Isaac G. de G. Angus (1840-1885)

James W. Angus

James W. Angusimage from my family’s private collection

Wealthy Ann (Jaques) Angus

Wealthy Ann (Jaques) Angusimage from my family’s private collection

Isaac Gabriel de Guadaloupe Angus1,the eldest child of James Winans Angus and Wealthy Ann Jaques (married 26 January 1839) was born on 12 January 1840². In terms of his first name, little Isaac was likely named after Wealthy’s father, Isaac Jaques, but I have no idea where the very unusual “Gabriel de Guadaloupe” comes from. There are a number of places in Mexico with Guadalupe (alternate spelling: Guadaloupe) in their name, including an area of Mexico City, apparently. As Isaac’s birth preceded James and Wealthy’s relocation to Mexico before the Mexican-American War, perhaps Gabriel was someone they met in New Jersey or someone in Mexico with whom they corresponded who was of such great assistance to the family in making arrangements for their upcoming move to Mexico that they decided to name their first-born child after him. While it could be completely off the mark, that’s my best theory at this point. If anyone reading this has other thoughts on the matter, please chime in.

Norwich Harbor, 1906

Norwich Harbor, 1906 (Credit: Wikimedia)

There was about a 22-year span between Isaac G. de G. Angus’s birth and the birth of James and Wealthy’s 11th, and youngest, child Walter Prince Angus. Some sources say Isaac was born in Norwich, CT, but the family Bible indicated that the birth took place in ‘Elizabeth Town, New Jersey’, and I am more inclined to believe the latter.  Then, the young family moved to Norwich, where second child James was born.

Fall of Mexico City during the Mexican-American War, painting by Carl Nebel. Published in the 1851 book "The War Between the United States and Mexico, Illustrated".  (Public Domain - Wikipedia)

Fall of Mexico City during the Mexican-American War, painting by Carl Nebel. Published in the 1851 book “The War Between the United States and Mexico, Illustrated”. (Public Domain – Wikipedia)

NY Tribune, Thursday, 28 Jun 1860

The New York Tribune, Thursday, 28 Jun 1860, courtesy of http://www.fultonhistory.com

James Angus was an entrepreneur. Attracted to Mexico’s affordable labor and high-quality coach-making materials, he went to Mexico City in 1842/early 1843, and Wealthy joined him with their two boys (Isaac and James Jr.) some time later.³ The family’s residence there coincided with the tumult of the Mexican-American War, in which James and Wealthy played a role. All survived the experience, and the family departed Mexico in early 1849, when James’ health problems forced them to head home to New Jersey.  Returning with them were two more children, both born in Mexico: Jacob Baker Angus and Mary Martha Angus4. [More on the Mexico years in an upcoming post]

Some six to seven years after returning to NJ, Isaac entered Princeton University. He graduated on 27 June 1860 with an AB degree5 and went on to be employed as a clerk in the Union County Surrogate’s Office, a position he held for many years6.

In 1862, the Angus family’s world was shattered when James W. Angus died of erysipelas7, also known as St. Anthony’s Fire ( disease that was dreaded in the Middle Ages), a bacterial infection of the upper dermis and superficial lymphatics. I found one website that describes the disease as being caused by the consumption of ergot (a fungus that contaminates grains such as rye). It’s not usually fatal unless there are complications, so James’ case must have been particularly severe. He was only 52. Wealthy was left a widower with a very large brood of children, aged 1 – 22, to tend to. In the years ahead, her home became the anchor for some of her children (or their spouses) after losing their life partner and needing a place for themselves and their children to stay. It’s no wonder she had to slowly peel off and sell real estate holdings to keep her household going8.

"New Jersey, County Marriages, 1682-1956," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VWR3-3R8 : accessed 17 April 2015), Isaac G Angus and Susan M Robinson, 08 Jun 1865; citing Union, New Jersey, New Jersey State Archives, Trenton; FHL microfilm 1,301,706.

“New Jersey, County Marriages, 1682-1956,” index and images, FamilySearch (https: //familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VWR3-3R8 : accessed 17 April 2015), Isaac G Angus and Susan M Robinson, 08 Jun 1865; citing Union, New Jersey, New Jersey State Archives, Trenton; FHL microfilm 1,301,706.

On June 8, 1865, in Elizabeth City, NJ9, Isaac married Susan Maria Robinson (b. 5 Aug 1837 in Brookfield, Worcester, MA10), the daughter of Jeremiah and Julia Robinson, who were both originally from Massachusetts.

(According to the 1850 census11, Susan (age 12) and the rest of the Robinson family were living in Elizabeth, NJ. Jeremiah was listed as a merchant with real estate holdings valued at $6,500 (almost $192,000 in today’s currency).

Among Susan’s siblings were Oscar B. Robinson and Zachary T. Robinson.) A first child, James W. Angus, was born to Isaac G. de. G. Angus and Susan Robinson on 22 Jun 186612. On 22 Jan 186713 (according to NJ Births and Christening Records), a male child was born, but that birth is not recorded in the family Bible, so I am not sure what to make of this record. Did this child die a short time after birth? Or was this James, and the DOB was recorded incorrectly in the Bible? The former seems more probable to me.

Almost exactly nine months later, another son was born, Isaac Jaques Angus14 (30 Oct 1867)—named after his paternal grandfather. And yet another son, George Belcher Angus, was born on 5 Nov 186915, in Elizabeth, NJ.

The 1870 census16 shows the Isaac and Susan Angus household consisting of:
Isaac Angus, M, 30  – birthplace New Jersey
Susan Angus, F, 30 – birthplace Massachusetts
Isaac Angus, M, 2 – birthplace New Jersey
George Angus, M, 0 – birthplace New Jersey
Joshua Robinson, M, 20 – birthplace New Jersey [a brother of Susan’s?]

Son James, who would have been four at the time, is not present. Had he passed away?

Two years passed, and tragedy struck. That summer, little Isaac died on 1 August 187217, just shy of his sixth birthday. He was followed four days later by little George, who died on 5 August 187218. It goes without saying that this must have been a devastating blow to the parents and the extended family; especially if they had indeed lost little James too. A worldwide smallpox epidemic that began in 1871 claimed eight million lives; had this been the cause of death for Isaac and George?

It must have been a joyous day when Isaac and Susan’s welcomed their last child Addison Clark Angus on 17 December 187519.

In 1880, the Census20 shows the family residing at 848 Second Avenue, Elizabeth, NJ, and consisting of:
Household     Gender     Age     Birthplace
Isaac G Angus     M     40     New Jersey, United States
Susan M Angus   F     40     Massachusetts, United States
Adison Angus     M     4     New Jersey, United States

Five years later, Isaac G. de G. Angus died—on 9 May 188521 at 44 years and four months. Subsequently, it appears that Susan and Addison moved in, at least temporarily, with mother-in-law Wealthy Ann (Jaques) Angus, because the 1885 NJ Census22 shows Wealthy’s household consisting of the following:

Wealthy Angus   F  [over 60 yrs; family matriarch Wealthy Jaques Angus, widow of James Winans Angus Sr.]
Walter Angus     M  [age 20-60; Wealthy’s youngest son, b. 1861)
Lavinia Angus     F  [age 20-60; Wealthy’s daughter, b. 1858)
James Angus     M  [age 20-60; likely James Winans Angus Jr, widower, b. 1841)
James Angus     M  [age 20-60; duplicate entry?]
Alfred Angus     M  [age 5-20; likely Alfred Carpenter Angus, b. 1873, son of James Winans Angus Jr.)
Christopher Angus  M [age 0-4; likely Christopher Angus, b. 1880, son of James Winans Angus Jr., died of hydrocephalus, buried 30 Sept 1885)
Susan Angus     F [age 20-60; widow of Isaac G. de G. Angus]
Addison Clark Angus     M [age 5-20; surviving son of Susan Angus and the late Isaac G. de G. Angus]

Addison was so young at the time of his father’s death, he may have grown up without any real recollections of him. And then at age 14, he lost Susan as well. She was  51. According to Evergreen Cemetery records, she died in February 1889 and was buried on the 25th of that month. The cause of death was given as ‘mania’.

I can’t help but wonder what happened to Susan and how long she had been experiencing problems. What must Addison have gone through? ‘Mania’ back then indicated “insanity” or “madness”. The Michigan Family History website has a page on the topic of medical terms used long ago. The entry for mania says: Any of the forms of mental illness, or dementia. May also mean, along with the term “vapors” that the individual died from acute alcohol ingestion, or the DTs. In the 1800s it was defined as severe insanity. Acute mania was used as a term for death when the patient had been hospitalized in a mental institution. It would be hard to say exactly what the mental illness was. The topic was covered in the article “Lunacy in the 19th Century: Women’s Admission to Asylums in United States of America” (click here to view).  And often it did not take much to be locked up back then, as you can see from this Slate article, “Those Funny 19th-Century Reasons for Admission to Mental Institutions” (to view it, click here.)

Isaac and their two little sons were disinterred from the churchyard of the First Presbyterian Church of Elizabeth and removed to Evergreen on 13 February 1890 to be buried next to Susan. I asked a Find a Grave volunteer to locate the graves for me (Plot 207, Section F), but they could not find any Angus markers in that vicinity.

Addison certainly was faced with challenges in his young life, losing both parents the way he did.  His entry in a college yearbook23 indicates he spent time in Oakham, MA—perhaps with grandparents or other relatives. He went on to attend Oberlin Academy24 in the mid-1890s and Yale25 (graduated 1901; 1913-1915, MA History), and lived a very long life. He died in 1970, having made it into his mid 90’s26.

1909 U.S. print advertisement. Scanned from Early American Automobiles (out of print). Previously uploaded to en:Wikipedia by Richardj311 (Public domain in USA)

1909 U.S. print advertisement. Scanned from Early American Automobiles (out of print). Previously uploaded to en:Wikipedia by Richardj311 (Public domain in USA)

I found out a bit more information about him, including evidence of three marriages. One of them, which involved a whirlwind wedding in an automobile, to a wealthy new divorcée, Mrs. Elsie Brinkerhoff Sanford (a daughter of the Fargo family—as in Wells Fargo), was quite amusing—so amusing, in fact, that the story ended up in newspapers all over the country and even halfway around the world in New Zealand!!! Some clippings are below, Each one varies slightly; clues are sprinkled throughout. One article—in the Mathews Journal of Virginia—says the groom gave his age as 26 and the bride said she was 34, and both said they’d been married previously. Perhaps his merry mood made Addison say he was 26. Born in 1875, he would have been 37 at the time! Another article said the couple had just wrapped up an auto tour of Maine and were on their way back to NYC (The Springfield Union (MA), 18 Sept. 1912; available through Genealogy Bank); Addison is buried in Maine, so perhaps that was the trip that first introduced him to the extraordinary beauty of that state. The other details I’ve discovered about Addison I will keep under my hat since they are of a more recent nature, relatively speaking.

My great-grandmother Wealthy (Angus) Woodruff was one of Isaac G. de G. Angus’s little sisters; they were about 10 years apart. Their two families no doubt interacted frequently given they all lived in Elizabeth, not too far from each other. I have a few very old letters somewhere that reference Isaac’s family and will put them on my list of things to scan and share in a future post. As always, corrections, comments, additions, etc., are very welcome.

Addison_Clark_Angus_marriage2_Trove_httpnla.gov.aunla.news-article33416747

Auckland Star, Volume XLIII, Issue 276, 9 November 1912, Page 18

Addison_Clark_Angus_marriage

San Francisco Call, Vol. 112, No. 109, 17 September 1912 – California Digital Newspaper Collection – “A Freely Accessible Repository of Digitized California Newspapers from 1846 to the Present” – California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, <http://cdnc.ucr.edu&gt;. All newspapers published before January 1, 1923 are in the public domain and therefore have no restrictions on use.

New York Telegram, 16 September 1912 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

New York Telegram, 16 September 1912 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Mathews Journal (VA), Vol. 9, No. 32, 26 September 1912 (Credit: Library of Virginia Digital Archives)

Mathews Journal (VA), Vol. 9, No. 32, 26 September 1912 (Credit: Library of Virginia Digital Archives)

New York Times, 21 June 1912

The New York Times, 21 June 1912 – Elsie was a divorcée, not a widow as one article suggests.

Notes:

  1. Angus family Bible
  2. Angus family Bible
  3. One Line of Descendants of James Angus, 1751-1896 compiled by Harriet Stryker-Rodda and published in 1969, p. 9.
  4. One Line of Descendants of James Angus, 1751-1896 compiled by Harriet Stryker-Rodda and published in 1969, p. 9
  5. New York Tribune, Thursday, 28 Jun 1860
  6. One Line of Descendants of James Angus, 1751-1896 compiled by Harriet Stryker-Rodda and published in 1969, p. 13
  7. One Line of Descendants of James Angus, 1751-1896 compiled by Harriet Stryker-Rodda and published in 1969, p. 11
  8. One Line of Descendants of James Angus, 1751-1896 compiled by Harriet Stryker-Rodda and published in 1969, p. 12
  9. “New Jersey, County Marriages, 1682-1956,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VWR3-3R8 : accessed 17 April 2015), Isaac G Angus and Susan M Robinson, 08 Jun 1865; citing Union, New Jersey, New Jersey State Archives, Trenton; FHL microfilm 1,301,706.
  10. “Massachusetts, Births and Christenings, 1639-1915,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VQ6J-CNL : accessed 17 April 2015), Susan Maria Robinson, 05 Aug 1837; citing BROOKFIELD,WORCESTER,MASSACHUSETTS, ; FHL microfilm 0547195 IT 1.
  11. “United States Census, 1850,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M6MX-6P2 : accessed 17 April 2015), Susan M Robinson in household of Jeremiah Robinson, Elizabeth, Essex, New Jersey, United States; citing family 964, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  12. Angus family Bible
  13. “New Jersey, Births and Christenings, 1660-1980,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FCTD-955 : accessed 16 April 2015), Isaac Angus in entry for Angus, 22 Jan 1867; citing Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey, reference v AG p 203B; FHL microfilm 584,583.
  14. “New Jersey, Births and Christenings, 1660-1980,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FC2X-SZR : accessed 16 April 2015), Isaac Angus in entry for Isaac J. Angus, 30 Oct 1867; citing Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey, reference v BV 2 p 998; FHL microfilm 494,163.
  15. Angus family Bible
  16. “United States Census, 1870,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MN68-PYJ : accessed 16 April 2015), Isaac Angus, New Jersey, United States; citing p. 29, family 236, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,389.
  17. “New Jersey Deaths and Burials, 1720-1988,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FZ8S-DX7 : accessed 16 April 2015), Isaac Angus in entry for Isaac G. Angus, 01 Aug 1872; citing Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey, reference v A-V p 319; FHL microfilm 584,595.
  18. “New Jersey Deaths and Burials, 1720-1988,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FZ8S-DXH : accessed 16 April 2015), Isaac Angus in entry for George B. Angus0, 05 Aug 1872; citing Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey, reference v A-V p 319; FHL microfilm 584,595.
  19. “New Jersey, Births and Christenings, 1660-1980,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FCG8-6D9 : accessed 17 April 2015), Addison C. Angus, 17 Dec 1875; citing Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey, reference v CL p 461; FHL microfilm 494,180.
  20. “United States Census, 1880,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MNDS-VLF : accessed 17 April 2015), Adison Angus in household of Isaac G Angus, Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey, United States; citing enumeration district 167, sheet 114A, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 0800; FHL microfilm 1,254,800.
  21. Evergreen Cemetery records
  22. “New Jersey, State Census, 1885,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:6BFT-JT2 : accessed 17 April 2015), Susan Angus in household of Wealthy Angus, Elizabeth, Ward 03, Union, New Jersey; citing p. , Department of State, Trenton; FHL microfilm .
  23. The 1901 entry for him in the Yale yearbook reads: ADDISON CLARK ANGUS ‘Agnes’  – ‘Began his career at Elizabeth, N.J. The record of his life has been carelessly kept, for he does not know when he was born nor his father’s name and occupation. He does know, however, that he himself has lived not only in Elizabeth but also in Oakham, Mass., and that his paternal ancestor graduated from Princeton in ’63. We guess that the date of his birth was …. and have ascertained that his father, …. is a …. Prepared at Oberlin Academy, Oberlin, O.
  24. Source: ‘Cl.’ in Catalogue of Oberlin College for the year 1896.
  25. “United States Census, 1900,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M97Q-LBW : accessed 14 Dec 2013), Addison Angus, Yale University Ward 1, New Haven, Connecticut, United States; citing sheet , family , NARA microfilm publication T623, FHL microfilm 1240144.
  26. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=41155314
Categories: Angus, Jaques, New Jersey 1885, Norwich, Robinson, US Federal 1850, US Federal 1870, US Federal 1880 | 7 Comments

Anniversaries and things

number4This blog is four years old today.  I want to thank everyone who is a ‘follower’, and all who have offered support and feedback over the years. I hope to keep it going for at least a while longer. There are more stories to tell (just need to find more time to tell them!). And, my offer stands—if you are a descendant of a family covered in this blog, you are welcome to submit material for a guest post about one of your ancestors.

I don’t write with ‘stats’ in mind, but to close, I will leave you with some blog ‘stats’ for the last four years. It’s kind of interesting to see where all the visitors come from and what topics interest them. For some reason, the Thanksgiving murder/suicide post has been getting lots of visitors lately. I’m not sure why that is. I did update it not too long ago with some newspaper images from the Philadelphia Inquirer that were not freely available for reuse at the time I published it. If you are interested in that branch of the Brodhead family, you may want to revisit it.

I was also surprised to see that the post I did about my father’s uncle Lewis Dingman Brodhead is the ‘most shared’. I’m still at a dead-end with knowing what happened to Lewis’s wife Mildred. I wrote the Schuylkill Co. (PA) Historical Society, and they could not find anything either. The next step is to go to the court house there to investigate divorce records. A trip north is not in the cards for me at the moment, however.

In any case, it’s satisfying to see that this blog is obviously being of benefit to cousins, near and far, known and as yet unknown.

THANK YOU AGAIN, ONE AND ALL!

TOTAL VIEWS: 38,315 and counting

TOTAL POSTS: 332

BEST-EVER TOTAL VIEWS: May 6, 2012: 391 (Mostly G.S.V. Wills-related posts)

TOP 20 – MOST SHARED

Another Brodhead elopes, this time in 1911 at NYC’s ‘Little Church Around the Corner’
Wealthy Angus’s Trendy Autographed Fan
19th-century Carbon County, PA — Lindermans, Packers, & Brodheads
Merry Christmas in vintage cards
In memory of WWII US Army Captain Henry D. Wirsig
Striking gold: Gleanings from the Samuel Barron Jaques family Bible
The Brodhead-Linderman Cemetery: Descendants work on clean up and restoration
1870s fashions from Godey’s magazine
1898 Shipwreck: Brodhead sister-in-law & husband lost
Murder or suicide? Thanksgiving Day 1904 tragedy at Robert Sayre Brodhead home
Henry Conrad Brodhead & Eva Wilder McGlasson: late 19th- / early 20th-century “power couple”
Monsieur Alphonse P. M. de la Flechelle (cir. 1792 – 14 October 1847)
Daniel Brodhead Jr.’s daughter, Ellen
Northamptonshire Slaymakers
Mary Rebecca Brodhead Pike (1815-1922) — New Hampshire DAR member — achieved age 106
Was Maria Lesher Daniel Brodhead Jr.’s First Wife?
Brodhead family descendants repair Cornelia D. Brodhead headstone
Job W. Angus (1856-1936) — Sept. 9, 1877, letter from Dripping Springs, Texas
New Year’s Eve 1895: An Unbroken Family Celebrates a 50th Wedding Anniversary
Cupid’s Arrow —> William H. Brodhead

TOP 20 POSTS

Title Views
Home page / Archives 18,660
Murder or suicide? Thanksgiving Day 1904 tragedy at Robert Sayre Brodhead home 339
A favorite recipe: Tvorozhniki (a.k.a. cheese pancakes) 294
Early 1900’s camping and hiking for women: the “dos & donts” 280
Brick Walls 275
Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family 271
Edward Boles family photos, late 1800s, early 1900s 252
Typhoid Fever Claimed Frank T. Ludey 247
George Wills Family Tree 230
Happy Easter — Poppy-Seed Nut Roll (Potica) Recipe 226
Dan Crawford, Scottish Missionary to Belgian Congo 164
Francis Woodruff Family 156
The curious case of Daniel Brodhead Jr. (1756 – 2 Feb 1831) 138
Old Woodruff Family Homestead: Witness to American History 128
George Wills Descendants in America — An Update 117
Trewin and Truin, Thomas and Thos 113
Brodhead family descendants repair Cornelia D. Brodhead headstone 112
Daniel Brodhead Jr.: A Timeline of Life Events 111
Pvt. Uzal Trowbridge 109
Mary Martha Angus Knowles (1846-1922) 106
Rev. Samuel Sargent 105

110+ COUNTRIES (since February 25, 2012)

Country Views
United States 27,435
United Kingdom 3,302
Canada 897
Australia 726
France 330
Ireland 249
New Zealand 248
Germany 153
Netherlands 151
Belgium 147
Finland 104
India 103
Russia 94
Indonesia 70
Spain 58
Brazil 55
Denmark 47
Italy 40
Portugal 38
South Africa 38
Philippines 37
Japan 30
Switzerland 30
Greece 28
Colombia 28
Uruguay 25
Israel 23
South Korea 23
Argentina 22
Mexico 22
Czech Republic 21
Ukraine 20
Poland 20
Hungary 20
Pakistan 18
Slovakia 17
Taiwan 15
Sweden 15
Hong Kong SAR China 14
Turkey 14
Nicaragua 13
Luxembourg 13
Albania 12
European Union 12
Lebanon 11
Austria 11
Norway 11
Bangladesh 10
Serbia 10
Thailand 10
Jamaica 9
Romania 9
United Arab Emirates 8
Singapore 7
Qatar 6
Venezuela 6
Bulgaria 6
Malaysia 6
Puerto Rico 5
Chile 5
Guam 5
Kazakhstan 5
Croatia 5
Azerbaijan 4
Sri Lanka 4
Saudi Arabia 4
Peru 4
Jersey 4
Dominican Republic 3
Algeria 3
Egypt 3
Lithuania 3
Vietnam 3
Zimbabwe 2
Iraq 2
Ecuador 2
Barbados 2
Trinidad & Tobago 2
Kenya 2
Malta 2
Oman 2
Nepal 2
China 2
Cambodia 2
Latvia 2
U.S. Virgin Islands 2
Iceland 2
Bahamas 2
Macau SAR China 2
Nigeria 2
Georgia 2
Armenia 2
Syria 2
Palestinian Territories 1
Mongolia 1
Estonia 1
Cyprus 1
Paraguay 1
Tunisia 1
Suriname 1
Jordan 1
Morocco 1
Benin 1
Slovenia 1
Namibia 1
Isle of Man 1
Seychelles 1
Guernsey 1
Rwanda 1
Tajikistan 1
Costa Rica 1
Macedonia 1
Moldova 1
Categories: Miscellaneous | Tags: | 9 Comments

Easter—a century ago

Vintage Scrapbook, Wikimedia image, contributed 1/12/02 by KirNata, source Vintage Scrapbook, Tulane Public Relations (File licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license)

Vintage Scrapbook, Wikimedia image, contributed 1/12/02 by KirNata, source Vintage Scrapbook, Tulane Public Relations (File licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license)

Easter 1915. Ever wonder what things may have ‘looked like’ back then? Thanks to the Library of Congress and the Fulton History website, I’ve been able to gather a few items to share with you today that give a glimpse into that moment in the past.

I love old photos—I enjoy seeing the outfits and faces, and, in this case, checking out all the ladies bonnets floating about the images of Easter parades and throngs of churchgoers. This was the big opportunity for those of means to show off their new spring wardrobes and a chance for bystanders to witness quite a spectacle.  Irving Berlin’s 1948 musical Easter Parade, starring Fred Astaire and Judy Garland and set in the Manhattan of 1912-1913, brings to life the fabulous parades of that era.

Judy Garland as Hannah Brown and Fred Astaire as Don Hewes in the finale of the 1948 musical Easter Parade

Judy Garland as Hannah Brown and Fred Astaire as Don Hewes in the finale of the 1948 musical Easter Parade (Image from Wikipedia)

And what would Easter be without bunnies? Check out the article about the ‘bunny trade’ back then—it was quite a brisk business. American bunnies. Bunnies from Australia. Bunnies from Belgium. The Australian bunnies ruled supreme. And apparently some folks took their bunny purchases very seriously, accommodating their tiny, new little friends in elaborate apartment-like ‘digs’! Thankfully I think (and I hope) a bit more common sense prevails nowadays when it comes to acquiring—or should I say ‘not acquiring’ bunnies at Easter time. Back then, it appears to have been de rigueur.

And, as always, the advertisements are very revealing. Ladies, don’t forget to purchase the ‘hair switches’ you’ll need to enhance the look of your Easter bonnet! And, gents, it may be time to invest in a new $15 balmacaan*!

Anyway, I hope you find something of interest here~ Best wishes to you all for a very Happy Easter!

*Per Merriam-Webster’s: “a loose single-breasted overcoat usually having raglan sleeves and a short turnover collar”

Fifth Avenue Easter Parade (Library of Congress -  LC-DIG-ggbain-09337)

Fifth Avenue Easter Parade (ca 1910 – ca 1915, Library of Congress – LC-DIG-ggbain-09337)

Easter - entering St. Thomas's (ca 1910 - ca 1915 - Library of Congress, LC-DIG-ggbain-11681)

Easter – entering St. Thomas’s (ca 1910 – ca 1915 – Library of Congress, LC-DIG-ggbain-11681)

Easter egg rolling, White House, [Washington, D.C.], 1915 (Library of Congress,  LC-DIG-npcc-27674)

Easter egg rolling, White House, [Washington, D.C.], 1915 (Library of Congress, LC-DIG-npcc-27674)

Easter egg rolling, White House, [Washington, D.C.], 1915 (Library of Congress,  LC-DIG-npcc-27675)

Easter egg rolling, White House, [Washington, D.C.], 1915 (Library of Congress, LC-DIG-npcc-27675)

EASTER. CHILDREN OF RODIER, WHITE HOUSE TELEGRAPH OPERATOR, READY FOR EGG ROLLING, 1915 (Library of Congress,  LC-DIG-hec-06371)

EASTER. CHILDREN OF RODIER, WHITE HOUSE TELEGRAPH OPERATOR, READY FOR EGG ROLLING, 1915 (Library of Congress, LC-DIG-hec-06371)

Easter Bunnies in Great Demand (The Troy Times, 1 April 1915)

Rabbits for Easter souvenirs are unusually large and varied this season. The prices are comparatively high. A little bunny, which would be dear at a quarter of a dollar at any other time, is quickly snapped up for a dollar, sometimes more, just before Easter. As is customary at this time of year, the supply is far behind the demand.

The little fellows are offered for sale in expensive nests in great variety. These vary from simply little baskets just large enough for a single occupant to miniature kennels or houses with every modern convenience. These little homes often contain several apartments, carpeted with cotton or even raw silk. It often costs many dollars, to provide an Easter rabbit with one of these luxurious homes.

The pure white rabbits, as is customary, bring the best prices. They are generally preferred above any other color. The supply of white rabbits is very limited. They are imported especially for the Easter trade from Australia. This particular market is very difficult to supply, since it is necessary for the little bunnies to be not more than a few days old on Easter Sunday They quickly outgrow the size most in demand by the Easter trade.

The young of the native-born American rabbits are a grayish white in color. The color makes all the difference in the world when it comes to selling them at Easter.

The growth of late of the Belgian hare industry has made a large supply of their young available at Easter, but the color is not satisfactory. They are reddish brown in color and slightly larger than the older breeds. It is hoped by the trade that the young of the Belgian hare will eventually come into favor, thus solving the difficult problem of the Easter rabbit supply.

Illustrated is an Easter bunny that came to live with two little boys. These little boys have a game which they invariably play, on Easter morning. “Hunting the eggs” it is called. Their mamma buys candy eggs in beautiful colors, and on the night before Easter when the kiddies are slumbering she makes little nests of hay, using as a foundation old hats; then she fills these nests with the colored candy Easter eggs and secretes them in the most unheard of places. With shouts of glee these youngsters pass the early morning hours of Easter day searching for these nests.

The Troy Times, 1 April 1915

The Troy Times, 1 April 1915

The Troy Times, 1 April 1915

CLICK TO ENLARGE – The Troy Times, 1 April 1915

easter_clothes_1915

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle, 31 March 1915

The Post-Standard, Syracuse, NY, 3 April 1915

The Post-Standard, Syracuse, NY, 3 April 1915

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle, 31 March 1915

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle, 31 March 1915

Categories: 1900s, Advertisements, Easter, Holidays & Festivities | 4 Comments

Vintage Easter cards

Easter will soon be upon us. Seems an appropriate moment to post some vintage Easter cards. These belonged to my mother’s side of the family. Two are from her Aunt Jessie Trewin—the top card and the one with the little girl holding the yellow bonnet full of chicks. The rest are unlabelled or from ‘aunties’, i.e., friends of my grandmother’s. I think I like the top one and the one used in the blog’s header the best. Very sweet!
card7

card1

card2

card3

card4

card5

card6

card8

Categories: Easter, Holidays & Festivities, Vintage cards | 2 Comments

More traces of Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead & Cornelia M. Ely

Down Among the Coal Mines -- Chutes Loading the Canal-Boats on the Lehigh Canal, a wood engraving published in Harper's Weekly, February 1873. Coal was loaded at Mauch Chunk (Image found on Wikimedia Commons; public domain in the US)

Carbon County Scene: “Down Among the Coal Mines — Chutes Loading the Canal-Boats on the Lehigh Canal,” a wood engraving published in Harper’s Weekly, February 1873. Coal was loaded at Mauch Chunk (Image found on Wikimedia Commons; public domain in the US)

One of this blog’s new readers, whose spouse is a descendant of Abram & Cornelia Brodhead, kindly pointed me in the direction of some wonderful Carbon County resources that are available online thanks to the amazing contributions of a Mr. Tony Bennyhoff.  They reveal some interesting details, and I encourage anyone whose ancestors spent time in Carbon County to check them out. You never know what you may find.

What I found were several newspaper notices related to Abram’s passing, and I am sharing them here:

The Lehighton Press, Volume 2, Number 2, Thursday, October 27, 1892:
Death of A. C. Brodhead. Abram C. Brodhead died on Tuesday morning at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Garrett B. Linderman, South Bethlehem. Mr. Brodhead was 68 years of age, and lived for many years in Lehighton. About two months ago he went to South Bethlehem to visit his daughter, and while there he was taken ill. Mr. Brodhead was the youngest brother of the late Judge A. G. Brodhead , of Mauch Chunk; D. D. Brodhead , of Wilkes-Barre; A. J. Brodhead , of Flemington, N. J., and W. F. Brodhead, of Packerton. He was a staunch Democrat, having held several offices in the gift of his party. He was well known and greatly respected. The funeral of the deceased will take place to-day. Interment at Bridgeport, Conn. [Note: W. F. Brodhead, of Packerton, was a cousin on the Dingman side,  the son of William Franklin Brodhead (b 1807) and Jane Dingman (b 1808; Cornelia Dingman’s younger sister).]

Carbon Advocate, Volume 20, Number 50, Saturday, October 29, 1892:
Death of Abr. Brodhead. After an illness dating back a long time Abraham Brodhead died at the home of his daughter at Bethlehem on Monday night at the age of 68 years. For many years deceased resided in this city and was the superintendent of the Lehigh Stove Foundry. During the Grover Cleveland administration he held a lucrative position in the Philadelphia mint. He was an eccentric character in many ways. The news of his death was heard with regret by many old friends here.

View of Mauch Chunk, Carbon County, Pennsylvania, a wood engraving sketched by Theodore R. Davis and published in Harper's Weekly, September 1869 (Found on Wikimedia Commons; image is in public domain in US)

“View of Mauch Chunk, Carbon County, Pennsylvania,” a wood engraving sketched by Theodore R. Davis and published in Harper’s Weekly, September 1869 (Found on Wikimedia Commons; image is in public domain in US)

The Lehighton Press, Volume 2, Number 3, Thursday, November 3, 1892:
Funeral of A. C. Brodhead – The funeral of A. C. Brodhead, of Lehighton, took place on Thursday morning last from the residence of Mrs. G. B. Linderman, the daughter of the deceased, at South Bethlehem. The services were conducted by Rev. Gilbert H. Sterling, after which the remains were taken to Bridgeport, Conn., and there interred beside Mr. Brodhead’s wife. Mr. Brodhead was born in Pike county, August 6, 1824. In his early years Mr. Brodhead was connected with the Lehigh Valley Railroad and was subsequently in the government employ, in the custom house, in New York, and in later years in the mint, in Philadelphia. He was the youngest son of Garrett Brodhead and his wife, Cornelia Dingman , of Delaware, Pa. He was married January 6, 1862, to Cornelia Ely , of Bridgeport, Conn., but his wife died in the second  year thereafter, leaving but one child, Jennie, wife of Garrett B. Linderman. The funeral was largely attended by relatives and friends of the deceased from Lehighton and Mauch Chunk.

And, I found a morsel about Cornelia M. Ely in George Burritt Vanderpoel’s The Ely ancestry: lineage of Richard Ely of Plymouth, England who came to Boston, Mass., about 1655 & settled at Lyme, Conn, in 1660… (NY: Calumet Press, 1902, p. 369):

137313- Cornelia Maria Ely, b. 1842, d. 1864, dau. of Henry Gideon Ely and Cornelia Maria Whiting; m. 1863, Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead, Lehighton, Carbon Co., Pa., who was b. 1824, son of Garrett Brodhead and Cornelia Dingman. Their children:

1. Jennie S, b. 1863.

So Abram was ‘well known and greatly respected’ and ‘an eccentric character in many ways.’ I enjoy hearing little details like that, don’t you?

I am so grateful for this blog’s readers and appreciate all the feedback and help you so generously provide!

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Pennsylvania | 2 Comments

James Easton Brodhead’s fish story – summer 1916

James Easton Brodhead

James Easton Brodhead – image from my family’s personal collection

Just a quick post to share a little article “A Fisherman’s Scales” which I came across online and found rather funny. It’s from Fur-Fish-Game Volumes 23-24 (A. R. Harding Publishing Company, 1 January 1916) and gives a bit of a glimpse into the life of my great-grandfather A. D. Brodhead’s brother James Easton Brodhead who lived in that grand house in Flemington, NJ, and about whom I wrote in a past post. I imagine that once this little piece was published, his siblings (those still alive at that point) and children gave him a bit of a razz. James would have been about 68 at the time, and likely went on to catch many more fish. He was child number four of A. J. Brodhead and Ophelia Easton‘s ten children but he outlived all of them, dying on 10 November 1943 at the ripe old age of 92. Enjoy the fish story and feel free to share one of your own in the comment box below!

Do not tell fish stories where the people know you; but particularly, don’t tell them where they know the fish. ~Mark Twain

Fur_News_Aug_1916

Fur-Fish-Game Volumes 23-24 (A. R. Harding Publishing Company, 1 January 1916) – CREDIT: Google Books

salmon_flies

Salmon and Sea Trout Flies from Fly Fishing (1899), Sir Edward Grey, 1920 edition (Wikimedia – Public domain in US)

 

Categories: Brodhead, Fishing, Flemington, Hobbies, Nature | 8 Comments

Traces of Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead & wife Cornelia M. Ely

Over the years, I’ve been trying to connect the dots on Find a Grave, linking relatives together. Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead, brother of my 2nd great-grandfather Andrew Jackson Brodhead, about whom I know very little, has long eluded me. But, I just discovered his and his wife’s graves on the Find a Grave site, and with the permission of ‘Nashvillerambler’, I am publishing the images here. The graves are located in Mountain Grove Cemetery & Mausoleum, Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT.

I’ve put in a request to have Abram linked to his parents Garret Brodhead and Cornelia Dingman Brodhead. Just goes to show what a wonderful gift Find a Grave can be when searching for one’s ancestors!

Abram and Cornelia married in 1863 when she was about 21 and he was 39. A daughter Jennie Seymour Brodhead was born later that year. Cornelia died the following year, and I believe Abram remained a bachelor for the rest of his days. Daughter Jennie married into the Linderman family, making her a direct descendant of Richard Brodhead (b. 1771) and Hannah Drake (b. 1769) along two Brodhead family lines.

Brodhead_graves

Abram C Brodhead grave in Mountain Grove Cemetery and Mausoleum in Bridgeport, CT (PHOTO PERMISSION: Find a Grave’s ‘Nashvillerambler’)

Brodhead graves

Cornelia M. (Ely) Brodhead grave in Mountain Grove Cemetery and Mausoleum in Bridgeport, CT (PHOTO PERMISSION: Find a Grave’s ‘Nashvillerambler’)

***********************************************************************************

Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832)

Parents: Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832)

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851)

Parents: Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851)

Albert Gallatin Brodhead portrait

Brother: Albert Gallatin Brodhead portrait from 1905’s Historic Homes and Institutions and Genealogical and Personal Memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, PA (p. 260)

Andrew Jackson Brodhead

Brother: Andrew Jackson Brodhead, my 2nd great-grandfather

 

Categories: Brodhead, Linderman, Mountain Grove Cemetery & Mausoleum Bridgeport CT | 8 Comments

Some feline chips off the old block…

If you’re a fan of vintage cartoons, check out the amusing seven-minute-long Chips Off the Old Block from 1942. Could not resist posting it here given the name of this blog.

Some 1967 chips off the old block

1967 – some new chips off the old block appeared at our house

It reminded me of lots of the kittens who appeared at our old farmhouse 40-50 years ago. I dug out this old slide of two little 1967 chips. We never discovered who their ‘dad’ was.

Somewhere we have a handwritten ‘cat family tree tree’ that my mom started but abandoned after documenting the first few generations of barnyard cats, realizing that it was a losing battle. If I find her chart again, I’ll add it to this post. It’s very amusing. Our all-time favorite cat from that era was a Tabby cat named ‘Jeff’ who disappeared one fall and was gone for six months. We assumed he’d been eaten by something, but he eventually returned—one leg almost completely severed. The vet amputated it, and miraculously Jeff survived to a pretty ripe old age.

Categories: Miscellaneous, Pets | 2 Comments

Family recipe Friday — Four sweet bread recipes from Violet Boles

My grandfather's cousin Violet Boles with a furry friend, 1957.

My grandfather’s cousin Violet Boles with a furry friend, 1957.

To close out the week, I will leave you with four recipes left us by Violet Boles, my mom’s 1st cousin (once removed). Violet was born in Knocknagrally, County Laois, Ireland, in 1904. According to my mother she worked in the hotel industry on the Isle of Wight for a number of years. She emigrated to the US after her marriage to James Newton Boles (b. 1898, Tipperary, Ireland) in the early 1960s. Ordinarily I would not write about folks in the family tree who lived so close to the present day, but Newton (who went by his middle name) and Violet had no children; so, I hope they would not mind me sharing a bit about them here.

My mom’s father William Boles was very close to Newton, his cousin six years his junior. William, who emigrated to the US in 1912, was at least some of Newton’s inspiration to do the same, according to my mother. Newton emigrated in 1925 to Ontario, Canada, and from there made his way to Detroit, where he worked for Uniroyal for many years.

Newton and Violet  eventually retired to 800 20th Avenue North in St. Petersburg, FL, tending their backyard fruit trees and enjoying the warm temperatures and steady sunshine. I remember them showing us their avocado and orange trees—an exotic sight for us. They were wonderfully kind and caring people; both had a twinkle in their eye, and Newton especially had a terrific sense of humor. He was a very fun-loving man. My mother thought the world of him.

Boles_Newt_and_Violet_StPete_house

Newton & Violet Boles in front of their St. Petersburg home

I’ll never forget visiting them in February 1975 or 1976 when Newton was already in his 70s, and how Newton took us up I-4 to ride on Disney’s newly opened ‘Space Mountain’ roller coaster. We were amazed that he took the roller coaster with us and that he seemed to take it all in stride. Newton was a rather wild driver, so between the journey itself and the nerve-shattering, vertebrae-jarring ‘Space Mountain’ ride, we had a very memorable time!

Violet’s banana bread recipe is the best one I’ve ever come across. I’ve made it many times (I love the typo: ‘chapped walnuts’!) The date loaf is delicious, too (that recipe is cut off at the end, but you just add the remaining ingredients, mix, and bake at 350 for 50-60 min., depending on your altitude).

I’ve yet to try the carrot and cranberry breads, but know I will get to them eventually.

So enjoy these, if you are so inclined, and let me know how things turn out. Have a good weekend!

(Note: Newton died in 1983 at 84, and Violet in 1993 at 89. They were interred at St. Petersburg’s Memorial Park Cemetery.)

Boles_Violet_breads1

Boles_Violet_breads2

Categories: Boles, Co. Laois, Co. Tipperary, Food: Family Recipes & Favorites, St. Petersburg | 6 Comments

1805/1806: Luke Brodhead and “The Battle of the Butcher Boys and Delaware River Raftmen”

"The City and Port of Philadelphia, on the River Delaware from Kensington". Frontispiece to The City of Philadelphia..., plate 2. Engraving, hand-colored. Wikimedia Commons: In public domain in US due to publication prior to January 1, 1923. (Image shown has been cropped)

“The City and Port of Philadelphia, on the River Delaware from Kensington”. Frontispiece to The City of Philadelphia…, plate 2. Engraving, hand-colored. Wikimedia Commons: In public domain in US due to publication prior to January 1, 1923. (Image shown has been cropped at the top)

Now here’s an interesting tale dating back to 1805/1806 about a memorable ‘David vs. Goliath’ brawl featuring one Luke Brodhead. I found it in The Evening Gazette (Port Jervis, NY), dated Tuesday, May 28, 1878. The paper is one of thousands archived on the free Fulton History website.

Having checked some Brodhead family genealogies, I believe this Luke was probably the son of Luke Brodhead of Revolutionary War fame (my fifth great-grandfather Garret Brodhead‘s younger brother).  I could be wrong, of course, but there have never been that many Luke Brodheads in the family tree, and age-wise Luke Jr. (1777-1845) is a good fit. He would have been about 28 or 29 at the time of this incident, and still a bachelor. Luke Sr., who was left quite disabled by the war, passed away in 1806 at age 65.

On a side note, you may remember one of last July’s posts: “The 1868 murder of Theodore Brodhead of Delaware Water Gap.” Luke Brodhead Jr. was Theodore’s father. Luke Jr. was married to Elizabeth Wills (1789-1873), and together they had nine children—one girl (b. 1812) and eight boys (born between 1814 and 1831), all very tall in stature. Remember how Elizabeth joked that she had “48 feet of sons”?

Luke Jr. and Elizabeth ran an inn* at the Delaware Water Gap beginning circa 1820 to accommodate the influx of tourists to the area. From the “Theodore” post, you know that some of Luke Jr’s sons carried on this tradition, most notably Luke Wills Brodhead, who is deserving of a separate post of his own.

But, back to the story. It’s quite a tale, and I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. It obviously stood the test of time to be featured in a newspaper article some seven decades later! As always, comments, corrections, suggestions are welcome. And of course if you have different thoughts as to which Luke this was, please let me know.

The Evening Gazette. 28 May 1878

The Evening Gazette. 28 May 1878

— — — — — — —

MEMORABLE ENCOUNTER.
BATTLE OF THE BUTCHER BOYS AND DELAWARE RIVER RAFTMEN.
A HAND TO HAND CONTEST IN PHILADELPHIA OVER 70 YEARS AGO—HOW 10 RAFTMEN WHIPPED 30 BUTCHERS—DEATH OF THE LAST RAFTMAN ENGAGED IN THE FIGHT.

In the year of 1805 or 1806 a fierce fight took place in Philadelphia between about 30 butchers and 10 Delaware river raftmen. Some of the latter we have the names of. There was Major Ebeneezer Wheeler, his brother Joseph, Squire Holmes, John Weiss, Rock Run and William Tyler [**], Royal Warner, Luke Brodhead, and Captain C. Fennington of Delhi, N.Y.

Joseph Wheeler owned a very fleet black mare. The spring before the fight truth his horse had a race with one owned by the association of butchers. He won the race, but the butchers refused to give up the stakes, and it was finally agreed to have a second trial the following spring.

When the spring came around the race took place, and again there was a controversy as to which was the winning horse. This dispute led to the memorable conflict. Joseph Wheeler was challenged by the butchers to a single combat. This be declined to accept for the reason, as he said to his brother, that there was no prospect of fair play being shown him, the butchers outnumbering the raftmen three to one.

Ebeneezer Wheeler then stepped forward and accepted the challenge offered to his brother. He is represented to have been a man of wonderful strength and at the same time as fleet as a deer. He was just six feet two. Luke Brodhead was the same height, and was a man of great courage.

It was proposed by the butchers that the fight should take place with a rope between the combatants. To this Major Wheeler would not concede, saying: “Gentlemen, if I fight I fight to win, and want nothing between us.” An adjoining field was selected for the contest. The butcher who was to be Mr. Wheeler’s antagonist put one hand on the fence and as if to show his agility sprang over into the lot with a bound. The Major followed and jumped the fence without touching it.

Luke Brodhead and Mr. Weiss happened at the place by accident, not knowing any of the parties. They were mere spectators and not called upon to form a part of the ring around the fighters. The fight between the two men began. Mr. Wheeler’s antagonist fell at the first blow. He arose and the second blow from Mr. W’s big fist again sent him to the earth.

At this juncture Mr. Brodhead saw a butcher strike Wheeler with a heavy whip. (It afterward appeared that all the butchers were armed with loaded whips.) Mr. Brodhead went to one of the butchers and told him of the occurrence. He was thrust aside and told it was none of his business. But he persisted and said he would not stand by and see such foul play practiced. He had scarcely done speaking when he received a heavy blow on the head with a whip. The blow nearly stunned him.

Delaware River. An extract of an 1806 map of New Jersey, depicting the area around Philadelphia and Trenton. Credit: Wikimedia Commons. Source: Source=http://maps.bpl.org/details_12444/?mti

Delaware River. An extract of an 1806 map of New Jersey, depicting the area around Philadelphia and Trenton. Credit: Wikimedia Commons. Source: Source=http://maps.bpl.org/details_12444/?mti

In the mean time the fight in the field had progressed, and Wheeler had given his antagonist such a blow that it nearly killed him. Of course he retired at once from the contest.

But the fight now became general. The butchers used their loaded whips freely and the numbers being greatly in their favor gave them courage. Unfortunately, however, for the butchers every time one of them received a square blow from the raftmen he was forced to leave the field. Their numbers soon became less, none of them caring to risk a second blow. The contest thus steadily grew in favor of the raftmen, none of them becoming disabled. They stood their ground to the last, the butchers dropping away one by one until the field was cleared and the victory won for the sturdy raftmen, the butchers finally running from the field.

The mistake the butchers made was in using their whips instead of their fists. They were large, strong men, yet they could not strike the whip with sufficient force to prostrate one of the sturdy raftmen. Nevertheless some very severe blows were given them. Messrs. Wheeler, Brodhead, and Fennington were cut badly and were confined to their boarding-houses several days under medical treatment.

It is said that Mr. Eb. Wheeler and Brodhead each disabled five butchers from as many blows. Captain Fennington of Delhi was a giant in strength and rendered very efficient aid to the raftmen. Mr. Weiss was badly scared and climbed a tree when the fight became general. He was not to be blamed, however, for he was a little fellow and would not have stood much of a chance. Royal Warner also showed the white feather. Joseph Wheeler got over the fence to see the fight when he received the blow of a loaded whip. He picked up a new beaver hat and left.

Luke Brodhead and the Wheelers became warm friends after this fight. The latter insisted on his accompanying them home after their recovery, which he did and remained with them several months. He frequently visited them. They afterward presented him with a tract of land on the Delaware river in Delaware county, which he declined to accept.

Brodhead was one of the most peaceable of men, and was esteemed for his good character and sound judgment, integrity and love of justice. The characters of Mr. Fennington and the Wheelers were also beyond reproach. Rock Run Tyler, the last of the survivors of this fight, ever memorable among raftmen, died in November, 1877, at a very old age.

That part of the family tree

How we are related

*Better in the Poconos by Lawrence Squeri (Penn State Press, 2010), p. 23.

**I think they mean “William ‘Rock Run’ Tyler” judging from the brief bio about him on p. 634 in the book History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886)

Categories: Brodhead, Delaware Water Gap, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia | 2 Comments

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com. The Adventure Journal Theme.

Chips Off the Old Block

A blog devoted to genealogical wanderings - dedicated to family near and far, through distance and time

Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter

The Daily Online Genealogy Newsletter

A SILVER VOICE FROM IRELAND

An eclectic mix of items from Ireland, past, present and future!

My Aunt the WAC

Marian Solomon's midlife transition from the farm to the Women's Army Corps (WACs)

Opening Doors in Brick Walls

“When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us.” ~ Alexander Graham Bell

jerseyrootsgenealogy

A Garden State Journey in Genealogy

Genealogy With Valerie

Genealogy..a journey to the past present and future.

Jake Fletcher's Genealogy Project

Documenting Family History Research

The Hanneman Archive

History Preserved. Lives Treasured.

craftedincarhartt

a blog about women who do amazing things

Radici Siciliane (Sicilian Roots)

Sicilian Family Recipes, with a Twist

Intrepid Pantry

Adventures in Global Groceries

Rose of Sharon Healing

Herbs and Healing for the Nations

Jane's Blog

Bitter Angry Ajumma

TRACK

Truth and Reconciliation for the Adoption Community of Korea

Enhanced News Archive

Enhanced Google News Archive List | Genealogy can be fun and educational | Learn how to use old newspapers to build a family tree

The People of Pancho

At Play In The Archive

Heart of a Southern Woman

A snapshot of life one blog post at a time, including: community and family life, gardening, genealogy, people's stories, spirtiuality, and health.

Cemeteries of Brunswick, Maine

To live in the hearts we leave behind, is not to die. ~ Thomas Campbell

Kitty Calash

Confessions of a Known Bonnet-Wearer

Luce Stellare

Contemplative Articles and poetry

She Made A Difference

Women Who Changed the World

Masako and Spam Musubi

Short Stories about World War II. Two Countries. One Family

 Stanczyk - Internet Muse™

... A Muse — ing                                                

TWISTED LIMBS & CROOKED BRANCHES

Genealogy: Looking For "Dead People"!

Food Perestroika

Adventures in Eastern Bloc Cuisine

Cody C. Delistraty

writer. historian.

Gone Catawampus

The random shenanigans of two desk jockeys with both too much and too little time on their un-manicured hands.

The Consecrated Eminence

The Archives & Special Collections at Amherst College

The Social Historian

Adventures in the world of social, economic, and local history

savethephotos

Just another WordPress.com site

Scots Roots

Helping you dig up your Scots roots.

On the Luce travel blog

Part-time travel, full-time travel obsession

Life in the Boomer Lane

Musings of a former hula hoop champion

Root To Tip

Not just a list of names and dates

The Family Kalamazoo

A genealogical site devoted to the history of the DeKorn and Zuidweg families of Kalamazoo and the Mulder family of Caledonia

Of Graveyards and Things

A discussion of cemeteries visited, gravestone art and epitaphs, and interesting historical documents, photographs, material culture, DNA, and lives researched.

Cemeteries and Cemetery Symbols

Exploring the meaning of cemetery symbols and other graveyard mysteries. For genealogy sleuths, taphophiles and goth kids.

Ephemeral New York

Chronicling an ever-changing city through faded and forgotten artifacts

History Archives

Angel Orensanz Foundation~

Delight-Filled Leaves Art

Finding inspiration in nature, family and the creative life.

CAT IN WATER

Art. Design. Nature. Inspiration

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 160 other followers

%d bloggers like this: