied to a front button on your garment should allow it to be slung over your shoulder onto your back when not in use.

Of course, these little points about the use of different things are all familiar to the Angler with but the slightest experience, and will appear to him neither instructive nor interesting, but we must, as gentle Anglers, give a thought or two to the earnest tyro, for we were young once ourselves.

I always carry two fly-books with me; one big fellow with the general fly stock in, which is kept at the farmhouse, and a little one holding two dozen flies and a dozen leaders, which I carry on the stream. A string tied to this, too, will prevent the unpleasantness of having it fall in the water and glide away from you. I even tie a string to my pipe and knife. The outing hat is an important thing to me. Mine is always a soft brown or gray felt, and I use it to sit on in damp and hard places fifty times a day.

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Dressing a Fly

“Dressing a Fly” circa 1817 from Fishing and Shooting by Sydney Buxton (1902), p. 92.

*Some sources say 1737, e.g., The Wyoming and Lackawanna Valleys by Hayden, Hand and Jordan (pub. 1906)

**p. 2 of The Heraldic Journal, Vol. III (Boston: Wiggin & Lunt, Publishers, 1867)

***p. 446 of The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XXVII (Philadelphia: The Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1903)

Additional Resources:

Categories: Brodhead, Kingston, Monroe Co., Nature, Pennsylvania | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

The Brodhead-Linderman Cemetery: Descendants work on clean up and restoration

This post is devoted to Part II of the cemetery restoration efforts undertaken by James & Barbara Brodhead over recent summers; although they live in Washington State–far from their ancestral roots in Pennsylvania–they have made it their mission to see to it that broken and downed stones of Brodhead family ancestors receive the care and respectful restoration they deserve. As you may recall, the first post was devoted to the repair of Cornelia Dingman Brodhead’s gravestone in the Mauch Chunk Cemetery in Jim Thorpe, PA.

This post focuses on their work in the Brodhead & Linderman Cemetery, part of the Brodhead-Courtright Farm Burial Ground, which is very much off the beaten path, within the territory of what once was Wheat Plains farm. The farm was established by Garret and Jane Brodhead after the Revolutionary War, and here in the Brodhead & Linderman Cemetery lie Richard Brodhead (Garret & Jane’s 3rd son) and his wife Hannah Drake. They and their family members resided in the Wheat Plains house for many years. So, once again, without further ado, here is a description of Barbara and James’ efforts in James’ own words (apart from a few spots where I have left clarifying notes in [brackets]; also, please click on images to see enlarged versions–the tile mosaics can be viewed as slideshows):

"Wheat Plains"

“Wheat Plains,” the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

Lt Garret Brodhead served in the Continental Army and as part of his “bounty” for service he was given a land grant along the Delaware River near present-day Dingman’s Ferry. The farm he established in the 1770s was named Wheat Plains. The farm remained in the Brodhead family until 1865 and then it was purchased back by Robert Packer Brodhead in 1894. Robert’s family held the land until the Federal Government took (some say stole) the land under eminent domain in preparation to build the Tocks Island Dam in the 1970s. The dam was supposed to control the occasional floods [One terrible flood occurred in 1955 with the tail end of Hurricane Diane, killing 75 in the Brodhead Valley, alone], but for several reasons the dam was not built. The lands were not returned to the owners. Many of the homes, farms, and hotels were demolished because of squatters (hippies) living in the then empty buildings. When the project was cancelled the land was turned over to the National Park Service.

The sad state of the Wheat Plains house

The sad state of the Wheat Plains house, 2013

The house at Wheat Plains is one of the few remaining homes in the area. Unfortunately the National Park Service is not maintaining the home and it is destined to be destroyed when it is deemed unsafe. Parts of the original log home are integral to the structure. Garret’s son Richard owned and lived in the home for many years.

Wheat Plains house exterior, 2013

Wheat Plains house exterior, 2013

Across the road and on a rise between the fields and the river lies the Brodhead & Linderman Cemetery. The family plot contains the headstones of Richard (d. 1843) and Hannah (d. 1831). Their son Richard (1st of 2 sons named Richard, d. 1809 @ 2½ yrs. old) and his sister Eliza (d. 1814 @ 10 months old) are also buried there. There is a wrought iron fence with a gate surrounding the plot. “Brodhead & Linderman” is cast into the gate. It is unknown who put up the fence and Hannah’s current headstone, but the inscription on the back states “This sacred memorial erected March 2nd 1869”. Richard and Hannah’s daughter Rachael married Dr. John Linderman. It is logical that the Lindermans were the benefactors. [John purchased the Van Gordon property, adjacent to Wheat Farms, after he got his medical license, and built a house on it in 1817 -- see past post].

A foot stone, as found

A foot stone, as found

There are several other stones other than the foot stones, but no marking can be discerned. The plot is too small for many more internments so there was probably no plan for the Linderman family to bury others there.  Next to the family plot on the road side of the hill are buried Van Gordens and others. Moses Van Gorden married Charlotte Newman Easton following the death of her husband Calvin Easton. It is not known how this Moses is related to those interned there. The Moses here may be the father of Charlotte’s husband, Moses. Calvin and Charlotte Easton are the parents of Ophelia Easton who married Richard and Hannah’s grandson Andrew Jackson Brodhead.

We have made two trips to the area. The first was in 2011 and then again in 2013.

Summer 2011

In 2011, we met Leroy and Bobby Cron, longtime residents of Dingman’s Ferry and members of the Dingman’s Ferry and Delaware Township Historical Society. We had sent a letter to the Society and asked for family information. Leroy took us down an access road next to a corn field. He pointed into the woods and stated that the cemetery was in there. He was correct, but nothing was visible from that vantage point.

The cemetery in 2011, as found

The cemetery in 2011, as found

The next day we met with a park ranger who helped us find the cemetery, and using his skills as a former surveyor, he looked at the Park Service map and then said “I am going up there.” And he walked off the road and into the brush. A few minutes later he called out “I found it!” The only thing visible through the brush was part of the cast iron fence.   We had to climb over downed trees and push our way through the brush to get there. The ranger stated that even though the National Parks owns the land, the cemetery is still owned by the family.

James dealing with a fallen tree

James dealing with a fallen tree

There was a tree that had been growing inside the plot that died and fell over damaging the fence. Hannah’s headstone was knocked over by the tree and was broken in half. Richard Jr and Eliza’s head stones had been tilted. According to Leroy a local Boy Scout troop, as a service project, cleaned up the cemetery in the late 1990’s, but the bushes rapidly regrew. The fence showed signs of having been painted.

We had about two hours left in our schedule to do what we could do. The ranger station loaned some tools to us. We started calling the sticker bushes “Grab-me-gotchas” because they were long and ‘viney’ and after cutting them, when we tried to throw them outside the fence the Grab-me-gotchas would somehow wrap around our legs and poke us through our pants. We also cut up the tree.

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Summer 2013

In 2013 we returned with the supplies we needed to do some of the repairs. We ordered a headstone repair kit (medium kit 3-6 stones) from Polymer Concrete Inc. (http://www.tombstonerestoration.com) and had it shipped to Myer Country Motel where we stayed. We had to again find the plot because of the rapid re-growth of the brush.

After cutting our way in, we began cleaning up Hannah’s headstone. When the headstone was originally set, the gap between the stone and the base (tongue and groove) should have been filled with molten lead, but it was not done. The first task was then to clean out the dirt and abrade the surfaces to be joined with a wire brush. Masking tape was put around the joint to protect the other surfaces from excess epoxy. The epoxy was mixed and put on the surfaces with a paint brush and extra epoxy used to fill the gap described. The surfaces of the break in the stone were then abraded. Wood stakes were clamped vertically to the lower half of the stone using ratcheting squeeze clamps. The stakes provided a means to align and secure the two halves. The epoxy was applied and the parts fitted together. The upper half of the stone was then clamped to the stakes. Extra epoxy was pushed into the gaps where the stone had chipped when it broke. A couple of days later we returned to remove the clamps and clean up.

We will be returning this year and will give all the stones a good scrubbing, paint more of the fence, and try to slow the growth of the brush. We may also give some attention to the Van Gorden family stones outside the fence, if our time allows. Below is a description of how to find the cemetery.

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If You Go

Along the trail in 2013

Along the trail in 2013

The access road is located north of the Wheat Plains farm on the east side of Hwy 209. Coming south from Milford or Dingman’s Ferry, just past the Briscoe Mountain Rd, is the McDade Trail Access Road. The road sign is hard to read at highway speeds, so look for the Pocono Environmental Education Center sign.

Turn left on the access road and follow it to the end (locked post). From there walk about ½ mile.

McDade Trail marker; red arrow points to the twisted tree.

McDade Trail marker; red arrow points to the twisted tree.

At mile marker 15.5 (left hand side) stop and look to the right and look for the twisted tree. Enter the bushes between the twisted tree and the tree to the left. You are facing the direction of the cemetery. White paint dots were sprayed on the trees on right and left side of the “trail”.   The cemetery is about 100 yards from the road as the crow flies. Be sure to dress in clothes that cover you, and protect yourself from ticks and other insects. Rubber bands or duct tape and a good bug spray around the bottom of your pant legs acts as a good barrier. We did not find any ticks in the five trips to the cemetery.

We are looking forward to our next trip to Dingman’s Ferry to visit the Brodhead/Linderman Cemetery and Wheat Plains Farm. We feel a special connection to our family there.

How to get there

How to get there

Categories: Brodhead, Stroudsburg, Cemeteries, Linderman, Brodhead-Linderman Cemetery, Monroe Co. | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Rachael Brodhead Linderman (1803-1864): “a most estimable woman”

"The Country Doctor" oil on Canvas. Source: http://www.wikigallery.org/; Author: Charles Stewart

“The Country Doctor” oil on Canvas. Source:
http://www.wikigallery.org/; Author: Charles Stewart, 1908 (I could not find an image of an early 19th century American country doctor–if anyone knows of one, please let me know!)

Just as I was thrilled to find a physical description of the Hon. Richard Brodhead, the subject of the June 24th post, I was thrilled to find a glimpse of his daughter Rachael Brodhead‘s personality and disposition in the 1905 publication Historic homes and institutions and genealogical and personal memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania:

[Rachael] …was a most estimable woman, whose gentle nature and kindly sympathies made her a dear friend of all with whom she was associated.

Rachael was married to Pike county physician Dr. John Jordan Linderman. They lived on a property next door to Rachael’s parents (Richard and Hannah). The descriptions I found of him are equally pleasant to read: He treated his poor patients with as much consideration as he did those who were able to recompense him, and his cheery geniality made him an ideal physician in the sick room. His very large practice required him to cover quite a bit of territory—often making a daily journey of forty miles on horseback or twenty miles afoot in his professional rounds. WOW! Now that is dedication! He lived into his eighties, so obviously all that exercise did him good.

Dr. Valentine Mott, one of John Linderman's mentors (Image from Memoir of Valentine Mott, M.D., LL. D.: Professor of Surgery in the University of the City of New York; Member of the Institute of France by Samuel David Gross (New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1868)

Dr. Valentine Mott, one of John Linderman’s mentors (Image from Memoir of Valentine Mott, M.D., LL. D.: Professor of Surgery in the University of the City of New York; Member of the Institute of France by Samuel David Gross (New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1868)

And he was evidently a man of great conviction; I was amused to read in the 1886 book History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania: He was the only man who voted for Clay’s election in Lehman township during the Polk and Clay Presidential contest, for which the Whigs of Easton presented him with a valuable double-barreled rifle, doubtless feeling that one who was able to stand alone in such a contest merited some kind of recognition.

Portrait of Dr. David Hosack by Rembrandt Peale, 1826 (Wikipedia image)

Portrait of Dr. David Hosack by Rembrandt Peale, 1826 (Wikipedia image) – Dr. Hosack was another mentor of John Linderman’s.

Rachael and John had a daughter Sarah Maria Linderman and three sons, Dr. Henry R. Linderman (nearly six feet tall, of fine proportions and scholarly appearance, and possessed of a genial and polished address), Dr. Garret B. Linderman, and Albert Linderman. This and much more about them can be found on pages 934-938 of History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania, edited by Alfred Mathews  (Philadelphia: R. T. Peck & Co., 1886). A previous blog post on the Carbon County Packers, Lindermans and Brodheads also mentions members of this family.  Note: Some trees on Ancestry dot com show additional children, but I have not had time to verify that. Perhaps there were more kids, but these two old history books simply decided to mention only the most prominent and successful children? If anyone reading this knows of bona fide additional children, by all means leave a comment in the box below.

Rachael and John were buried in Bethlehem’s Nisky Hill Cemetery. Please visit the Find a Grave site, if you are interested in seeing their resting places and those of other family members (oddly, John Linderman’s grave marker has ‘Jay’ for his middle name, while sources quoted here say ‘Jordon’):

Rachael Brodhead Linderman
Dr. John J. Linderman

Below are clippings taken from the aforementioned books, identified accordingly. I hope you enjoy reading them and learning more about that offshoot of the Brodhead family tree. As always, corrections, comments, and suggestions are welcome.

Historic homes and institutions and genealogical and personal memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania, Volume I, edited by John W. Jordan, Edgar Moore Green, and George T. Ettinger (NY/Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Co. 1905)

From pp. 209-210 of Historic homes and institutions and genealogical and personal memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania, Volume I, edited by John W. Jordan, Edgar Moore Green, and George T. Ettinger (NY/Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Co. 1905)

Historic homes and institutions

p. 937 of History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania, Edited by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: R. T. Peck & Co., 1886)

Garrett Brodhead Linderman, b. 1829

Garrett Brodhead Linderman, b. 1829

Henry R. Linderman

Henry R. Linderman, b. 1825

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Resources:

Passion for the Past blog: The World of a 19th Century Country Doctor

Categories: Brodhead, Linderman, Medical, Pike Co. | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

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