Vintage Easter cards

Easter will soon be upon us. Seems an appropriate moment to post some vintage Easter cards. These belonged to my mother’s side of the family. Two are from her Aunt Jessie Trewin—the top card and the one with the little girl holding the yellow bonnet full of chicks. The rest are unlabelled or from ‘aunties’, i.e., friends of my grandmother’s. I think I like the top one and the one used in the blog’s header the best. Very sweet!
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Categories: Easter, Holidays & Festivities, Vintage cards | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

More traces of Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead & Cornelia M. Ely

Down Among the Coal Mines -- Chutes Loading the Canal-Boats on the Lehigh Canal, a wood engraving published in Harper's Weekly, February 1873. Coal was loaded at Mauch Chunk (Image found on Wikimedia Commons; public domain in the US)

Carbon County Scene: “Down Among the Coal Mines — Chutes Loading the Canal-Boats on the Lehigh Canal,” a wood engraving published in Harper’s Weekly, February 1873. Coal was loaded at Mauch Chunk (Image found on Wikimedia Commons; public domain in the US)

One of this blog’s new readers, whose spouse is a descendant of Abram & Cornelia Brodhead, kindly pointed me in the direction of some wonderful Carbon County resources that are available online thanks to the amazing contributions of a Mr. Tony Bennyhoff.  They reveal some interesting details, and I encourage anyone whose ancestors spent time in Carbon County to check them out. You never know what you may find.

What I found were several newspaper notices related to Abram’s passing, and I am sharing them here:

The Lehighton Press, Volume 2, Number 2, Thursday, October 27, 1892:
Death of A. C. Brodhead. Abram C. Brodhead died on Tuesday morning at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Garrett B. Linderman, South Bethlehem. Mr. Brodhead was 68 years of age, and lived for many years in Lehighton. About two months ago he went to South Bethlehem to visit his daughter, and while there he was taken ill. Mr. Brodhead was the youngest brother of the late Judge A. G. Brodhead , of Mauch Chunk; D. D. Brodhead , of Wilkes-Barre; A. J. Brodhead , of Flemington, N. J., and W. F. Brodhead, of Packerton. He was a staunch Democrat, having held several offices in the gift of his party. He was well known and greatly respected. The funeral of the deceased will take place to-day. Interment at Bridgeport, Conn. [Note: W. F. Brodhead, of Packerton, was a cousin on the Dingman side,  the son of William Franklin Brodhead (b 1807) and Jane Dingman (b 1808; Cornelia Dingman’s younger sister).]

Carbon Advocate, Volume 20, Number 50, Saturday, October 29, 1892:
Death of Abr. Brodhead. After an illness dating back a long time Abraham Brodhead died at the home of his daughter at Bethlehem on Monday night at the age of 68 years. For many years deceased resided in this city and was the superintendent of the Lehigh Stove Foundry. During the Grover Cleveland administration he held a lucrative position in the Philadelphia mint. He was an eccentric character in many ways. The news of his death was heard with regret by many old friends here.

View of Mauch Chunk, Carbon County, Pennsylvania, a wood engraving sketched by Theodore R. Davis and published in Harper's Weekly, September 1869 (Found on Wikimedia Commons; image is in public domain in US)

“View of Mauch Chunk, Carbon County, Pennsylvania,” a wood engraving sketched by Theodore R. Davis and published in Harper’s Weekly, September 1869 (Found on Wikimedia Commons; image is in public domain in US)

The Lehighton Press, Volume 2, Number 3, Thursday, November 3, 1892:
Funeral of A. C. Brodhead – The funeral of A. C. Brodhead, of Lehighton, took place on Thursday morning last from the residence of Mrs. G. B. Linderman, the daughter of the deceased, at South Bethlehem. The services were conducted by Rev. Gilbert H. Sterling, after which the remains were taken to Bridgeport, Conn., and there interred beside Mr. Brodhead’s wife. Mr. Brodhead was born in Pike county, August 6, 1824. In his early years Mr. Brodhead was connected with the Lehigh Valley Railroad and was subsequently in the government employ, in the custom house, in New York, and in later years in the mint, in Philadelphia. He was the youngest son of Garrett Brodhead and his wife, Cornelia Dingman , of Delaware, Pa. He was married January 6, 1862, to Cornelia Ely , of Bridgeport, Conn., but his wife died in the second  year thereafter, leaving but one child, Jennie, wife of Garrett B. Linderman. The funeral was largely attended by relatives and friends of the deceased from Lehighton and Mauch Chunk.

And, I found a morsel about Cornelia M. Ely in George Burritt Vanderpoel’s The Ely ancestry: lineage of Richard Ely of Plymouth, England who came to Boston, Mass., about 1655 & settled at Lyme, Conn, in 1660… (NY: Calumet Press, 1902, p. 369):

137313- Cornelia Maria Ely, b. 1842, d. 1864, dau. of Henry Gideon Ely and Cornelia Maria Whiting; m. 1863, Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead, Lehighton, Carbon Co., Pa., who was b. 1824, son of Garrett Brodhead and Cornelia Dingman. Their children:

1. Jennie S, b. 1863.

So Abram was ‘well known and greatly respected’ and ‘an eccentric character in many ways.’ I enjoy hearing little details like that, don’t you?

I am so grateful for this blog’s readers and appreciate all the feedback and help you so generously provide!

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Pennsylvania | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

James Easton Brodhead’s fish story – summer 1916

James Easton Brodhead

James Easton Brodhead – image from my family’s personal collection

Just a quick post to share a little article “A Fisherman’s Scales” which I came across online and found rather funny. It’s from Fur-Fish-Game Volumes 23-24 (A. R. Harding Publishing Company, 1 January 1916) and gives a bit of a glimpse into the life of my great-grandfather A. D. Brodhead’s brother James Easton Brodhead who lived in that grand house in Flemington, NJ, and about whom I wrote in a past post. I imagine that once this little piece was published, his siblings (those still alive at that point) and children gave him a bit of a razz. James would have been about 68 at the time, and likely went on to catch many more fish. He was child number four of A. J. Brodhead and Ophelia Easton‘s ten children but he outlived all of them, dying on 10 November 1943 at the ripe old age of 92. Enjoy the fish story and feel free to share one of your own in the comment box below!

Do not tell fish stories where the people know you; but particularly, don’t tell them where they know the fish. ~Mark Twain

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Fur-Fish-Game Volumes 23-24 (A. R. Harding Publishing Company, 1 January 1916) – CREDIT: Google Books

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Salmon and Sea Trout Flies from Fly Fishing (1899), Sir Edward Grey, 1920 edition (Wikimedia – Public domain in US)

 

Categories: Brodhead, Fishing, Flemington, Hobbies, Nature | Tags: , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Traces of Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead & wife Cornelia M. Ely

Over the years, I’ve been trying to connect the dots on Find a Grave, linking relatives together. Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead, brother of my 2nd great-grandfather Andrew Jackson Brodhead, about whom I know very little, has long eluded me. But, I just discovered his and his wife’s graves on the Find a Grave site, and with the permission of ‘Nashvillerambler’, I am publishing the images here. The graves are located in Mountain Grove Cemetery & Mausoleum, Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT.

I’ve put in a request to have Abram linked to his parents Garret Brodhead and Cornelia Dingman Brodhead. Just goes to show what a wonderful gift Find a Grave can be when searching for one’s ancestors!

Abram and Cornelia married in 1863 when she was about 21 and he was 39. A daughter Jennie Seymour Brodhead was born later that year. Cornelia died the following year, and I believe Abram remained a bachelor for the rest of his days. Daughter Jennie married into the Linderman family, making her a direct descendant of Richard Brodhead (b. 1771) and Hannah Drake (b. 1769) along two Brodhead family lines.

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Abram C Brodhead grave in Mountain Grove Cemetery and Mausoleum in Bridgeport, CT (PHOTO PERMISSION: Find a Grave’s ‘Nashvillerambler’)

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Cornelia M. (Ely) Brodhead grave in Mountain Grove Cemetery and Mausoleum in Bridgeport, CT (PHOTO PERMISSION: Find a Grave’s ‘Nashvillerambler’)

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Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832)

Parents: Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832)

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851)

Parents: Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851)

Albert Gallatin Brodhead portrait

Brother: Albert Gallatin Brodhead portrait from 1905’s Historic Homes and Institutions and Genealogical and Personal Memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, PA (p. 260)

Andrew Jackson Brodhead

Brother: Andrew Jackson Brodhead, my 2nd great-grandfather

 

Categories: Brodhead, Linderman, Mountain Grove Cemetery & Mausoleum Bridgeport CT | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Some feline chips off the old block…

If you’re a fan of vintage cartoons, check out the amusing seven-minute-long Chips Off the Old Block from 1942. Could not resist posting it here given the name of this blog.

Some 1967 chips off the old block

1967 – some new chips off the old block appeared at our house

It reminded me of lots of the kittens who appeared at our old farmhouse 40-50 years ago. I dug out this old slide of two little 1967 chips. We never discovered who their ‘dad’ was.

Somewhere we have a handwritten ‘cat family tree tree’ that my mom started but abandoned after documenting the first few generations of barnyard cats, realizing that it was a losing battle. If I find her chart again, I’ll add it to this post. It’s very amusing. Our all-time favorite cat from that era was a Tabby cat named ‘Jeff’ who disappeared one fall and was gone for six months. We assumed he’d been eaten by something, but he eventually returned—one leg almost completely severed. The vet amputated it, and miraculously Jeff survived to a pretty ripe old age.

Categories: Miscellaneous, Pets | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

Family recipe Friday — Four sweet bread recipes from Violet Boles

My grandfather's cousin Violet Boles with a furry friend, 1957.

My grandfather’s cousin Violet Boles with a furry friend, 1957.

To close out the week, I will leave you with four recipes left us by Violet Boles, my mom’s 1st cousin (once removed). Violet was born in Knocknagrally, County Laois, Ireland, in 1904. According to my mother she worked in the hotel industry on the Isle of Wight for a number of years. She emigrated to the US after her marriage to James Newton Boles (b. 1898, Tipperary, Ireland) in the early 1960s. Ordinarily I would not write about folks in the family tree who lived so close to the present day, but Newton (who went by his middle name) and Violet had no children; so, I hope they would not mind me sharing a bit about them here.

My mom’s father William Boles was very close to Newton, his cousin six years his junior. William, who emigrated to the US in 1912, was at least some of Newton’s inspiration to do the same, according to my mother. Newton emigrated in 1925 to Ontario, Canada, and from there made his way to Detroit, where he worked for Uniroyal for many years.

Newton and Violet  eventually retired to 800 20th Avenue North in St. Petersburg, FL, tending their backyard fruit trees and enjoying the warm temperatures and steady sunshine. I remember them showing us their avocado and orange trees—an exotic sight for us. They were wonderfully kind and caring people; both had a twinkle in their eye, and Newton especially had a terrific sense of humor. He was a very fun-loving man. My mother thought the world of him.

Boles_Newt_and_Violet_StPete_house

Newton & Violet Boles in front of their St. Petersburg home

I’ll never forget visiting them in February 1975 or 1976 when Newton was already in his 70s, and how Newton took us up I-4 to ride on Disney’s newly opened ‘Space Mountain’ roller coaster. We were amazed that he took the roller coaster with us and that he seemed to take it all in stride. Newton was a rather wild driver, so between the journey itself and the nerve-shattering, vertebrae-jarring ‘Space Mountain’ ride, we had a very memorable time!

Violet’s banana bread recipe is the best one I’ve ever come across. I’ve made it many times (I love the typo: ‘chapped walnuts’!) The date loaf is delicious, too (that recipe is cut off at the end, but you just add the remaining ingredients, mix, and bake at 350 for 50-60 min., depending on your altitude).

I’ve yet to try the carrot and cranberry breads, but know I will get to them eventually.

So enjoy these, if you are so inclined, and let me know how things turn out. Have a good weekend!

(Note: Newton died in 1983 at 84, and Violet in 1993 at 89. They were interred at St. Petersburg’s Memorial Park Cemetery.)

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Boles_Violet_breads2

Categories: Boles, Co. Laois, Co. Tipperary, Food: Family Recipes & Favorites, St. Petersburg | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

1805/1806: Luke Brodhead and “The Battle of the Butcher Boys and Delaware River Raftmen”

"The City and Port of Philadelphia, on the River Delaware from Kensington". Frontispiece to The City of Philadelphia..., plate 2. Engraving, hand-colored. Wikimedia Commons: In public domain in US due to publication prior to January 1, 1923. (Image shown has been cropped)

“The City and Port of Philadelphia, on the River Delaware from Kensington”. Frontispiece to The City of Philadelphia…, plate 2. Engraving, hand-colored. Wikimedia Commons: In public domain in US due to publication prior to January 1, 1923. (Image shown has been cropped at the top)

Now here’s an interesting tale dating back to 1805/1806 about a memorable ‘David vs. Goliath’ brawl featuring one Luke Brodhead. I found it in The Evening Gazette (Port Jervis, NY), dated Tuesday, May 28, 1878. The paper is one of thousands archived on the free Fulton History website.

Having checked some Brodhead family genealogies, I believe this Luke was probably the son of Luke Brodhead of Revolutionary War fame (my fifth great-grandfather Garret Brodhead‘s younger brother).  I could be wrong, of course, but there have never been that many Luke Brodheads in the family tree, and age-wise Luke Jr. (1777-1845) is a good fit. He would have been about 28 or 29 at the time of this incident, and still a bachelor. Luke Sr., who was left quite disabled by the war, passed away in 1806 at age 65.

On a side note, you may remember one of last July’s posts: “The 1868 murder of Theodore Brodhead of Delaware Water Gap.” Luke Brodhead Jr. was Theodore’s father. Luke Jr. was married to Elizabeth Wills (1789-1873), and together they had nine children—one girl (b. 1812) and eight boys (born between 1814 and 1831), all very tall in stature. Remember how Elizabeth joked that she had “48 feet of sons”?

Luke Jr. and Elizabeth ran an inn* at the Delaware Water Gap beginning circa 1820 to accommodate the influx of tourists to the area. From the “Theodore” post, you know that some of Luke Jr’s sons carried on this tradition, most notably Luke Wills Brodhead, who is deserving of a separate post of his own.

But, back to the story. It’s quite a tale, and I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. It obviously stood the test of time to be featured in a newspaper article some seven decades later! As always, comments, corrections, suggestions are welcome. And of course if you have different thoughts as to which Luke this was, please let me know.

The Evening Gazette. 28 May 1878

The Evening Gazette. 28 May 1878

— — — — — — —

MEMORABLE ENCOUNTER.
BATTLE OF THE BUTCHER BOYS AND DELAWARE RIVER RAFTMEN.
A HAND TO HAND CONTEST IN PHILADELPHIA OVER 70 YEARS AGO—HOW 10 RAFTMEN WHIPPED 30 BUTCHERS—DEATH OF THE LAST RAFTMAN ENGAGED IN THE FIGHT.

In the year of 1805 or 1806 a fierce fight took place in Philadelphia between about 30 butchers and 10 Delaware river raftmen. Some of the latter we have the names of. There was Major Ebeneezer Wheeler, his brother Joseph, Squire Holmes, John Weiss, Rock Run and William Tyler [**], Royal Warner, Luke Brodhead, and Captain C. Fennington of Delhi, N.Y.

Joseph Wheeler owned a very fleet black mare. The spring before the fight truth his horse had a race with one owned by the association of butchers. He won the race, but the butchers refused to give up the stakes, and it was finally agreed to have a second trial the following spring.

When the spring came around the race took place, and again there was a controversy as to which was the winning horse. This dispute led to the memorable conflict. Joseph Wheeler was challenged by the butchers to a single combat. This be declined to accept for the reason, as he said to his brother, that there was no prospect of fair play being shown him, the butchers outnumbering the raftmen three to one.

Ebeneezer Wheeler then stepped forward and accepted the challenge offered to his brother. He is represented to have been a man of wonderful strength and at the same time as fleet as a deer. He was just six feet two. Luke Brodhead was the same height, and was a man of great courage.

It was proposed by the butchers that the fight should take place with a rope between the combatants. To this Major Wheeler would not concede, saying: “Gentlemen, if I fight I fight to win, and want nothing between us.” An adjoining field was selected for the contest. The butcher who was to be Mr. Wheeler’s antagonist put one hand on the fence and as if to show his agility sprang over into the lot with a bound. The Major followed and jumped the fence without touching it.

Luke Brodhead and Mr. Weiss happened at the place by accident, not knowing any of the parties. They were mere spectators and not called upon to form a part of the ring around the fighters. The fight between the two men began. Mr. Wheeler’s antagonist fell at the first blow. He arose and the second blow from Mr. W’s big fist again sent him to the earth.

At this juncture Mr. Brodhead saw a butcher strike Wheeler with a heavy whip. (It afterward appeared that all the butchers were armed with loaded whips.) Mr. Brodhead went to one of the butchers and told him of the occurrence. He was thrust aside and told it was none of his business. But he persisted and said he would not stand by and see such foul play practiced. He had scarcely done speaking when he received a heavy blow on the head with a whip. The blow nearly stunned him.

Delaware River. An extract of an 1806 map of New Jersey, depicting the area around Philadelphia and Trenton. Credit: Wikimedia Commons. Source: Source=http://maps.bpl.org/details_12444/?mti

Delaware River. An extract of an 1806 map of New Jersey, depicting the area around Philadelphia and Trenton. Credit: Wikimedia Commons. Source: Source=http://maps.bpl.org/details_12444/?mti

In the mean time the fight in the field had progressed, and Wheeler had given his antagonist such a blow that it nearly killed him. Of course he retired at once from the contest.

But the fight now became general. The butchers used their loaded whips freely and the numbers being greatly in their favor gave them courage. Unfortunately, however, for the butchers every time one of them received a square blow from the raftmen he was forced to leave the field. Their numbers soon became less, none of them caring to risk a second blow. The contest thus steadily grew in favor of the raftmen, none of them becoming disabled. They stood their ground to the last, the butchers dropping away one by one until the field was cleared and the victory won for the sturdy raftmen, the butchers finally running from the field.

The mistake the butchers made was in using their whips instead of their fists. They were large, strong men, yet they could not strike the whip with sufficient force to prostrate one of the sturdy raftmen. Nevertheless some very severe blows were given them. Messrs. Wheeler, Brodhead, and Fennington were cut badly and were confined to their boarding-houses several days under medical treatment.

It is said that Mr. Eb. Wheeler and Brodhead each disabled five butchers from as many blows. Captain Fennington of Delhi was a giant in strength and rendered very efficient aid to the raftmen. Mr. Weiss was badly scared and climbed a tree when the fight became general. He was not to be blamed, however, for he was a little fellow and would not have stood much of a chance. Royal Warner also showed the white feather. Joseph Wheeler got over the fence to see the fight when he received the blow of a loaded whip. He picked up a new beaver hat and left.

Luke Brodhead and the Wheelers became warm friends after this fight. The latter insisted on his accompanying them home after their recovery, which he did and remained with them several months. He frequently visited them. They afterward presented him with a tract of land on the Delaware river in Delaware county, which he declined to accept.

Brodhead was one of the most peaceable of men, and was esteemed for his good character and sound judgment, integrity and love of justice. The characters of Mr. Fennington and the Wheelers were also beyond reproach. Rock Run Tyler, the last of the survivors of this fight, ever memorable among raftmen, died in November, 1877, at a very old age.

That part of the family tree

How we are related

*Better in the Poconos by Lawrence Squeri (Penn State Press, 2010), p. 23.

**I think they mean “William ‘Rock Run’ Tyler” judging from the brief bio about him on p. 634 in the book History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886)

Categories: Brodhead, Delaware Water Gap, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Some descendants of the Nixon family of Fermanagh, Northern Ireland

Louise and Jennie Nixon, 1964

Photo from my family’s private collection: Sisters Louise (75) and Jennie Nixon (80) in 1964

These lovely elderly ladies are Louise E. Nixon and Jane ‘Jennie’ Bracken Nixon, nieces of my great-grandmother Sarah (Nixon) Boles of Co. Leitrim, Ireland, whose parents—William Nixon and Rachel Miller—and numerous siblings moved to the United States in the late 1860s. The ladies were my grandfather William Boles‘s cousins.

A previous post on Sarah Nixon Boles mentioned the fact that most, if not all, of her family relocated to New York after the US Civil War. This Nixon family is presumably part of the Nixon family of Fermanagh*—about which much has been written (e.g., The Families of French of Belturbet and Nixon of Fermanagh, and Their Descendants by Henry B. Swanzy, published in 1908).  However, I have yet to figure out the family’s location in the larger Nixon family tree.

William and Rachel Nixon were about 67 and 51, respectively when they arrived in America in 1869 (the year given me by the descendant of Benjamin, one of their sons). Joining them were supposedly all of their children (I’ve found 11, although my mother’s records list 14) except for my great-grandmother Sarah: Mark Nixon (b. cir. 1839/1845), Edward Nixon (b. cir 1845); Elizabeth ‘Lizzie’ Nixon (b. cir. 1849); Jane Nixon (b. 1851); Thomas Nixon (b. cir. 1852); Sarah Nixon (b. 1855); Rachel Nixon (b. cir 1865); Mary Nixon (b. cir 1858); Benjamin Nixon (b. cir 1862); Robert Nixon (b. 1863); Catherine Nixon (b. 1864); the last three (whom I have yet to find a trace of) were James, John, and William.

Passenger List - The Caledonia - sailed from Moville, Ireland to NY, NY on 14 Sep 1868 (Source Citation: Year: 1868; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: M237; Microfilm Roll: 301; Line: 22; List Number: 989.)

Passenger List – The Caledonia – sailed from Moville, Ireland to NY, NY on 14 September 1868 (Source Citation: Year: 1868; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: M237; Microfilm Roll: 301; Line: 22; List Number: 989.)

The passenger list inset for the ship Caledonia , which set sail from Moville on Lough Foyle at the northern tip of Northern Ireland to New York on 14 September 1868, shows the names of some Nixons–the names seem to fairly well coincide with some of the Nixon children’s names & ages. If these indeed are ‘our Nixons’, it would indicate that the older children may have come ahead of the parents and younger children.

While researching the family, I found William, Rachel and a number of the children in the 1870 US Federal Census, living in NYC Ward 18. William is listed as a ‘farmer’, an answer based certainly on his past occupation in Ireland. The children in the household were: Edward (30), Thomas (20), Eliza (22), Jane (18), Rachel (15), Mary (10), and ‘Bennett’ (10, this was probably ‘Benjamin’).

1870 Census Record ("United States Census, 1870," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M8X8-K4T : accessed 25 February 2015), Rachael Nixon, New York, United States; citing p. 34, family , NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,539.)

1870 Census Record (“United States Census, 1870,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M8X8-K4T : accessed 25 February 2015), Rachael Nixon, New York, United States; citing p. 34, family , NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,539.)

William Nixon died before the 1880 US Federal Census, as Rachel Nixon is listed in that census record as a widow ‘keeping house’ and living at 203 16th Street, NY, NY. and living with children Edward, Lizzie, Thomas, Rachel, Benjamin, Robert, Mary, and Kate, and several lodgers. The census record indicates that family members were involved in the dry goods business. Son Thomas (28 and now widowed) is listed as being a ‘dry goods buyer’ as is son Edward, age 35 and single. Benjamin (20) is listed as a ‘dry goods clerk’ as is Robert (18). (The 1900 Census indicates that Robert emigrated in 1879.)

Looking at old newspapers, I found the following mortuary notice in the New York Herald, dated 11 Aug 1871: At his [Gramercy] residence, 346 East 17th Street, on Thursday, August 10, William Nixon, aged 69 years. Funeral will take place on Saturday, August 12, at one o’clock PM from Seventeenth Street Methodist Episcopal Church, between First and Second avenues. Relatives and friends are invited to attend.

Wikimedia Commons: Manhattan neighborhoods (map); Author= Stilfehler; Oct. 15th, 2007

Wikimedia Commons: Manhattan neighborhoods (map); Author= Stilfehler; Oct. 15th, 2007

Almost two decades later, I found a notice for a Rachel Nixon (New York Herald, 12 May 1890): On Saturday, May 10, 1890, Rachel Nixon, age 72 years. The relatives and friends of the family are invited to attend the funeral services at her late [East Village] residence, No. 224 East 12th Street, on Monday evening, May 12, 1890 at eight o’clock. Interment in Green-wood.

A William Nixon (bur. August 1871, Find a Grave memorial #127997780) and a Rachel Nixon (bur. 5-13-1890; Find a Grave memorial #106845856) are buried in Green-wood Cemetery Lot 17245 Section 17, Grave 114. The grave is unmarked according to the Find a Grave photographer who kindly attempted to find the graves for me. I’m not yet certain that I have the correct Rachel and William, but hope to pin all this down at some point. Meanwhile I toss this info out there to my readers and future readers who may already have turned over these stones and arrived at some conclusions.

Son Edward Nixon and wife Anna (Bracken) Nixon, who emigrated from No. Ireland in 1883, had four children: Jane ‘Jennie’ (b. 1884), William (b. 1885), George (b. 1887), and Louise (b. 1889). The first two children were born in Manhattan. The second two were born in Bridgeport, CT. Edward died sometime between 1889 and 1900, as Anna is a widow as of the 1900 census. There is an Edward Nixon in the same plot at Green-wood Cemetery (Burial 1899-03-29, Lot 17245 Section 17, Grave 114; (Find a Grave #106846467), perhaps giving a bit more weight to the possibility that the Green-wood plot is indeed where our Nixon ancestors were laid to rest.

By the 1900 Census, Anna (Bracken) Nixon and her children (ages 16, 15, 13, 11), sister Mary J. Bracken, and a lodger are living at 160 Virginia Avenue in Jersey City Ward No. 8, Hudson Co., NJ, and it was there that the family remained for many years. Neither Jennie nor Louise ever married. Jennie devoted her life to working as a teacher in the Jersey City public school system, and Louise worked for many years as a stenographer and then executive secretary for the president or vice president of a company in NYC. Eventually the sisters joined forces with their brother William and his wife Marion to buy a large house at 680 Orchard Street in Oradell, NJ, where they spent happy years before moving into the Francis Asbury Manor Methodist rest home in Ocean Grove, NJ. Jane died in May of 1972, and Louise in October 1979.

Jennie Boles with Louise and Jennie Nixon, spring 1964

Photo form my family’s private collection: Jennie Boles (75) of Ireland with her American cousins Louise (75) and Jennie Nixon (80), early spring 1964, New Jersey

Serendipitously it was during their years in Jersey City that Jennie and Louise befriended my grandmother Zillah Trewin who lived there with her parents William Trewin and Elizabeth (Sargent) Trewin. According to my mother, Zillah was great friends with the Nixon sisters, as well as their cousins (the children of Jane Nixon and Wm Elliott Roberts), and it was through that friendship that she ultimately met and married their cousin (my grandfather) William Boles who emigrated to the US in 1912 at the encouragement of his uncle Robert Nixon who sponsored him.

I remember Jennie and Louise well. They were very fun ladies—full of good humor and always had a twinkle in their eyes. I always enjoyed the times spent with them, and best remember our visits to their Ocean Grove apartment. As I recall, we would drive down to see them on Saturdays since the roads in Ocean Grove are closed to all traffic on Sundays. We always took them out to lunch, and I remember taking them down to some restaurant near the ocean in Spring Lake, a short drive to the south. They were two sweethearts and it was very sad to lose them. I would love to have them here now to have some family history chats with them. When I was a teenager that topic was far from my mind.

I’ll close this post with a couple of Louise’s recipes (‘Chocolate Flake Candy’ and ‘Date Balls’) I recently came upon while re-binding my mom’s old recipe notebook. I haven’t tried either of them yet as I am trying to shift a bit of weight. Such temptations would surely sabotage my results! But they will stay on my radar!

If you’ve made it this far in the post, I wish you a great day. If you have anything to add, share, correct, etc., please don’t hesitate to get in touch or leave a comment!

Nixon_Louise_recipe

Recipes typed up by Louise Nixon for my mother

Jennie and Louise’s Nixon Tree Branch
1-William Nixon b. Cir 1802, Ireland, d. Bef 2 Jun 1880; possibly 10 Aug
1871 +Rachael Millar b. Cir 1818, Ireland, d. Possibly 10 May 1890, Manhattan, New
York, New York
|—–2-Edward Nixon b. Cir 1845, Ireland, d. Betw 1889 and 1900
| +Anna Bracken b. Aug 1847, Northern Ireland, d. After 1930
| |—–3-Jane Bracken Nixon b. 15 Apr 1884, Manhattan, New York, New York,
| | d. May 1972, Ocean Grove, Monmouth, NJ
| |—–3-William Thomas Nixon b. 24 Aug 1885, Manhattan, New York, New
| | York, d. Sep 1967, Suffolk, New York
| | +Marion Zoller
| |—–3-George Robert Bracken Nixon b. 12 Feb 1887, Bridgeport,
| | Connecticut
| | +May L. Swenarton b. Cir 1889, New Jersey
| | |—–4-George W. Nixon b. Cir 1914, New Jersey
| | |—–4-Frank L. Nixon b. Cir 1919
| |—–3-Louise E. Nixon b. 22 Jul 1889, Bridgeport, Connecticut, d. Oct
| | 1979, Ocean Grove, Monmouth, NJ

Categories: Boles, Co. Fermanagh, Drumkeeran, Co. Leitrim, Food: Family Recipes & Favorites, Green-Wood Cemetery Brooklyn NY, Ireland, Jersey City, Hudson Co., Manhattan, Methodist Episcopal, New York, Nixon, Trewin, US Federal 1880 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

1917 Valentine’s Day children’s party ideas, including recipes

A little glimpse of Valentine’s Day ideas from almost 100 years ago, including recipes for Frozen Cupid’s Pudding, Valentine Marguerites, heart candies, and more… The article below appeared in a popular syndicated column called “What Every Woman Wants to Know,” edited by Anne Rittenhouse. Anne’s column no doubt had its share of avid followers, some of whom may have been members of our own families who were alive and interested in such things at that time. So I usually read articles like this with my grandmothers and their mothers in mind. Some of you probably can’t help but do the same! FOR BETTER READING, CLICK EACH IMAGE OF THE ARTICLE TWICE TO ENLARGE

VALENTINE card - Girl with SlateFrozen Cupid’s Pudding – Cover 1/2 pound of seeded raisins and 1 cup of finely chopped blanched almonds with 1 pint of orange juice and let stand overnight. Cut some stale sponge cake into 1/2-inch slices, then put the slices into heart shapes. Place a layer of hearts in a mold then a layer of raisins and almonds then another layer of the heart cakes ans so on until the mold is nearly full. Pour over this one pint of hot custard. When cool, cover the mold and bind the seam with a strip of muslin dipped in melted suet, and bury in ice and salt. Let stand four hours. Cut little red hearts from candied cherries and sprinkle a few on top when serving.

(Courtesy of The Syracuse Herald, Sunday, February 5, 1917, p. 12; Credit: http://www.fultonhistory.com)
The Syracuse Herald, Sunday, February 5, 1917, p. 12 (www.fultonhistory.com)The Syracuse Herald, Sunday, February 5, 1917, p. 12 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The Syracuse Herald, Sunday, February 5, 1917, p. 12 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The Syracuse Herald, Sunday, February 5, 1917, p. 12 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Categories: Food: Family Recipes & Favorites, Holidays & Festivities, Miscellaneous, Valentine's Day | Tags: , , , , | 3 Comments

More “Prized Pets”

Rosie, our adopted stray, trying to get a bit of shut-eye

Rosie, our adopted stray, trying to get a bit of shut-eye

Poor Rosie—I sympathize with her. I can’t sleep unless the room I am in is pitch black and so quiet you can’t hear a pin drop. Here she is waiting for us to turn the lights out one recent January night.

This photo really makes me smile, especially when I remember how Rosie once looked so sad, skinny, and desperate wandering the grounds of our community in search of the occasional hand-out. And now she’s comfy, pleasantly plump, and evidently very content (apart from that darn light that needs to go out NOW!).

She reminded me that I had some more ‘pet photos’ from ages past to add to the Gallery I started long ago. To view the updated (5 new photos added) ‘Prized Pets’ Gallery, please click here. OK, Rosie—Relax! Lights going out now!

Categories: Miscellaneous, Pets | Tags: , , , | 8 Comments

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