Wealthy Ann Cushman Jaques and the possible Mayflower connection

View of Plymouth Harbor fall or spring of 1973

Happy Thanksgiving to all this blog’s readers! Thank you for your support and encouragement this past year, and thanks to all of you who have shared information, supplied material for guest posts, or written guest posts yourself.  I have seen this blog continue to help people connect with family members near and far, and for that I am also very grateful.

Today’s post may be of interest to descendants of Isaac Jaques and Wealthy Ann Cushman and it concerns the possible familial link between Wealthy and the youngest of the Mayflower’s 102 passengers—Mary Allerton. (Anyone out there with information on that link, please do get in touch via the comment box below or my email address which appears on the ‘About’ page.)

I had absolutely no idea when I visited Plimoth Plantation at age 12 that I may be related Mary Allerton. I recall wandering that open-air museum on a very cold and raw day, thinking about what it must have been like to get through just one day of life in the 1620s, let alone entire months and years. Brrr—just thinking about it makes me cold. (Ever see the episode of Colonial House where Oprah and her friend Gayle “go back in time” 400 years to experience life in a Maine settlement? See https://vimeo.com/2811969. Again, all I can say is Brrrrrrrrrrr….) Our foreparents were made of extremely tough stuff! (Four hundred years from now, they may be saying that about us, which is hard to imagine given how comfortable life is today, compared to 400 years ago.)

Angus_Job_W_obit 002

Elizabeth Daily Journal obit for Job Winans Angus Jr.

Forward to 2016. You may recall that I was somewhat flabbergasted this past summer to come across an obit for Job Winans Angus Jr. in which it was stated that Job had an ancestor who came over on the Mayflower. A little hand-written note I found from Job’s nephew Thomas Russum seemed to confirm that this was indeed something worth exploring even if it was, perhaps, wishful thinking on their part. The ancestor on whom all this hinged was Wealthy Ann Cushman: wife of Isaac Jaques, mother of Wealthy (Jaques) Angus, and my third-great-grandmother. Thomas’s note mentioned a father Eleazer and a mother Mary Zooker/s with a question mark next to her first and last names. The year of death for Eleazer was given as 1792, again with a question mark. The mother “Mary? Zooker/s?” was noted as having remarried someone named Keeney and having had two children with him: Aaron and Jane. I did find a death record for a Mercy Keeney who was presumably born around 1779. If the circa 1779 birth date is accurate, she would have given birth at age 14/15, so this may be a red herring; if the date is off and she was older when Wealthy was born, this could be the correct Mercy.

I subsequently found, on page 206 of Families of Early Hartford, an Eleasur Cushman listed as having been buried in the Center Church Ancient Burying Ground in Hartford, Connecticut: “Eleasur Cushman died Aug 9, 1795 ae 27 bur Center Church. Widow Mercy Cushman.”  I believe this Eleasur may very well be the father of Wealthy Ann Cushman, who was born in Hartford, CT, on November 11, 1793, and that “Mary? Zooker/s?” was Mercy Cushman, but proving that is an entirely different thing. (Wealthy Ann Cushman married Isaac Jaques on Feb 4, 1812, and they named their second son Eleazer (b. 1820), which may be more than coincidence).

Another thing to prove is the link back from Eleasur Cushman of Hartford to his parents—possibly Seth Cushman (1734-1771) and Abiah Allen. They had a son named Eleazer, born July 17, 1768 in Dartmouth, Massachusetts. If you add 27 years to 1768, you come up with 1795, the year of death of Hartford’s Eleasur Cushman.

life_1904

Life Magazine 1904

The links between Seth Cushman and Mary Allerton (1616-1699; wife of Thomas Cushman, 1608-1691) have all been proven and are all documented.

So the challenge is to definitively connect Wealthy Ann Cushman with Eleasur Cushman and Eleasur Cushman to Seth Cushman. If those connections don’t exist, it will be back to square one. I contacted the Connecticut State Archives hoping for some clues about the Cushman family of Hartford, but they had nothing new to tell me. I also contacted the Mayflower Society (MS), but they had no information on anyone using Seth and Abiah Cushman’s son Eleazer to prove Mayflower ancestry. It is up to us descendants to do it. The MS was very helpful and supportive, so as time goes on, maybe they will help steer me in some fruitful directions.

I know from reading some letters that Wealthy’s daughter Wealthy (Jaques) Angus of Elizabeth, NJ, stayed in contact with Hartford relatives and visited them periodically, but I have found no new clues that would better ID them. Perhaps, someone out there has a box of old letters that contains some answers?

Anyway, we are standing before a brick wall of sorts and hopefully, we’ll figure it all out. Perhaps, in time for next Thanksgiving – 2017? It would be fun to be able to pass this info on to the little ones in the family. We shall see!

Again, best wishes to you all for a very blessed Thanksgiving 2016.

Categories: Elizabeth, Union Co., Angus, Jaques, New Jersey, Cushman, Connecticut, Hartford, Mayflower 1620 | Tags: , , | 7 Comments

A Florida Friday: Mangrove tunnels

map

Cropped from Colton’s United States of America. Published in 1865 by J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York. Credit: http://www.davidrumsey.com

We recently took a canoe ride along a portion of the Blackwater River which starts at the 7,271-acre Collier Seminole State Park on the western edge of the Everglades and takes you out several miles through a vast mangrove swamp until you reach the Ten Thousand Islands. Were it not for the fact that the mangroves produce tannin, the water would be crystal clear (which would be much more comforting for the purpose of alligator spotting!). It’s an incredibly peaceful experience; just remember your bug spray and sunscreen and to stay in your canoe so you don’t bring home any physical souvenirs (or lose a limb!). We’ve done this trip several times, and the mangrove tunnels where the river narrows are (for me) the most special part of the journey. The water is like glass and the reflection of the mangroves on the water makes for some heavenly scenes. In winter there’s the added benefit of seeing lots of birds.

When you go through such uninhabitable terrain, it is easy to see why the Seminole Indians were never defeated, and also easy to see why the author of the below small article on the Ten Thousand Islands, published in 1886, found this part of Florida “desolate” and “gloomy” in comparison with the northern part of the state, which was fairly well inhabited and offered comforts that clearly would have been absent in south Florida at that time. Coming here in the hot and humid months of the year especially, one can be eaten alive by no-see-ums and mosquitoes and burnt to a crisp by a relentless and unforgiving sun. The article was printed in November, so hopefully the author escaped the worst of the bugs and weather—in any case, he lived to tell his tale!

Thankfully, we 21st-century South Floridians are able to enjoy these wild  environments by day and return to the comforts of our homes at night.

Have a tranquil weekend, all.

mangroves

Blackwater River mangrove tunnel, November 2016

Starting point for the Blackwater River with canoe/kayak launch area in distance

Starting point for the Blackwater River with canoe/kayak launch area in distance

ten_thousand_islands1Daily Alta California, Friday, November 12, 1886 (Credit: California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside - . All newspapers published before January 1, 1923 are in the public domain and therefore have no restrictions on use.)

Daily Alta California, Friday, November 12, 1886 (Credit: California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside – . All newspapers published before January 1, 1923 are in the public domain and therefore have no restrictions on use.)

Mango [sic] trees on the jungle trail, Palm Beach, Fla. - Detroit Publishing Company, 1910-1920 Credit: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Mango [sic] trees on the jungle trail, Palm Beach, Fla. – Detroit Publishing Company, 1910-1920 Credit: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Categories: Florida, Ten Thousand Islands | Tags: , , , | 5 Comments

Garret Brodhead’s Wheat Plains Farm in Pike Co., PA, needs your support

"Wheat Plains," the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

Circa 1900: “Wheat Plains,” the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

The sad state of the Wheat Plains house

2016: The sad state of the Wheat Plains house – victim of the Tocks Island Dam project

Hello, Brodhead descendants & anyone with an interest in Pennsylvania history! You may not be aware of an important project that could greatly use your support: the restoration of Wheat Plains Farm in Pike County, Pennsylvania, the old Garret Brodhead (1730-1804) family homestead that Brodhead family members were forced to abandon in the 1970s due to the Tocks Island Dam project. Below is a letter just received from James and Barbara Brodhead who are spearheading the DePuy-Brodhead Family Association’s efforts to restore the home (now managed by the National Park Service). So please take a few moments to read the below letter and see if you can lend your support. PS: Next summer’s DePuy-Brodhead Family Association annual reunion is likely to be held there; it would be extremely positive if as many Brodhead descendants as possible made the effort to be there to show the NPS that the home’s fate is of concern to many, not just a few. I hope to be there—a great opportunity to support a great cause and meet cousins of all kinds.

 

Dear Family,

As many of you know, some members of the DePuy/Brodhead Family Association have been working with the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area to preserve the Wheat Plains house. Wheat Plains is the farm started by Garret Brodhead on the land he received as partial payment for his service in the Revolutionary War. From 1790 the farm was owned by the Brodhead family until it was sold to Cornelius Swartout in 1871. Robert Packer Brodhead purchased back the farm in 1896 and his descendants remained there until the 1970’s when the land was acquired by eminent domain as part of the Tocks Island Dam Project. The Army Corp of Engineers headed the project. Later the Army Corp of Engineers determined that the river bed would not support the dam. The land then was transferred to the National Parks Service (NPS) who now manages the property. There are currently about 700 buildings remaining in the park on both sides of the Delaware River. Some have historical significance and most have sentimental value. Many buildings are in poor condition. Wheat Plains is structurally sound and it sits in a prominent place on highway 209.

The Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (DWGNRA) is developing a long range plan to identify which buildings should be restored, maintained, or removed. The NPS has limited funds to do this work. Included in their consideration is the cost of maintenance and what the long term usage of the structure will be. Without a defined usage the preservation efforts will be limited.

Now to get to the purpose of this letter. We have been encouraged to send letters to the Superintendent of the DWGNRA and express our interest and support of preserving Wheat Plains or other structures. Please write a politely worded letter expressing your personal interest in preserving Wheat Plains farmhouse and property. Please include personal memories and historical facts that you have. If you have ideas for the usage for the house, (i.e. museum, vacation rental, etc.) please include that also. These letters need to be sent by the end of the year in order to be included in the evaluation process. The sooner the letters arrive the better. The Association created a good impression when we helped clean the house in 2015. It showed the NPS how much we care and your letter will add to that.

When writing your letter please remember that the NPS had nothing to do with taking the land; they were given the task of maintaining it. Please keep your letter kind and considerate.

Please address your letter to:
John J. Donahue, Superintendent
Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area &
Middle Delaware National Scenic and Recreational River
1978 River Road
Bushkill, PA 18324

Please also send copies of your letter to the following at the address above or email a copy to the addresses
given below:
Judson Kratzer – Judson_Kratzer@NPS.gov
Jennifer Kavanaugh – Jennifer_Kavanaugh@NPS.gov

We are in the initial stages of organizing a “Friends of Wheat Plains” non-profit org. to collect donations to help support the preservation of Wheat Plains. More information coming.

We sincerely thank you,
James and Barbara Brodhead
425-418-4742

Categories: Brodhead, Delaware Water Gap, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

A Florida Friday: Coquina ‘flashback’

1966_st_augustine

January 1966 visit to St. Augustine’s Castillo de San Marcos (that’s little moi in the white glasses with mom & big sis)

Below are some shells seen and collected during a recent outing to Sanibel Island… among them, the tiny, colorful coquina. Millions line the shore, and at low tide, you can watch them jiggle and maneuver as they wait, and hope, for the tides to shift back in their favor.

coquina12

Coquina shells

Whenever I see coquina shells, St. Augustine always comes to mind. If you’ve been to that beautiful, historic city on Florida’s NE coast, you know that the Spanish quarried coquina rock (a limestone composed of sand and mollusk shells found in NE Florida) to build their Castillo de San Marcos (known for some time as Fort Marion) from 1672 to 1695.

I first saw the fortress at age 5, and it, and the coquina rock, made a huge impression on me. The old ‘downtown’ as well, of course, which was supplemented by Henry Flagler’s amazing architectural creations in the 1880s. What kid would not be awestruck by all that?! And, goodness, let’s not forget Ponce de Leon’s ‘Fountain of Youth‘ up the street from the fort. (I think I am way more interested in that fountain now than I was even back then!!!😉 )

Of course, I’m not alone—for generations, St. Augustine has been casting a spell on travelers. I found one visitor’s account from 1890 (below; scroll down); much of what they wrote about then could easily be experienced today.

Well, have a good weekend all; we’ve ‘cooled down’ here to a chilly 82! I think we’ll go fishing.
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coquinas


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St. Augustine, Florida, 1898

Fort Marion, St. Augustine and harbor, Detroit Publishing Company, 1898 (Library of Congress image LCCN2008678231 - No known restrictions on publication)

Fort Marion, St. Augustine and harbor, Detroit Publishing Company, 1898 (Library of Congress image LCCN2008678231 – No known restrictions on publication)

A visitor’s perspective – Duluth Evening Herald, Saturday, March 15, 1890
(courtesy of http://www.fultonhistory.com)

coquina_fl1coquina_fl2coquina_fl3coquina_fl4

Categories: Florida, Sanibel Island, St. Augustine | 6 Comments

Photograph of Isaac Jaques (1791-1880) of Elizabeth, NJ

Courtesy of San Benito County Historical Society

Isaac Jaques (1791-1880) –  Courtesy of San Benito County Historical Society

An amazing discovery: the existence of an image of Isaac Jaques of Elizabeth, New Jersey, father of my second-great-grandmother Wealthy Jaques (wife of James W. Angus).

I have written rather extensively about Isaac and some of his family members, as you know. First wife Wealthy Cushman of Hartford, CT, died in 1856; and he and Wealthy had nine children: Jane (1814-1843), Wealthy (1815-1892), Isaac (1817-bef. 1880), Eleazer (1820-?), John (1822-1895), Samuel (1824-1858), Walter (1826-1850), Christopher (1831-1851), and Charles (1834-1866).

Isaac’s second wife was Rebecca Ann Gold Robinson (widow of William J. Robinson); and, at some point, descendants of one of Rebecca’s sisters donated an album containing old Gold family photos to the San Benito County [California] Historical Society. In the album was this image of “Uncle Isaac,” as well as one of Rebecca.  I am indebted to an Ancestry dot come member for telling me about the image. She is a descendant of one of Rebecca’s sisters.

The photo of Isaac is not dated, but it must have been taken not too long before he passed away, in August 1880 at the age of 89.

Note: I had to pay a small fee to acquire this low-resolution image and get permission to publish it on this blog. If you want a high-resolution copy for your personal use (no sharing via email, no posting on Ancestry, social media, etc.), you can contact the San Benito Historical Society directly and officially request one (for a fee). You can also request an image of Rebecca Robinson Jaques. I paid for the high-res image of her but did not pay the extra fee to be able to post a low-res image here.

Categories: Elizabeth, Union Co., Angus, Jaques, New Jersey | Tags: , | 2 Comments

Guest Post: “Grave Marker Dedication of Revolutionary War Soldier Benjamin Woodruff on May 14, 2016”

This post was contributed by Sue Woodruff Noland. Her previous post on the topic of the Woodruff family can be found here.

Benjamin Woodruff Grave Marker - PHOTO COPYRIGHT: SUE WOODRUFF NOLAND

Benjamin Woodruff Grave Marker – PHOTO COPYRIGHT: SUE WOODRUFF NOLAND

Benjamin Woodruff, born 26 November 1744 to James Woodruff* (1722-1759) and Joanna ? (1722-1812), attended the Morristown Presbyterian Church.  He served during the Revolution with the New Jersey militia, leaving behind his wife and 3 children; his wife, Phoebe Pierson Woodruff, died 21 January 1777, aged 36, and one can only hope that Benjamin was able to be there with her and the children.  Benjamin married again 8 July 1778, to Patience Lum, daughter of Obadiah Lum, with whom he had more children he left behind as he served our country.  It has been certified that Benjamin served one monthly tour in 1776 as a drummer; three monthly tours as a sergeant in 1776, including an engagement near Elizabeth, NJ, on 17 December 1776.  He served under various captains to the close of the war.  [information from the genealogical history provided by Charles Marius Woodruff]

Grave marker - Note the misspelling of Freelove Sanford's first name - IMAGE COPYRIGHT: SUE WOODRUFF NOLAND

Grave marker – Note the misspelling of Freelove Sanford’s first name – IMAGE COPYRIGHT: SUE WOODRUFF NOLAND

Those of you who are familiar with Michigan and the Great Lakes, which is where I live, know how variable the weather can be; mid-May average temperature is mid-60s.  On May 14, 2016, the day of the Grave Marker Dedication Ceremony for Benjamin Woodruff, son Andrew and I, both descendants of Benjamin, encountered temperatures in the low 40s and brisk breezes that carried sleety-snowy-rain as we gathered at Forest Hill Cemetery in Ann Arbor, Michigan!

As was common in 1837, when Benjamin died, he was buried the following day and therefore was not accorded a military funeral.  The DAR and SAR strive to provide a service for our forgotten patriots; on this day another Revolutionary War soldier, Josiah Cutler, was honored with our ancestor, Benjamin.

Benjamin Woodruff Grave Market Dedication Ceremony – At podium: Phil Jackson, Huron Valley Chapter SAR – PHOTO COPYRIGHT: SUE WOODRUFF NOLAND

The ceremony began with a welcome from Phil Jackson, Huron Valley Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR).  Following Phil’s remarks, we watched the posting of colors and standards with bearers dressed in Revolutionary War period uniforms.  Thomas Pleuss, Chaplain of the Huron Valley Chapter SAR, gave the invocation, and then Kate Kirkpatrick, from the local Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) chapter made some remarks, followed by remarks from a representative from each patriot’s family.  Thomas Woodruff and Frank Ticknor (Josiah’s family) each presented a brief history of our respective ancestor.  This portion of the ceremony was conducted about mid-way between the two patriot’s graves.  After family remarks, the ceremony was conducted separately at each grave site.

Thomas Woodruff receiving flag - IMAGE COPYRIGHT: CHUCK MARSHALL - USED WITH PERMISSION

Descendant Thomas Woodruff receiving flag – Sue Woodruff Noland in purple shawl looking on; her son Andrew is on the left in a plaid jacket – IMAGE COPYRIGHT: CHUCK MARSHALL – USED WITH PERMISSION

Benjamin’s grave site is a family memorial with several of his family interred there.  Tom and his son, Michael, generously purchased a marker for Benjamin indicating his service as a Revolutionary War patriot.  (The US government ‘declined’ to provide a marker.)  Our grateful thanks to Tom and Michael’s families for researching Revolutionary War markers and commissioning the marker to be made.  The marker was unveiled before our nation’s tribute, the folding of the flag.  Since there was no flag pole, the ceremony actually involved unfolding a flag brought by the SAR/DAR for the occasion, and then refolding it as a story was told about the meaning of the folds, the last fold being a representation of a mother tucking in her child for the night—a story made up sometime in the past, but a touching story nonetheless.  Once folded, the flag was presented to Tom.  We were then cautioned that the next part of the ceremony would be the military tribute, a 21-gun (and 2 muskets) salute—startlingly loud!

Twenty-one gun salute - IMAGE COPYRIGHT: CHUCK MARSHALL - USED WITH PERMISSION

Twenty-one gun salute – IMAGE COPYRIGHT: CHUCK MARSHALL – USED WITH PERMISSION

The veterans Honor Guard of Washtenaw County (Michigan), the Indiana Society Color Guard, and the Ohio Society Color Guard performed the tribute of three volleys.  The 21 spent shells were given to Tom, who offered one to each of the family as a memento of the day.

Sword Ceremony - IMAGE COPYRIGHT: CHUCK MARSHALL - USED WITH PERMISSION

Sword Ceremony – IMAGE COPYRIGHT: CHUCK MARSHALL – USED WITH PERMISSION

The Sword Salute was by far the most touching part of the ceremony for me.  Three of the Color Guard detached from the group.  The leader explained that, on command, the three of them would tip their tri-corn hats to honor our patriot and then bow, touching the ground with their swords, to show humility for Benjamin’s service to us and our country.  To conclude the ceremony there was a sounding of taps by two buglers.

Both families (Woodruff and Cutler) came together once again after Josiah’s ceremony, for floral tributes from several SAR, DAR, and CAR groups (Children of the American Revolution).  These organizations developed at various times with the objective of keeping alive their ancestors’ stories of patriotism and courage “in the belief that it is a universal one of man’s struggle against tyranny….” [from SAR website]  The conclusion of the entire ceremony was a bagpipe tribute to both soldiers, by Herm Steinman.

Bagpiper who performed at the ceremony - IMAGE COPYRIGHT: SUE WOODRUFF NOLAND

Bagpiper who performed at the ceremony – IMAGE COPYRIGHT: SUE WOODRUFF NOLAND

Chilled to the bone, but eager to meet cousins we didn’t even know existed a few short weeks before, we gathered with Benjamin’s other descendants at Conor O’Neill’s Irish Pub in Ann Arbor, as guests of Tom and his wife, Jane, and Mike and his wife and tiny daughter.  We met ‘new’ cousins, including Tom and Mike’s families, as well as Pam Olander from the Chicago area and reacquainted ourselves with cousins who had attended one of the Woodruff family reunions we organized during the mid-2000s.  The room was quite abuzz with everyone sharing history and asking questions.  Tom told us the motto on our Woodruff Coat of Arms, “Sit Dux Sapientia,” translates as “Let wisdom be your guide;” we had not known the motto, only the shield design.

The day before the ceremony, Andrew and I had met Pam at the Bentley Historical Library on the U of M campus in Ann Arbor.  We spent over two hours poring through Woodruff documents stored at the Library and were finally able to answer a question:  Why would John Woodruff leave England in 1640?  The answer: he seems to have decided that King Charles I was taking too much of the family income via taxes.  Later, it seems our Benjamin, living in the colonies, may not quite have agreed with King George III’s Stamp Act of 1765 (and a few others: sugar tax, currency, etc.), thus leading to his participation in the Revolutionary War a few years later.

If any of you should travel to Michigan in the future, for research at the Library or simply to visit Benjamin’s final resting place (he was moved to Forest Hill from another site), we would love to meet any ‘new’ cousins.

 

*James Woodruff (b. 1722, Elizabethtown, NJ) was the son of Benjamin Woodruff (1684-1726) and Susanna (1686-1727), both of whom were born and died in Elizabethtown, NJ.

Categories: Ann Arbor, CAR, DAR, Lineage Societies, Michigan, New Jersey, Revolutionary War, SAR, Woodruff | Tags: , | 2 Comments

An image of Mrs. Lewis Dingman Brodhead (a.k.a. Mildred Elizabeth Hancock)

Lewis Dingman Brodhead (undated; probably circa 1904)

Lewis Dingman Brodhead (undated; probably circa 1904) – Image copyright James and Barbara Brodhead

As long-time readers of this blog know, Mildred Elizabeth Hancock (1892 – Aft 1940) eloped with my Great Uncle Lewis Dingman Brodhead (1884-1934) on June 23, 1911, at the Church of the Transfiguration in Manhattan.

(My previous blog posts about them include: Another Brodhead elopes, this time in 1911 at NYC’s Little Church Around the Corner; More on Lewis D. Brodhead; and Survived by ‘Mrs. R. J. Cole of Philadelphia’)

Well, some good news! The Baltimore Sun has kindly given me permission to publish the photo of Mildred that appeared on p. 14 of the July 12, 1911, issue of that paper.

Mildred’s hat is pretty fabulous; it’s a shame we can’t see her or her hat in full living color, but under the circumstances, B&W will definitely do!

Below Image: Reprinted with permission from The Baltimore Sun.  All rights reserved.

Mildred

Reprinted with permission from The Baltimore Sun. All rights reserved.

Categories: Brodhead, Hancock, Lutherville, Maryland, New York City | Tags: | 7 Comments

Another descendant of the Nixon family of Fermanagh Co., Northern Ireland

My grandmother Zillah May Trewin’s best friend Catherine Mae Roberts, April 1905; they appear together in the 2nd photo from the right.

My grandmother Zillah May Trewin’s best friend Catherine Mae Roberts, April 1905; they appear together in the 2nd photo from the right.

This is Catherine Mae Roberts, one of my grandmother Zillah Trewin’s best friends from childhood, in April 1905. Catherine was a cousin of the Nixon sisters (Jennie & Louise), about whom I have previously written. From the second photo from the right, in which my grandmother appears with Mae, you can tell they were good chums. Fourteen years after these photos were taken, my grandmother would marry Mae’s cousin William Robert Boles whose mother Sarah was a sister of Mae’s mother Jane. Below is a family tree of sorts in the event one of you wants to see the details. (Anyone who wants to help me fill in some of the blanks, please give me a shout at ‘chipsoff at gmail dot com’!)

I love the smiles. And the hats!!! What were they made of?!

{{Information |Description=Advertisting poster for hats for C.A. Browning & Co., Boston. French, 1904–05. France. Lithograph, printed in color, on paper. Anonymous firm. Poster advertising hats for C. A. Browning and Co., 32 Franklin Street Boston. (In public domain is US due to being published before

Advertising poster for hats for C.A. Browning & Co., Boston. French, 1904–05. France. Lithograph, printed in color, on paper. Anonymous firm. Poster advertising hats for C. A. Browning and Co., 32 Franklin Street Boston. (In public domain is US — see below *)

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Courtesy of Fulton History dot com

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Sunday, March 26, 1905 (Courtesy of Fulton History dot com)


1-William Nixon b. Cir 1802, Ireland, d. 10 Aug 1871, Manhattan, New York, 
  New York
 +Rachael Millar b. Cir 1818, Ireland, d. Possibly 10 May 1890, Manhattan, New 
  York, New York, bur. Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, 
  USA
|--2-Edward Nixon b. Cir 1839-1845, Ireland, d. Betw 1889 and 1900
|   +Anna Bracken b. Aug 1847, Northern Ireland, d. After 1930
|  |--3-Jane Bracken Nixon b. 15 Apr 1884, Manhattan, New York, New York, d. 
|  |    May 1972, Ocean Grove, Monmouth, NJ
|  |--3-William Thomas Nixon b. 24 Aug 1885, Manhattan, New York, New York, d. 
|  |    Sep 1967, Suffolk, New York
|  |   +Marion Zoller 
|  |--3-George Robert Bracken Nixon b. 12 Feb 1887, Bridgeport, Connecticut
|  |   +May L. Swenarton b. Cir 1889, New Jersey
|  |  |--4-George W. Nixon b. Cir 1914, New Jersey
|  |  |--4-Frank L. Nixon b. Cir 1919
|  |--3-Louise E. Nixon b. 22 Jul 1889, Bridgeport, Connecticut, d. Oct 1979, 
|  |    Ocean Grove, Monmouth, NJ
|--2-Mark Nixon b. Cir 1845, Ireland, d. 28 Mar 1893, New York, New York, bur. 
|    31 Mar 1893
|   +Mary Quaile b. Abt 1846, Derrintober, Drumshambo, Ireland, d. possibly 25 
|    Nov 1876, Derrintober, Drumshambo, Ireland
|  |--3-Florence Katherine Nixon b. 25 Sep 1869, New York, New York, d. 21 Aug 
|  |    1944, Porter Hospital, Middlebury, Addison, Vermont
|  |--3-Evangeline Roberta Nixon b. Sep 1873, bur. 15 Dec 1960, Green-Wood 
|  |    Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, USA
|      +Joseph Russell Parker b. 29 Sep 1879, d. 1950, bur. Green-Wood 
|       Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, USA
|--2-Elizabeth Nixon b. Cir 1849, Ireland, d. After 2 Jun 1880
|--2-Jane Nixon b. 28 Dec 1851, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 7 Feb 
|    1938, East Orange, Essex Co., NJ, bur. 9 Feb 1938, Jersey City, Hudson 
|    Co., NJ
|   +William Elliott Roberts b. 12 Dec 1842, Enniskillen, Co. Fermanagh, 
|    Ireland, d. 4 Apr 1907, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, bur. Jersey City, 
|    Hudson Co., NJ
|  |--3-William Roberts b. 1876, d. 10 Mar 1942
|  |--3-Charles Benjamin Roberts b. 9 Aug 1878, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 
|  |    14 Mar 1962
|  |   +Grace Yates b. 1882
|  |--3-Edward Roberts b. 1880, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 22 Sep 1951
|  |   +Ruth Deming 
|  |--3-Catherine Mae Roberts b. 3 May 1882, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 13 
|  |    Dec 1966
|  |   +Emory Chenoweth b. 1878
|  |--3-Harry James Roberts b. 12 Dec 1886, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 2 
|  |    Feb 1974, Novato, Marin Co., CA, bur. 8 Feb 1975, Cheyenne, Laramie 
|  |    Co., WY
|  |   +Mary Elizabeth Baldwin b. 21 Nov 1884, d. 3 Feb 1971
|  |  |--4-Paul Nixon Roberts b. 30 Jul 1922, East Orange, Essex Co., NJ, d. 26 
|  |  |    Jan 1941
|  |--3-Herbert George Roberts b. 17 Oct 1888, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 
|  |    19 Nov 1972
|      +Ella Marjorie Harrison b. 1892
|--2-Thomas Nixon b. Cir 1852, Ireland, d. After 2 Jun 1880
|   +Eliza d. Bef 2 Jun 1880
|--2-Sarah Nixon b. 26 May 1855, Ireland, d. Sep 1938, Dublin South, 
|    Ireland, bur. Kentstown Cemetery, Co. Meath, Ireland
|   +Edward Boles b. 4 Jun 1855, Fingreagh Upper, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 24 
|    Oct 1940, Meath Hospital, Dublin, Ireland, bur. Kentstown Cemetery, Co. 
|    Meath, Ireland
|  |--3-Jane Kathleen Boles b. 7 Jul 1889, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 
|  |    5 Jun 1982, Belfast, Northern Ireland
|  |--3-John James Boles b. 10 Jan 1891, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 
|  |    Dec 1935
|  |--3-William Robert Boles b. 24 Feb 1892, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, 
|  |    Ireland, d. 2 Mar 1950, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. 4 Mar 1950, 
|  |    Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union, NJ
|  |   +Zillah May Trewin b. 11 Jun 1883, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, d. 11 May 
|  |    1955, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. 13 May 1955, Evergreen Cemetery, 
|  |    Hillside, Union, NJ
|  |--3-Edward Benjamin Boles b. 9 Apr 1894, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, 
|  |    d. 21 Nov 1970, bur. Clandeboye Cemetery, Bangor, Northern Ireland, UK
|  |--3-Beulah Sarah Boles b. 9 Apr 1894, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 
|  |    1900, co. Leitrim, Ireland
|  |--3-Mary Elizabeth Boles b. 5 Jun 1896, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, 
|  |    d. 26 Jul 1928, Cloneen, near Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland
|--2-Rachael Nixon b. Cir 1856, Ireland, d. After 1886, United States
|   +Charles F. Hodgson 
|  |--3-Elizabeth Hodgson b. 18 May 1886, Manhattan, New York, New York
|--2-Mary Nixon b. Cir 1858, Ireland, d. After 2 Jun 1880
|--2-Benjamin Nixon b. 2 Aug 1862, Ireland, d. 5 Aug 1939
|   +Mary Graham Clark b. 9 Mar 1864, New York, NY, d. 23 Jan 1948
|--2-Robert Nixon b. Jan 1863, Ireland, d. After 1912
|   +Blanche Shaw b. Mar 1868, d. After 1912
|  |--3-Nixon b. Betw 1891 and 1900, d. Betw 1891 and 1900
|  |--3-Dorothy R. Nixon b. Aug 1895
|  |--3-Marguerite Nixon b. Cir 1902
|  |--3-Margaret A. Nixon b. Cir 1906
|--2-Catherine Nixon b. 3 Jan 1864, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. After 
|    Oct 1886
|   +Charles Hugh Larkin 
|--2-James Nixon 
|--2-John Nixon 
|--2-William Nixon

********************************************************************************

*This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published (or registered with the U.S. Copyright Office) before January 1, 1923. This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 70 years or less.

Categories: Boles, Chenoweth, Elizabeth, Union Co., Fashion & Beauty, New Jersey, Roberts | Tags: , , , , | 9 Comments

March 1888: Luke Brodhead’s collection of Indian relics stolen

In my travels, I came across the below article about the theft of Luke Wills Brodhead’s collection of Indian artifacts, and it reminded me that I should consolidate some information I’ve gathered about him into a blog post. He was a very interesting man and must have been a powerful presence in his community in and around Delaware Water Gap. Autumn is here and soon the colors will be changing in that neck of the woods—a gorgeous spot on the Delaware River that he and his family held dear. Long gone are the massive summer hotels looking down from high above at the flowing waters and rolling hills. City folk have far more places to vacation now. But, this was once a hugely popular area for tourism, and Luke was in the thick of if. Seeing images from that time and his portrait (he and his brothers were extremely tall), I can almost envision him energetically walking about his hotel’s grounds, chatting with guests, and directing his staff on various matters. And then to think of all his historical interests and writings…he was truly a class act!

Philadelphia Enquirer, Wednesday, 12 September 1888*

Luke Wills Brodhead

Luke Wills Brodhead portrait from History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania, by Alfred Mathews, published by RT Peck & Co., 1886

BRODHEAD’S COLLECTION. Stolen Indian Relics Traced to a European Museum.
TRENTON, Sept. 11.—The most remarkable and curious robbery on record has just been made known. It occurred at the Delaware Water Gap last March, when the celebrated collection of Indian relics and specimens of the stone age, which L. W. Brodhead spent a lifetime in gathering, were carried away. The most peculiar feature about this robbery was the fact that only the most valuable specimens were taken, and that the work was done by a student and expert.

Mr. Brodhead is well known all over the country for his excellent collection, and one that would command an immense sum of money even under a forced sale. Mr. Brodhead keeps a hotel. Adjoining his own private parlor he has a library, the chief decorations of which are his arrow heads, axes, spears, rollers, javelins, pipes and bits of ancient pottery. With much care they have been arranged in groups. The arrow heads are tacked on white boards in groups, according to chronology or topography. He takes much pride in showing them to friends. Last winter the side shutter was forced open and the cases rifled and about one-third of the collection was taken away. The most valuable and rarest pieces were taken.

After the blizzard snow had melted away in a ravine near the house, the boards on which they were fastened were found. A detective was employed on the case, and he enjoined secrecy on all members of the household. The relics have been traced to England and are now thought to be in the possession of the officers of a museum. It is also thought that the man, who sold them for a handsome sum, will soon be apprehended. He is said to be a man well known in scientific circles, who acts as a purchasing agent for several European museums.

Luke Wills Brodhead bio from Transactions of the Moravian Historical Society by Moravian Historical Society, published 1900, pp. 38-39

Luke Wills Brodhead was born Sept. 12, 1821, in Smithfield Township, Monroe County, Penna. His parents were Luke and Elizabeth Wills Brodhead; his grandfather was Luke, one of the sons of Daniel Brodhead and his wife Esther Wyngart, who lived in Dansbury, now East Stroudsburg, whither they had come from Marbletown, N. Y. […]

ny_evening_express_1867

New York Express 1867

Luke Wills Brodhead, at an early age, engaged in mercantile business at White Haven for twelve years ; returning to the Delaware Water Gap, he was appointed Postmaster there and, at the end of his term of office, he shared with his brother the management of the Kittatinny House.

In 1872 he built the Water Gap House, which he conducted until the time of his death.

Kittatinny Hotel, Delaware Water Gap, published by Detroit Publishing Company, 1898 (NYPL collections) - Wikimedia Commons

Kittatinny Hotel, Delaware Water Gap, published by Detroit Publishing Company, 1898 (NYPL collections) – Wikimedia Commons – Public domain in US

He was a man of more than ordinary ability and, by his genial personality, he made his house famous throughout the land.

He devoted much time and energy to the study of the records, historical and geological, of the Minnisink Valley, was a frequent contributor to the public press and in 1862 wrote a volume concerning the Delaware Water Gap.

Water Gap House, Detroit Publishing Company, 1905 (Illinois State Library Collections - non-commercial use permitted)

Water Gap House, Detroit Publishing Company, 1905 (Illinois State Library Collections – non-commercial use permitted)

He was a member of the Moravian Historical Society, the Historical Societies of Pennsylvania, Minnesota, Georgia and Kansas, the Minnisink Historical Society and the Numismatic and the Geographical Societies of Philadelphia. He was also a member of the Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revolution.

Mr. Brodhead was twice married – in October, 1850, to Leonora Snyder, who departed in 1877, and in 1881 to Margaret D. Coolbaugh. His son, Dr. Cicero Brodhead, died in 1884, and two daughters, Mrs. John Ivison, of Coatesville, and Mrs. H. A. Croasdale, of Delaware Water Gap, together with his widow survive him.

He was an active and interested member of the Presbyterian Church and by his modest, generous, unselfish and courteous manner he made hosts of friends.

View on roof of Water Gap House by Albert Graves - stereocard -no known copyright restrictions - Boston Public Library collections

View on roof of Water Gap House by Albert Graves – stereocard -no known copyright restrictions – Boston Public Library collections

For some years he had been suffering from chronic bronchitis, although his final illness was very brief. He died on May 7, 1902, and his remains were laid to rest in the Water Gap Cemetery.

[Find a Grave link to grave site]

Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XXVII, Philadelphia: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1903, p. 447-228

[…] Luke W. Brodhead was a man of more than ordinary ability, and for many years was deeply interested in the history and genealogy of the Upper Delaware and Minisink Valley. His published contributions comprise the following:

The Kittatiny House and the Water Gap House - Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

The Kittatiny House and the Water Gap House – Detroit Publishing Co., ca 1900 – Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

“The Delaware Water Gap: Its Scenery, its Legends, and its Early History;” “The Minisinks and its Early People, the Indians;” “An Ancient Petition;” ” Tatamy;” “Settlement of Smithfield;” “Portals of the Minisink: Tradition and History of the ‘Walking Purchase’ Region and the Gateway of the Delaware;” “Early Frontier Life in Pennsylvania: Efficient Military Service of Four Brothers;” “George Lebar;” “Historical Notes of the Minisinks: Capture of John Hilborn by the Indians on Brodhead’s Creek;” “Pioneer Roads, the Old Mine Road, Early People, etc.;” ” The Old Stone Seminary of Stroudsburg in 1815;” “Indian Trails;” “Soldiers in the War of 1812 from the Townships of Smithfield and Stroud;” “Almost a Cetenarian: The Last of the Soldiers of the War of 1812 in Northern Pennsylvania;” “History of the Old Bell on the School­-House at Delaware Water Gap;” “Indian Graves at Pahaquarra;” “Half-Century of Journalism;” “The Depuy Family;” “Early Settlement of the Delaware: Was the Upper Delaware occupied before Philadelphia? Early Occupation of the Upper Delaware;” “Sketches of the Stroud, Van Campen, McDowell, Hyndshaw, Drake, and Brodhead Families.” He was also associate editor of the “History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties.”

In addition to his connection with the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Mr. Brodhead was a member of the Numismatic and Antiquary Society, the Geographical Society, and the Pennsylvania Society Sons of the Revolution, of Philadelphia; the Minisink Valley Historical Society, the Moravian Historical Society, the Georgia Historical Society, the Kansas Historical Society, and several college literary societies.

*************************************************************************
Links
Antoine Dutot Museum and Gallery
Spanning the GapPDF newsletter – US Dept of the Interior National Park Service
NJ Skylands “Million dollar highway” by Robert Kopenhaven
Pocono history website

*Article from http://www.fultonhistory.com

Categories: Brodhead, Delaware Water Gap, Pennsylvania | Tags: , | 4 Comments

Last group photos of the Woodruff sisters, early 1950s

My garage clear-out yielded these two group photos of my grandmother Fannie B. Woodruff and her five sisters, Jennie, Flora, Mildred, Cecelia, and Bertha—the children of William Earl Woodruff and Wealthy Ann Angus. The photos were damaged and faded, but some “Photoshopping” has helped to revive them a bit. Oldest sister Jennie died in October 1955 so the image was obviously taken sometime prior to that. Sister Flora Ulrich lived out in California, so maybe this photo was taken to commemorate her visit to New Jersey or to mark some other special/solemn occasion, perhaps even the death of one of their spouses. My grandfather died in May 1951 and Jennie’s in December 1953. The location I am not sure of; but I think it may have been my grandmother’s home in Scotch Plains, NJ. I think it’s somewhat sweet that in the top photo they are all looking in different directions as if trying to catch their best sides. In the photos I have of them in their much younger years, all heads were always pointed in the same direction.

woodruff_sisters_group_elderly_2

Front Row: Jennie Bell Woodruff Coleman, Fannie Bishop Woodruff Brodhead, Flora May Woodruff Baker Ulrich /// Back Row: Bertha Winans Woodruff, Wealthy Mildred Woodruff Brown, Cecelia Russum Woodruff Van Horn

woodruff_sisters_group_elderly1

Front Row: Bertha (daughter #6) and Jennie (daughter #1) Back Row: Cecelia (daughter #3), Mildred (daughter #5), Fannie (daughter #4), Flora (daughter #2)

Woodruff_sisters_adults_view2_labelled

Categories: Brodhead, Brown, Coleman, Elizabeth, Union Co., Hillside Union, New Jersey, Russum, Scotch Plains, Ulrich, Van Horn, Winans, Woodruff | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

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