Monthly Archives: February 2012

Trewin Ancestral Plot Thickens

Some recent digging on the Family Search website helped me find some siblings for Thomas J. Trewin (b. 1817) whose apprenticeship papers appeared in the last post: Sarah, John, Mary Ann, and John. And the search confirmed that baby Joseph was definitely Thomas’s brother. (Last June, I’d written a post about the condolence letter written to Thomas (Sr.) and Sarah Trewin by someone named Featherstone on the sad occasion of Joseph’s passing in 1833. At the time I had been uncertain as to whom baby Joseph belonged.) Parents Thomas and Sarah were Wesleyan Methodists and all the children mentioned above were baptized in the Wesleyan Methodist Church on William St. in Woolwich (Greater London). We know from biographical information that Thomas (Jr.) took part in the construction of one of London’s first Wesleyan chapel. Whether it was the Woolwich chapel or one elsewhere, I do not yet know.

Early 19th century image of Gosport, England (from http://www.sopse.org.uk)

I have always wondered about parents Thomas and Sarah’s own origins since the Trewin surname seems to have originated in Cornwall in Southwestern England, and at one time, most Trewins were concentrated there. So my curiosity was piqued when during my search I found a William Trewin, born in 1812 to a Thomas Trewin and a Sarah Larsen. Now, I can’t be sure that those parents are our Thomas and Sarah, at least not yet, but the fact that William was baptized in the Wesleyan Church–albeit on Middle Street in Gosport, Hampshire (located near Portsmouth on England’s south coast)–is intriguing. Could it be that the couple migrated from Cornwall to Hampshire, had William (and perhaps some other children) there, and then sometime between 1812 and 1817 traveled up to the Woolwich area, perhaps for work reasons or to join other Wesleyan Methodists, and ended up settling there?

Royal Arsenal, Woolwich (no known copyright restrictions per Wikipedia)

I did find a marriage record for a Thos. Trewin and Sarah Larcom (Larcom and Larsen are close; same number of letters; both begin with “Lar”; perhaps the discrepancy boils down to differing interpretations during document handwriting analysis) dated 27 February 1811. They were married in Alverstoke, Hampshire, which is just two miles from Gosport. This would certainly fit with William Trewin’s birth in Gosport about eleven months later. Now, if only we can prove that this Thomas and Sarah are indeed our Thomas and Sarah who lived in Woolwich–that would be quite something!  Hopefully it won’t take a trip to Alverstoke to figure this out! Anyone with information on the Trewins in Alverstoke or Woolwich, please get in touch. [see update posted on 6/15/12.]

1-Thomas Trewin 
 +Sarah
|--2-William Trewin b. 23 Jan 1812, c. 23 Feb 1812, Wesleyan Church, Middle
|    Street, Gosport, Hampshire, England
|--2-Thomas J. Trewin b. 12 Aug 1817, Woolwich, Kent, England, c. 7 Sep 1817,
|    Wesleyan Methodist Church, William St, Woolwich, Kent, England
|--2-Sarah Trewin b. 29 May 1822, c. 23 Jun 1822, Wesleyan Methodist Church,
|    William St, Woolwich, Kent, England
|--2-John Trewin b. 10 Jun 1824, c. 4 Jul 1824, Wesleyan Methodist Church,
|    William St, Woolwich, Kent, England
|--2-Mary Ann Trewin b. 23 Nov 1825, c. 9 Apr 1826, Wesleyan Methodist Church,
|    William St, Woolwich, Kent, England
|--2-John Trewin b. 17 Aug 1827, c. 14 Aug 1831, Wesleyan Methodist Church,
|    William St, Woolwich, Kent, England
|--2-Joseph Trewin b. 22 Jul 1831, c. 14 Aug 1831, William St, Wesleyan
|    Methodist Church, Woolwich, Kent, England, d. 9 Apr 1833
 
Categories: Alverstoke, Hampshire, Gosport, Hampshire, Phillips, Trewin, Wesleyan Methodist, Woolwich, Greater London | 2 Comments

Apprenticed to Joseph David Binks of Woolwich

Descendants of Thomas are welcome to contact me so I can email them a high-res copy of this certificate.

Descendants of Thomas are welcome to email me for a high-res copy of this certificate.

Much to my amazement, accidentally mixed in with a bunch of Woodruff family papers was this 1830 indenture certificate whereby shipwright “Thomas Trewin the Elder of Plumstead” placed his son “Thomas the Younger” into the hands of Joseph David Binks of Woolwich with whom the younger Thomas, at 13 years of age, was to apprentice as a cabinet maker and joiner for seven years. The document is dated May 14, 1830, “the Eleventh Year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord, George the Fourth by the Grace of God, of the united Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Kind Defender of the Faith, and so forth, and in the Year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Thirty.” [George IV–not a very popular guy due to his extravagant lifestyle–died some six weeks later; his brother was crowned King William IV.] If you click on the links I included above, you will see that Plumstead and Woolwich are right next door to each other south of the Thames; at that time, the towns were part of the County of Kent, but were later (1889) swallowed up by Greater London. Thomas the younger would have finished his apprenticeship at age 20 in 1837, the year Queen Victoria began her 63-year reign at age 18 and the year in which Charles Dickens set his novel Great Expectations.

Thomas the Elder gave Binks 10 pounds to take his son on, the equivalent of nearly $1,000 today. From August 1832 to August 1834, Thomas the younger was to receive six shillings per week [about $30 today]; seven shillings per week for the next two years; and eight shillings for the remainder of the contract. The certificate is an interesting read, and the scan is of sufficient quality that you should be able to get down to the fine print.

Joseph David Binks’ descendants have posted quite a bit of information on him. He was a master cabinetmaker whose business was situated at 1 Wellington Street in Woolwich. To read more about him, click here.

You may remember that it was Thomas the younger who eventually, in 1857, with his wife Mary Phillips (married January 27, 1839, in Lewisham village, Co. Kent) and children set sail for a new life in Canada having endured great hardship in the Woolwich area once work became scarce at the arsenal there after the Crimean War.* The emigration chapter of their life was described in one of my earliest posts. (To read all Trewin-related posts, click on Trewin under the surname category on the left side of this blog page; it’s best to go in chronological order.)

Note: For an interesting synopsis of the history of London’s royal dockyards, Woolwich and Deptford, visit the PORTCITIESLondon website.

Categories: Phillips, Trewin | Leave a comment

Just Married — Nearly 104 Years Ago!

Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

I went through a box recently and happened upon Fannie Woodruff and Frank Brodhead’s wedding announcement and honeymoon photo, as well as a list of wedding gifts they received and from whom, a wedding guest book, and a small leather-bound guest book that they used when they moved into their new house after their honeymoon.  They were both 26 at the time.

Miss Fannie Bishop Woodruff’s Calling Card

Wedding Announcement

Judging from the body language in the honeymoon photo, they may have hit a rough patch. But I guess back in those days, smiling was not common in photos. Photographers did not appreciate motion–the chance of a lip or an eyebrow being lowered or raised. The pair probably popped out of this faux carriage as soon as they were finished and had a laugh about how serious they must have looked during what was such a festive occasion in their young lives. At least, I hope so!

One thing that caught my eye about the newspaper announcement was “The groom’s father AD Brodhead [son of AJ Brodhead and Ophelia Easton] lives at Greenville, Pennsylvania.” Greenville is actually in western Pennsylvania close to the Ohio border. I had no idea that he had lived out that way, but it must have had to do with his work with the railroad. His brother Richard spent time out there, as I recall. It seems strange that the article did not mention Frank’s mother, Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead. Was it common in those days to leave out a parent’s name? Meanwhile sister Bertha was Fannie’s maid of honor, and her sister Wealthy Mildred Woodruff was a bridesmaid. Her other three sisters, Jennie, Flora, and Celia, were not mentioned.  I don’t recognize any of the other names there.

Frank M. Brodhead’s Calling Card

If you go to Google Streetview for the honeymooners’ new address of 732 Jersey Avenue in Elizabeth, NJ, you’ll see a pretty unremarkable looking street full of homes that look like they could have been there for 100 years. I wonder if the home they spent their first happiest years together in still stands?

Footnote: I checked real estate listings and, indeed, these homes were built in the early 1900s, one of these could well have been their then-new home!

Update: I later discovered that this was indeed the street address of Frank’s parents, A.D. & Margaret Brodhead. Perhaps the parents were living temporarily in Greenville and Frank and Fannie temporarily made their home at #732.

Categories: Angus, Brodhead, Elizabeth, Union Co., Weddings, Woodruff | Leave a comment

Valentine’s Day Cards from Yesteryear

Categories: Holidays & Festivities, Valentine's Day | Leave a comment

William Boles’s New Jersey WWI Service Medallion

We happened upon a box containing this WWI service medallion presented by the State of New Jersey to its citizens who served in the 1st World War. This was awarded to William R. Boles, my grandfather, whose WWI photos and itinerary appear in past blog posts. He never had his name engraved in the rectangular box on the Victory side, but he carried it on a chain so no doubt it meant a great deal to him.

Categories: Boles, World War I | Leave a comment

Sweet Little Edith Easton Brodhead

Brodhead_Edith_Easton_wm

Edith Easton Brodhead

The recent post of the Andrew Jackson Brodhead family reminded me of this sweet little angel, Edith Easton Brodhead, who was born in Perth Amboy, NJ, on November 3, 1879. Both the assembly of photos of the A. J. Brodhead family and this portrait of Edith are in nearly identical frames. And both frames are quite large.

Brodhead_MargaretLewisMartin

Margaret Lewis (Martin) Brodhead

Edith passed away just shy of age 2 years and 5 months. She was the firstborn child of Andrew Douglas Brodhead and Margaret Lewis (Martin) Brodhead who had married the year before Edith was born, in 1878. At the time of Edith’s passing, Andrew Douglas Brodhead was 29, and wife Margaret was 21. The second Brodhead child, Frank Martin Brodhead (my grandfather), was seven weeks old. Two other brothers would follow not long thereafter: Lewis Dingman Brodhead in 1884, and Andrew Jackson Brodhead in 1886.  All of the Brodhead-Martin children were born in Perth Amboy, NJ. (At some point, the family relocated to Elizabeth, which as just up the pike, but I am not sure exactly when that was.)

Brodhead_Andrew_D_old_PS1

Andrew Douglas Brodhead

The portrait of Edith is unsigned; there may be a clue under the mat, but because the frame is very old and the portrait is under glass, I don’t think we’ll be taking it apart any time soon. I plan to write away to the NJ archives to see if I can find out her cause of death. I can’t imagine how sadly her loss must have been felt by the young couple. Perhaps the arrival of baby Frank the preceding month helped them cope with their grief. If Edith was taken by a serious childhood illness, thankfully it did not take Frank as well.

Over the years, I’ve often looked at Edith’s little face and felt sad to think of her loss at such a young age. Makes one appreciate one’s own survival of childhood. There was a time–not all that long ago–when such losses were very common. Little Edith must have brought great joy to those around her during her brief time on earth. That is what I now try to remember whenever  I see her precious little face.

Categories: Brodhead, Easton, Lewis, Martin, Perth Amboy | 3 Comments

Powered by WordPress.com.

TJR MinT

Not Just Food

Dream To Cook

Taste heavenly good

Bruno Biancardi

LANDSCAPE OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY

Ailish Sinclair

Stories and photos from Scotland

Briar Rose Blog

a lifestyle blog by Briar Rose

The Walking Sketchbook

Creating Outdoors in Nature

Paddy Tobin, An Irish Gardener

Our garden, gardens visited, occasional thoughts and book reviews

Dr. Mary Ann Niemczura

Author of "A Past Worth Telling"

Very Nearly Tea Time

Celebrating the best about the ritual of tea

Gerry's Family History

Sharing stories from my family history

The History Interpreter - Janet Few

Presenting and Preserving the Past

What Florida Native Plant Is Blooming Today?™

Daily Photo of Plants Native to Florida

Jet Eliot

Travel and Wildlife Adventures

The Chiddicks Family Tree

Every Family has a story to tell..........Welcome to mine

kelleysdiy

Where Creativity and Imagination Creates Wonderful Ideas for Your Home!

Chaotic Shapes

Art and Lifestyle by Brandon Knoll

thedihedral.wordpress.com/

Climbing, Outdoors, Life!

Dusty Roots & Forgotten Treasures

Researching, Preserving, and Sharing Genealogical Information For Future Generations

WitzEnd Family History

Adventures in Genealogy of the Witzel and Kroening Families

American in Korea

Everything International

The Genealogist's Craft

My aim is to tell interesting stories of how genealogical information comes to be. Please pull up an armchair ...

omordah.wordpress.com/

Art by Susan M. L. Moore

Lee's Birdwatching Adventures Plus

Birdwatching from a Christian Perspective

Story_Trails

Family history in stories recalled by Edie and Leo. Edith GAYLORD Allen, Leo ALLEN, Jr

Princes, Paupers, Pilgrims & Pioneers

“There are two lasting bequests we can give our children: One is roots, the other is wings.” Teaching children values and giving them the opportunity to excel is essential to good parenting. However, I feel I must also provide my children (and myself) insight into the ones who came before us: our ancestors whose lives and stories have shaped us into who we are. This is my journey; these are their stories…

Myricopia

Exploring the Past to Improve the Future

Buddha Walks Into A Wine Bar ....

Sits down with The Two Doctors and .....

MarileeWein.com

DOUBLE GENEALOGY: the ADOPTION WITNESS

Tastes of Health

Recipes For Delicious Food & Healthy Lifestyle

Applegate Genealogy

Helping others discover their roots

allenrizzi

Sempre in Movimento! Published Every Monday and Friday at 12 PM EST

Cooking Without Limits

Food Photography & Recipes

THEVYPEFFECT

all about travelling in korea

Smart Veg Recipes

Welcome to home made, vegeterian, healthy & kids friendly recipes

ICI & LA NATURE PICTURES

Walk and Bike in France and Europe www.walk-bike-camino.com

The Lives of my Ancestors

Lives, Biographies and Sketches of my Family History

Down the Rabbit Hole with Sir LeprechaunRabbit

Serious about Genealogy? Let this Olde Grey hare show you about

Diggin' Up Graves

Genealogy and family history, dirt and all.

Fiction Gets Real: Classic Literary Characters Transported To The Modern World

https://www.amazon.com/Jane-Eyre-Gets-Real-Annabelle-ebook/dp/B00FAS3I7O

Momoe's Cupboard

Low Budget Meals and Ideas

Generations of Nomads

On the Trail of Family Faces, Places, and Stories Around the World

Your daily Civil War newspaper [est. 1995]

All the Civil War news fit to re-print

Author Adrienne Morris

The Writing Life at Middlemay Farm

Travels with Janet

Just another WordPress.com weblog

%d bloggers like this: