Monthly Archives: May 2011

F.C. Ludey and the End of a Family Line

Emma Trewin had married Francis C. Ludey on 15 February 1871 in Elizabeth, NJ. Born in May 1845, Francis would have been 25. Emma, born in May 1850, would have been 20.

F.C. Ludey, age 70

Francis was the son of German immigrants, Jacob and Eliza, whose names I found on the marriage record. If Francis had any siblings, I have yet to find them. I have seen the surname spelled a variety of ways: Ludy, Ludey, Luddy, etc., and this tends to make searches complicated.

Francis served in the Civil War Union Army in New Jersey’s Company C, 14th Regiment, from 26 August 1862 – 18 June 1865. His Civil War Pension Index Card spelled his name “Ludy.” The Find a Grave website has documented his resting place with a photograph of the memorial. The interment took place in January 1918 in the family’s Evergreen Cemetery plot.

It appears that Francis and Emma started out residing in Elizabeth, but moved to Bayonne, NJ, sometime between 1880-1900.

Sunday School March, 7 Jun 1908

Francis was evidently a very devout Christian given his involvement with the Methodist Episcopal Church in Bayonne, NJ, where he served as Sunday School superintendent and head of a Missionary Society. As for Francis Ludey’s everyday life, it appears from the 1880 census that he worked as a gas fitter. The 1910 census described him as a mechanic.

I can only imagine how sad it must have been for Francis and Emma Ludey to lose so many of their children so young. And the loss of son Frank, whose school notebook we found amidst family papers, must have been a particularly devastating blow given he’d made it to adulthood, was just married, and appeared to have his whole life ahead of him. His death eliminated the possibility that the Ludey name would be carried on by a male descendent.

Photo found in Ludey Family Bible; Reverse says either “1886” or “1866” and then “age 47”. Was this the church pastor?

Auxillary Missionary Society certificate with Ludey signature

Ludey Family Bible

Ludey Family Bible Title Page

Date of printing of Ludey Family Bible

Bookmark in Ludey Family Bible: Mrs. FC Ludey “Mery Christmas” in a child’s handwriting

Categories: Bayonne, Census Records, Civil War, Elizabeth, Union Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Ludey, Methodist Episcopal, Trewin, US Federal 1860, US Federal 1910 | Leave a comment

Emma Trewin Ludey

The youngest of the three Trewin siblings was Emma. She was born on 4 May 1850 in England.  I found this date of birth in the leaflet distributed to guests at her funeral.

Emma Trewin Ludey funeral leaflet

According to this leaflet, her birthplace was “Cambellwell,” but I believe this was probably meant to be Camberwell as the former does not appear to exist, and the latter is situated in South London to the west of Woolwich Arsenal, which is where Emma’s father, Thomas Trewin, worked until the family emigrated to Canada in 1857.

Distance from Woolwich to Camberwell

Emma would have been 9 years old when her family relocated to Jersey City, NJ, from Toronto, Canada, where they had been living for the two years following their arrival in Quebec from England. On 15 February 1871, Emma, then 20 years of age, married Francis C. Ludey in Elizabeth, NJ. Together they had six children. I know this because the 1900 Census, which lists her incorrectly as “Susan Ludy,” states that there were six children altogether but that only two were living as of the 1900 Census (Mary Emma and Louisa). The couple spent a number of years living in Bayonne, NJ.

William & Elizabeth Trewin and Francis & Emma Ludey on Holiday, Bethlehem, PA, 1915 (Image from my family’s personal collection)

From what I have pieced together, the children were:

Francis T. Ludey, born in 1871. He married Metta S. Ryman on 18 June 1896 in Summit. NJ. Less than four years later, Francis (aka Frank) passed away. NJ Deaths and Burials shows a Frank T. Ludry passing away in Summit, NJ, on 11 January 1899. The occupation listed was “C Traveller.” I have no idea what that meant, unless “C” meant “Sea” in which case, perhaps he worked on ships? I believe this “Ludry” spelling to be a typo as “r” and “e” are neighbors on the keyboard and the birth year listed in the record (1871) fits with census records that estimate the year of birth as 1872. Our old family cemetery records show a Frank Ludey being buried in the family plot in Evergreen Cemetery on 13 January 1900. Perhaps the family had the year mistakenly written down as 1900? I have not checked with the cemetery yet. But in any case, a death on the 11th of the month would make a burial on the 13th plausible. (Update 4/14/12: see later posts on Frank T. Ludey which include cause of death)

Online, I found Metta working as a kindergarten teacher in 1896, as staff librarian at Pratt Institute in 1901, and from 1915-1920 working as the librarian-in-charge at Jarvie Memorial Library in Bloomfield, NJ. The 1920 Census shows her as a widow living with her parents in Essex, NJ. She died on 8 July 1952 and was buried with her parents, Charles S. Ryman and Mary Wells, in Milford Cemetery, Milford, Pike Co., PA. The grave can be found on Find a Grave’s website. I believe Metta lived most of her adult life as a widow since women back then typically gave up employment upon getting married and she obviously developed quite a career as a librarian. And being buried with her parents would also indicate she had lived most of her life as a single person. I would certainly be interested in knowing more about Frank Ludey and how/why he passed away so young. Update (1/3/2012): see photo of Frank in later post; click here.

Mary Emma Ludey (aka “Minnie”), born on 5 February 1873, in Elizabeth. She is also buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Hillside. Minnie was married twice, first to Herbert Duryea Crane (a life insurance salesman per the 1900 census; you must open the original census document to find that out) in Bayonne, NJ, on 23 September 1897 (I just love the NJ Marriage record which has his first name spelled “Herebert” and her surname spelled “Lendey”! See why you have to be creative with your searches?!). They had a daughter named Metta Beryl who was born in 1899. Minnie eventually divorced and was living at 17 West 32nd Street in Bayonne, NJ, when she met and married her second husband Lynn Everett Jennison, a professor of history at Bayonne High School, in April 1916. According to the announcement in the NY Times, Professor Jennison was Minnie’s daughter’s instructor and they became acquainted during a parent-teacher conference to discuss the daughter’s progress. The article refers to the daughter as May. I do not know yet whether this was daughter Metta Beryl’s nickname which she may have gone by in everyday life.  The Professor, who’d been a widower, had two daughters from his first marriage with Hestis Jennison: Eleanor S. Jennison (b. circa 1905) and Amelia W. Jennison (b. circa 1906). The 1920 Census showed the couple living in Bayonne. By 1930 they had relocated to Elizabeth, NJ. Mary Emma Ludey passed away on 20 October 1938 at the age of 65.  Lynne Jennison survived her by almost 30 years. He passed away in Duval, Florida, in June 1967 at the age of  88.

Louise Beryl Ludey was born circa 1875 in Union Co., NJ. She married George Bonney (b. 1873) on 13 January 1894 in Port Richmond, NY. The 1900 Census shows a son Harold L. Bonney (b. 1896) and Dorothy B. Bonney (b. June 1898; married Jonathan Beltz; daughter Elenor, b. 1929). At the time the family was living in Bayonne City, Hudson Co., NJ, and George was working as a boiler maker. In addition, Rhode Island Births and Christening records show a son, Francis George Bonney, born on 24 November 1905. The 1910 Census shows the family still living in Providence, Rhode Island, with George still working as a boiler maker.

William W.F. Ludey was born on 11 July 1877 in Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ. According to cemetery records he was buried that same day. See below.

Another child was born on 16 September 1878 per NJ Births and Christening records. Though no name is given in the record, I believe this was Anna L. Ludey who was buried on 28 December 1878. Our family cemetery records state that William W.F. Ludey and Anna L. Ludey died very young and were buried with their grandparents, one child sharing the plot with grandfather Thomas J. Trewin, and the other child sharing a plot with grandmother Mary Phillips Trewin.

Note: The 1880 Census for “Frank Ludy” and Emma Ludy” shows a daughter Lulu Ludey born in 1876. I suspect that “Lulu” and Louisa may be one in the same person. Or Lulu could have been the sixth child about whom Emma Ludey referred in the 1900 census.

___________________________

Emma lived with her daughter Mary Emma “Minnie” Jennison and Mary’s husband Lynn Jennison after Francis Ludey passed away, in Bayonne, NJ, and then in Elizabeth, NJ. Emma died at age 83 on 9 June 1933 in Elizabeth, NJ. She was buried three days later in Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, alongside her husband Francis C. Ludey. Some more about him in the next post.

Emma Trewin Ludey, obituary notices

Categories: Bayonne, Census Records, Elizabeth, Union Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Jennison, Ludey, Obituaries, Ryman, Trewin, US Federal 1880, US Federal 1900, US Federal 1910, US Federal 1920 | Leave a comment

Thomas Trewin Jr. — Bookbinder

Traveling on the ship Ion was also Thomas (12/1839 – 7/1913), son of Thomas Trewin and Mary Anne Phillips. He would have been 18 at the time of the trans-Atlantic crossing and 20 when the family relocated to Jersey City, NJ. His date of birth I found in the 1900 Census. His name was transcribed (incorrectly) as “Thomas ? Frenen.”  His date of death is based on family burial records, showing he was buried in Evergreen Cemetery on 31 July 1913 in the Trewin family plot. He was 73.

I don’t know a lot about Thomas. The 1885 NJ state census shows him living with his sister Emma and her husband Francis C. Ludey in Bayonne, Hudson Co., NJ. According to 1900 and 1910 Census records, he was still residing with Emma and Francis in Bayonne. His status, when listed, was single. He may have lived with is parents until their passing in the late 1870s and then moved in with Emma who had married in 1871. So it could well be that Thomas never married. The 1910 Census lists his occupation as “Bookbinder.”

That unfortunately is about all I know about Thomas. He was active in the religious life of his church as is evidenced by his signature on the below document, a certificate for an auxiliary missionary society of the Methodist Episcopal Church dated 1877. Thomas Trewin served as Secretary and Francis C. Ludey as President. The certificate is for Ludey’s son, Francis T. Ludey. Update: 12/11, please see this follow-up blog post with photos of Thomas!

Auxillary Missionary Society certificate with Trewin signature (Image from my family’s personal collection)

Categories: Bayonne, Census Records, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Ludey, Methodist Episcopal, New Jersey 1885, Trewin, US Federal 1900, US Federal 1910 | Leave a comment

Trewin and Truin, Thomas and Thos

One lesson I’ve learned well is that all genealogical information gleaned must be viewed with some degree of skepticism unless concrete verifiable sources are provided, and even then you can’t assume 100% accuracy. Another lesson learned has to do with spelling. Often family names can be found spelled in a variety of ways, and Trewin is no exception.  I found it spelled “Truin,” which surprised me, but then again, it shouldn’t have. Truin and Trewin sound the same, after all. Even first names can be problematic. Sometimes for William, the abbreviated Wm is used.

William Trewin

Likewise, for Thomas, I found “Thos.” Or you may see nicknames. In searching for a great grandparent named Elizabeth, I came across her in a census record listed as “Lizzie.” Another family relation, Sarah, was listed by her nickname “Sadie.” So you may think records do not exist for your ancestors when they, in fact, do. You may also have always thought an ancestor had one first name only to find that name was an alternate to the real legal name. I’d always heard of an Aunt Minnie. Eventually I learned her name was Mary. I’ve also discovered that some folks went by their middle names in daily life. I learned, for instance, that my Uncle Ben was Edward Benjamin. Also worth noting is that mistakes can be made in the transcription process. For example, one census had my ancestor Emma listed as “Susan”. When I looked at the original document, I could clearly see that it was “Emma,” but for some reason, the transcriber spelled it as “Susan.” Other mistakes are made by the census takers themselves who misspell names perhaps because of different accents. For example, an ancestor Zillah had her name listed as “Allie” in one census.

So, it seems that you may have to tweak names in numerous ways to come up with bona fide (or very likely bona fide) data. Fortunately, when you use a site like Family Search, you can make use of an abundance of filters–something I did not clue in on at first, regrettably, but once I discovered that feature, it simplified searches greatly and presented me with alternatives I might not have considered.

In any case, with all that said, I was able to use the Family Search site to trace the Trewins and flesh out the scanty details we had about the family. Of course, I can’t tell you that everything in this post is 100% true, but I can say that there is a high degree of probability that most of the information is reliable as it is based on family papers, NJ Death and Burial records, England Births and Christening records, census records, and other fairly reliable sources.

William Trewin, taken in 1895

From christening records, I learned that Thomas J. Trewin’s parents’ names were Thomas and Sarah. I also learned that Thomas (Jr.) Trewin’s wife Mary Anne Phillips’ parents’ names were John and Sarah. Thomas and Mary Anne were both born in the County of Kent, England. Today parts of Kent have been taken in by Greater London. Thomas

was born in Woolwich,which is just south of the River Thames, on 12 August 1817. He was christened on 7 September 1817 in the Wesleyan Methodist Church on William Street, in Woolwich. Mary Anne was born in 1820. On Rootsweb World Connect, I found someone listing Mary Anne’s birthplace as “Deppard, Co. Kent, England,” but I have not been able to find a place called “Deppard” so I am not sure what to make of that information.  Most likely this is Deptford, a town south of the River Thames now part of Greater London rather than County Kent. As per the previous post, the pair emigrated to Canada in 1857 and two years later moved to New Jersey, initially settling in Jersey City. According to NJ Deaths and Burials, Thomas, who died in Elizabeth, NJ, on 19 September 1875, had been a carpenter (listed under “Thos. Truin”). He was buried on 22 September 1875 in Evergreen Cemetery in Union County, NJ. I learned (also from NJ records) that Mary Anne passed away on 30 May 1878 in Elizabeth, NJ, and was buried on 2 June 1878, in Evergreen Cemetery as well, next to Thomas. The two were both just 58 years old at the time of their passing.

Copy of William Trewin’s Citizenship Certificate (Image from my family’s personal collection)

Although I don’t have photos of Thomas or Mary Anne, I do have photos (in this post) for their son William and his second wife Elizabeth Sargent.  William, as you may recall from the previous post, had a biography written about him.  He was born in Woolwich, Kent, on 21 March 1847. He was too young to serve in the Civil War and worked in the Commissary Department. He was thrilled to meet President Lincoln at some point during his service. William became a US citizen 0n 26 October 1868. He graduated from Bryant and Stratton Commercial College of NYC the previous year, and from 1867-1868 worked for New York Scientific Magazine. From 1870 to 1890 he worked for the Tidewater Oil Company. In 1896 he established the Trewin Supply Company and sold the company 18 years later. He remained there as a manager until his death from a stroke on 4 December 1916 in Elizabeth (NJ) General Hospital. He was buried in Evergreen Cemetery near his parents.

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin (Image from my family’s personal collection)

As for family matters, around 1881, he married his second wife Elizabeth Sargent. They had one daughter, Zillah, born in 1883. The couple also cared for William Clarence Trewin (“Clarence”) and Albert Phillips Trewin (“Bert”), William Trewin’s sons from his first marriage to Edith Fry. The boys would have been about 10 and 12 at the time of the marriage. Edith Fry, a daughter of Judge Asa Fry of Jersey City, NJ, had died tragically on 7 December 1879, shortly after giving birth. The child, born on 5 December 1879, died the next day. Note: I have seen in NJ Deaths and Burials, the year 1880 used for the deaths of both mother and daughter, but I don’t think this is correct. It seems unlikely that almost exactly a year later the two would have passed away. In addition, those documents list the child’s year of birth as 1880, when the NJ Births and Christenings document clearly shows 7 December 1879 and contains more complete detail, e.g. name of father, age of mother, places of birth for mother and father. Also, the biography available online at US GenWeb Archives states: “In 1879 Mr. Trewin was called upon to mourn the loss of his faithful wife.” So I am inclined to believe “1880” is an error. [Update 3/17/12: the year mother and baby died was indeed 1879. Newspaper mention in The Evening Journal, Jersey City, on Tuesday, December 9, 1879: The numerous friends of Judge Fry will sympathise with him in his bereavement. His oldest daughter, Mrs. Trewin, died at Elizabeth on Sunday, and will be buried with her infant this afternoon.]

Eventually older son “Clarence” (born 9 April 1869) married Vivian Reynolds Cross on 3 June 1896 in Manhattan. From what information came down through the family, I understand the couple initially lived in the NYC area and eventually ended up in Camden, NJ. I’ve heard they had a large number of children, but thus far, I have only discovered three: Earl, Vernon, and Roy. “Clarence” may have worked as a journalist at one point. In any case, he was heavily interested in politics and ran for office in NY state at least once (he lost on that occasion).

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin and Zillah Trewin, 1919, Roundtop, NY (Image from my family’s personal collection)

The younger son of William Trewin and Edith Fry, “Bert” (b. 26 June 1871) spent the majority of his working life in Pittsburgh. Apparently he climbed quite high up in US Steel. He was first married to Georgie Francis Duke. She passed away from influenza in 1917. Together they had three children: Elmer Archer, Albert Gray, and Edith May.  “Bert” later remarried Jessie Mallette Smith. “Bert” passed away on 19 April 1948 in Orlando, FL. He and his two wives are buried in Allegheny Cemetery (Find a Grave link)  in Pittsburgh.

(William Trewin’s siblings, Thomas and Emma, in next post)

Categories: Census Records, Civil War, Elizabeth, Union Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Fry, Phillips, Sargent, Trewin, Wesleyan Methodist | Leave a comment

On the Ship Ion

To continue last post’s topic of the emigration of Thomas J. Trewin and Mary Ann Phillips to Canada in 1857, a while back I came across The Ships List website when searching for information on the ship Ion. The site lists news from the Canadian News and American Intelligencer 1857. The entry for July 8, 1857, states:

“The ship Ion leaves Woolwich Arsenal jetty this day, having on board 187 emigrants (about 240 souls), bound for Quebec. On Saturday 17 single men will leave in the Hibernia, which will complete the shipment of the unemployed artisans connected with the Government works. These poor people have all been shipped under the superintendence of the shipping committee of the Wellington Emigration Fund.”

I was very intrigued by this information since I had no idea the Trewin family had emigrated to Canada because of impoverished circumstances. The web page contains news and information on many different ships (both commercial and passenger) making the crossing from Europe. Some passenger names are listed. These are mostly those who were located in cabins. As the Trewins are not listed, I can only surmise that they were in steerage. I also was curious to see what caused these artisans to be unemployed and what the role of the Wellington Emigration Fund was. I discovered that there was an armaments factory located in Woolwich which is located on the south side of the River Thames in southeast London (formerly in County of Kent). The arsenal expanded greatly during the Crimean War (1854-1856), but once the war ended, a substantial number of the workers there became unemployed. Evidently, the Wellington Fund Emigration Committee worked to resettle many of these unemployed artisans, together with their wives and children if married, in Canada.

Another entry from the Canadian News and American Intelligencer for June 10, 1857, which is located on the same web page, states:

“We are glad to learn that the Wellington Emigration Fund Committee are exercising the utmost vigilance, in conjunction with the Woolwich Committee, to ship off a number of the unemployed workmen from that locality to Canada with all speed. On Thursday next, the ship Midlothian will call at the Arsenal Jetty to take on board sixty adults. These will consist of the most extremely destitute cases, and sad, indeed, was their condition when mustered for inspection. The gentlemen forming the Woolwich Committee, however, have behaved most liberally towards the unfortunate people, all of whom appeared very thankful for the generosity exhibited towards them. Each emigrant will be supplied with a railway ticket franking them from Quebec (the port of debarcation) to Toronto. Next week, from 150 to 200 adults will be shipped in the Henry Cook, from Liverpool, and they will be speedily followed by about a similar number in the Ion, from London. By this means the severe distress at present existing in the neighbourhood of Woolwich will be partly alleviated…”

This explains how the Trewins ended up in Toronto for the two years before heading south to resettle in New Jersey. The July 22, 1857, entry of the Intelligencer informs as to how many individuals emigrated to that point under the umbrella of the Wellington Fund Emigration Committee’s efforts. From May 24 to July 17, 1857, the total number of “souls” was 1,097. Two hundred forty-eight of them had traveled on the Ion.

So this explains the circumstances under which the Trewins came to Canada. I don’t yet know what prompted them to leave Toronto and head south to New Jersey. More on the Trewins in the next post.

Categories: Crimean War, Quebec City, Quebec, The Ion, Toronto, Ontario, Trewin, Woolwich, Greater London | 5 Comments

Trewin Family of Woolwich, County of Kent

Not long ago, I discovered a little scrap of paper with a faded handwritten note in pencil tucked away with some old family papers: “Thomas and Mary Trewin and three children sailed from England to Quebec on the ship Ion on July 8, 1857.

The other side of the note provided a bit more information:”Were living in Woolwich, County of Kent at that time. Grandpa age 40, Grandma 38, Uncle Will 10 1/2″ I presumed that William referred to our great grandfather William Trewin.

Intrigued, I decided to dig around for some more information about this line of the family about which little was known.

One discovery was a biography about  William Trewin (1845-1916) which I came across in the Memorial Cyclopedia of New Jersey, Ed. Mary Depue Ogden, Vol. III, (Newark: Memorial History Company, 1917). It can be found at Internet Archives. From this bio I was able to learn not only that he had the amazing privilege of meeting Pres. Abraham Lincoln while serving for the Commissary Dept. during the Civil War, but also was able to confirm the details found in the handwritten note as to where in England he and his parents had come from and how and when they ended up in New Jersey.

As confirmed by the bio, William Trewin’s parents were Thomas J. Trewin and Mary Anne Phillips Trewin of Woolwich, England, which at the time of William’s birth (March 21, 1845) was located in the county of Kent. Today it is part of London. If the handwritten note is accurate, Thomas would have been born circa 1817 and Mary circa 1819. Thomas is described in the bio as “the builder and founder of one of the first Wesleyan Methodist chapels erected in London.” I tried to research that angle online, but have yet to find details connecting him to the construction of a Wesleyan Methodist chapel in London. The bio confirms that Thomas and Mary Anne Trewin moved their family to Canada in 1857. William would have been 12. They lived in Toronto and two years later resettled in New Jersey.

The names of William’s two other siblings I have from a genealogy passed down by family: Thomas and Emma. Emma married Francis C. Ludey. Together they had a daughter Mary Emma (Minnie). I do not have any information yet as to what happened to Thomas. Note: Of the two siblings, only Emma is mentioned in the bio as having survived William at the time of his death in 1916.

William was married first to Edith H. Fry, daughter of Judge Asa Fry of Jersey City. Together they had two sons, William Clarence Trewin and Albert Phillips Trewin. Some time after Edith passed away (1879), William married Miss Elizabeth Sargent, also of Jersey City. Together they had one daughter, Zillah.

More on the Trewins in the next post.

Categories: Jersey City, Hudson Co., Lincoln, President Abraham, Ludey, Quebec City, Quebec, Sargent, The Ion, Trewin, Wesleyan Methodist, Woolwich, Greater London | Leave a comment

The Daniel Jr. Puzzle

In the last post, I said I’d leave Daniel Brodhead Jr. (son of Brig. General Daniel Brodhead of Revolutionary War fame) who “died when young” to another post since there is a bit of a story there.  I’d always assumed “died when young” meant that young Daniel was a child when he died. Then one day I read on Wikipedia that he died of wounds he suffered in 1776 at the Battle of Long Island during the Revolutionary War. He was in the 8th Pennsylvania Regiment and had been wounded and captured. He was quickly exchanged, but died of his wounds shortly after being released. He’d have been just 20. And I found information on page 986 of Armstrong County Pennsylvania: Her People, Past and Present, Vol II, Chicago: J.H. Beers & Co., 1914, to corroborate that version of events: “The son, Daniel, Jr., was wounded at the Battle of Long Island and captured, was exchanged and died soon afterward.”

I thought that was the end of that mystery, but then I made a few new discoveries that made me question Daniel Jr.’s fate once again:

  • In his article “General Daniel Brodhead” Patriot in War, Civil Servant in Peace” (Milestones Vol. 17, No. 2), Dr. John C. Appel, a history professor at East Stroudsburg State College, stated: “Colonel Brodhead had seen very little of his family during the war. A son, Daniel, saw military service until captured by the British. After release he entered business in Philadelphia.” Hmmm…
  • Volume II of the book, Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania, edited by John W. Jordan, LLD, and published by The Lewis Publishing Company of New York and Chicago in 1911, makes no mention of Brig. Gen. Daniel Brodhead’s children, Daniel Jr. and Ann Garton. See pages 906-911. However on page 907, we read that Luke Brodhead (1737-1806; Brig. Gen. Daniel Brodhead’s brother) enlisted in the Revolutionary War in “the spring of 1776 as a third lieutenant, First American Rifle Regiment, Colonel William Thompson commanding. He was appointed second lieutenant, October 24, 1776, in Major Simon Williams’ regiment. He was wounded and taken prisoner at battle of Long Island (italics mine). Later he was commissioned captain of the Sixth Pennsylvania Regiment under Colonel Magaw in Continental service.” Could Luke have been confused with Daniel Jr? Or were both men indeed wounded and taken prisoner in the same battle?
  • Most surprising, I came upon a World Connect Project genealogy showing Daniel Jr. as having married someone named Christian Abel. Together they produced six children. But as there was only one person showing such a genealogy, I had my doubts.

Then I re-read the excerpt mentioning Daniel Jr. in Dr. John C. Appel’s article, “General Daniel Brodhead: Patriot in War, Civil Servant in Peace” (Milestones Vol. 17, No. 2): “Colonel Brodhead had seen very little of his family during the war. A son, Daniel, saw military service until captured by the British. After release he entered business in Philadelphia.” I wondered about the pronoun “he” in that last sentence. Perhaps, the “release” referred to Brig. Gen. Daniel Brodhead’s exit from the military because he did indeed wind up in Philadelphia…. But that seemed a bit of a stretch.

Well, through the Brodhead Family Association of Port Ewen, NY, I learned that, indeed, Daniel Jr. did survive the Revolutionary War and did go on to marry and have children! Wow–that was quite a surprise! The reason they are sure about this is that at some point this Daniel Jr. applied for a pension and when doing so submitted an affidavit of his service and identity-related documentation. So the World Connect Project listing, it would seem, is correct: Daniel Jr.’s dates are listed as 1756 – 2 Feb 1831; he was married to ‘Christian Abel’ (have not found anything to verify) and fathered six children (Ellen, Julianna, Amanda, Evelina, Mira, and Daniel). Other evidence of this Daniel Jr. exists in Genealogical Abstracts Revolutionary War Veterans Scrip Act 1852 by Margie G. Brown. (6/7/2011 Follow-up Note: In checking Brodhead Family History (Vol. IV, page 295) published by the Brodhead Family Association, I discovered that they do not show the identity of Daniel Jr.’s spouse; as that volume appeared in 1986, they could have issued an amendment at some point, so this is something I’ll have to look into).

In my last post, I shared that I’d read that Brig. General Daniel Brodhead left all his lands to his daughter Ann Garton Brodhead Heiner, and from her the lands all went to her son, John. That made me wonder what kind of relationship existed between Daniel Sr. and Daniel Jr. We know they saw very little of each other given Daniel Sr.’s extensive military service and travels. Were they pretty much estranged? Somewhere along the way, I’d heard/read that Daniel Jr. had business dealings out in Kentucky, buying and selling land. Apparently he was not a great success at it. Did Daniel Sr. see the way his son operated out in KY and then decide not to trust him with his belongings and property? And why was Daniel Jr. dropped from family descriptions (e.g. the previously mentioned Luke W. Brodhead’s book)? I’d love to know the answers to these questions some day.

Update 5/30/13: Daniel Jr.’s military service dates as a 1st Lieutenant and then a Captain can be found on the State Society of the Cincinnati of Pennsylvania website.  Also, this recent post may hold some clues about the Daniel Sr./Daniel Jr. relationship.

Categories: Brodhead, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia | 6 Comments

Milford Monument

I recently came across a website called pennsylvaniagravestones.org. It’s similar to Find a Grave but is limited (obviously!) to PA. I searched for the Brodhead surname and came up with the following:

Most of these are on Find a Grave, as I recall, however, one that stood out for me was “Brodhead (RW), Daniel.” If you go to the site, you’ll see a photo of the monument for Brig. Gen. Daniel Brodhead who was mentioned in previous posts. It’s in the Milford Cemetery in PA, and is dedicated to Daniel and his 1st wife, Elizabeth DePuy (sometimes spelled “DePui”), and 2nd wife, Rebecca Mifflin. A photo of the monument has yet to appear on Find a Grave, so this PA website is worth knowing about.

As for Daniel’s heirs, I’m not sure what to make of writings by Luke Wills Brodhead (The Delaware Water Gap: Its Legends and Early History, Philadelphia: Sherman Co. Printers, 1870), who said Daniel “left several daughters, and one son, named Daniel, who died when a young man.” First, off the bat, I will say that I’ll leave son Daniel to another post since there is a bit of a story to him. Second, I have yet to come across any evidence of more daughters. Ann Garton Brodhead (b. 12 February 1758, m. Casper Heiner in 1779) was–as far as I can see–his only daughter. She and her husband had five children: John Heiner (b. 1780), Rebecca Johnson Heiner (recipient of her grandfather Daniel Brodhead’s “miniature picture set in gold”), Margaret Heiner, Catherine H. Heiner (recipient of her grandfather Daniel Brodhead’s “small portrait picture”), and Mary Heiner.

When I came across that Heiner surname, I used it in a Google search and found some interesting information at the PA-Roots website: a bio of General Daniel Brodhead from an 1883 book, History of Armstrong County Pennsylvania by Robert Walker Smith, published by Waterman, Watkins & Co. of Chicago. The bulk of the bio describes Daniel’s extremely successful military career, but there is information towards the end about his children and grandchildren. For instance we learn that Casper Heiner, Ann Garton Brodhead’s husband, was from Reading, PA, a surveyor and “an author on a series of mathematics.”

When the Revolutionary War was over, Daniel was given several thousand acres of land in western Pennsylvania as reward for his outstanding military service. He also purchased land in Virginia, Kentucky, and Western PA. Walker’s bio says that he concentrated his purchases in the vicinity of Kittanning (to the northeast of Pittsburgh) and on the Allegheny (River), “the scenes of his former exploits, which he never ceased to love.” All of his lands were left to Ann Garton Brodhead Heiner upon his death, and from her all the lands passed to her only son, John Heiner.

I will also mention two interesting articles I came across that were written by Dr. John C. Appel, a history professor at East Stroudsburg State College. One is “Colonel Daniel Brodhead and the Problems of Military Supply on the Western Frontier, 1779-1781″ (Milestones Vol. 4, No. 1), and the other is “General Daniel Brodhead” Patriot in War, Civil Servant in Peace” (Milestones Vol. 17, No. 2). You can find them at the Beaver County History web site. He provides insight into Brig. Gen. Daniel Brodhead’s later years:

“Throughout the1790s Daniel Brodhead resided in Philadelphia where he mingled with the top echelons of state and national government (the national capital was located in Philadelphia in the 1790s). In 1788, following the death of his wife, Daniel Brodhead married Rebecca Mifflin, widow of Samuel Mifflin. Samuel’s brother Thomas was soon to be elected Governor of Pennsylvania.” As for why an individual marker may not be found in the Milford Cemetery, Dr. Appel writes, “Upon resigning his surveyor-general office in 1800, the Brodheads retired to Milford, Pennsylvania. He died there in the summer of 1809. His grave has not been identified; but the citizens of that community erected a monument to his memory in the Milford Cemetery.”

Categories: Brodhead, De Puy (De Pui), Milford, Milford Cemetery Milford PA, Revolutionary War | Leave a comment

1755: Enter Benjamin Franklin

The reason I picked up the LaBar book, The Reminiscences of George La Bar, the Centenarian of Monroe County, PA., Who Is Still Living In His 107th Year! by A. B. Burrell, which was introduced in the previous post, was because it contained a few references to the Brodheads–as one might expect given their shared early-settler status. The LaBar family is fortunate to have such a wonderful record from that era in their history.

We do know from George’s book that Ben Franklin came in contact with the Minisink Valley Brodheads, and we have evidence of the courtship taking place between Daniel Brodhead (the future Brigadier General, son of Daniel Brodhead and Hester Wyngart) and Elizabeth DePui (Samuel DePui’s daughter), who were married in 1756 when he was 20, and she was 17.

You may recall that it was in 1755 that the Indians’ rampage against the settlers began. That December (10th) they attacked the Brodhead house. Daniel Brodhead Sr. and his sons and daughter repelled the attack, but the Indians went elsewhere, attacking and destroying many settlers. Five hundred troops were sent to the area immediately, to protect the survivors.  Benjamin Franklin (in his late 40s at the time) was commissioned by the Governor to oversee the construction of fortresses in the region and direct all operations. He arrived in Bethlehem eight days after the rampage to begin his work.

I’m not sure when exactly the following took place, since it’s referred to only as being “early in the Indian Wars”, but at some other point, the Governor sent Franklin to go from fort to fort to pay the troops stationed there. Franklin was to report back his observations. At one point per the LaBar book, Franklin stops by Nicholas DePui’s and while there, “a young Brodhead, son of Daniel, was ‘sparking’ the old man’s daughter, and as he (Brodhead son) was a frontier man, he thought the Colony owed him services, as well as the more idle soldiers. Franklin denied the claim, saying it was unnecessary for a man to stand guard over a a woman who lived in a fort.” I assume “sparking” meant flirting.

Some more references to the Brodheads in 1755:

On June 24, 1756, LaBar relates how a Commissary-General recorded the following account:

LaBar’s book also mentions the 389 troops positioned in Northampton Co. in 1758. On page 16 we read that 26 troops under the command of Lieutenant Wetherhold were positioned at the Brodhead house. As an interesting aside, on page 17 we learn that on 6/21/1757, Samuel DePui’s ailing wife (who by then was Daniel Brodhead Jr.’s mother-in-law) was escorted by troops to a doctor in Bethlehem.

In 1757, Daniel Brodhead (would have been Daniel Jr. as Daniel Sr. died in 1755), signed the following declaring unfair dealing during the Great Walk. The William Marshall referred to is the son of walker Edward Marshall:

In 1763, the year George LaBar was born, the book notes the below (pp. 18-19). I’ll finish this post here, but, hopefully I’ve whetted your appetite to read the LaBar book in full. It is a source of great information–in spite of the fact that the author admits that George’s memory for dates was rather unreliable at 107. And to think he survived another five years–amazing!

Categories: Brodhead, Franklin, Benjamin, LaBar, Stroudsburg | Leave a comment

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