Monthly Archives: January 2012

Some Updated Posts: William Boles & Bertha Woodruff

I recently scanned in a photo of grandfather William Boles in his WWI US Army uniform. Please see the post WWI Itinerary. He was a very handsome young man.

Also uploaded recently were two watercolor paintings by Bertha Winans Woodruff, one of hydrangeas and the other a mixed floral arrangement. You can find them in them in the 9/16/11 post devoted to her. Click here.

Categories: Boles, Woodruff, World War I | 4 Comments

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904, (watermark and labeling added by me)

You may recall a previous post about Robert Packer Brodhead in which I related that much material was available about the Brodhead family from the book Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania. We are very fortunate to have a large framed photo display of Robert’s father and mother, Andrew Jackson Brodhead and Ophelia Easton, together with Robert’s nine siblings. The display was assembled in Flemington, NJ, in 1904, and must have been compiled in the early part of the year since Ophelia passed away that April, some 18 months shy of what would have been her and her husband’s 60th wedding anniversary. Son Calvin died several years later, in 1907, from gastritis*. Andrew Jackson Brodhead died at 91 in 1913. So this assembly of photos is a wonderful thing to have.  My great grandmother Margaret Lewis Martin can be credited with identifying each person. She died in the mid-1940s but at some point before then created a diagram showing who was who, and attached it in an envelope to the reverse side of the frame.

Andrew Jackson Brodhead

Andrew Jackson Brodhead

Brodhead_Ophelia_Easton

Ophelia Easton Brodhead

Below in italics is material on the Andrew Jackson & Ophelia (Easton) Brodhead family excerpted from John W. Jordan’s 1911 book, Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania, in three volumes, published by Lewis Publishers of New York. Note: I cropped the individual photos from the compiled version above; also, please note that Mauch Chunk in Carbon County, Pennsylvania, is now known as the town of Jim Thorpe. Click the preceding link to peruse the interesting materials on the Mauch Chunk Historical Society’s website.

Andrew Jackson Brodhead, third son of Garret and Cornelia (Dingman) Brodhead, was born in Northampton (now Pike county), Pennsylvania, May 6, 1822. He received his early education in the common schools of the towns in which his parents lived, at the Dingman Academy, and a term at the Stroudsburg Academic School. He taught school one year, and in 1850 began working in Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania, where he removed his family in 1851. From 1851 to 1857 he was employed as clerk and bookkeeper, and for five years was in business with a partner, repairing cars used by the pioneer coal company of that region. About 1861 Mr. Brodhead began shipping coal for other producers, and in 1877 opened a general store at Hickory Run, Pennsylvania, where he lived until 1883, when he returned to Mauch Chunk. In 1884 he removed to Flemington, New Jersey, his present home. In 1868-69 he was treasurer of Carbon county, Pennsylvania, for several years he was school director of East Mauch Chunk, and served as justice of the peace.

Calvin Easton Brodhead

Calvin Easton Brodhead

1. Calvin Easton, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, December 27, 1846; married (first) December 6, 1870, Laura Clewell Leisenring, born at Mauch Chunk, August 9, 1848, daughter of Alexander William and Ann (Ruddle) Leisenring.  They had Anna Leisenring, born November 12, 1871; Emily Easton, born November 3, 1872; Alexander William, January 1, 1874; married (second) at Oakville, Canada, Mary Lewis, who died March 31, 1905.

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Garret Brodhead

Garret Brodhead

2. Garret, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, February 11, 1848; married, September 17, 1872, Annie Kocher, born in Mauch Chunk, August 25, 1849, daughter of Conrad and Catherine (Wasser) Kocher.  Seven children: Conrad and Andrew Jackson (twins), born July 19, 1873; Alonzo Blakeslee, December 26, 1875; Calvin Easton and Laura Leisenring (twins), born September 21, 1878; Ruth Randall, born March 7, 1884; and Garrett, born January 3, 1888.

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John Romeyn Brodhead

John Romeyn Brodhead

3. John Romeyn, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, June 11, 1849; married, November 13, 1882, Mary Martha Holbert, born in Chemung, New York, March 22, 1858, daughter of Joshua Sayre and Catherine Van Houton (Ryerson) Holbert.  They had Henry Holbert, born September 29, 1883, and Arthur Sayre, born November 26, 1886.

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James Easton Brodhead

James Easton Brodhead

4. James Easton, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, February 22, 1851; married, May 1, 1877, Hattie Lochlin Boyd, born July 11, 1852, daughter of Nathaniel and Jane (Curran) Boyd.  They have Walter, born March 9, 1878; John Romeyn, born September 25, 1880; Frederick Moon, born July 31, 1883; and Nathaniel Boyd, born June 22, 1891.

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Andrew Douglas Brodhead

Andrew Douglas Brodhead

5. Andrew Douglass [misspelling by author, should be Douglas], born in Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania, August 17, 1852; married Margaret Lewis Martin, born January 15, 1859, daughter of Moses and Sarah Augusta (Lewis) Martin.  They have Edith Easton, born November 3, 1879; Frank Martin, born February 5, 1882; Lewis Dingman, born October 5, 1884; Andrew Jackson, born October 3, 1886.

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Charlotte E. Brodhead

Charlotte E. Brodhead

6. Charlotte Easton, born in Mauch Chunk, December 11, 1855; married, October 5, 1887, Franklin Clark Burk, born in Flemington, New Jersey, April 8, 1853, son of Peter Wilson and Clarinda (Bellis) Burk.

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Jean Struthers Brodhead

Jean Struthers Brodhead

7. Jean Struthers, born in Mauch Chunk, November 21, 1857; married, October 15, 1885, Charles Ashley Blakslee, born in Mauch Chunk, July 4, 1859, son of James Irwin and Caroline Jones (Ashley) Blakslee.  They have Gertrude Easton, born June 21, 1887, and Ophelia Easton Blakslee, born January 9, 1895.
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Robert Packer Brodhead

Robert Packer Brodhead

8. Robert Packer, see forward [of book].

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Emily L. Brodhead

Emily L. Brodhead

9. Emily Linderman, born in East Mauch Chunk, June 1, 1862; married Frederick Moon, born September 30, 1851, son of Samuel and Matilda White Moon. They have Frederick Wiles Moon, born July 27, 1882.

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Richard H. Brodhead

Richard H. Brodhead

10. Richard Henry, born in East Mauch Chunk, November 4, 1864; married, March 6, 1890, Jane Vanderveer Smock, born October 15, 1861, daughter of Daniel Polheim and Sarah Jane Smock. They have Estelle Smock, born November 26, 1890; Mary Ophelia, born April 2, 1892; Jean Blakslee, born July 3, 1893, died July 27, 1893, and Richard Henry.

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Quite a few of their resting places have been documented, and in some cases photographed, on Find a Grave’s website. If you go to Andrew Jackson Brodhead’s entry (click here), you can click on links to others of the family who have been documented.

*Note re: Calvin Easton Brodhead, his May, 1, 1907, obituary in The Reading Eagle stated: Calvin E. Brodhead died suddenly in New York City of gastritis. He was born in Pike County in 1846. He was widely known in contract affairs, having served as chief engineer of the Lehigh Valley Railroad for some time. In 1872 he supervised the construction of the Easton and Amboy division of the road. He was well known in Flemington, NJ, where he lived before locating at Mauch Chunk.

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Easton, Flemington, Lewis, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Obituaries | 8 Comments

William & Elizabeth Trewin and daughter Zillah

Some more photos of William Trewin, his second wife Elizabeth Sargent, and their daughter Zillah Trewin have surfaced. You may remember a previous post in which photos of them appeared. (I have also written quite a bit about them in additional posts; refer to the category link for the Trewins on the right of this page, and you will be able to read all Trewin/Sargent posts created thus far. It is best to start with the oldest posts first.)

One of the newly discovered photos is of William (b. 1847) as a very young man, perhaps a graduation photo. Unfortunately it is undated. There is also a tintype of Elizabeth Sargent Trewin with daughter Zillah (born 1883). And lastly two photos of Zillah as a young child. The one in which she is standing and wearing quite an amazing hat, scarf, and muffler was taken when she was four. Enjoy!

William Trewin

William Trewin

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin with daughter Zillah Trewin Boles, 1883, who later married Wm R. Boles of Dumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin with daughter Zillah Trewin Boles, 1883, who later married Wm R. Boles of Dumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland

Zillah Trewin, circa 1885

Zillah Trewin, circa 1885

Zillah Trewin, age 4, circa 1887

Zillah Trewin, age 4, circa 1887

Zillah Trewin, 1919 (age 36)

Zillah Trewin, 1919 (age 36)

Categories: Elizabeth, Union Co., Sargent, Trewin | Leave a comment

1930s Interior / Mystery Photo

Here is a photo taken in 1936, but the individuals were not identified, and we have no idea who they are.  I love that cat. He looks so fat and happy sitting there with his/her mom and dad. I’ve enlarged the photo a number of times to try to see whose photos are on the mantle. I don’t have a clue as to who those folks are. The photo was in a Trewin family album so there must be a connection there. Anyone with an idea, please let me know!

A 1936 Interior: Occupants Unknown

One happy cat!

Categories: Pets, Trewin | Leave a comment

Two Angus Daughters, Early 1890s

(Photo from my family's personal archives)

(Photo from my family’s personal archives)

I just love this photo and wish I had more like this one. Thankfully it was labelled (but not dated) when I found it buried with all sorts of family papers. It was in bad shape so I spent a lot of time on Photoshop getting rid of distracting specks, spots, and tears. Seated are the moms, two of James and Wealthy Angus‘s daughters, Cecelia Bensey (Angus) Russum and Wealthy Ann (Angus) Woodruff. Standing are their spouses, Thomas B. Russum (left) and William Earl Woodruff (right). (Wealthy and William Woodruff were my great grandparents. William, son of Mary Jane Trowbridge and Francis Woodruff, was the one who was mentioned in previous posts as having received letters from his uncles, Henry and Uzal Trowbridge, during the Civil War.) The photo was taken in the early 1890s, perhaps on the occasion of Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus’ death in March 1892 (both sisters dressed in black). Little Bertha Woodruff was born in 1888; I’d say she looks about four here. Anyone with a stronger opinion on her age, please let me know your thoughts.

With the moms and dads are some of their children and some children of another Angus sister, Mary Martha (married to Austin F. Knowles). I have labelled the photo so I won’t repeat names here. Suffice it to say that I have quite an abundance of material on this side of the family and will be working to assemble it to include as much as possible of it in this blog in the upcoming year.

On a side note, I am probably going to be reducing my blog posting to once per week as other commitments will be taking up more of my time in the coming months. That may change when summer comes as I should have a bit more time on my hands.

I welcome hearing from any Angus descendants who have any information or photos to share or who simply want to get in touch.

Update 5/16/12: Photos have been added to the memorial on Find-a-Grave for Rev. William Russum, who appears in the photo as a small chubby boy.

Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., Knowles, Russum, Woodruff | Leave a comment

More Prized Pets

It’s been a busy week; I’ve managed to add a few more photos to last July’s “Some Prized Pets” post. To view them, click here. Family members, if you have any you would like me to post, send them my way and I will add them in.

Categories: Pets | Leave a comment

Typhoid Fever Claimed Frank T. Ludey

Frank T. Ludey Jr. (1871-1900), photo taken in 1892 at age 29

Typhoid fever–that was the cause of death of Frank T. Ludey, who died in Summit, NJ, on January 11, 1900, after a sixteen-day illness. The death certificate arrived in the mail on Tuesday from the New Jersey Department of Health Archives and solves the mystery as to what took Frank at such a young age. Sadly he was affected before a vaccine appeared nine years later that, combined with improvements in sanitation, drastically reduced the number of typhoid cases in the US.

Per the CDC website, while there are relatively few cases these days here, in the developing world, over twenty million are affected annually with a 10-30 percent mortality rate. Where Frank may have contracted the bacteria Salmonella enterica, of course, we don’t know. The death certificate lists his occupation as “Commercial Traveler” (a.k.a. salesman); I can’t imagine that his travels took him outside the country but one never knows. According to the CDC, in 1900, “the incidence of typhoid fever was approximately 100 per 100,000 population; by 1920, it had decreased to 33.8…”

This image is a work of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, part of the US Dept.of Health and Human Services. As a work of the US federal government, the image is in the public domain.

“Typhoid Fever And Its Prevention In Town and Country” Virginia Health Bulletin vol. 3, #6, June 1911 (VCU Tompkins-McCaw Special Collections; used with permission under Creative Commons 2.0 Generic license) 

Typhoid can only be transmitted from human to human. According to Wikipedia, “the bacteria which causes typhoid fever may be spread through poor hygiene habits and public sanitation conditions, and sometimes also by flying insects feeding on feces.”

If left to run its course, the illness develops in four stages, each one lasting about a week. That Frank died in just over two, one can only imagine what sort of suffering he must have gone through. How horrible for his family and young wife to have to stand by helplessly as he suffered. It’s so tragic, and though he has been gone for 112 years now (hard to believe!), I can’t help but feel sad for him and his family.

I noticed on Wikipedia that typhoid fever has claimed a number of famous victims including Abigail Adams, wife of President John Adams; William Wallace Lincoln, third son of President Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln; and Wilbur Wright of the famed Wright Brothers. It’s thought that typhoid fever may have wiped out the colony of Jamestown.

Illustration from The New York American, 1909  (Public Domain)

Not everyone who contracted it died, however. Some people were carriers of the disease without being affected themselves–the most notorious arguably being Typhoid Mary, a New York chef, who transmitted the bacteria to fifty-three, resulting in three deaths. Carriers were often institutionalized and many went mad from their confinement. At one point, Mary was released if she promised never again to work as a cook, which she did. Some time later, however, another outbreak occurred and it was traced back to her again (she had been working under a pseudonym). She spent the last 24 years of her life in quarantine on an island before succumbing to pneumonia.

So travelers today to the developing world are wise to get vaccinated beforehand.

Some tips from the CDC website under the heading “Boil it, cook it, peel it, or forget it”:

  • “If you drink water, buy it bottled or bring it to a rolling boil for 1 minute before you drink it. Bottled carbonated water is safer than uncarbonated water.”
  • “Ask for drinks without ice unless the ice is made from bottled or boiled water. Avoid popsicles and flavored ices that may have been made with contaminated water.”
  • “Eat foods that have been thoroughly cooked and that are still hot and steaming.”
  • “Avoid raw vegetables and fruits that cannot be peeled. Vegetables like lettuce are easily contaminated and are very hard to wash well.”
  • “When you eat raw fruit or vegetables that can be peeled, peel them yourself. (Wash your hands with soap first.) Do not eat the peelings.”
  • “Avoid foods and beverages from street vendors. It is difficult for food to be kept clean on the street, and many travelers get sick from food bought from street vendors.”

Oh dear, that last one reminds me of a disastrous few days spent in Paris in 1985. No doubt everyone has one story or another on the subject. Perhaps, it’s best to leave the topic behind.

Back to Frank, I wish we knew more about him and his young wife Metta who survived him by many years (she died in 1952). Perhaps in time, we’ll discover more clues. May they both rest in peace.

Categories: Death Certificates, Ludey, Ryman, Trewin | Leave a comment

Hoping the New Year Brings New Discoveries

Happy New Year to everyone. May 2012 bring us all some new and exciting genealogical discoveries. I’m still deciding whether to “ancestry.com” or not; I’m curious as to how helpful it might be, yet it troubles me to have to pay for information that I may be able to find for free elsewhere. Thus far, almost all the information I have found, I have found for free by “googling” names and details or using free sites like Family Search. So “to ancestry.com” or not “to ancestry.com,” that is the question (admittedly not a very important one, at the end of the day)! Perhaps I will try the free trial. Anyone able to recommend it or not?

Well, with what to begin the new year? I must admit the past two weeks have made me a bit lazy–too much cranberry-walnut pie and roast turkey, I guess. But, I did start looking at some more very old family albums, and I came across one that had some more photos of Emma (Trewin) Ludey and her daughter Minnie (Ludey) Crane that were taken in the early 1920s. I hope to scan them in shortly and post them here. I also found the enclosed small photo of Edith May Trewin with her husband Nelson Kilb and their daughter Connie taken in July 1952. It was dated but had no names; fortunately my mother was able to “ID” them.

Nelson & Edith May (Trewin) Kilb with daughter Connie

Now, you may be wondering which Trewin this Edith May is. Well, she was born in 1910 to Albert Phillips Trewin and his first wife Georgie Francis Duke who passed away from influenza in 1917 (just six months prior to the start of the 1918 flu pandemic that ultimately claimed the lives of 3 percent of the world’s population). Albert was the son of William Trewin and his first wife Edith Fry. I’d mentioned Edith May Trewin along with her brothers Elmer Archer Trewin and Albert Gray Trewin at the very end of a previous post.  I first heard the name Nelson Kilb from Find a Grave volunteer photographers Mary and Charlie Burrow. Back in August, they had taken photos for me of Albert’s grave and the graves of his first wife Georgie and second wife Jessie Mallette. (I’d previously discovered the entries for them on the Find a Grave site but they had no grave photos.) The Burrows alerted me to the presence of Nelson Kilb’s grave after noticing it said that he was “husband of Edith Trewin.”  Edith is presumably buried in the same cemetery, the Allegheny Cemetery of Pittsburgh, Allgheney County, but because she remarried someone by the last name of Brown, she must be located elsewhere. The Burrows did not see any sign of her in the vicinity of Nelson’s grave.

It is always fascinating to me how many details start to come together, usually quite slowly, to create what suddenly becomes a snapshot of a moment in one’s family history. Ideally one would like to know more than just names and faces. But that information can only come from the senior members of our families who still have memories of members past; or from notes, diaries, letters, etc. left behind by the dearly departed; or, if one’s extremely lucky, from published books, biographies, etc. I think Colin Newton’s approach of interviewing senior family members on video is a great idea. Audio recordings are also a good idea for the camera shy. I think I am going to try undertaking something like that myself in the year ahead.  It’s the little details about what people were like that makes learning about our ancestors extra interesting and even more special.

Categories: Kilb, Pittsburgh, Trewin | Leave a comment

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