Monthly Archives: June 2013

Oldest Jaques daughter: Jane F. Birch of Brooklyn, NY

Image credit below

Image credit below

I glanced at all the material I still have to share about John B. Jaques, and decided I’m not up to it this week. Sorry to those of you who may be waiting for the next installment!  Instead, this week, I’d rather focus on another member of the Isaac Jaques’ family — John’s sister, Jane F. Jaques.

I’d discovered Jane quite by accident doing a bit of surfing on the Family Search website. I mentioned finding her in a post that dates back to May 21 of this year. In that post, I mentioned finding a marriage record for her (dated 27 December 1836) that mentions Isaac Jaques of Elizabeth, NJ, as being her father. I have since found a bit more information about her and the John F. Birch family she married into, and I’ll take this opportunity to share.

But first a disclaimer: there was a Jane Jaques born in Woodbridge, NJ, on 16 May 1814, to an Isaac Jaques (1778-1861) and Elizabeth Jones (22 December 1801). I’ve found no further information about that Jane nor do I have any information suggesting that that Isaac spent time in Elizabeth, so I feel pretty confident that these two Janes were separate individuals for several reasons: 1) the marriage record specifies Isaac Jaques of Elizabeth, 2) the marriage took place at the Second Presbyterian Church in Elizabeth, the church Isaac’s funeral was held in, so I am assuming this was the church the family attended, 3) census records indicating “my” Jane was born in New York, whereas the Woodbridge Jane was born in NJ. But I can’t be 100% sure without proof of the birth to Isaac and Wealthy Jaques. So I just wanted to get that “out there.”

With that said, on with this post! Provided “my” Jane was part of the Isaac and Wealthy Jaques family, she was likely the oldest child. A funeral notice for her, found while visiting the Brooklyn Daily Eagle archives (made available by the Brooklyn Public Library), shows that she did not live long.  Sadly she died at the young age of 29 (which means she did not get to witness her younger brother’s John’s troubling antics). From the obituary, I’ve estimated that she was born in 1813/4, before her sister Wealthy Ann who appeared in 1815.

The funeral notice, which appeared on August 2, 1843, stated: In this city, Aug. 1st, Jane F., wife of John F. Birch, and daughter of Isaac Jaques, Esq., in the 30th year of her age.  The friends of her husband, and those of her father and father-in-law, George L. Birch, are respectfully invited to attend her funeral from her late residence, Smith st near Mill st, on Thursday morning at 10 o’clock.

Image credit below.

Image credit below.

John and Jane Birch had one son named William Mabury Birch (b. Brooklyn, September 1839) who is mentioned in his father John F. Birch’s obituary dated 14 Mar 1872 (also in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle): On Tuesday night, March 12, John F. Birch, in the 59th year of his age. The funeral will take place on Friday, March 15, at 2 1/2 o’clock P.M. from the residence of his son, Wm. Mabury Birch, 130 Gold Street. The relatives and friends of the family are respectfully invited to attend.

William’s 1900 & 1920 Census records state that his mom Jane was born in New York (the 1910 record says New Jersey). Isaac Jaques moved to Elizabeth, NJ, from New York between 1830 and 1840 (in 1830, the family is in Brooklyn Ward 4 on Smith Street; in 1840, they are in Elizabeth, NJ; Jane and Wealthy Ann were married in Elizabeth, NJ — 1836 & 1839, respectively) so it seems likelier that Jane was born in New York (as her other siblings were). More on William below.

As for John F. Birch’s father, George L. Birch, an interesting bio appears on him in the 1884 book (p. 1170), The Civil, Political, Professional and Ecclesiastical History, and Commercial and Industrial Record of the County of Kings and the City of Brooklyn, N. Y., from 1683 to 1884 (available as a free eBook – see my “Links” page):

George L. Birch, born in Limerick, Ireland, August 15, 1787; came to this country in 1798, with his parents, who settled first in Providence, R. I., then in Brooklyn. After completing his education, he was bound apprentice to Messrs, Arden & Close, shipping merchants of New York; afterwards became a bookkeeper for a large distiller, and then first clerk in the Columbian Insurance Company. At the dissolution of this company, he became the cashier and business manager of the National Advocate, a leading Democratic newspaper, edited by the late M. M. Noah, in partnership with whom he afterwards started a printing office. Shortly after, he became printer to the Common Council and to the Custom House, both of which positions he held until 1828. In 1819, he was an active member of the Kings County Agricultural and Domestic Manufacturing Society, and, on the 17th of March, 1821, he issued the first number of the Long Island Patriot, a weekly family newspaper. In October of the same year he joined the fire department, with which, as foreman of Engine No. 2, he was identified for a long period. On the 31st of December, 182., he received the appointment of Postmaster of Brooklyn, which office he occupied for four years, being succeeded by Thomas Kirk. In 1822, he established a monthly, the Minerva, in New York, and during this year, at his suggestion, a branch of the Columbian Order, or Tammany Society, was established in Brooklyn. He was a member the Mechanics’ and Tradesmen’s Society of Brooklyn, the Mechanics Society New York, and was also largely instrumental in the organization of the first Sunday-school in the village; the Erin Fraternal Association, the Apprentices’ Library, and various other valuable institutions, which have greatly contributed to the welfare of Brooklyn. In 1829, he received an appointment in the Custom House, and sold out the Patriot. In 1843, he became the custodian and librarian of the U.S. Naval Lyceum, at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, which position he retained until his death, which occurred on the 27th of July, 1864. In all his relations of life, he was respected and beloved.

On p. 1170, I found the below blurb about George L. Birch’s newspaper activities. And page 1171 had a brief mention of John F. Birch, who also dabbled briefly in the newspaper business after Jane’s death, founding the short-lived Brooklyn Morning Post on October 25, 1844.

page 1170 re: George L. Birch

page 1170 re: George L. Birch

Page 1071 re: John F. Birch

Page 1071 re: John F. Birch

So Jane, who was from a very well respected family, obviously married into one that was equally impressive in the contributions it was making to society.

From 1870 census records, I learned that John F. Birch went on to remarry — an English woman named Francis. They had a son — George L. Birch who was born in NY circa 1856 and would have been roughly 16 years of age when his father died in 1872.

As for John and Jane’s son William Mabury Birch, he was born in Brooklyn in September 1839 and would have been about 33 when his father died, just 4 when his mother died. William lived a good long life. I’m not sure when he died, but I found him in census records as late as 1925 (NY State Census) so he lived to be at least 85.

William married Elizabeth C. de la Flechelle circa 1864. Elizabeth’s father was Alphonse P. M. de la Flechelle who came from France with Elizabeth’s mother. Elizabeth herself was born in NJ in May 1845. She died on July 13, 1900. A funeral notice appeared in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle on July 15, 1900: At Woodhaven, L.I., on July 13, ELIZABETH C., beloved wife of William M. Birch and daughter of the late Alphonse P. M. de la Flechelle. Funeral services to be held Sunday, July 15, 2 P.M. at the Church of the Epiphany, Belmont and McCormick avs. Ozone Park, L. I. Relatives and friends invited.

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 5 July 1900 (www.fulton.com)

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 5 July 1900 (www.fulton.com)

William and Elizabeth had 5 children in all and 4 of them were still alive at the time of the 1900 census taken in June, shortly before Elizabeth died. I don’t have all the details about the five children, mostly just their approximate birth dates: Marion N. (cir. 1862); Maybury W. (cir. 1864); Zulma (1867; have also seen her name listed as Zuluna, Julia, Zulima, Zulina– she married a John Eckert and had a son named Harry); Florence (b. cir. 1867/8); and Alphonse (b. cir 1870). Alphonse appears in the 1870 census. A “John” of the same age appears in the 1875 NY Census–so perhaps John and Alphonse were one in the same.

On a final note, I am wondering how the Birch family with its Irish roots may be related to the de la Flechelle family of France. The marriage record for Jane and John Birch’s 1836 wedding lists his name as “J. D. La Fletcher Birch”. A newspaper clipping I found lists him as “John W. De La Fletcher Birch.” There appears to be some similarity between “De La Fletcher” and “de la Flechelle” — perhaps these families were somehow related. Otherwise it would seem too much of a coincidence.

Update: Regarding Alphonse P. M. de la Flechelle, I’ve since learned that he and his wife Elizabeth Burton Fitzgerald de la Flechelle (m. Sept 1825), together with three young daughters, are buried in the churchyard of the First Presbyterian Church of Woodbridge, NJ.  A book on the history of that church (History of the First Presbyterian Church, Woodbridge, New Jersey 300th Anniversary May 25, 1975 (published 1975) says that they investigated who this Frenchman was and discovered that he was the late deputy consul from the court of France to the US. He served as Chief Secretary of the French Embassy in Dublin, Ireland, in 1814, and later in the same capacity in NY (1825) and Boston (1837). They have no idea why he came to Woodbridge and speculate that he or his wife may have had relatives there.  Their children that I know of were: Elizabeth Edmire (d. 20 Mar 1834, Woodbridge, age 7 1/2), Zelma Catherine (d. 19 Mar 1834, Woodbridge, age 6 1/2), Louise M. (d. 14 Mar 1837, Woodbridge, age 3 weeks), Elizabeth C. (b. 1845, m. Wm Mabury Birch), Alphonse E. W. (m. Georgiana Sheldon 13 May 1857), and Alexandrine (d. 4 Apr 1902, Hempstead, LI, m. Joseph Van Winkle). Page 80 of the above book (click link for online reading options) shows a photograph of some de la Flechelle graves in the churchyard cemetery. UPDATE 7/5/13: See latest post for more on the de la Flechelles.

That’s all for today! Have a great weekend!

IMAGE CREDIT: Both from The Civil, Political, Professional and Ecclesiastical History, and Commercial and Industrial Record of the County of Kings and the City of Brooklyn, N. Y., from 1683 to 1884

Categories: 1st Presbyterian Woodbridge NJ, Birch, Brooklyn, de la Flechelle, de la Fletcher Birch, Death, Elizabeth, Union Co., Green-Wood Cemetery Brooklyn NY, Jaques, New York City, Obituaries, US Federal 1870 | 4 Comments

John B. Jaques – Part II – The ‘Infamous’ Brooklyn Case

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1856 — New York City and Environs, showing Newark, NJ, on the left & Brooklyn, NY, on the right (Map Credit: David Rumsey Historical Map Collection – details and link to full map below)

Just after the New Year in 1858, John Jaques resurfaced in the newspapers in a story that one paper referred to as ‘one of the most infamous cases ever placed on record.’ He was 34 years old, his wife Mary — in her early 30s, and their eldest child Wealthy Ann — about 13 years of age. Walter, their youngest, was about five. John’s dad, the respected Isaac Jaques of Elizabeth, NJ, was about 67 and long retired after a successful career as a Manhattan tailor and an Elizabeth, NJ, real estate investor. John’s mom (also named Wealthy Ann) had died of consumption some two years prior, in April 1856. Sometime between Wealthy’s death and the 1860 census, Isaac remarried — to Rebecca Robinson, so he could have already been married to Rebecca at the time this ‘infamous’ Brooklyn case was the talk of the town, state, and tri-state area (the story even made it into the Boston Herald and the Philadelphia Press).

As far as John’s siblings go, Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus (my 2nd great grandmother) was married to carriage maker and respected Elizabethtown businessman James Angus, Walter was a dentist, and Charles was in the process of becoming a doctor. I’m not sure about Jane, Christopher, and Isaac Jr., but (provided they were still around–and I know at least Isaac Jr. was) I suspect they were busy living respectable lives. So, John’s propensity for alcohol must have been a source of disruption and great worry for his friends and family, and the third article included in this post states just that. At some point down the road, they may well have washed their hands of him, but it appears that at this point at least some of his friends and family were standing by him. And he had not yet trashed his reputation with the community; one paper described him as ‘a man of respectable standing, except that occasionally he drinks too much.’

Brooklyn, NY, in 1868, showing location of the IX Ward (Map Credit: David Rumsey Maps -- full credit and link below)

Brooklyn, NY, in 1868, showing location of the IX Ward (Map Credit: David Rumsey Maps — full credit and link below)

But, on with the story of what happened. On the cold winter’s night of January 4, 1858, John was discovered lying unconscious and near death in a pond in Brooklyn’s 9th Ward. The incessant barking of a dog, whose master eventually came outside to see what the fuss was all about, is the only thing that saved him. Allegedly he was severely beaten and left there to die by two shady characters who were trying to prevent him from testifying at a trial taking place the next day in New Jersey. I’ll let you do your own reading of the tale as it unfolds. Suffice it to say, you’re going to get some background on John (residing in Newark, NJ, at this time) and his own recounting of the events, and you’re going to ‘hear’ courtroom testimony from John’s long-suffering wife Mary F. (Briggs) Jaques and his daughter Wealthy Ann. There are twists and turns, and things are not always what they seem. Is he a victim, or is there more to the story? The last clipping included contains the verdict which came in mid-February 1858; this clipping is a bit hard to read, so I am including a transcription of the most illegible section below it.  (As an aside, those interested in Brooklyn of that era will enjoy the website Whitman’s Brooklyn: A Virtual Visit Circa 1850) There are some views of old Brooklyn from about this period which help set the scene for this story. Worth a look, if you have time.)

Currier & Ives, View of Brooklyn, 1879 (In public domain in US - credit below)

Currier & Ives, View of Brooklyn, 1879 (In public domain in US – credit below)

Thanks to the generosity of the Fulton History website’s lack of copyright restrictions, I can post the articles here. And that’s a great thing because, just like the previous post’s article about John (the ‘Prodigal Son’ returns), these articles are (naturally) written in a way that reflects the tone of that era, something I’d find impossible to convey should I be forced to paraphrase or re-word. So enjoy the read. This post will be followed by 1-2 more as we are still in the 1850s, and John lived another 37 years. As always, comments, thoughts, corrections, and additions welcome.

Jamaica, NY, Long Island Farmer, January 7, 1858

Jamaica, NY, Long Island Farmer, January 7, 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com).

Jamaica, NY, Long Island Farmer, January 7, 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com).


The New York Evening Express, 7 Jan 1858

crime

The New York Evening Express, 7 Jan 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Times, 7 January 1858

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Herald, 8 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Herald, 8 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, Friday evening, 8 January 1858

Crime

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, Friday evening, 8 January 1858

Trenton State Gazette (8 January 1858): Mr. John B. Jaques, of Newark, New Jersey, was found insensible in a pond in the Ninth Ward of Brooklyn, on Wednesday morning. It appears that he had been inveigled from New York by a man named Smith, the keeper of a saloon, and against whom a charge was pending for selling liquor without license, and Jaques was the principal witness for the prosecution. Arrived in Brooklyn, Smith was joined by one Myers, the keeper of a saloon on Fulton Avenue, when they robbed and threw Jaques into the pond where he was found.

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, 9 January 1858

Crime

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, 9 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, Monday evening, 11 January 1858

Crime

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, Monday evening, 11 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Times, Friday, 15 January 1858

Crime

The New York Times, Friday, 15 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Crime

The New York Times, Friday, 15 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Crime

The New York Times, Friday, 15 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Herald, 18 January 1858

Crime

The New York Herald, 18 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Herald, 19 February 1858

New York Herald, 19 February 1858

New York Herald, 19 February 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Herald, 19 February 1858: …the defendants were arrested and had a partial examination before Justice Morehouse, when they waived further examination, and were committed to await the action of the Grand Jury. That body indicted  Myres and Smith for assault and battery with intent to kill, and also for highway robbery. The present trial was for assault and battery with intent to kill. The evidence of Jaques was substantially as above; that of Dr. Ball went to show the extent of the injuries which were at the time thought to be of a serious nature, although Jaques had subsequently entirely recovered from them. The witnesses for the defence went to show that Jaques could not be believed under oath, and that he had been arrested for various offences in New Jersey, and that indictments were there pending against him. They sought to prove that Myres and Smith separated from Jaques on the night of the affair, and that the injuries were the result of his falling while intoxicated. The trial was concluded yesterday  afternoon and the case given to the jury, who, after a long absence, returned a verdict of “not guilty.” The defendants were then discharged, their own recognizances being taken to appear and answer the other indictment.

Resources: Those interested in Brooklyn of that era will enjoy the website Whitman’s Brooklyn: A Virtual Visit Circa 1850.

MAP CREDITS:
David Rumsey Historical Map Collection, Full Title: Map Of The Country Thirty Three Miles Around The City Of New York. Published By J.H. Colton, No. 86 Cedar St. New York, 1853. Drawn by G.W. Colton. Engraved by J.M. Atwood, N.Y.

Full Title: Plan of New York and Brooklyn. (Atlas of New York and vicinity by F.W. Beers published by Beers, Ellis & Soule, New York, 1868)

Currier & Ives image from Eric Homberger: The Historical Atlas of New York City: A Visual Celebration of Nearly 400 Years of New York City’s History. Holt Paperbacks, 1998, page 72 (see Wikimedia Commons link) – ‘This media file is in the public domain’ in the United States. This applies to U.S. works where the copyright has expired, often because its first publication occurred prior to January 1, 1923. See http://copyright.cornell.edu/resources/publicdomain.cfm this page for further explanation. This image might not be in the public domain outside of the United States; this especially applies in the countries and areas that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works, such as Canada, mainland China (not Hong Kong nor Macao), Germany, Mexico, and Switzerland.

Categories: Angus, Brooklyn, Crime & Punishment, Cushman, Elizabeth, Union Co., Jaques, Manhattan, New York City, Newark, Essex Co., Scandal | 2 Comments

John B. Jaques – Part I – The Early Years

The Parable of the Prodigal Son, oil on canvas, by Frans Francken II, 1860 (Wikimedia Commons - Public domain in US - expired copyright)

The Parable of the Prodigal Son, oil on canvas, by Frans Francken II, 1860 (Wikimedia Commons – Public domain in US – expired copyright)

Was John B. Jaques, who arrived at his father Isaac’s door in 1879 looking for forgiveness, to be trusted in his recently adopted quest to make things right? I must admit that I felt cynical; the Oswego newspaper article makes it quite clear that John had been leaving a trail of misery behind him for the previous 30 years.  I could not help but wonder who else had been affected by his behavior, and whether, aware of his father’s advanced years, he wasn’t simply trying to pull a fast one, to get his frail old father to include him in a share of his estate, which I imagine must have been quite substantial.

But, I always try to be one to keep an open mind and give people the benefit of the doubt. Perhaps, this really was the turning of a page. And, I was very intrigued as to who this John Jaques was and what else I could find out about him.

From his death record, I discovered that John was born in 1822 in New York, so he was 57 when he was reunited with Isaac. John’s year of birth probably places him in the middle of the pack of the Isaac Jaques and Wealthy Ann Cushman family:

1-Isaac Jaques b. 8 Aug 1791, Woodbridge Neck, NJ, d. 24 Aug 1880, 
  Elizabethtown, NJ, bur. 27 Aug 1880, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ
 +Wealthy Ann Cushman b. 11 Nov 1793, Hartford, CT, d. 11 Apr 1856, Elizabeth, 
  Union Co, NJ, bur. 13 Apr 1856, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ
|----2-Wealthy Ann Jaques b. 15 Dec 1815, New York City, New York. NY, d. 7 Mar 
|      1892, At Home, 25 Reid Street, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. First 
|      Presbyterian Church yard of Elizabeth, NJ
|----2-Jane F. Jaques b. cir. 1818
|----2-Isaac Jaques
|----2-John B. Jaques b. Mar 1822, New York or New Jersey, USA
|----2-Walter Jaques b. Cir 1826, New York City, New York USA
|----2-Christopher P. Jaques b. Cir 1832, New York City, New York USA
|----2-Dr. Charles P. Jaques b. Cir 1834, New York City, New York USA, d. 2 Nov 
|      1866, Brooklyn, Kings Co., NY
 +Rebecca Robinson b. 1804, CT, d. 29 Dec 1886, bur. Evergreen Cemetery, 
  Hillside, Union Co., NJ

I also learned that John was a family man; his wife’s name was Mary F. Briggs (b. cir. 1827 in NJ), and they had five children, born between circa 1845 and 1853:

  • Wealthy Ann (there’s that name again!)
  • Mary
  • John B. Jr.
  • Margaretta
  • Walter

Curiously, in the 1850 census (taken on 16 September 1850), John was in Richmond Co., Georgia. Yes, I know. Georgia. How did he end up there? His age is listed as ’30’, occupation — ‘Tailor,’ and birth place — ‘NY’. He is listed among a large number of other seemingly mostly single individuals of various occupations — teacher, clerk, mechanic, book keeper, stable hand, etc. To be sure that was him, I looked to see where his wife was that year. I found her and the children that had been born prior to that living in Elizabeth, NJ, (down the street from Isaac and Wealthy Jaques and family) with what appears to be Margaretta’s family (John’s sister):

  • Charles B Archer, 33, Cabinetmaker, b. New York
  • Margaretta Archer, 26, b. New Jersey
  • Margaret Carlton, 61, b. New York
  • Mary Jaques, 23, b. New Jersey
  • Wealthy A. Jaques, 5, b. Pennsylvania
  • Mary J. Jaques, 3, b. New Jersey
  • John Jaques, 1, b, New Jersey

So, why Georgia? And what was going on in Richmond Co. at that time that may have taken John Jaques there?

According to Rootsweb: In 1850, Richmond  County produced 1087 bales of cotton; 297,780 bushels of corn; 27,458 of oats, and 51,045 of sweet potatoes. There were 2 woolen factories, 1 cotton mill, 2 foundries, 1 car factory, 3 saddle manufactories, 1 machine shop, 3 flour mills, and 19 saw mills. It contained 14 churches, 10 newspaper offices; 720 pupils attending public schools, and 415 attending academies or other schools.

I assumed that being a tailor, he was somehow attached to the woolen factories or the cotton mill. Apparently the mill industry gained great momentum in the first half of the 19th century in Georgia, and by 1850, the industry had really taken off. According to the Georgia EncyclopediaSensing the emergence of a profitable enterprise for their state, political leaders passed legislation making it easier for potential mill operators to incorporate their businesses. The industry began to flourish, and by 1850 Georgia had thirty-eight textile mills. The cloth produced in the mills evolved from the early coarse fabrics, sometimes called “Georgia wool,” to cotton duck, a heavier canvas-like material. Most of the regional mills in operation at this time were small, with fewer than 2,000 spindles and 100 workers. Often these mills were situated next to the local gristmills, flour mills, and sawmills. 

In Georgia’s emerging cities, however, factories tended to be larger. One example was Eagle Manufacturing Company in Columbus, opened in 1851 by William H. Young, a native New Yorker. The growth of the textile industry in Georgia, along with the population increase and expansion of railroads in the state, prompted William “Parson” Brownlow, the editor of a Tennessee newspaper, to call Georgia “the New England of the South” in 1849.

As the 1850s progressed, Georgia mill owners focused on improving rather than expanding their factories. Employees, by then strictly composed of rural whites from areas surrounding the mills, were developing into a skilled workforce. Some owners in the state encouraged seasoned northern mill workers to relocate to Georgia factories, where they could pass along their experience to local workers; some experienced mill workers came from as far away as England.

Perhaps, John was one of those seasoned northern workers who was paid to come down to Georgia to pass on his experience. Given his father was a tailor, John grew up in the trade and no doubt had acquired a great deal of skill by this time.  How long he spent there, I don’t know, but I do know that he was back in New Jersey several years later, as I found the first trace of trouble — a little article in the ‘Police’ section of the Newark Daily Advertiser on 9 August 1853:  John B. Jaques arrested yesterday by Marshal Francisco for obtaining goods under false pretenses, by representing himself as a partner of Holmes, the clothing merchant, was committed to Justice Plume.

Whether this marked the beginning of John’s run-ins with the law, I don’t know,  nor could I find a follow-up article to see what the outcome of this incident was.  Isaac and Wealthy would have been in their late 50s when this took place.  You can imagine what their reaction must have been, not to mention the reaction of John’s poor young wife.

The 1850s held more tumult for John and those in his sphere.

Part II to follow.

Categories: Crime & Punishment, Death Certificates, Elizabeth, Union Co., Georgia, Jaques, Richmond Co., US Federal 1850 | 2 Comments

Daniel Brodhead Jr.’s daughter, Ellen

Mt. Vernon Cemetery (image in public domain - Wikimedia Commons)

Mt. Vernon Cemetery, Robert N. Dennis collection of stereoscopic views (in public domain – Wikimedia Commons)

Ellen Brodhead was “Christian” & Daniel Brodhead Jr.‘s first child. Born in Pennsylvania in 1802, she died in Philadelphia on 17 August 1881 of a cerebral hemorrhage at the age of 79. She was buried two days later in Mt. Vernon Cemetery. At the time of her death, she had been living at 4658 Main Street in Germantown, Philadelphia.

Ellen married Michael Stroup circa 1822; their two children that I know of are listed below. :

  • Amanda Kline Stroup (b. cir. 1823) – married Christian Donat (b. 1822; d. bef. 1870) and had at least one child, a daughter named Mary (1846-1895) who went on to marry Charles D. Matlack (1843-1905).  Amanda died on 1 November 1895 and was buried in St. Thomas Episcopal Church Cemetery, Whitemarsh, Montgomery Co., PA. Daughter Mary and Charles Matlack are buried there as well. (Whitemarsh is a suburb of Philadelphia.)
  • Ellen Stroup (b. 1826) – married **Thomas Jefferson Woolf on 25 Sep 1845; they had one child — Margaret Ewing Woolf (b. 1847) who married a Mr. Hatch.  Ellen Stroup Woolf was buried in Monument Cemetery, Philadelphia. Her husband Thomas went on to marry one of Ellen’s cousins, **Julia Brodhead Cobb (daughter of Mira Brodhead and William Cobb), on 9 March 1857. Thomas and Julia are buried in Mt. Vernon Cemetery. A son named Clifford (b. 1859), who died of pulmonary consumption at age 16, is also buried at Mt. Vernon.

Michael Stroup likely passed away prior to 1850 since, according to census records, that year Ellen was living with her daughter Amanda Donat & family in Spring Garden, Ward 3, Philadelphia. Unfortunately, Ellen’s marital status is not given.

Christian Donat M 28 Pennsylvania
Amanda Donat F 26 Pennsylvania
Mary Donat F 4 Pennsylvania
Joseph Mahenacke M 24 Pennsylvania
William La Mintzer M 32 Pennsylvania
Ellen Stroup F 46 Pennsylvania

The 1860 and 1870 census records* show an Ellen Stroup (of the right age) living in Hoboken, Weehawken Co., NJ, and working as a housekeeper in the two households. I don’t know why Ellen would have left Phila. for a housekeeping job in Hoboken.

View looking down the Schuylkill River from Laurel Hill cemetery near Philadelphia, Pa, from Robert N. Dennis collection of stereoscopic views (in public domain - Wikimedia Commons)

View looking down the Schuylkill River from Laurel Hill cemetery near Philadelphia, Pa, from Robert N. Dennis collection of stereoscopic views (in public domain – Wikimedia Commons)

In 1880, at age 76,  she was back in Philadelphia, living on Germantown Avenue with the Joseph Budd family, according to US Census records found on Ancestry.com. At this point she is listed as a widow. Her relationship to the Budds is not given. Joseph Budd was listed as a bookkeeper and Ellen Budd as keeping house.

Self Joseph Budd M 60 Pennsylvania, United States
Wife Ellen Budd F 56 Pennsylvania, United States
Daughter Julia Budd F 28 Pennsylvania, United States
Son Charles Budd M 25 Pennsylvania, United States
Other Ellen Stroup F 76 Pennsylvania, United States

Since 1st daughter Ellen Stroup Woolf died in 1852, this Ellen Budd could not have been Ellen Brodhead Stroup’s daughter as I have seen claimed in message boards on the topic. But Ellen Budd must have been someone important to Ellen Stroup since Ellen Budd is listed as a beneficiary in Ellen Stroup’s will* dated 20 March 1873 and proved on 6 September 1881 in Philadelphia.

Laurel Hill Cemetery, stereoscopic views (in public domain - Wikimedia Commons)

Laurel Hill Cemetery, Robert N. Dennis collection of stereoscopic views (in public domain – Wikimedia Commons)

Interestingly, Ellen B. Budd and Joseph Budd are buried next to Ellen Brodhead Stroup’s sister Juliana Brodhead Mintzer and Juliana’s husband Adam in Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, which is just across the road from Mt. Vernon Cemetery, resting place for Ellen Brodhead Stroup and her niece Julia Cobb Woolf & husband Thomas J. Woolf.

So who was Ellen Budd? That’s the question. If you know or have a theory, please share!

More on other Daniel Brodhead Jr. offspring in an upcoming post.

1-Capt Daniel Brodhead Jr b. 1756, d. 2 Feb 1831, Philadelphia, PA
 +Christian Abel b. Poss. 1783, d. Prob. bef. 1820
|----2-Ellen Brodhead b. Cir 1802, Pennsylvania, United States, d. 17 Aug 1881, 
|      Philadelphia, PA, bur. 19 Aug 1881, Mt. Vernon Cemetery, Philadelphia, 
|      Philadelphia Co., PA
|     +Michael Stroup d. Bef 1850
|    |----3-Amanda Kline Stroup b. Cir 1823, Philadelphia, PA, d. 1 Nov 1895, 
|    |      Pennsylvania, United States, bur. St. Thomas Episcopal Church 
|    |      Cemetery, Whitemarsh, Montgomery Co., PA
|    |     +Christian Donat b. 1822, d. Bef 1870
|    |    |----4-Mary Donat b. 1846, Pennsylvania, United States, d. 15 Mar 
|    |    |      1895, Pennsylvania, United States, bur. St. Thomas Episcopal 
|    |    |      Church Cemetery, Whitemarsh, Montgomery Co., PA
|    |          +Charles D. Matlack b. 23 May 1843, d. 16 Feb 1905, bur. St. 
|    |           Thomas Episcopal Church Cem., Whitemarsh, Montgomery Co., PA 
|    |         |----5-Elwood Matlack b. Cir 1866
|    |----3-Ellen Stroup b. 23 Feb 1826, Pennsylvania, United States, d. 27 Nov 
|    |      1852, Philadelphia, PA, bur. Monument Cemetery, Philadelphia, PA
|          +Thomas Jefferson Woolf b. 28 Apr 1823, Philadelphia, PA, c. 8 Mar 
|           1850, St. Jude's Church, Philadelphia, PA, d. 15 Feb 1904, 
|           Philadelphia, PA, bur. 18 Feb 1904, Mt. Vernon Cemetery, 
|           Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., PA
|         |----4-Margaret Ewing Woolf b. 1847
|               +Hatch

Source:

*Research done by Diana Gail Matthieson and posted on Diana, Goddess of the Hunt — for Ancestors!
**Harper-Banta Tree on Ancestry.com – shows original marriage records for the two Thomas Woolf marriages.
Ellen Stroup on Find a Grave

Categories: Brodhead, Death Certificates, Donat, Last Wills and Testaments, Laurel Hill Cemetery Phila PA, Mintzer, Monument Cemetery Phila PA, Mt. Vernon Cemetery Phila PA, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, St. Thos Episc Church Cem Whitemarsh PA, Stroup, US Federal 1850, US Federal 1860, US Federal 1870, US Federal 1880, Woolf | Leave a comment

Wayward Jaques son returns home in 1879

River front, Oswego, N.Y., c1909. (Wikimedia Commons - photo in public domain in USA)

River front, Oswego, N.Y., cir. 1909 (Wikimedia Commons – photo in public domain in USA)

In a million years, I never would have expected to find clues about my Elizabeth, NJ, ancestors in an Oswego, NY, newspaper. Oswego, which is perched on the northeast border of Lake Ontario, is roughly 300 miles away from Elizabeth, NJ — a city very close to Manhattan. On a total lark, about eight weeks ago, I did a search for Isaac Jaques on the Fulton History website, which features old newspapers from NY state, and up popped a headline for the ‘Temperance Column’ in the Oswego Daily Times for 24 January 1879, about 18 months before Isaac passed away at age 89. (Just goes to show, that when searching old newspapers, it may be worth not restricting your search to a particular city, county, or state.)

Oswego Daily Times, Saturday Evening, 24 January 1879 (Credit: www.fultonhistory.com)

Oswego Daily Times, Saturday Evening, 24 January 1879 (Credit: http://www.fultonhistory.com)

Temperance Lecture, oil painting by Edward Edmondson, Jr., Dayton Art Institute collection, (Wikimedia Commons: Public domain due to expired copyright)

‘Temperance Lecture,’ oil on canvas, by Edward Edmondson, Jr. (1861), Dayton Art Institute collection (Wikimedia Commons: Public domain due to expired copyright)

This all happened prior to my discovering that Isaac had children other than my 2nd great grandmother Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus. You may recall from a previous post that I’d mentioned even Roger & Patricia Jaques’ Jaques Family Genealogy book, a massive tome, contains no reference to children other than Wealthy Ann.

I couldn’t imagine what could possibly have linked Isaac, an upstanding citizen of Elizabeth, NJ, to the issue of temperance. So, after opening the link and pulling up the page, I was shocked to scroll down to read about Isaac’s reunion with a once very wayward son named John, who had been Isaac’s ‘secret sorrow’ for several decades prior. Thankfully the Fulton History site permits its articles to be shared, so I don’t have to try to paraphrase or summarize. I think the writing of that era is so much more descriptive anyway. So I hope you’ll enjoy reading it as much as I did.

John must have been quite a character. Let’s be honest, throughout the ages, it’s the rare family that does not have at least one individual in it who occasionally (or more than occasionally) brings inharmonious moments to that family’s life. Back then, however, I suspect this all would have been much more scandalous. So it’s no wonder John got erased from the family record books; and perhaps that’s why this ‘Temperance Column’ appeared in a distant city rather than Isaac’s home town, although I can’t be certain of that since the now-out-of-print Elizabeth Daily Journal may have carried it. However, that newspaper does not appear to be available through any online sites (If I’m wrong about that, please let me know).

I’ll close this post by saying that I’ve since done tons of digging on John, on his life, both pre- and post-‘Temperance column,’ and I have much more to share. Suffice it to say that he took me on quite a roller coaster ride; just when I thought I’d found the last trace of his bad behavior, I’d stumble on something else. There were a sufficient number of cringe-worthy moments, and I will share them as well as some other interesting details, in the next 1-2 posts.

P.S. In some ways, I feel rather uncomfortable sharing scandal that’s been locked away in the family cupboards for 130+ years. What do you think? — Would it be better to let sleeping dogs lie?

Part 2

Part 2/3

Part 3/3

Part 3/3

Links:
Dayton Art Institute
Wikimedia

Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., Jaques, Oswego, Scandal | 16 Comments

Daniel Brodhead Jr. Timeline – Updates

Philadelphia 1838; Collection: David Rumsey Historical Map Collection, Author: Bradford, Thomas G. Date: 1838 Short Title: Philadelphia. Publisher: Weeks, Jordan & Co. Boston

Philadelphia 1838; Collection: David Rumsey Historical Map Collection, Author: Bradford, Thomas G.
Date: 1838
Short Title: Philadelphia.
Publisher: Weeks, Jordan & Co. Boston

The grand discovery of Philadelphia City Directories for 1796 – 1830 (on the website Greater Philadelphia GeoHistory Resources) and of several other bits and pieces have allowed me to update my recent post on Daniel Jr.

I apologize for the super-sized length, but I think it makes sense to keep all the info together on one page.

Have a great weekend!

Map Credit: http://www.davidrumsey.com/

Categories: Brodhead, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia | Leave a comment

Daniel Brodhead Jr.: A Timeline of Life Events

Philadelphia's Ancient Town Hall, Second and Market Streets, 1829.

Philadelphia’s Ancient Town Hall, Second and Market Streets, 1829, from America’s Most Historic Highway: Market Street Philadelphia.

One little sentence can open up a whole can of worms, and I’ve found myself wallowing in a can of big, fat, juicy ones this past week. And all because of two little words: “William Baker”.

Following Daniel Brodhead Jr.’s death on the February 2, 1831, at age 75, a little funeral announcement appeared the next day in The Philadelphia Inquirer:

DIED: On Wednesday morning, the 2nd inst. Mr. Daniel Brodhead, in the 76th year of his age, who served as a Lieutenant in the revolutionary war.

His friends and acquaintances are particularly invited to attend his funeral, from the residence of his son-in-law, William Baker, in Buttonwood Street, above Tenth, tomorrow afternoon, at 2 o’clock.

That name (William Baker) was new to me. Daniel had five daughters, and I only knew the name of two of the daughters’ spouses, so I set out to try to figure out which of the remaining three daughters had been married to ‘William Baker’. This took some doing; in fact, it was only after I figured out some of the other spouses that I finally had a feeling about William Baker. And along the way, I unearthed all sorts of other things about Daniel. Isn’t that always the way? That’s what I meant about the can of worms. But, as exhausting as it was, now I have a decent tree fleshed out for Daniel Jr.’s line and have unearthed a bit more about him. So below is a timeline that offers a possible glimpse into some of his activities; I say “possible” because there is no way to know with 100% certainty, without doing much more research, that ALL references to Daniel Jr. herein actually refer to Colonel Brodhead’s son and not some other Daniel.

Robert Morris, painted by Robert Edge Pine, ca. 1785

Robert Morris, painted by Robert Edge Pine, ca. 1785 (Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license)

1776 (age 20): Rank of 1st Lieutenant attained on January 6. Unit: 3rd Pennsylvania Battalion. Captured at the surrender of Fort Washington on November 16.

1777 (age 21): POW throughout the year. Rank of Captain attained on Sept. 1.

1778 (age 22): Exchanged on August 26. Worked as a supernumerary officer.

Gen. Daniel Brodhead Portrait

Gen. Daniel Brodhead Portrait

1779 (age 23): Daniel Brodhead Jr. is mentioned in a letter (Fitzpatrick, pp. 480-481) from General George Washington to Colonel Daniel Brodhead (Sr.) in response to the latter’s attempt to secure a military post for Daniel Jr. (at Daniel Jr.’s request according to one of Fitzpatrick’s footnotes): ...It has been the misfortune of Many Officers in captivity to have been overlooked by their States, who had the power of all regimental appointments, which seems to have been the case with respect to Mr. Broadhead. Had he been appointed in the line, after so long an absence from you, I should not have refused him the opportunity of paying you a visit but as he has not, there cannot be a possibility of objection on my part.

From the book History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties (p. 935): [Col. Daniel Brodhead] …had only one son, also named Daniel (by his first wife, Elizabeth De Pue), who was also an officer during the Revolution. He was sent to Virginia in 1779, in charge of the prisoners of General Burgoyne’s army. If this is true, he could not have been in Virginia for long in that capacity as he retired from the military that year.

1781 (age 25): From the diary of Robert Morris, US Superintendent of Finance, on August 28: Mr. Danl. Brodhead entered in this Office as one of my Clerks (Morris, Aug-Sept 1781, p. 119, 121).

1782 (age 26): On May 29, Daniel Jr. was fired from his position by Robert Morris (Morris, April 16 – June 20, 1782, p. 280) – note: the spelling is Morris’s: …The Pennsylvania Commissioners for fitting out the Ships to defend the Bay and River Delaware called and executed the Contract for the Ship Washington Capt Barney. These gentleman informed me that Mr. Daniel Brodhead, one of the Clerks in this Office, had mentioned the Destination of that Ship, whereupon I sent for him and told him before them what was said. He very candidly acknowledged the Fact, alledging in excuse that he had heard it mentioned by other Persons before and therefore conceiving the thing to be known he had inadvertantly mentioned the matter in a Company, that it is the only time and the only thing he ever did mention out of this Office. Mr. Brodhead being a modest, well disposed young Man I am perswaded that this was an act of meer inadvertency, but the Consequences of imprudence or indiscretion in things of this nature may be as pernicious as if they proceeded from bad designs, therefore I dismissed him instantly from this office — sorry however for the Necessity he has laid me under to do so.

Also in 1782: Possibly living at his father’s home in Reading, PA, Daniel described the July 12, 1782, suicide that took place there of Captain Charles Craig, an intelligence officer during the Revolutionary War, who had a major disagreement with his father-in-law that turned ugly. In a letter written to a Walter Stone in Maryland, Daniel wrote: After taking such precautions as were requisite to prevent detection, he laid himself on the bed, raising his head, with several pillows, to a convenient height; He placed a muzzle of the pistol under one ear, and discharged its contents, which went thro’ his head. The report of the pistol brought up his brother Colonel Thomas Craig, who immediately burst open the door (he having had the precaution to bolt it on the inner side) But the unfortunate Charles was already quite dead.——-I ought here to take notice, that, least (sic) the pistol should by any means have proved ineffectual, he had provided his sword, which lay across his breast when his brother entered the room. So determined was he, on the preparation of this shocking deed. (Rubicam, Milton)

Land claims, 1783 (credit: Florida Center for Instructional Technology at the University of South Florida-website below)

Land claims, 1783 (credit: Florida Center for Instructional Technology at the University of South Florida-website below)

1783 (age 27): Daniel was the first merchant to arrive in the new frontier town of Louisville, Kentucky. At that time, there was no state of Kentucky. Virginia extended westward as the map of land claims indicates. I found mention of Daniel Jr. in a number of books, including one on the life of Daniel Boone: In 1783 Daniel Brodhead astonished the settlers by offering for sale goods from Philadelphia, having succeeded in freighting them from thence to Pittsburgh in wagons, and down the river in flat-boats. Even upon those days of simplicity arose the radiance of gaudy calico and overshadowing wool hats. It was a time of serious innovation. (Bogart, p. 305).

George Rogers Clark (Public Domain, expired copyright*)

George Rogers Clark, painted by Matthew Harris Jouett in 1825 (Public Domain, expired copyright*)

In a book on Chesapeake politics (Risjord, p. 236), I found the following on Daniel: Merchants who established themselves in Kentucky at the end of the war augmented the ranks of the court party, though few of them could claim Virginia ancestry. The first merchant in the newly erected town of Louisville at the falls of Ohio was Daniel Brodhead, Jr., son of the Pennsylvania colonel who had commanded at Pittsburgh in the last years of the war. Arriving in 1783, Brodhead established a commercial contact with George Rogers Clark and his cousin William, who were then surveying the Virginia military district across the river. These men, in turn, had interests in the down-river trade with New Orleans, and they had contacts with New Orleans merchants as a result of Clark’s military expeditions. Before long, Brodhead too had mercantile acquaintances in Spanish Louisiana.

On the Kentucky Educational Television site under the topic of Louisville Life, I found the following: According to “The Encyclopedia of Louisville”, the first dry goods store opened in Louisville in 1783. It was basically a double-sized log cabin with glass pane windows, featuring merchandise from Pittsburgh and Philadelphia. The store was located on the north side of Main St. between Fifth and Sixth Streets and was owned by Daniel Brodhead. This mercantile outlet was the precursor to department stores.

Another reference to Daniel’s store is contained in the book, A History of Ohio Falls Cities and Their Counties (p. 189): Another notable commercial event occurred after navigation opened this year — the opening of the first general store in Louisville, and the second in what is now the State of Kentucky, the first having been started at Boonesborough in April, 1775, by Messrs. Henderson & Co., the would-be founders of “the Province of Transylvania.” Mr. Daniel Brodhead was the happy man to expose, first amid the wildness of the Louisville plateau, the beautiful fabrics of the East to the linsey-clad dames and belles of the Falls city. Mr. Butler, in his History of Kentucky, says “it is believed that Mr. Broadhead’s was the first store in the State for the sale of foreign merchandise.” He transported his moderate stock in wagons from Philadelphia to Pittsburg, and thence on flat-boats they were floated down to Louisville. Mr. Collins says : ” The belles of our forest land’ then began to shine in all the magnificence of calico, and the beaux in the luxury of wool hats.” We add the following from Casseday’s History: The young ladies could now throw aside all the homely products of their own looms, take the wooden skewers from their ill-bound tresses, and on festive occasions shine in all the glories of flowered calico and real horn-combs.

It is not known whether it was this worthy Mr. Brodhead who was the first to introduce the luxury of glass window-lights, but it is certain that previous to this time such an extravagance was unknown, and there is an incident connected with the first window-pane which deserves a place here, and which is recorded in the words of an author who is not more celebrated for his many public virtues, than for his unceasing and incurable exercise of the private vice of punning. After referring to the introduction of this innovation, this gentleman says : “A young urchin who had seen glass spectacles on the noses of his elders, saw this spectacle with astonishment, and running home to his mother exclaimed, ‘O, Ma! there’s a house down here with specs on!”…

1784 (age 28): Daniel was still active in Louisville as is evidenced by the insurance he took out for some of his freighted goods (see article inset, The Baltimore Underwriter, p. 344).

Daniel Brodhead, Jr. insurance policy, 1784

Daniel Brodhead, Jr. insurance policy, 1784

1785 (age 29): From the History of Ohio Falls Cities and Their Counties (p. 183-184), came more information on Daniel Jr. On October 6th of that year James Sullivan and James Patton were appointed to superintend the sales of lots. Captain Daniel Brodhead was subsequently appointed in place of Patton. The superintendents of sales were authorized to bid on lots “as far as they may think necessary, or nearly their value, which purchases are to be considered as subject to the further direction of the trustees.” December 9, 1785, it was resolved “that all the land from Preston’s line to the mouth of Beargrass [Daniel Jr. owned the “point over Beargrass” according to p. 149 of this book] and up said creek to said line be sold to the highest bidder, and also all the land that remains on this side of said creek at the mouth, thereof, exclusive of the thirty feet allowed for a road between the Bottom squares and the Ohio.” All the remaining land of the one thousand acre tract, formerly Connolly’s, was ordered sold the next February to “the highest bidder for ready cash.”

1788 (age 32): Daniel sold all of his Jefferson Co., Kentucky, goods (Early Kentucky Settlers, p. 374): Daniel Brodhead, Jr. of Jefferson Co. sold to Richard Jones Waters of said county his goods, chattels, and all his personal property, farm implements, cattle, sheep, a negro woman, also horses, including young stallion purchased from John Severns, his interest in a stud horse late the property of Samuel Boon purchased at Sheriff’s sale by Brodhead in partnership with Samuel Wells, 4 wagons, gears for 16 horses, etc., log chains and trace chains, stock of all kinds, timbers belonging to Brodhead, in Louisville or elsewhere, his furniture, rifle-gun, rugs, cherry cupboard, one chocolate pot, pewter ware, etc. August 4, 1788. Recorded September 2, 1788.

Also in 1788: (Early Kentucky Settlers, p. 375) Daniel Brodhead [the father] of the Burrough of Reading, Berks Co., Pa. appoints his son Daniel Brodhead Jr., his lawful attorney to collect from James Francis Moore and James Sullivan of Kentucky, his former agents, all money and all such other matters as they had in trust for him. March 1, 1787. Witnesses: Charles Jno. Biddle, John Christian Hondebier. Recorded September 2, 1788. Father and son, evidently, still in good rapport.

1790 (age 34): (Early Kentucky Settlers, p. 383) Elijah Logan Hall [Hale?] of Louisville, now intending a journey to Fauquier Co., in the Old Settlement, appoints his friend Benjamin Johnston, his lawful attorney, to represent him in all matters of business. Revokes all other powers of attorney, especially the one to Daniel Brodhead Jr. to transact business with Colo Harry Lee of Virginia. August 24, 1790.  The emphatic “especially” is particularly intriguing.

1790-1797 (age 34-41): After Daniel Jr. left Kentucky, he spent time living in Richmond, Virginia (Goodwill & Smith, p. 136). So he must have spent at least some of these years there.

1798 (age 42): Daniel is listed on p. 59 of the book Centennial anniversary of the Pennsylvania Society, for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage: And for Improving the Condition of the African Race published by the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery. Philadelphia is given as his place of residence. C.W. Stafford’s Philadelphia Directory lists his place of residence as: 214 High Street (later known as Market Street; current location of Campo’s Philadelphia Deli). His father lived steps away at 226 High Street, current home of Mac’s Tavern.

PA Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery

PA Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery

1799: Stafford’s City Directory still shows the father and son living at their respective residences on High (Market) Street.

1800 (age 44): Daniel’s father, former General Daniel Brodhead who served as Surveyor-General from 1789-1800, retired to Milford, Pennsylvania, after spending the previous decade in Philadelphia. In 1795 he is known to have lived next to the southeast corner of Seventh and Market Streets (Jackson, p. 194). It was on the southwest corner of that intersection that Thomas Jefferson had written the Declaration of Independence between June 11-28, 1776.

SW corner of Seventh and Market Streets in Philadelphia. General Brodhead lived nearby in 1795. Photo from 1858.

SW corner of Seventh and Market Streets in Philadelphia where the Declaration of Independence was written. General Brodhead lived steps away in 1795. Photo from 1858. America’s Most Historic Highway: Market Street Philadelphia.

Stafford’s 1800 city directory still shows the pair at their respective residences, the only change is that Daniel Jr.’s occupation (not listed in the previous two year’s editions) is “tanner” (Merriam-Webster’s definition #1: “one who tans hides” as opposed to definition #2: “one who acquires or seeks to acquire a suntan” – injecting some levity here!).

Once Daniel Jr. relocated to Philadelphia in cir. 1898 (when he surfaces in the city directory listings), were father and son on good terms? I would think so given that they lived in such close proximity to each other. But something must have happened between then in the course of the next few years because the fallout was certain in August of 1803 when the General set his hand to his last will and testament and omitted Daniel Jr.

1800-1802: The son appears to have finally taken a stab at married life, and he did it in a pretty big way. Some family trees I’ve seen have listed Daniel Jr.’s wife as “Christian Abel”; that may well have been her name, but I have yet to see any proof of that. In any case, I must say that I feel slightly suspicious that “Christian” may have been a second wife since Daniel Jr. would have been between the ages of 47-58 when his six known children were born: Ellen (1803), Juliana (1805), Amanda (b. Phila., cir 1807), Evelina (1809), Mira (1812), and Daniel (1814) .

1801-1808: Daniel Jr. is absent from the Philadelphia City Directory. Was he no longer in the city or just living in someone else’s household?

1808 (age 52): The Tickler article of October 5 alluded to Daniel Jr. as having married a woman in Virginia and abandoning her and their small children. Had that been a first wife? Or is that a reference to ‘Christian Abel’ and her first 3 children born between 1803 and 1807? (The problem with that is that all of ‘Christian’ and Daniel’s children were born in Pennsylvania, not Virginia.) The article also alleges Daniel Jr. to have been Daniel Sr’s illegitimate son. Was that the public’s assumption regarding Daniel Jr. after he was omitted from his father’s will? That said, the General did not die until November 15, 1809; would the will have been made public prior to that for people to have been able to draw such a conclusion? Or was this gossip that had been tossed about for a long time?

Another Tickler article appeared a month later on November 9: A fellow called major Brodhead, who frequently boasted since the governor’s election, that he was one who had assisted in naturalizing the 500 aliens, recently solicited alms, in a certain billiard room, for one of the new made citizens, under the plea that he was a seafaring man thrown out of employ by the embargo. Now, although we do not know by what right Brodhead claims the title of major, we wish major Wash-tub to inform the public, whether the man for whom he solicited alms, is a seaman ; or whether he does not keep a sailor’s boarding house in Southwark. Further — major Wash-tub is requested to state, whether he ever received favors, similar to those he solicited for his protegee?

1809 (age 53): Daniel Sr. dies in Milford, Pike Co., PA, on November 15, and is buried in the Milford Cemetery. Daniel Jr. is listed in Robinson’s Philadelphia Directory: Broadhead, Danl., accomptant, N. Broad.

1810 (age 54): Daniel Jr. is again listed in Robinson’s Philadelphia Directory: Broadhead, Daniel, accomptant, North Broad. The 1810 Census shows the family living in South Mulberry Ward, Philadelphia. The household included 1 male under 10, 1 male aged 10-16, and 1 male aged 45 and older (Daniel Sr.). I don’t know who the 2 male children could have been because presumably son Daniel was not born until 1814. There were 5 girls under the age of 10,  1 between the age of 10-16, and 1 aged 26-44 (‘Christian Abel’). I don’t know who the 5th girl under the age of 10 could have been since Mira was born in 1812, nor do I know who the girl aged 10-16 could have been.

1813 (age 57): Daniel Brodhead Jr. is listed among numerous insolvent debtors in a newspaper notice that appeared in Daniel Poulson’s American Daily Advertiser (Philadelphia) on Wednesday, March 3, 1813. His profession is listed as “Accomptant” (an accountant). His creditors are listed as M. Randall, Henry Sparks, and Benjamin Noner.  Kite’s Philadelphia Directory for 1814 lists Daniel: Brodhead Daniel, accomptant north Broad and 24 Strawberry.

1814 (age 58): Kite’s Philadelphia Directory carries the same listing: Brodhead Daniel, accomptant north Broad and 24 Strawberry.

1816 (age 60): Robinson’s Philadelphia Directory lists Daniel Jr.: Broadhead, Daniel, accomptant, North Broad. Daniel offers bail for Jane Baker, mother of the notorious Ann Carson. Mrs. Baker had been implicated in her daughter’s attempted kidnapping of Governor Simon Snyder. See New York Evening Post article – October 31, 1816. Was Jane Baker, perhaps, related to Daniel’s aforementioned son-in-law William Baker? This was a huge scandal worthy of its own blog post, but for a quick synopsis, click here. For the whole story, click here. Update 6/13/13: Daniel’s role was that of professional bail bondsman. (Branson, p. 62)

New York Evening Post, 1816 (Credit: www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Evening Post, 1816 (Credit: http://www.fultonhistory.com)

Pennsylvania Governor Simon Snyder, ca. 1815 (Wikimedia Commons - image in public domain)

Pennsylvania Governor Simon Snyder, ca. 1815 (Wikimedia Commons – image in public domain)

1817 (age 61): Per Robinson’s Philadelphia Directory he is still at the same location: Broadhead, Daniel, accomptant, North Broad.

1818 (age 62): On March 27, Daniel Jr. appeared in District Court in Philadelphia to confirm his identity as a veteran of the Revolutionary War and to request a pension due to his “reduced circumstances in life”. (Goodwill and Smith, p. 136) Paxton’s Philadelphia Directory shows a change of address: Brodhead, Daniel, accomptant, 17 Arch.

1819 (age 63): According to Paxton’s Philadelphia Directory, Daniel is now several doors away: Brodhead, Daniel, accountant, 12 Arch.

1820 (age 64): On August 11, Daniel appeared in Court again to affirm his identity and to demand Bounty Land promised to him by the US for having served as an officer in the War. (Goodwill and Smith, pp. 137-138)

The 1820 Census shows the family living in Philadelphia’s High Street Ward. But now there are only 7 in the household: 1 male over 45 (Daniel Jr), 1 female under 10 (must be Mira), 3 females aged 10-16 (presumably Juliana, Amanda, and Evelina), and 2 females aged 16-26 (one was probably Ellen, but who was the 2nd?). It appears that ‘Christian Abel’ and young son Daniel may have passed away by then, but I have not yet found proof of that. Whitely’s Philadelphia Directory shows an additional occupation (scrivener – a.k.a. notary): Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener and accountant, 12 Arch.

First Presbyterian Church, Market Street, East of Third, in 1800

First Presbyterian Church, Market Street, East of Third, in 1800

1821 (age 65): M’Carty Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener and accountant, 12 Arch.

1822 (age 66): M’Carty Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener and accountant, 12 Arch.

1823 (age 67): Desilver’s Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener and accountant, 12 Arch.

1824 (age 68): Desilver’s Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, accountant, 12 Arch.

1825 (age 69): Wilson’s Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, conveyancer and accountant, 12 Mulberry.

1828 (age 72): Desilver’s Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener, 12 Mulberry.

1829 (age 73): Desilver’s Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener, 12 Mulberry.

1830 (age 74): I could not find the family in the 1830 Census, but Desilver’s Philadelphia Directory carried this listing: Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener, 12 Mulberry.

1831 (age 75): Dies on February 2 in Philadelphia. Funeral procession departing from son-in-law William Baker’s home on Buttonwood Street. Burial place not stated.

1835: His estate is appraised on January 8. It consists of acreage in Henderson Co., Kentucky, transferred to him by “Military Warrant No. 3490”: …2666-2/3 acres — 766-2/3 ares of which remain unallocated and which we value at ——— $600. (Goodwill and Smith, p. 139).

So all of that research was triggered by those two little words “William Baker”– so whose husband was he? Juliana’s.

If you’ve made it this far, thanks for reading, and as always, your comments, corrections, and suggestions are welcome!

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Update 4/28/14: From the book History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties, p. 935:

[Col. Daniel Brodhead] …had only one son, also named Daniel (by his first wife, Elizabeth De Pue), who was also an officer during the Revolution. He was sent to Virginia in 1779, in charge of the prisoners of General Burgoyne’s army. He subsequently settled in Virgina and raised a family. Colonel James O. Brodhead, of St. Louis, MO, who has achieved a national reputation, is a grandson of his.

This obviously raises more questions that need to be looked into. Daniel Jr. supposedly retired in 1779, so if in fact he was sent to Va., he must not have been there that long. On the surface, this does seem to corroborate other sources alleging that a wife existed in KY/VA, at a time prior to when Daniel Jr. established a family in Philadelphia ca 1800-1802.

Note: It would seem that History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties is incorrect about James O. Brodhead being one of Daniel Jr.’s grandsons, unless there is another James O. Brodhead that was born in St. Louis. This is the only one I have found: James Overton Broadhead; born in Charlottesville, VA, 29 May 1819; died 7 Aug 1898 in St. Louis. The article ‘Ardent Unionist, Unrepentant Slaveholder’ contains a wealth of information about this James including that he was the son of Achilles Brodhead, who was ‘commissioned by Thomas Jefferson to survey the grounds that became the University of Virginia.’ After a bit of digging, I learned that Achilles’ father was a Jonathan Broadhead (from A History of the City of St. Louis and Vicinity, The Pioneers and Their Successors compiled and published by John Devoy, St. Louis, 1898: “Mr. Broadhead’s grandfather, Jonathan Broadhead, came to this country from Yorkshire, England, during the Revolutionary War and settled in Albemarle County”).

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References:

  • The Baltimore Underwriter: A Weekly Journal Devoted to the Interests of Insurance in All Its Branches, Vol. XIII, January – June 1875 (Baltimore: Bombaugh & Ransom Publishers and Proprietors).
  • Bogart, William Henry. Daniel Boone And The Hunters Of Kentucky (New York and Auburn: Miller, Orton & Mulligan, 1856).
  • Susan Branson. Dangerous to Know: Women, Crime, and Notoriety in the Early Republic. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008).
  • Early Kentucky Settlers: The Records of Jefferson County, Kentucky from the Filson Club History Quarterly (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. for Clearfield Co., 2007).
  • Fitzpatrick, John C., editor.The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799, Volume 14 (January 12, 1779 – May 5, 1779) by George Washington, John Clement Fitzpatrick, David Maydole Matteson. United States George Washington Bicentennial Commission.
  • Goodwill, Anne, and Jean Smith. The Brodhead Family: The Story of Captain Daniel Brodhead, His Wife Ann Tye, and Their Descendants, Vol. II (Port Ewen, NY: Brodhead Family Association, 1988).
  • The History of Ohio Falls Cities and Their Counties: Illustrations and Biographical Sketches, Vol. I (Cleveland: L.A. Williams and Co., 1882).
  • Jackson, Joseph. America’s Most Historic Highway: Market Street Philadelphia (Philadelphia & NY: Wannamaker, 1926).
  • Mathews, Alfred. History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania (Philadelphia: R. T. Peck and Co., 1886).
  • Morris, Robert. The Papers of Robert Morris, 1781-1784: August-September 1781 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1975).
  • Morris, Robert. The Papers of Robert Morris, 1781-1784: April 16-July 20, 1782 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1980).
  • Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery. Centennial anniversary of the Pennsylvania Society, for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage: And for Improving the Condition of the African Race (Philadelphia: Grant, Faires & Rodgers, Printers, 1875).
  • Risjord, Norman K. Chesapeake Politics: 1781-1800 (New York: Columbia University Press, 1978).
  • Rubicam, Milton. Evidence: An Exemplary Study, A Craig Family Case History. Special Publication No. 49. (Washington DC: National Genealogical Society, 1981).

Philadelphia Directory Listings:

Philadelphia city directories

Philadelphia city directories

Resources on Ann Carson:

  • The trials of Richard Smith, late lieutenant in the 23d Regiment U. States infantry, as principal, and Ann Carson, alias Ann Smith, as accessory, for the murder of Captain John Carson, on the 20th day of January 1816. Ebook on  openlibrary.org
  • Susan Branson. Dangerous to Know: Women, Crime, and Notoriety in the Early Republic. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008. ISBN 978-0-8122-4088-7
  • Essay: Crime, Class Consciousness and Narrative in the Early Republic

Map Credit: Florida Center for Instructional Technology at University of South Florida: http://etc.usf.edu/maps.

G. R. Clark image: This media file is in the public domain in the United States. This applies to U.S. works where the copyright has expired, often because its first publication occurred prior to January 1, 1923. See [http://copyright.cornell.edu/resources/publicdomain.cfm this page] for further explanation. This image might not be in the public domain outside of the United States; this especially applies in the countries and areas that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works, such as Canada, mainland China (not Hong Kong nor Macao), Germany, Mexico, and Switzerland.

Categories: Abel, Baker, Brodhead, Kentucky, Milford Cemetery Milford PA, Obituaries, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Scandal, US Federal 1810, US Federal 1820, Virginia, Washington, President George | 2 Comments

1749 Brodhead document donated to Monroe County Historical Society – PA

See article published in online Pocono Record on May 28, 2013. Click here.

Categories: Brodhead, Pennsylvania, Stroudsburg | Leave a comment

Shorpy – Treasure trove of old photos

Have you ever visited the Shorpy site? They describe themselves as “a vintage photo blog featuring thousands of high-definition images from the 1850s to 1950s. The site is named after Shorpy Higginbotham, a teenage coal miner who lived 100 years ago.”

I was looking for images of old Philadelphia, and stumbled on the below. The images are truly marvelous — you can almost feel as if you have been transported back in time and are right there witnessing the scene. It’s a great way to “place yourself” in the environment your ancestors lived in — to see what they may have seen, where they may have walked, lived, etc. Anyway, could not help but want to share since any time you spend on the Shorpy site will be time well spent.

For a sampling, click on the below. Captions are at the bottom of each image. Enjoy!

Categories: Philadelphia | 4 Comments

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