24 July 1994: Young St. Petersburg artist painting en plein air

I suppose my family history blog is as much about me as anyone else in the family tree, so I’m giving myself permission to upload a memory/souvenir from my travels. Below is a photo of a young artist (last name ‘Kozlov’) painting 22 years ago on the grounds of the Peter & Paul Fortress in St. Petersburg. The small painting I purchased from him on 24 July 1994 brings back great memories of a great city that I’ve had the pleasure of visiting at least a dozen times. Perhaps, this young fellow, who must be in his late twenties/early thirties by now, is a successful artist today—and still enjoys his en plein air painting. I’d like to think so.
StPete_artistStPete_painting

Categories: Russia, St. Petersburg | 2 Comments

Elizabeth, NJ: Coleman house interior

Coleman_house_interior This is the northeast corner of Clarence and Jennie (Woodruff) Coleman‘s living room in the house they built at 17 Wilder Street in Elizabeth, NJ, in 1912, I believe. The living room was on the left when you walked through the front door. The photograph was taken professionally, by ‘John L. Soltis’ of Elizabeth, and is undated. The house was torn down in the 1970s and replaced with an apartment building.

The C. Clarence Coleman family home at 17 Wilder Street, late 1930s/early 1940s (Standing, third from the left, is Jennie Woodruff Coleman; Clarence is the gentleman in the hat to her left. Their daughter is to Jennie's right. My dad, a nephew of Clarence and Jennie is standing by the door to the truck)

The C. Clarence Coleman family home at 17 Wilder Street, late 1930s/early 1940s (Standing, third from the left, is Jennie Woodruff Coleman; Clarence is the gentleman in the hat to her left. Their daughter is to Jennie’s right. My dad, a nephew of Clarence and Jennie is standing by the door to the truck)

How did we end up with this photo, you may be asking? After the Coleman’s daughter Jennie (only child; never married) died in the 1990s, we were contacted by a cousin of hers who lived in a NJ seaside town. At the time, my mom was in Florida (dad had passed away five years earlier), and I was living in London. The cousin told us that there were “a lot of family papers and other items that you should have, but it’s a lot and we can’t possibly ship it.” I had some vacation time and mom was retired so we met in Newark and drove down to get all of this stuff. When we arrived we were shown a couple of regular-size boxes, nothing that could not have been shipped… Needless to say we were ever so slightly annoyed, but on the other hand, got to converse with this cousin of Jennie’s and her spouse, both in their 70s by then, on family & family history matters.

Coleman_Charles_Clarence_family

Clarence and Jennie (Woodruff) Coleman with daughter Jennie, circa 1920

These boxes, containing some photos, newspaper clippings, year books and other memorabilia, were all that was left of the Coleman estate, at least as far as family members were concerned. The rest of the estate, which was quite substantial in both money and antiques, was all taken by the executor who moved out of state. A lawsuit was filed (all public record), and eventually this individual was removed from the executorship of the estate by court order. But, by the time that happened, there was nothing… he’d supposedly spent it all—all the fruits of Clarence Coleman’s labor.

I remember sitting on that beautiful, antique sofa many times. It was unlike anything we’d seen elsewhere as kids in the 1960s, and the picture on the wall above it always captivated me. The books and things in the corner were off-limits to us little kids, of course. I have vague memories of the rest of the room. I believe there was a fireplace on the west side of the room, as well as doors leading out to the covered porch.

I will probably publish another one or two posts containing the rest of the materials we have from this family. There are no descendants, so I think it’s important that their lives be remembered in this blog, especially since (I think) that is unlikely to happen anywhere else, now or in the future.

Coleman_Clarence

Categories: Coleman, Elizabeth, Union Co., Woodruff | 6 Comments

Kitty, kitty, little star…

TAIKO Ah, yes, the “perils” of living in a ground floor flat when spring’s kitten season has come and gone… and left behind all sorts of wee ones wandering about looking for homes before they wind up as some animal’s dinner… No room at the inn for these little ones at the local animal shelters and rescue groups; there are too many to take in😦.

About ten days ago, this little lassie turned up at our door, quite literally.

If she had been tall enough, she would have rung the bell.

How could we say no? She’s turned out to be a sweet little munchkin with a very endearing personality!😉

After trying out numerous names, we have settled on

Tiger Lily

.

Categories: Pets | 12 Comments

Circa 1906: Two Trewins in support of immigration

Trewins_immigration_play

‘Aliens or Americans’ – cast members from a church play? Elizabeth, NJ, circa 1906

Leafing through my grandmother’s photo album, I came across this group photo showing my great-grandmother Elizabeth Sargent Trewin standing in the back on the right, and her daughter (my grandmother) Zillah Trewin in the rear on the far left, partially obscured by a gentleman’s hat. On the back, Zillah had written Mother’s class in [???] ‘Aliens or Americans.’ I was intrigued. I scanned it at high resolution to read what was written on the rear left door:

A million immigrants!
A million opportunities!
A million obligations!

Interesting! My great-grandmother, a devout Christian, was evidently a proponent of immigration (not the least bit surprising since she was an immigrant herself—from England in about 1870).

The quotation on the door appears to come from a book called Aliens or Americans (by Howard B. Grose) which was published in 1906 by the Young People’s Missionary Movement, New York. I think this is about the time this photo was taken (Elizabeth’s hair has still not gone the gray that appears in photos from the 1910s).  The peak year of European immigration was 1907, so immigration was a very hot topic at that time, and the photo may be from a play that was performed in their Elizabeth, NJ, church (St. James Methodist) to highlight the church’s duty to engage in mission work by assisting newly arrived immigrants in the resettlement process.

I’ve pulled the author’s preface and Josiah Strong’s introduction to Aliens or Americans and have included them below to give a sense of what my great-grandmother and grandmother may have been experiencing and responding to. The book is available online through The Project Gutenburg (click the link in the previous paragraph). I have not had time to read it (it’s several hundred pages long), but glancing at the table of contents, it looks like it gives plenty of interesting insight into immigration at that time, the Ellis Island experience, etc. Anyone with ancestors who immigrated in the early 1900s may find something of interest here.

Have a good day, all. As always, thanks for stopping by.

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Preface

new_americans

Image from Aliens or Americans, published 1906

It is not a question as to whether the aliens will come. They have come, millions of them; they are now coming, at the rate of a million a year. They come from every clime, country, and condition; and they are of every sort: good, bad, and indifferent, literate and illiterate, virtuous and vicious, ambitious and aimless, strong and weak, skilled and unskilled, married and single, old and young, Christian and infidel, Jew and pagan. They form to-day the raw material of the American citizenship of to-morrow. What they will be and do then depends largely upon what our American Protestant Christianity does for them now.

Immigration—the foreign peoples in America, who and where they are, whence they come, and what under our laws and liberties and influences they are likely to become—this is the subject of our study. The subject is as fascinating as it is vital. Its problems are by far the most pressing, serious, and perplexing with which the American people have to do. It is high time that our young people were familiarizing themselves with the facts, for this is preëminently the question of to-day. Patriotism and religion—love of country and love of Christ—unite to urge thoughtful consideration of this great question: Aliens or Americans? One aim of this book is to show our individual responsibility for the answer, and how we can discharge it.

Immigration may be regarded as a peril or a providence, an ogre or an obligation—according to the point of view. The Christian ought to see in it the unmistakable hand of God opening wide the door of evangelistic opportunity. Through foreign missions we are sending the gospel to the ends of the earth. As a home mission God is sending the ends of the earth to our shores and very doors. The author is a Christian optimist who believes God has a unique mission for Christian America, and that it will ultimately be fulfilled. While the facts are in many ways appalling, the result of his study of the foreign peoples in our country has made him hopeful concerning their Americanization and evangelization, if only American Christians are awake and faithful to their duty. The Christian young people, brought to realize that immigration is another way of spelling obligation, must do their part to remove that tremendous IF.

These newcomers are in reality a challenge to American Christianity. The challenge is clear and imperative. Will we give the gospel to the heathen in America? Will we extend the hand of Christian brotherhood and helpfulness to the stranger within our gates? Will we Christianize, which is the only real way to Americanize, the Aliens? May this book help to inspire the truly Christian answer that shall mean much for the future of our country, and hence of the world.

The author makes grateful acknowledgment to all who have assisted by suggestion or otherwise. He has tried to give credit to the authors whose works he has used. He is under special obligation for counsel and many courtesies to Josiah Strong, one of the modern patriot-prophets who has sought to awaken Americans to their Christian duty and privilege.

Howard B. Grose. Briarcliff Manor, June, 1906.

***************************************************

Introduction

A million immigrants!
A million opportunities!
A million obligations!
This in brief is the message of Aliens or Americans?

In this country every man is an American who has American ideals, the American spirit, American conceptions of life, American habits. A man is foreign not because he was born in a foreign land but because he clings to foreign customs and ideas.

I do not fear foreigners half so much as I fear Americans who impose on them and brutally abuse them. Such Americans are the real foreigners.

Most of those who come to us are predisposed in favor of our institutions They are generally unacquainted with the true character of those institutions, but they all know that America is the land of freedom and of plenty, and they are favorably inclined toward the ideas and the obligations which are bound up with these blessings. They are open to American influence and quickly respond to a new and a better environment.

They naturally look up to us, and if with fair and friendly treatment we win their confidence, they are easily transformed into enthusiastic Americans. But if by terms of opprobrium such as “sheeny” and “dago,” we convince them that they are held in contempt, and if by oppression and fraud we render them suspicious of us, we can easily compact them into masses, hostile to us and dangerous to our institutions and organized for the express purpose of resisting all American influences.

Whether immigrants remain Aliens or become Americans depends less on them than on ourselves.

Categories: Elizabeth, Union Co., Methodist, Missionaries, Religion, Sargent, Slaymaker, Trewin | Tags: | 1 Comment

Happy Fourth of July

Independence Day Celebration in Centre Square, Philadelphia, John Lewis Krimmel, 1819. Credit: Wikimedia Commons - US Public Domain image - published in the US before 1923 and public domain in the US)

Independence Day Celebration in Centre Square, Philadelphia, John Lewis Krimmel, 1819. Credit: Wikimedia Commons – US Public Domain image – published in the US before 1923 and public domain in the US

Have we improved upon our manner of celebrating the Fourth? Looking south on Broadway from corner of Cortlandt Street, 1834. Daniel Carter Beard, 1850-1941, artist; Illus. in: Harper's Weekly, July 7, 1894, p. 641. Library of Congress image - No known restrictions on publication.

Have we improved upon our manner of celebrating the Fourth? Looking south on Broadway from corner of Cortlandt Street, 1834. Daniel Carter Beard, 1850-1941, artist; Illus. in: Harper’s Weekly, July 7, 1894, p. 641. Library of Congress image – No known restrictions on publication.

The Glorious Fourth--sending up the fire balloon / C.S. Reinhart, del., 1871. Library of Congress - No known restrictions on publication.

The Glorious Fourth–sending up the fire balloon / C.S. Reinhart, del., 1871. Library of Congress – No known restrictions on publication.

The Centennial Fourth - illumination of Union Square, New York / drawn by Schell & Hogan. , 1876; Library of Congress - No known restrictions on publication

The Centennial Fourth – illumination of Union Square, New York / drawn by Schell & Hogan. , 1876; Library of Congress – No known restrictions on publication

The flag that has waved one hundred years--A scene on the morning of the fourth day of July 1876 / Fabronius ; E.P. & L. Restein's oilchromo, Phila.; National Chromo Co. pub., Phila., c1876; Library of Congress - No known restrictions on publication

The flag that has waved one hundred years–A scene on the morning of the fourth day of July 1876 / Fabronius ; E.P. & L. Restein’s oilchromo, Phila. ; National Chromo Co. pub., Phila. , c1876; Library of Congress – No known restrictions on publication

July 4th - F. A. Loumis, ca. 1906. Library of Congress - No known restrictions on publication

July 4th – F. A. Loumis, ca. 1906. Library of Congress – No known restrictions on publication

Fourth of July Scenes in celebration at Walter Reed; Harris & Ewing photographer; 1919. Library of Congress - No known restrictions on Publication

Fourth of July Scenes in celebration at Walter Reed; Harris & Ewing photographer; 1919. Library of Congress – No known restrictions on Publication

FOURTH OF JULY. GENERAL VIEW OF CROWD ON ELLIPSE FOR EXERCISES, 1919, Harris & Ewing Photographer - Library of Congress - No known restrictions on publication

FOURTH OF JULY. GENERAL VIEW OF CROWD ON ELLIPSE FOR EXERCISES, 1919, Harris & Ewing Photographer – Library of Congress – No known restrictions on publication

A Fourth of July celebration, St. Helena Island, S.C. Photographer Marion Post Wolcott; 1939; Library of Congress - No known restrictions on publication

A Fourth of July celebration, St. Helena Island, S.C. Photographer Marion Post Wolcott; 1939; Library of Congress – No known restrictions on publication

July 4th Fireworks. Washington DC is a spectacular place to celebrate July 4th! The National Mall, with Washington DC’s monuments and the U. S. Capitol in the background, forms a beautiful and patriotic backdrop to America's Independence Day celebrations.

July 4th Fireworks. Washington DC is a spectacular place to celebrate July 4th! The National Mall, with Washington DC’s monuments and the U. S. Capitol in the background, forms a beautiful and patriotic backdrop to America’s Independence Day celebrations. – Library of Congress – No restrictions on publication

Categories: Fourth of July | 6 Comments

Circa 1895 photograph of Benjamin Boles and wife Mary Galbraith

Below is a photo of my great-grandfather Edward Boles‘s youngest brother Benjamin Boles, who was born on 28 February 1871 in Fingreagh, Inishmagrath, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, and Benjamin’s wife Mary Galbraith. They had one child, a son, James Newton Boles, who was born on 14 September 1898, in Tipperary. Mary died in childbirth and, from what my mother has told me, after Mary’s death, Benjamin, a shopkeeper, renounced all of his worldly possessions in order to become an evangelist in a religious movement that had recently gotten underway in Ireland.

Benjamin never remarried, as far as we know, and his son was raised by Benjamin’s sister Jane and Jane’s husband William Pearson. I don’t know when Benjamin passed away; I have a photo of him that was taken in 1943, so it was sometime after that. I imagine the photo below was taken on the occasion of Benjamin and Mary’s marriage given that her one glove is off and she appears to be wearing rings. Or perhaps on the occasion of their engagement since he is ring-less. I also have this lovely photo of Mary all by herself, and this undated photo of father and son.

Boles_Benjamin_and_Mary

Mary Galbraith and Benjamin Boles

Boles_Mary

Mary Galbraith

Ben Boles with son Newton Boles

Ben Boles with son Newton Boles (1920s?)

 

Categories: Boles, Co. Tipperary, Galbraith, Ireland, Religion | Tags: | 4 Comments

Linderman children info updated; October 1889: Albert Brodhead Linderman returns from quick trip to London and Paris

Sinking of the Cunrad Line's steamer SS Oregon, 14th march 1886, 15 miles off Long Island.

Sinking of the Cunard Line’s steamer SS Oregon, 14th march 1886, 15 miles off Long Island. Nathaniel Currier & James Meritt Ives, 1886 (Wikimedia Commons – Image in public domain in US due to publication in the US prior to 1923.)

One of this blog’s readers, Steve, is actively engaged in researching his wife’s Linderman & Brodhead ancestors. He recently emailed me some Linderman tree info I was lacking in my post on Rachael Brodhead, wife of John Jordan Linderman. To view that post, click here. Scroll down and you will find Steve’s tree showing the seven children of John and Rachael. Anyone with additional info to share, please, by all means, leave a comment.

Port Jervis Evening Gazette, 9 October 1889 (Credit: Fultonhistory.org)

Port Jervis Evening Gazette, 9 October 1889 (Credit: Fultonhistory.org)

Coincidentally I came upon an October 1889 article about one of the children, Albert Brodhead Linderman, who’d have been about 57 at the time of publication. It’s a brief article but is packed with interesting little details. Albert was just returned from a brief trip to London and Paris, and seems to have been heavily involved in the railway industry. He was described as “a great traveler and a great talker” (the gift of gab always seems to go to at least one member of a family!) and a survivor of an 1886 ship collision off the coast of Long Island, New York. I can imagine that that disaster, only three years in the past, was still very fresh in people’s minds. For a description of the fate of the luxurious 650-passenger SS Oregon whose last journey was from Liverpool, England, to New York, click here. Thankfully, all of the Oregon‘s passengers were rescued.

Yes, Albert definitely got around. Upon further investigation, I found evidence (see article on the right) of his plan to purchase the island of Cuba (!) and his involvement in draining Lake Okeechobee here in South Florida to make way for agricultural expansion:

The State authorities of Florida have entered into a contract with I Coryell of Jacksonville and A B Linderman representing capitalists of Philadelphia and San Francisco to drain Lake Okeechobee in Southern Florida. The scheme if successfully carried out will reclaim millions of acres of excellent sugar lands and result not only in the reclamation of the bed of the lake itself but it is believed in that of the two vast swamps known as the Everglades and the Big Cypress which lie south of the lake and cover the greater portion of the lower end of the peninsula. The Everglades is sixty miles in length and about the same width really constitute a vast lake from one to six in depth studded with thousands of small islands. (From The Friend, Volumes 54-55, The Society of Friends, pub. 1881)

To my knowledge, the lake—the seventh largest freshwater lake in the US—was never drained, however, due to devastation and loss of life in the 1920s as a result of some hurricanes crossing over the lake and creating a storm surge, a dike was built around the lake in the 1930s. I remember setting off with my husband to the east coast 8-9 years ago and deciding to travel in such a way as to travel along the west and north sides of the lake on our trip east and then drive along the east and south sides on our return. We’d no idea the dike existed and were expecting to see some scenic views of the lake on our journey. Boy, were we disappointed for there really were very few places to catch a glimpse of it. You have to climb up to the top of the dike to see down below. A 109-mile walking/cycling trail—the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail—goes around the perimeter of the lake, often on top of the dike, but you are fully exposed to the sun, something to take into consideration especially at the hottest time of year. One of the best viewing spots we found was in the town of Pahokee (with a name like that, you just have to stop to be able to say you have been there), but that is not saying too much since it’s not like you’re climbing up to any great elevation.

The fishing in the lake is supposed to be very good, and it seemed like every home along the water’s edge had a boat, but, of course, there are lots of gators in there too. We were in Boston several months after that trip and were chatting over a B&B breakfast with some German tourists who were heading down to Miami the following day. One of their top priorities was going to be to go off to swim in Lake Okeechobee. We nearly choked on our French toast, and once the powdered sugar dislodged from our throats, strongly advised them against that idea!!!

Anyway, I have gotten way off track… Back to Albert. I don’t know why he is called Colonel. Had he served in the Civil War? Anyone with some thoughts on that or anything else to do with the Linderman children, feel free to comment below. Have a good day, all.
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Update 7/5/16 – Some additional information kindly provided by aforementioned researcher Steve Hatchett:

  • Albert Brodhead Linderman patent1882 patent
  • Article on land deal in Florida involving Linderman and prominent men from Great Britain
  • Part owner of a business enterprise with brother HR Linderman – for the link, click here
  • Chester A. Arthur, 21st President of the United States of America

    Chester A. Arthur, 21st President of the United States of America – Public Domain image

  • Linderman meets President Chester A. Arthur Google Books link – Eve Bacon writes in Orlando: A Centennial History that when Arthur’s train reached Kissimmee, Colonel A.B. Linderman greeted the President and announced, “We flatter ourselves that we have among us not only the president, but the next president.” Arthur, in no mood to make a politcal address, answered, “We are not here to look after the next president. We are here for rest and quiet,” Bacon writes.
  • Hamilton Diston - Image in public domain - Florida Memory Archives call number Rc02832

    Hamilton Diston – Image in public domain – Florida Memory Archives call number Rc02832

  • Although Linderman is not mentioned by name, this Wikipedia article about Linderman’s associate, Hamilton Disston details some of the dealings in which Linderman was involved in Florida. AB Linderman was an agent and business associate of Hamilton Disston. Disston’s agents arranged the purchase of something like 4 million acres in Florida, one of the largest private land purchases at the time. This was related to the draining projects. Disston sold some of the land to Sir Edward James Reed of Great Britain. One of the articles above mentions Linderman involved in land deal with prominent Great Britain people including another Sir that was also an M.P. Reading some of the news articles about the draining made it sound like a flakey thing, but Disston was the real deal, and was moving and shaking in Florida. Note in the Wikipedia article the mention of President Arthur going to Kissimmee. That seems directly tied to the mention above of Linderman meeting Arthur in Kissimme.
  • H.R. Linderman, sometime between 1865-1880. Library of Congress image - No known restrictions on publication

    H.R. Linderman, sometime between 1865-1880. Library of Congress image – No known restrictions on publication

  • There is also a US Mint pamphlet that mentions him helping the Mint in reviewing contract bids during Henry Richard Linderman‘s term there. So ABL had his fingers in a lot of things.
  • Categories: Brodhead, Hamilton Disston, Linderman, President C. Arthur | Tags: | 6 Comments

    1902: A milestone year for Abigail Winans Angus Woodruff, sister of James Winans Angus

    Angus_AbbyAngusWoodruff

    Abigail Winans Angus Woodruff’s 90th birthday. Newspaper probably Elizabeth Daily Journal

    On the morning of 16 July 1902, Abigail Winans (Angus) Woodruff (1812-1905) awoke in her home at 1177 South Chestnut Street in Elizabeth, NJ, to begin celebrating her 90th birthday. Abigail made it into the newspaper that day on the occasion of her newly acquired nonagenarian status, and thanks to my grandmother who saved the clipping, I can share it with you today. Many came to meet and greet Abigail, who was “in the possession of health and strength, and received her guests in a most affable manner.” (On a side note, not surprisingly the house on Chestnut Street no longer exists, which is a shame; I’d love to see what it was like.)

    Abigail’s older brother James, my 2nd-great-grandfather, died in 1862 at just 52 years of age, and because of that I always think of him as being someone from the fairly distant past. But the fact that his sister, and brother Job (1821-1909) for that matter, made it into the 20th century just goes to show that there were indeed some very good genes in the family, and were it not for an unfortunate twist of fate (an unpleasant bacterial skin illness), James may have made it into the 20th century as well.

    Abigail was married to Henry King Woodruff (1806-1853), who’d died nearly a half century before this 1902 celebration. They’d had three children together: Mary Jane (1832-1916), Jacob (1840-1847), and William (1842-1913). So two of the three children were present for their mother’s milestone festivities.

    Unfortunately, another clipping from 1905 reports the sad news of Abigail’s demise on the 16th of March of that year, but it’s obvious from reading the clipping that hers was a life very well lived, and that she enjoyed the support of the community and a great many family members. The clipping offers us a little snapshot in time of the funeral, and because it names names, we know with certainty where some of our ancestors were on that day in history. I learned, for example, that my great-grandfather William Earl Woodruff was a pallbearer (he was married to Abigail’s niece Wealthy Ann Angus Woodruff, James & Wealthy Angus’s daughter) at the funeral. Other pallbearers included nephews Charles Dujah Angus, Job Winans Angus (Jr.), and George Welsh Angus—all sons of my 2nd-great-grandparents James and Wealthy Angus; and two sons of Mary Martha Winans Angus Knowles (another daughter of James & Wealthy). Abigail was buried in the historic First Presbyterian Churchyard.

    Angus_AbbyAngusWoodruff_obit

    Abigail Winans Angus Woodruff’s 1905 funeral. Newspaper probably Elizabeth Daily Journal

    Creative commons attribution license cc-by-2.5, attribution 'R.E.H.'.

    Grave of Abigail Winans Angus Woodruff in First Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ; Creative commons attribution license cc-by-2.5, attribution ‘R.E.H.’.

    Categories: Woodruff, Elizabeth, Union Co., Angus, Obituaries, New Jersey, Death | Tags: | 4 Comments

    Photo circa 1880: Jno. Philip Marthaler, husband of Lavinia P. Angus

    Lavinia Pratt Angus, youngest daughter of James Winans Angus and Wealthy Ann Jaques, was married briefly to John Philip Marthaler, who went by his middle name. They wed in Elizabeth, New Jersey, on 24 May 1879. Lavinia (“Vean”) was twenty years old and Philip was about 28 at the time. I have come upon a labelled photograph of Philip who died sometime before 1885. It was taken at Bogardus’ Souvenir Card, at 872 Broadway in New York City. He was a very handsome fellow with very kind eyes, and I think this solves the mystery for me of who the fellow was in one of my past posts in which I thought perhaps the man shown was a Jaques family member. No, it’s Philip—sans beard! Now I just wish I could find a photo of Aunt Vean

    Marthaler_Phillip

    John Philip Marthaler

    Isaac Jaques

    The past post “mystery photo”

    Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., Marthaler, New Jersey, New York, New York City, Weddings | Tags: | 2 Comments

    1905: Jennie & Louise Nixon with their Aunt Ethel

    Nixon

    Louise (L) and Jennie Nixon, their Aunt Ethel Bracken on right

    Now don’t these ladies look like fun?

    I met them when they were in their seventies and eighties, but here they are young lasses, in 1905, looking happy, fresh-faced, and full of life. These are the Nixon sisters, Jennie (middle) and Louise (left), about whom I’ve written, with their aunt Ethel Bracken (also quite jolly-looking) on the right.

    (See post: Some descendants of the Nixon family of Fermanagh).

    In this black-and-white photo, Jennie was about 21 and Louise just 17. The daughters of Irish-born Edward Nixon and Anna Bracken, the cheerful pair were 1st cousins of my grandfather William Boles and great friends of my grandmother Zillah Trewin who was closest in age to Jennie.

    I would love to sit down and chat with them right now over a nice cup of tea! They were such sweet gals and had a wonderful sense of humor.

    Nixon_Jennie_and_Louise copy

    Louise and Jennie Nixon, 1964

    Categories: Nixon | 5 Comments

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    A snapshot of life one blog post at a time.

    Zimmerbitch

    age is just a (biggish) number) NUMBER

    The People of Pancho

    At Play In The Archive

    TRACK

    Truth and Reconciliation for the Adoption Community of Korea

    Rose of Sharon Healing

    Herbs and Healing for the Nations

    DNAeXplained - Genetic Genealogy

    Discovering Your Ancestors - One Gene at a Time

    Monkey Map

    The completed project of three years of mapping monkey puzzle trees

    A SILVER VOICE FROM IRELAND

    An Eclectic mix of items from a 'senior' blogger in Ireland looking at the past and keeping an eye on the present.

    Opening Doors in Brick Walls

    “When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us.” ~ Alexander Graham Bell

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