Monthly Archives: April 2013

Jane D. Brodhead’s spouse dies; daughter & granddaughter perish in fire; President Benjamin Harrison comes to call

Coincidentally to yesterday’s post on Isaac S. Catlin, a grandson of Garret Brodhead (b. 1733), I discovered an obituary for Isaac’s father Nathaniel Catlin. Nathaniel was married to Jane Dingman Brodhead (1805-1876), daughter of Samuel Brodhead (b. 1779) and Hannah Shoemaker. Interestingly, Jane’s brother Daniel (b. 1798) was married to Nathaniel’s sister Phoebe.

Nathaniel outlived Jane by some 17 years, dying at the ripe old age of 97. What particularly struck me about the obit was the last line about his daughter Mrs. Benjamin F. Tracey having died several years before, perishing in a fire in Washington DC. That definitely piqued my curiosity. I managed to find a newspaper article describing the horrific tragedy which took her life and that of her daughter in February 1890. More below.

NY Herald Tribune, 28 September 1893 (permission from www.fultonhistory.com)

NY Herald Tribune, 28 Sept. 1893 (permission from http://www.fultonhistory.com)

Catlin_Nathaniel

NY Herald Tribune, 28 Sept. 1893 (permission from http://www.fultonhistory.com)

AN AWFUL CALAMITY, the headline about the deadly fire, appears on the front page of the Gloversville, NY, Daily Leader, of 4 February 1890. Nathaniel’s daughter (Isaac’s sister) Delinda E. Catlin (b. 1826) was married to Secretary of the Navy Benjamin F. Tracy who served in the administration of President Benjamin Harrison. The article describes how the Tracy home in Washington DC was consumed by fire, killing Mrs. Tracy, her unmarried daughter Mary, and a French nurse named Josephine. The home was located at 1684 I Street NW which would have placed it on Farragut Square. The cause of the fire was deemed to be a defective flue. Mrs. Tracy (Delinda), who jumped from a second floor window, could have survived the fire had she waited just moments more for the ladder that was being raised to her. The Secretary, who had evidently passed out in the room his wife had just leaped from, was rescued and carried through the window and down the ladder.

Tracy was taken to someone’s home to recover. He was called on there by President Harrison, and Harrison had Tracy removed to the Executive Mansion (the “White House”). It was Harrison who broke the news to Tracy about his wife and daughter. The entire article is included below.

Gloversville, NY, Daily Leader, 4February 1890 (used with permission of www.fultonhistory.com)

Gloversville, NY, Daily Leader, 4 Feb. 1890 (permission from http://www.fultonhistory.com)

Calamity, section 1

1

Calamity, section 2

2

Calamity, section 3

3

Calamity, section 4

4

Calamity, section 5

5

Calamity, Section 6

6

The article goes on to describe how, due to the tragedy, the President and his cabinet called off a planned visit to NYC. The Senate voted to adjourn out of respect. All in all, a terribly tragic story, and I was sorry to come across it. Without a doubt other family tragedies — some known and many still unknown to us — “adorn” our family trees; this is one of the most striking examples I have come across so far. May all those impacted be resting in peace.

Links to Find a Grave memorials:
Delinda E. Catlin Tracy
Mary Farrington Tracy
Benjamin Franklin Tracy
Emma Louise Tracy Wilmerding

White House in the Civil War era 1860s (photographer unknown; photo in public domain*)

White House in the Civil War era 1860s (photographer unknown; photo in public domain*)

President Benjamin Harrison, 23rd president (photo in public domain)

President Benjamin Harrison, 23rd president (Pach Brothers, 1896; photo in public domain*)

Calamity, section 7

7

*This media file is in the public domain in the United States. This applies to U.S. works where the copyright has expired, often because its first publication occurred prior to January 1, 1923. See [http://www.copyright.cornell.edu/public_domain/ this page] for further explanation. This image might not be in the public domain outside of the United States; this especially applies in the countries and areas that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works, such as Canada, mainland China (not Hong Kong nor Macao), Germany, Mexico, and Switzerland.

Categories: Brodhead, Brooklyn, Catlin, Green-Wood Cemetery Brooklyn NY, Harrison, President Benjamin, Shoemaker, Washington DC | 2 Comments

Isaac Swartswood Catlin (1835-1916) — a great grandson of Garret Brodhead

On the Old Fulton NY Postcards website, I came upon the following article on Isaac S. Catlin, son of Jane D. Brodhead and Nathaniel Catlin. He and I share a common ancestor, Garret Brodhead (b. 1733), a lieutenant during the Revolutionary War and brother of Brigadier General Daniel Brodhead who was mentioned in recent posts. The article was published in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle on Sunday, February 7, 1909. An interesting read, although those prices in that advertisement are incredibly distracting!

For more information on the General, visit:
Congressional Medal of Honor
Arlington National Cemetery
New York Times obituary
Political Graveyard
Find a Grave

Reproduced with permission of Old Fulton NY Postcards website

Reproduced with permission of Old Fulton NY Postcards website

Catlin1

Catline_2

Catlin 3

Catlin4

Catlin_5

Catlin_6

Catlin_7

Catlin_8

Catlin_9

Categories: Arlington National, VA, Brodhead, Catlin, Owego | 6 Comments

The curious case of Daniel Brodhead Jr. (1756 – 2 Feb 1831)

Brig. Gen. Daniel Brodhead Portrait

Brig. Gen. Daniel Brodhead Portrait

I’d written once before about Daniel Brodhead Jr., a child of Elizabeth DePuy and Brigadier General Daniel Brodhead of Revolutionary War fame. (The previous blog post on Daniel Jr. can be found here.) Different accounts of Daniel Jr.’s fate had been bandied about over the years. I’d always believed he’d died as an infant, as that is what our family tree had recorded. Then I found an account that he had been killed in the War. Later I found an account stating he settled in Philadelphia and started a business there. Thankfully, his fate was finally confirmed to me by the Brodhead Family Association which had positively identified him through Revolutionary War pension records. So, in short, I was pretty surprised to discover that Daniel Jr. had made it to retirement. (Surprised, too, to learn that he had a wife and six children.)

Daniel Jr. had two siblings: Ann Garton Brodhead (1758) and Phebe Brodhead (c. 1759), and had been excluded from inheriting any of the substantial holdings listed in his father’s will. Family bad boy was the first thought that came to my mind; why else would his father cut him off?

Well, coincidentally, a few days ago, I was looking through some articles on Genealogy Bank, and up popped the following little article from the Tickler, a satirical publication out of Philadelphia (1807-1813) whose writings attacked politicians and government. The article is dated Wednesday, 5 October 1808. It paints a terribly unflattering picture of the General’s son and makes some pretty damning allegations.

Genealogy Bank terms of use prohibit me from posting a snippet of the article here. I am allowed to transcribe small bits of it, but not too many bits (I am not supposed to do anything that will keep you from wanting to subscribe to their services). So here is a heavily chopped version:

Skeleton fresh from the closet

Skeleton in the Brodhead family closet?

There is a… fellow named Dan Brodhead, an illegitimate son of old general Brodhead, who cuts a very busy figure among the Snyderites. …procured goods to a vast amount, on his father’s credit… …married an amiable woman in Virginia, whose property he lavished on prostitutes… deserted by husband… …several small children to support. Does Dan know the same son, whose father called him one of the most infamous wretches, that had ever disgraced society….

Six children were born to Daniel Jr. and his wife between 1803-1814. Three of them (Ellen, Juliana, and Amanda) would have been alive at the time of this publication. (Note: Daniel Jr.’s wife’s name may have been Christian Abel, but I have yet to see verification of that.)

Something must have prompted the authors of the article to hurl such horrible accusations. Illegitimate son? That’s an interesting one. The General was still alive at the time of publication (he passed away on November 15, 1809), suggesting (to me, anyway) that the authors felt they had some facts to back their statements and weren’t particularly concerned about being accused of libel.

Interesting!

Update 6/20/13: There are more recent posts on this topic. Visit:
Daniel Brodhead Jr.: A Timeline of Life Events
Daniel Brodhead Jr.’s daughter, Ellen
 

Categories: Brodhead, Philadelphia, Scandal | Leave a comment

Isaac Jaques (b. 1791) and family – more tidbits

Isaac Jaques had been a successful tailor in Lower Manhattan before retiring to Elizabeth, NJ. An article [found on Genealogy Bank] in the Newark Daily Advertiser, published on Thursday, 15 October 1846, mentions some tailor’s shears–an invention of Isaac’s–as being on display at an exhibition, the Fair of the American Institute: … An entire new invention, by which the cloth can be cut without raising it from the counter.

Elizabeth, NJ, 1872 (David Rumsey Map Collection (*credit below)

Elizabeth, NJ, 1872 (David Rumsey Map Collection (*credit below)

Last week I was wondering why more of Isaac’s children had not been mentioned in the few articles written upon his passing in August 1880. Until last week, I’d never known that Wealthy Ann (Jaques) Angus had siblings: Walter, Christopher, and Charles. Well, using Genealogy Bank, I came upon an obituary notice in the New York Tribune that was published on Thursday, 26 August 1880. From it, we know that two children were still living at the time of Isaac’s death, one of them being Wealthy Ann (d. 1892).

Downtown Elizabeth showing location of Jaques St (lower right) and 2nd Presbyterian Church - Rumsfeld Map Collection - credit below*

Downtown Elizabeth showing location of Reid St. and Jaques St (lower right) and 2nd Presbyterian Church (middle, top) – David Rumsey Map Collection – credit below* I believe Isaac Jaques lived on Reid Street.

According to the terms of use of articles found via the Genealogy Bank site, I am not allowed to provide a snippet of the actual obituary notice; I am only allowed to transcribe small bits of it (but not too many bits for fear you won’t want to subscribe to their services).  

Isaac Jaques, the oldest citizen of Elizabeth and Union County, NJ, died at his home…  …having accumulated a large fortune, he retired from active business in 1833, and bought a tract [Ricketts Farm]... …built a house which he occupied up to the time of his death. He… …was a member of Dr. Spring’s Church, [The Brick Church**]… …was active in caring for the poor… …was a sincere friend of sailors… attended the daily Fulton-street prayer meetings [up to two weeks before he died]. In the centennial celebration at Elizabeth in 1876, [he was one of four] of the oldest residents of the county [they rode in a carriage together; the others have since died]… …twice married… …two children still living. A sister… … is now lying at the point of death. [Funeral] …will take place… …the ***Second Presbyterian Church at Elizabeth.

So that chopped the obit considerably. Sorry I cannot include the whole thing!

In any case, Isaac’s immediate family now appears to have included the following:

1-Isaac Jaques b. 8 Aug 1791, Woodbridge Neck, NJ, d. 24 Aug 1880,
Elizabethtown, NJ
+Wealthy Ann Cushman b. possibly 1796, Hartford, CT, d. 13 Apr 1856,
Elizabeth, Union Co, NJ
|—-2-Wealthy Ann Jaques b. 15 Dec 1815, New York City, New York. NY, d. 7 Mar
| 1892, At Home, 25 Reid Street, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ
|—-2-Walter Jaques b. Cir 1826, New York City, New York USA
|—-2-Christopher P. Jaques b. Cir 1832, New York City, New York USA
|—-2-Dr. Charles P. Jaques b. Cir 1834, New York City, New York USA, d. 2 Nov
| 1866, Brooklyn, Kings Co., NY
+Rebecca Robinson b. Cir 1811, CT, d. After 24 Aug 1880

NY Death Newspaper Extracts (1801-1890) show Charles (a doctor) as having passing away in 1866. So who was the other survivor? Walter or Christopher? There was an 11-year gap between first-born Wealthy and second-born Walter. Had there been other children?

*Image courtesy of David Rumsey Map Collection: State atlas of New Jersey based on State Geological Survey and from additional surveys by and under the direction of F.W. Beers. Published by Beers, Comstock & Cline, 36 Vesey Street, New York. 1872. Lithogc. Power Press Printg. of Charles Hart, 36 Vesey St., N.Y. Engraved on stone by Louis E. Neuman, 36 Vesey St., N.Y.

**For more on the history of the Brick Church, click here.

***For an 1880’s-era exterior view of Second Presbyterian Church of Elizabeth, click here.

Categories: Cushman, Elizabeth, Union Co., Jaques, Manhattan, New York City, Obituaries, Presbyterian | Leave a comment

Isaac Jaques (1791-1880) – a family mystery solved?

(This post is a continuation of the previous post on Isaac Jaques.) A brief but interesting statement appeared in The Trenton State Gazette on April 13, 1880, celebrating Isaac Jaques’ longevity: Isaac Jaques, the oldest citizen of Elizabeth is 91 years of age. He has seen every President of the United States, except President Hayes. His age was not quite accurate, but nonetheless, this was a fun entry to come upon. If it’s true, he would have seen Presidents Washington, Adams, Jefferson, Madison, Munroe, Adams, Jackson, Van Buren, Harrison, Polk, Taylor, Pierce, Buchanan, Lincoln, and Grant! That’s pretty extraordinary to think about.

So what else do we know about Isaac? Well, according to US census records, in 1880, prior to his death, Isaac Jaques was living in his stately Elizabeth, NJ, home with his 2nd wife Rebecca (age 69) and two sisters-in-law: Angelina Wile (82) and Sarah Brown (80).

Wealthy Ann (Jaques) Angus, widow of James W. Angus, probably circa 1890

Wealthy Ann (Jaques) Angus, widow of James W. Angus, probably circa 1890

Isaac’s daughter Wealthy Ann Angus (widow of James Winans Angus, d. 1962) was living up the road with her three children who had yet to fly the coop (she and James Angus had 11 children in all): Walter (18, machinist), Job (23, machinist [and future superintendent of the construction of the Smithsonian Institution building in Washington, DC, and personal friend of President Lincoln]), and Charles (26, oil dealer). Next door to the Angus family lived Wealthy’s daughter Cecelia (25) and son-in-law Thomas B. Russum (30, draughtsman) and the Russum’s children Thomas (6) and Charles (1).

Cecelia Russum (left) and Thomas Russum (right)

Cecelia Russum (left) and Thomas Russum (right)

I would have liked the Memorial article in the last post or the obituaries I’ve seen to have included names of Isaac’s children. For some reason, our family tree for Isaac Jaques has always listed just one child for him and his first wife, Wealthy Ann Cushman: Wealthy Ann (Jaques) Angus, mentioned above. I’d long wondered whether that was correct. It’s been on my “to-do” list for a very long while. So today, I decided to do some digging and discovered one Ancestry tree (yes, I took the plunge after coming upon an enticing promo code) showing a son Walter (b. 1826, NYC) and a son Christopher P. (b. NYC, 1832). Although no sources were cited, I was very intrigued, so I took to the census records, and, lo and behold, in the 1850 record (available for free on Family Search), I discovered Walter (dentist) and Christopher P. There was also another son named Charles P. (b. cir 1834). Christopher and Charles (18 & 16) were working as clerks, perhaps in their father’s tailor shop. The census also showed a Catherine, age 20, and two small children (Isaac and Ann). I presumed Catherine may have been the wife of one of the son’s (Walter?), as the small children were a tad young to still be Wealthy’s. Turns out I was right–I found Catherine and her two children living with her parents (Samuel and Elizabeth Nichols) in 1860 in Elizabeth, NJ. What had happened to Walter? (5/21/13 Update: Walter must have passed away by then. I found a marriage record for Catherine on Family Search–she remarried Willet Stevenson on 22 October 1863 in Elizabeth, NJ.) (10/29/16 Update: Catherine was married to another son named Samuel.)

James W. Angus, older brother of Job W. Angus, father of Job W. Angus (b. 1856)

James W. Angus, older brother of Job W. Angus, father of Job W. Angus (b. 1856)

Wealthy Ann Cushman, Isaac’s first wife, passed away on April 13, 1856. A New York Times obituary for Wealthy [Cushman] Jaques was published on April 15, 1856: At Elizabeth, NJ, on Sunday morning, MRS. WEALTHY ANN JAQUES, wife of Isaac Jaques, in the 62d year of her age. The relatives and friends of the family are respectfully invited to attend her funeral, this (Tuesday) afternoon, at 3 o’clock, from her late residence. By the time of the 1860 census, Isaac (roughly 69) was married to Rebecca Robinson, a widow (age 49).

In summary, I am quite surprised never to have seen any mention made of Wealthy Angus’ siblings in any obituaries anywhere. Perhaps, indeed, they all predeceased her and her father, Isaac Jaques. I just truly find it odd that no family histories in my direct family line and the neighboring lines I’ve seen included any mention of anyone other than Wealthy Angus. Was it because she had been the most successful and the others not worthy of a mention? (I should hope not!) Or maybe they predeceased Wealthy and her father? Or maybe there are mentions of them out there that I simply have yet to come across.

This post has gone on way too long, so I will bid adieu for now. I have one other ‘bombshell’ to share, but I’ll leave that for next time! Maybe by then, I will have learned more about Isaac’s progeny.

Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., Grant, Gen. Ulysses S., Jaques, Lincoln, President Abraham, New York City, Obituaries, Russum, US Federal 1850, US Federal 1860, US Federal 1870, US Federal 1880, Washington, President George | Leave a comment

Isaac Jaques (1791-1880), Manhattan tailor & prominent Elizabeth, NJ, resident

Note: The surname is pronounced “Jay-quiss”; there is no “c”.

Isaac Jaques' calling card

Isaac Jaques’ calling card

On August 25, 1880, the Elizabeth Daily Journal (Elizabeth, NJ) carried a wonderful memorial article about one of my 3rd great grandfathers: Isaac Jaques. He had passed away the day before at the age of 89 and until then had been one of Elizabeth’s oldest and most revered residents.

My grandmother’s sister’s daughter Jennie Belle Coleman typed the article out some 50-60 years ago, and copies were then distributed to family members whose descendants may very well still have one in their treasure trove of family information. Those researching Isaac Jaques have no doubt come across this interesting tribute before, but for the benefit of others who may find this man and his era of interest, I am posting the tribute here. The wealth of information it contains is precious–each time I read it, I pick out something new.  (Note: some of the paragraph breaks are mine for readability.)

Jennie Bell Angus Coleman and daughter, Jennie Belle; Image from my family's private archives of  Jennie Belle Woodruff Coleman with her daughter, 1914

Jennie Bell Angus Coleman and daughter, Jennie Belle; Image from my family’s private archives of Jennie Belle Woodruff Coleman with her daughter, 1914

Elizabeth Daily Journal of 25 August 1880

IN MEMORIAM
****
Mr. Isaac Jaques

As a shock of corn fully ripe, this venerable man, our oldest citizen, has at last been gathered to his fathers, full of years, and in the fullness of Christian faith and hope. Mr. Jaques was born August 8th, 1791, and as he died on the 24th of this month, he had therefore attained the ripe old age of eighty-nine years and sixteen days, Of this long period, about one-half was passed in the city of New York, where he began to live in boyhood , and where he learned the trade and business of his life, which was that of a merchant tailor and clothier. Some forty-three years ago, before the era of Elizabeth’s modern growth had begun, and when it had its old name and stereotyped surroundings of “Elizabethtown”, Mr. Jaques removed hither from New York and purchased the ancient Ricketts property, or a portion of it, with other tracts in the neighborhood of the present “Cross Roads”, where he soon built the house in which he died and in which he lived nearly the whole time of his residence in this place. At that era, there were but few scattering houses between the “old Barber mansion”, which he subsequently purchased, now and long the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Angus [Wealthy Ann Jaques — widow of James Winans Angus], and the Port. But forest trees were numerous, and the road was a rough one indeed, with no sidewalks or attractions for the traveler, either on foot or in a carriage. But the advent of Mr. Jaques in that neglected quarter was the signal of a change for the better, which he inaugurated in person by laying a plank walk for a considerable distance in front of his premises. Time and space do not permit us here to mention other acts manifesting the public spirit and good taste of our aged departed friend at theat initial epoch of this city’s growth, even were we sufficiently familiar with his then history. The story of his early life and the record of his useful and exemplary Christian career, now claim attention and have points of more interest. And as Mr. Jaques was not only very old and a very worthy man, but also a man of rare good sense, extensive experiences of life, large acquaintance with men, great powers of observation and rich reminiscences of the past when among his friends, we may, with much propriety, extend this notice to more length than would otherwise be fitting.

Elizabeth, NJ, US Census map (in public domain - Wikimedia)

Elizabeth, NJ, US Census map (in public domain – Wikimedia)

The writer would also premise that having been favored with some knowledge of Mr. Jacques in early life, where for a few months residing in a friend’s family who knew him and who lived near his store, then between William and Gold on John Street, he feels a special interest in his memory, and desire to do justice to it in the following imperfect sketch. That was in 1826, and we did not enjoy an opportunity of a personal acquaintance until about the year 1870, when beginning our later connection with this city. For the last ten years this has been maintained, during which time we have frequently met with Mr. Jacques in his pleasant family circle, and, occasionally, in the old city, his former home. From his familiar New York, he was never weaned going over daily as along as strength would permit, and particularly drawn thither for many years past, by the honored Fulton Street prayer meeting, where his heart seemed greatly at home, and the consecrated noon hours of which he evidently enjoyed as little entepasts of heaven. Thither he would often direct his trembling steps and age-bent form, when more prudence or less zeal for the Master’s service would have kept him within his own doors. For several years past he has been notably the most aged attendant there, and it would also have been a rare thing to meet an older man walking along alone in the busy streets of New York. But the old gentlemen, though fragile in figure and tottering under the burden of nearly four-score and ten, never seemed to distrust either hinself or the protecting care that guided and guarded him through the friendly eyes and hand of others, acquaintances or strangers.

View near Elizabethtown, NJ, 1847

View near Elizabethtown, NJ, oil painting by Régis François Gignoux, 1847; Honolulu Academy of Arts (in public domain, copyright expired)

Mr. Jacques was a Jerseyman by birth – his native place being our near neighbor-town of Woodbridge, when his father lived at Inbery’s Point, near Woodbridge Creek, two miles this side of Perth Amboy. His father was Samuel B. Jacques, who commanded a Rahway company in the Revolution. He was brother of Col. Moses Jacques, a distinguished officer. The family was of French Huguenot origin. Several brothers came over, one of whom settled on Long Island, one in Connecticut and two in New Jersey. His grandfather was lost at sea on his way to America. The mother of Isaac Jacques was Mary Coddington, a daughter of Jotham Coddington, of Woodbridge. His father died about the year 1798, at Gravel Hill, near Rahway, called Milton. He was in the brick-making business, and built one of the first erected large brick houses on Whitehall Street, New York. His father’s partner in brick-making was James Patton, Aid-de-camp of Governor Livingston during the Revolution. He had a ball pass through his head from ear to ear and yet survived. His father’s brother, Col. Moses Jacques, was also in business with him. The old Jacques homestead and house at Locust Grove, in Woodbridge, is now the property and residence of Mrs. Doketty, a niece of Mrs. Jacques. It is about two miles back of Rahway. There were two farms, one called “the wild cat farm”. Both are in her hands. When Isaac Jacques was a little boy, perhaps seven years old, about the time of his father’s death, he went to live with his grandfather Coddington, near “Hartshorns”, a Quaker, and he had an impression that he then saw Washington as he passed through Woodbridge in a stage. If so, it must have been only a year or two before the death of that great man. Is there any account of his having been on north as late in his life as that?

There were four physicians of the Jacques family. Doctors Moses and John died in New York. We were told by our old friend that he learned his trade of Thompson & Logan in New York. Thompson was an Irishman who married a niece of Robert Lenox, the famous old New York Scotch merchant. A sister of his, Mrs. Tait, died at Lyons Farms a few years ago. His first store in New York was in John Street, near William, and he built a store right opposite. Over his store was a public room where he used to hear Thomas Addis Emmett speak three hours at a time, as also Thornton, and many other eminent orators. Mr. Jacques’ recollections of former citizens of New York were extensive and very interesting. His memory and well-preserved mental faculties generally was remarkable. As to his religious record, he believed that he experienced conversion in early life under the preaching of his father’s pastor, the Rev. Dr. Roe, of the Woodbridge Presbyterian Church, but with confirmed impressions by a sermon of Dr. McDowell in the city of New York. There he regularly attended, and there he heard the late distinguished Dr. Spring, so many years the pastor of the “Brick” church, preach his “trial” sermon. He was an early Sabbath-school teacher, and once in the lecture-room in Rose Street, when he had eleven boys in his class, four of whom became clergymen – the late Rev. Dr. Murray of this city, being one of them. He was converted in the old John Street Methodist Church. Mr. Jacques enjoyed the esteem and confidence of the good citizens of New York. Thus when quite a young man he was invited to take charge of the New York Hospital. It was then located in a large stone building at the upper end of Pearl Street, in Broadway. This position, however, he declined.

This venerable man naturally dwelt much upon past scenes, and respected old landmarks and historical associations, although keenly enjoying present blessings end modern improvements. His walking cane, for example, was from an ancient white oak tree that stood in front of the gate of the Ricketts place, and under which, as he had been told by a number of old persons, Washington and Lafayette once dined together during the Revolutionary War, It was killed by a “wanton girdling”. The visit of the noble Frenchman to this country in 1824-5 as the “Nation’s Guest”, he used to speak of with warm interest. Mr. Jacques’ mother married for her second husband a Mr. Force, a Methodist minister of old Hanover. Of his father’s children, an aged sister, now the only survivor, lies at the point of death at her residence in New York. Mr. Jacques was twice married, first to Miss Wealthy Ann Cushman, of Hartford, Connecticut, and his surviving wife and widow was Mrs. Rebecca Robinson, of Westfield. New Jersey. And now we, too, must bid last farewell to another of earth’s pilgrims long familiar to us by early associations, long before us in life’s crowded thoroughfare, far longer than most men in the active battlefield of duty, more successful than many in winning the day, and yet closing it with no trust in self, but all in God. It was a true euthanasia at last with our aged brother, a peaceful departure from the city of this world, a peaceful victory over the last enemy of our nature, but one long before assured to the faith of his waiting heart – for thus “He giveth his beloved sleep.”

More on Isaac Jaques next week…

Categories: Angus, Coddington, Death, Elizabeth, Union Co., Force, Gen. Lafayette, Geographical Locations, Jaques, New York City, Obituaries, Pitt, Pime Minister William, Washington, President George, Woodruff | Leave a comment

Charles C. Brodhead (1772-1852) — Surveyor

State of New York, 1833

*State of New York, 1833

A recent Google alert drew my attention to an excellent, three-part article by Pete Nelson in the online Adirondack Almanac about surveyor Charles C. Brodhead. As there are many Charles Brodheads in the Brodhead Tree, I turned to my handy volumes of The Brodhead Family: The Story of Captain Daniel Brodhead, his wife Anne Tye, and Their Descendants (BFH), written and published by The Brodhead Family Association, to figure out who this particular Charles was. If I am correct, he was a nephew of my fifth great grandfather Garret Brodhead:

BFH #A-2, Daniel Brodhead (1631, Yorkshire, England – 1680, Esopus, Ulster Co. NY) m. Ann Tye

BFH #B-3, Richard Brodhead (1666, Marbletown, NY – 1771) and Magdelene Jansen – this union produced one child, Daniel; Richard married a 2nd time (Wyntie Pawling)

BFH #C-6, Daniel (1693, Marbletown, NY – 1755, Bethlehem, PA) m. Hester Wyngart

BFH #D-21, Charles (b. 1729) – (brother of my fifth great grandfather Garret) – m. Mary Oliver

BFH #E-81, Charles C. Brodhead (b. 1772-1852) – never married

Charles C. Brodhead had an extraordinary life as a surveyor, engaging in derring-do while surveying swathes of the Adirondack mountains and playing a central role in the development of the Erie Canal. To enjoy this highly informative and well researched three-part article, visit:

For more on Charles C. Brodhead, refer to The Pioneers of Utica by M.M. Bagg, AD MD, published in 1877 by Curtis & Childs of Utica, NY, available online. Click here and go to pp. 104-111.

Find a Grave has his memorial. To view, click here.

His parents’ graves (Modena Rural Cemetery, Ulster Co. NY) can also be seen on Find a Grave. Click here for Charles Sr and here for Mary Oliver. According to BFH Volume I, Charles Sr., who was born in Kingston, NY, but relocated with his parents as a child to the wilderness of the Minisink Valley (PA), eventually moved back to New York state. Perhaps, the move back to New York was the result of some bad experiences in Pennsylvania: In his mid-twenties, under commission of PA Governor Morris, Charles Brodhead (Sr) undertook two solo missions to Wyoming (NE Pennsylvania) to invite the Indians there to participate in a conference in present-day Harrisburg for the purposes of arranging a treaty. During his last mission, his family home in Dansbury (present-day Stroudsburg) was attacked by the Indians. It was at some point after this that he moved to Ulster Co., NY, where he served in the Ulster Co. Regiment, attaining the rank of Captain in 1776 and serving in the War in that capacity. Charles Sr. and wife Mary Oliver had seven children in addition to Charles C. Brodhead, subject of this post.

*The Tourist’s Map of the State of New York Compiled from the latest Authorities. Utica, Published by William Williams, 1833. Engraved by V. Balch & S. Stiles. From the David Rumsey Historical Map Collection.

Categories: Brodhead, Forest Hill Cemetery Utica NY, Modena Rural Cemetery Ulster Co NY, New York, Utica | 2 Comments

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