1904: Madame Melba prompts Madame De Ryther to write about puddings


Australian opera singer Nellie Melba (1861-1931), 1896 (Credit: United States Library of Congress’s Prints and Photographs division under the digital ID cph.3b11681–Public domain in US)

Well, it’s the Monday after Thanksgiving, and food is now the farthest thing from my mind. I’ve cooked and baked enough in the last week to happily sail through the next few months without doing either, but I promised you a series of “Madame De Ryther Mondays” until Christmas… So here is a 1904 article in which she discusses how to make puddings: rice pudding, tapioca pudding, chocolate pudding, and one other whose name is concealed by the Fulton History site’s logo label. Since I honestly can’t bear the thought right now of unwrapping another stick of butter or spooning heaping tablespoonfuls of sugar into anything, I am currently psychologically unable to try any of these recipes out myself. But don’t let that stop you if you have managed to remain “on your kitchen feet,” both mentally & physically, in the aftermath of Thanksgiving ;-).

In her article, professional-singer-turned-food-writer Madame De Ryther opens with a comment made by Madame Melba (1861-1931), an Australia-born, world-renowned opera star, with whom Madame De Ryther was obviously acquainted, their singing careers, perhaps, having brought them together at some point.

Who was Madame Melba?  Per Wikipedia: Dame Nellie Melba GBE (19 May 1861 – 23 February 1931), born Helen Porter Mitchell, was an Australian operatic soprano. She became one of the most famous singers of the late Victorian era and the early 20th century. She was the first Australian to achieve international recognition as a classical musician. She took the pseudonym “Melba” from Melbourne, her home town. And, yes, “Peach Melba,” “Melba toast,” “Melba garniture,” and “Melba sauce” were all created in her honor by a French chef named Auguste Escoffier. I must admit that I often heard mention of Melba toast and peach Melba while growing up, but it was not until writing this post that I’d heard of Madame Melba (I’m embarrassed to say) and was able to put 2 and 2 together (much like discovering Italian opera singer Luisa Tetrazzini last year, and making the link with Chicken/Turkey Tetrazzini). (Note: Viewers of season 4 (2013) of Downton Abbey would have seen Madame Melba (played by Dame Kiri Te Kanawa, New Zealand’s famed soprano) perform for Lord and Lady Grantham; I was not a Downton viewer at that time.)


Australian children’s classic: The Magic Pudding (1918) by Norm Lindsay; Yes, Madame Melba was from a country that most certainly knows a thing or two about pudding! (Credit: Wikipedia – Image in Public Domain in US)

Getting back now to the article, Madame De Ryther reports that Madame Melba had once lamented to her the lack of good puddings in America, and having traveled the world and sampled desserts along the way, she indeed must have known a thing or two about the topic. In 1904, when this article appeared, everyone in America would have heard of Madame Melba, so using Melba’s opinion about America’s lack of good puddings was certainly a clever way for Madame De Ryther to hook her readers.

However, the food writer is not all that excited about replicating European puddings, more specifically English puddings, which she considers to be too heavy by American standards (and if you’re familiar with British cuisine, you know what she means—puddings here in the US are very different; Jello-type pudding comes to mind or rice pudding or tapioca, not hearty, classic fare like sticky toffee pudding, bread & butter pudding, spotted dick, and the like—puddings that I personally like, albeit usually in small doses).

The recipes Madame De Ryther includes here are for much lighter and “daintier” versions that she feels would suit the American palate better than English-style puddings which were designed to “to drive the heavy fog from [English] stomachs,” according to one French chef.

Of course, at this point neither a heavy pudding nor a light one could drive away the heavy Thanksgiving fog in my stomach! But that is neither here nor there. I’m sure Madame De Ryther’s recipes helped her readers “whip up” some divine puddings.  I’ll just wait ’til I’m fully “recovered” to give them a try! ;-)

PS: With Christmas fast approaching, for a fun and superbly informative post on English Christmas puddings that has lots of great images, click here. And for a few Madame Melba YouTube videos, scroll down below the article. Have a great day, all!

New York Press, 1904 (exact date unknown) - Credit: FultonHistory dot com

New York Press, 1904 (exact date unknown) – Credit: FultonHistory dot com

Categories: Christmas, Food: Family Recipes & Favorites, Luisa Tetrazzini, Madame Jule de Ryther, Thanksgiving | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Angus Family History – ‘Boots on ground’ NJ research opportunity

James Angus business card, side 2

James Angus business card, side 2 (from my family’s personal archives)

This blog is all about my desire to be collaborative and share family history information, and this post focuses on some collaborating we could do, but unfortunately, I can’t take the lead on this one at this time since I am my mom’s full-time caregiver. Embarking on distant travels is hard for me right now. My big July Oregon escape was just that: BIG. But, it was also RARE! :-) But, let’s get back to that ‘boots on ground’ research opportunity with regards to the Angus family:

If you visit the New Jersey Historical Society website and look up the ‘Angus Family’, you will discover that the Society has the following holdings in its archives:

No. 615.  ANGUS FAMILY  Papers, 1838-1969. 75 items. Correspondence, business records, genealogical material.  Business records relate to Angus family companies in New Jersey  and Mexico, I839-71.  Of particular interest are the business records, 1849-71, of the Elizabethtown Steam Manufacturing Company, James W. Angus, Superintendent. Gift of Exchange and Gift Division, Library of Congress, 1964.

Seventy-five items! There’s bound to be something ‘new’ there. Perhaps, someone reading this has visited the Society and has gotten to see these items (or at least some of them) first-hand. If so, please consider sharing your findings and impressions via the ‘Comments’ section below. Or perhaps this post will inspire someone who lives in or near Newark to visit the Society to find out exactly what’s there (I believe you may need to call ahead). You can request copies, but not of the entire collection due to staff shortages. Since I don’t know what is there, I don’t know what to request. The contact details, if you are interested: 52 Park Place, Newark, NJ. Tel: 973.596.8500.

James Angus business card, side 1 (from my family's personal archives)

James Angus business card, side 1 (from my family’s personal archives)

Some past posts on this family:
James Winans Angus (1810-1862): The Early Years
Isaac G. de. G. Angus (1840-1885)
Job Winans Angus & Lincoln’s Lost Ballroom
For additional posts, use the Search box in the left column.

On a positive note, my request for Angus records elsewhere was met with success, so I will be sharing information gleaned from them once I have had time to review them. They have yet to wend their way to my mailbox.

Happy Thanksgiving, All!

Categories: Angus, Hillside Union, New Jersey | Tags: | 2 Comments

1904: “Two Good Cakes” from Mme. De Ryther, “the best gentlewoman cook in America”

Fourth Estate: A Weekly Newspaper for Publishers, Advertisers, Advertising Agents and Allied Interests, Fourth Estate Publishing Company, 23 January 1904, p. 16.

Fourth Estate: A Weekly Newspaper for Publishers, Advertisers, Advertising Agents and Allied Interests, Fourth Estate Publishing Company, 23 January 1904, p. 16.

Two Good Cakes

New York Press, 1 January 1904 (Credit: Chronicling America dot loc dot gov)

New York Press, 1 January 1904 (Credit: Chronicling America dot loc dot gov)

To continue with “Madame De Ryther Mondays” in the run up to Christmas, I would be remiss if I did not first mention (on Thanksgiving Eve) that a post I created last year contained Madame’s recommendations for a festive Thanksgiving dinner (click here).

Now back to this post. Here is a clipping from 1904 that offers recipes for two cakes.

The first, which is for a molasses/gingerbread cake, includes ground mace, a spice that seems to be absent these days from most grocery stores. I am not sure why that is, but, in any case, you may have to go to a specialty store or order it online. Amazon carries it in both the ground and blade form. Mace is the outer covering of the nutmeg seed and blade form seems to be more highly praised for its flavor than ground. But for this recipe, it seems logical to go with the ground version.

The second recipe, for “Surprise Cake,” contains nothing that most kitchens would not have on hand. So I decided to try this one. It’s short and sweet, and to the point. After doing a bit of investigation, I learned that “sweet milk” simply means whole milk as opposed to buttermilk. I only had skim on hand, so that is what I used. The addition of all that baking powder resulted in a very robust-looking batter. The recipe calls for a little grated nutmeg; I only had ground on hand so I added 1/8 tsp.

After getting the batter in a cake pan, I put it in a 350-degree oven for 25 minutes but checked it with a toothpick (not a “broom splint,” as Madame directs) and decided it needed an extra five minutes. That seemed to do the trick (bear in mind, we are at a very low elevation, so more time may be required for those not in low-lying locations).

For the icing, I cheated horribly and used a tub of Betty Crocker’s vanilla icing (Madame De Ryther no doubt did an eye roll) and then sprinkled chopped walnuts on top (see image below).

I served slices of the cake for dessert with a bit of pistachio frozen yogurt. My “guinea pigs” gave it “two thumbs up.” The cake was very moist and light. The nutmeg was not too overpowering, but I do think I’d use a little less next time or try vanilla or lemon flavoring, alternatives the recipe suggests. But, overall, Madame De Ryther delivers what she promised: a cake that is “cheap, easy to prepare, and much better than the store-bought article.” Well, I can’t honestly say it is better than store-bought given how many superb bakeries exist today, but—straight from your oven—it will certainly be fresher.

At the start of her article, Madame De Ryther described cake-making as becoming a lost art among city women—thanks to the rise in popularity of store-bought cakes. I don’t think my grandmother on my father’s side would have been swept up in that trend. She would have been 22 at the time this column appeared, and she was quite the baker. My Dad used to wax lyrical about her culinary specialties. She probably would have devoured anything and everything Madame De Ryther wrote. My Mom’s mom, on the other hand, would definitely have been one to head to the bakery! She just did not enjoy cooking or baking, although she had the know-how. Let’s face it, some love to bake and some don’t. As the saying goes, “To each their own,” and Vive la différence!

Well, if anyone out there tries either of these recipes, feel free to share your results below!


Madame De Ryther’s “Surprise Cake”

Categories: Food: Family Recipes & Favorites, Madame Jule de Ryther, United States | Tags: , , , , , | 4 Comments

A Florida Friday: Mystery bird?

99 copyMystery bird? Well, perhaps, not to many of this blog’s readers, but when I came across this fellow a few days ago standing in the road with seemingly no intention of budging and sporting such attractive red ‘boots,’ I had to do a double-take. We are very accustomed to seeing Muscovy ducks here in SW Florida, but I had never seen one of these. Who was this strange visitor? Well, after Google-ing “Duck with red legs,” up popped a match: images of the Egyptian Goose, a native of Egypt and Syria. Actually, it’s neither a goose nor a duck, but something called a shelduck—a cross between the two.

Upon doing a bit of research, I learned that the Egyptian geese were considered sacred by the ancient Egyptians. The ones found in Florida are largely escapees from some of the animal parks in SE Florida where they are, I’ve read, a very common site. And, while not commonly seen here in SW Florida, apparently they are not a huge rarity either. But I doubt too many folks around here have ever spotted one. When I took the below photos, I was in my car, which as I later learned was a good thing because, according to birdinginformation.com, the Egyptian goose is (especially in breeding season) “quarrelsome and aggressive, very intolerant of other birds, including their own kind,” and “can even be vicious.” So, welcome to the neighborhood, exotic little visitor! I shall keep my distance! ;-)
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Categories: Florida, Nature | 4 Comments

1906: Food writer Madame De Ryther journeys to Jamaica & comments on ship cuisine

The Atrato, owned by the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company (Image from Wikimedia Commons)

The Atrato, owned by the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company (Image from Wikimedia Commons)

In early spring 1906, 60-year-old American food writer Madame Jule de Ryther sailed from New York to Jamaica on the Atrato, a luxurious 6,000-ton steamer belonging to the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company. At that moment in history, according to De Ryther, Jamaica had become “the most popular resort in the world” and was “the mecca of most of the fashionable tourists of America.” The British steamship company tapped into that burgeoning demand, sending an increasing number of its ships to the West Indies on tours ranging from 12-53 days at a price of $90-$240. Madame De Ryther was extremely impressed by the Atrato‘s steady offerings of culinary delights: “There seems to be no limit in the provision of food products on board these steamers. Table luxuries and delicacies from all parts of the globe are set out at every meal.” Below is part of an article she wrote for the New York Press that describes some of her observations from that journey. The excerpt was published on May 14, 1906, in the Rome Daily Sentinel, a month after she arrived back in New York on the ship La Plata (on April 13, 1906, per Ellis Island records).

View from Fern Tree Walk Jamaica, ca. 1870, by Martin Johnson Heade

View from Fern Tree Walk Jamaica, ca. 1870, by Martin Johnson Heade (Image from Wikimedia Commons)


New York Press, 13 January 1908 (Credit: fultonhistory dot com)

Cruise_14May1906_NY PRess_1 Cruise_14May1906_RomeDailySentinel_2 Cruise_14May1906_RomeDailySentinel_3 Cruise_14May1906_RomeDailySentinel_4


Rome Daily Sentinel, 14 May 1906 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

Categories: Food: Family Recipes & Favorites, Jamaica, Madame Jule de Ryther | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

1878: A Fashionable Woman’s Prayer: “Save me from my wrinkles…”

Copy of a Godey’s print, purchased by my mother from McCall’s magazine in 1970. The prints were offered by McCall’s to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Godey prints.


From the December 7, 1878, issue of The Independent Hour, Woodbridge, Middlesex County, New Jersey, a weekly newspaper:

“A Fashionable Woman’s Prayer”


Categories: 1870s, Fashion & Beauty | 2 Comments

1904: “Some Dainty Luncheon Dishes” by Madame Jule De Ryther

New York Press, 31 Jul 1904 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

New York Press, 31 Jul 1904 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

As promised last Monday, here is one of Madame De Ryther’s numerous food columns; this one from 1904 features “Dainty Luncheon Dishes.” She offers recipes for items with which most of us are probably familiar: chicken croquettes, turkey hash, minced ham with poached eggs, and a club sandwich which she insists must be served hot. Of those, I lean towards the croquettes (anyone remember Howard Johnson’s shrimp croquettes from the 70s?—loved them), but, as I am trying to watch my waistline, Madame momentarily lost me at “heaping tablespoon of butter” and “gill of cream.”

But once I learned that a gill of cream is only four fluid ounces, I felt I could give Madame’s recipe a try. With no chicken on hand, I opted for ground turkey. (The recipe calls for 1 pint which is about 1 lb.) And I used canola oil in a deep-fryer set to 350 degrees F. instead of “a kettle half full of fat over the fire.” I served them with some cranberry jelly, mashed potato & vegetable, and I must say, they turned out pretty well—everyone at the table thought they were tasty in spite of their truly unphotogenic appearance; and it was only after dinner that I showed them where I got the recipe.

Image from The Fun of Cooking (1915)

Image from The Fun of Cooking (1915) by Caroline F. Benton

I would definitely make these croquettes again (I’d never tried making them before this), but next time I would make my two heaping tablespoonfuls of flour more heaping than I did this time around. And, while I did let the mixture cool down, next time I would refrigerate it for a bit after it cooled down to make it easier to handle.  I might also spice it up a bit with a dash of chili flakes, or use a bit more red pepper.

So there you have it. All in all—a winner for dinner, but definitely too time-consuming for today’s world of ‘grab-and-go’ lunches.

Have a good Monday!

P.S. I would say that the recipe feeds 4-6 depending on how hungry everyone is.

Categories: Food: Family Recipes & Favorites, Madame Jule de Ryther | Tags: , | Leave a comment

John Oliver Wait (1787-1876) of Perth Amboy

The Independent Hour, Woodbridge, NJ, Thursday, Dec 7, 1876

I stumbled on an obituary recently for my fourth great-grandfather, John O. Wait of Perth Amboy, NJ. It was in the 7 December 1876 issue of The Independent Hour (Woodbridge, Middlesex Co., NJ).

A carpenter, and later a baker, by trade, John lived to the very ripe old age of 89, outliving his wife Elizabeth Crow by 22 years, and his daughter (my 3rd-great-grandmother Margaret Wait) by nearly 25 years. At the time of his death, he was one of the oldest, if not the oldest, citizens in the town.

The obit is short and sweet but provides me with some new details:

  • He was “an undertaker for a number of years”, which makes perfect sense—I’m sure he was called on to make plenty of coffins anyway.
  • He died “at the residence of his son, James T. Wait” (b. 1824).
  • He was “an amiable and straightforward man, and filled many offices of trust and importance in the city.” While I’d known he was someone who’d had his fingers in many pies (sometimes, perhaps, quite literally!), it was pleasant to read those characteristics nonetheless. For a past post on John, click here.
  • “The funeral services were held in the Baptist Church, after which the remains were taken to the cemetery for internment.” This surprised me, since I’d have thought that any funeral would have taken place at the Presbyterian Church where his father had been a founding member.

baptist_church I can think of a few others in my/our family tree who made it to such a ripe old age, or even farther: Isaac Jaques (1791-1880); Captain Richard Brodhead (1666-1758); Andrew Jackson Brodhead (1822-1913); Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862); and there may be others. But as the blog I’ve linked to below points out, the average age back then, which was in the forties, was just that—an average. Many attained old age, and they did it without all the healthcare advantages we have today.

Well, that’s the morsel I am sharing today. Have a good weekend.

Other blog posts on the Wait family: See: Post 1, Post 2, Post 3, Post 4, Post 5 and Post 6
Passion for the Past – Blog: Post on 19th century Mourning Practices; Post on The Average Life Expectancy Myth

Categories: Perth Amboy, Wait | Tags: | 4 Comments

Madame Jule De Ryther—Early-20th-century American food writer

ArmourIt’s already November, and simply thinking about Thanksgiving and Christmas is enough to expand my waistline by several inches. Where did the year go? Blink your eyes and Christmas will be here. Yes, Christmas is coming; the goose is getting fat…

This past year, while perusing old newspapers, I frequently stumbled upon early-twentieth-century food columns written by the exotic- and mysterious-sounding Madame Jule De Ryther (1845-1915). Apart from conveying her opinions on all things culinary, she touched on attitudes and social mores of the day, often with blunt humor, and even covered such topics as bacteriology and the importance of clean dishes and properly washed milk bottles1.

The Concert Singer by Thomas Eakins, 1892. Depicted artist: Weda Cook (Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Expired copyright)

The Concert Singer by Thomas Eakins, 1892. Depicted artist: Weda Cook (Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Expired copyright)

Over time, I quickly grew to admire Madame De Ryther, a ‘Martha Stewart’ of her time, and on further research, I found even more reason to place her on a mental pedestal: before her food career began, she had been a highly regarded soprano, performing in prestigious concerts around the United States. I assume that’s where the “Madame” came from, and while her first name may have been Jule, I suspect “De Ryther” was a stage name. I never found evidence of a marriage.

In her younger years and into middle age, Madame De Ryther was enjoying a busy musical career. She sang regularly at the Church of Divine Paternity and the Anthon Memorial Church (today known as All Souls Episcopal Church) in NYC.

Henryk Wieniawski, before 1870 (Wikimedia Commons)

Henryk Wieniawski, before 1870 (Wikimedia Commons)

She had been the celebrated soprano of the Wieniawski Troupe during its 1873 concerts in California. At that time, Henryk Wieniawski, a Polish violinist and composer, was recognized as being one of the world’s greatest violinists, having been the solo violinist of the Emperor of Russia2.

On August 23, 1874, she sang the Star Spangled Banner at a concert benefiting the Women’s Training School in Long Island, a school supported by Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant. President Grant was in attendance for the event3.

From The Letters of Sidney Lanier (Cambridge University Press, 1899)

From The Letters of Sidney Lanier (Cambridge University Press, 1899)

The 1899 book Letters of Sidney Lanier, which contains correspondence of the famous 19th-century American musician, poet, and author (d. 1881), includes a January 9, 1875, letter describing an upcoming concert in which Mme. De Ryther was to appear: “Our second concert comes off to night and we are to play such beautiful music as makes my heart tremble even to think of. First comes Beethoven’s Second Symphony, one written before the dreadful deafness had come upon his ears and pierced into his heart. […] Then Mme De Ryther, a lady in form and manner and stage appearance much like our dear departed G_______, is to sing with a glorious contralto voice a noble aria, Handel’s little known opera “Rinaldo.”

New York Dramatic Mirror (Credit: FultonHistory dot com)

New York Dramatic Mirror (Credit: FultonHistory dot com)

During its 1879-1880 run at the Fifth Avenue Theater in New York, Gilbert & Sullivan’s comic opera “Trial by Jury” included the talents of Mme De Ryther who took over the role of Little Buttercup, “a manifest improvement” over the previous performer, according to the New York Dramatic Mirror.

Scene in the Arctic by William Bradford, cir. 1880, De Young Museum, San Francisco (Wikimedia Commons-Public domain in US)

Scene in the Arctic by William Bradford, cir. 1880, De Young Museum, San Francisco (Wikimedia Commons-Public domain in US)

And, in 1886 she performed in a traveling lecture series presented by prominent painter, photographer, and explorer William Bradford (1823-1892) whose seven voyages to the Arctic in the 1860s, accompanied by other prominent photographers, resulted in dozens of images—“the only complete collection of views in existence of the Arctic Regions”4. These images, which provided the basis for many of Bradford’s subsequent paintings, were projected on a large screen. As the images unfolded during the lectures, Jule would sing Eskimo and old Norse songs and hymns “in the native tongue”; her “wonderfully sympathetic voice” was “heard to advantage in this weird music”5. (To view a gallery of Bradford’s paintings, click here.)

William Bradford, painter, explorer, photographer (Image from Wikimedia)

William Bradford, painter, explorer, photographer (Image from Wikimedia)

I’m not sure when Madame De Ryther’s singing career came to a close, but it was likely sometime in the 1890s. Her first newspaper job was as a society reporter with the New York Recorder. Later she worked for other papers, including the New York Herald and the New York Times. Her food columns started to appear in the New York Evening Mail and the New York Press in the early 1900s6.

Jule was born in Little Falls, New York. Her father Albert W. Churchill was the proprietor of the Benton House (later known as Garvan House) in Little Falls. He managed a number of hotels in Rome NY from 1858-1870: the American Hotel, Stanwix Hall, the Railroad House, and Curry’s Eating House7. Her mother was Susan E. Churchill. Jule’s early education was in Little Falls; she later moved to NYC to study vocal music under Madame Seguin8. Jule had four siblings: Fred B. Churchill; Emma Churchill Belden; Frances Churchill Waters; and Cornelia Churchill Russ. She died of pneumonia at age 69 on March 14, 1915, at the Hotel Vanderbilt in NYC9. Funeral services were held two days later at the Church of the Transfiguration in NYC, and she was buried in the Churchill family plot in Little Falls10. When I discovered that last bit of information, I created an entry for her on Find a Grave, and did my best to link the Churchill family together.


I have accumulated many of Madame De Ryther’s columns, many of which were likely read by our ancestors who lived at that time, so, in her memory, between now and Christmas, I am going to publish “Madame De Ryther Monday” posts (on Mondays, of course!), with or without commentary on my part. I may actually attempt some of her creations, and if I do, I will surely tell you about it. Perhaps, by Christmas you will have as much admiration as I do for this wonder woman of yesteryear!

Here is the first article, from October 11, 1903: “Madame De Ryther’s Receipts for Two Excellent One-Dish Dinners”

Oct 11, 1903 - Part 1

Oct 11, 1903, Part 2

Oct 11, 1903 - Part 3

Oct 11, 1903 - Part 4

1. “The Subject of Clean Dishes”, The Springfield Union, November 20, 1913
2. Reported in the Sacramento Daily Union, July 1, 1873
3. Reported in the New York Herald, August 24, 1873
4., 5. “The Bradford Recitals,” Elkhart, Indiana, Daily Review, October 19, 1886
6. Jule de Ryther Obituary, Utica Herald Dispatch, March 15, 1915
7. William Churchill obituary, Rome Citizen (NY), January 23, 1885
8. Jule de Ryther Obituary, Utica Herald Dispatch, March 15, 1915
9. Jule de Ryther New York Times Obituary, March 15, 1915
10. Jule de Ryther funeral announcement, Rome NY Daily Sentinel, March 16, 1915

Categories: Bradford Wm. artist explorer, Food: Family Recipes & Favorites, Grant, Holidays & Festivities, Little Falls, Madame Jule de Ryther | Tags: , | 9 Comments

Blooming Grove Park, Pike Co., PA (Post 3)

Blooming Grove Park

“Blooming Grove Park—The American Fontainebleau” (Image from my personal copy of Harper’s Weekly, December 17, 1870)

This past June I did a post on an 1891 Brodhead hunting expedition in Blooming Grove Park, Pike Co., Pennsylvania (and a subsequent follow-up). I just realized, while leafing through the December 17, 1870, Harper’s Weekly newspaper that contained the great scenes from Blooming Grove, that I failed to include in my post the accompanying article about this private 12,000-plus-acre hunting and fishing club. So, I will include it here now. It’s interesting (and good) to see how even back then, conservation was on people’s minds. You have to wonder what may have happened to all that land had it not fallen under the club’s protection.

As for the article, I had to chuckle when I read that the train took “only” 4.5 hrs to get to Blooming Grove from NYC, a distance of some 87 miles that is described as being one of the Park’s great advantages, which indeed it was at that time—and still is today. While Blooming Grove is still private/members-only, that part of Pennsylvania offers many other areas that are freely accessible to outdoors-lovers. We are still hoping to get up there next summer for some trout fishing and family-history-hunting expeditions.


A clipping of the article on Blooming Grove from my personal copy of Harper’s Weekly, December 17, 1870

Categories: Brodhead, Fishing, Hunting, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | Tags: | 5 Comments

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Kitty Calash

Confessions of a Known Bonnet-Wearer


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