Monthly Archives: March 2014

Job Angus & President Lincoln’s catafalque

Lincoln's funeral procession on Pennsylvania Avenue on April 19, 1865. Lincoln was being moved from the White House to the Capitol rotunda. Photo is attributed in some places to Alexander Gardner.  Wikipedia: his image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

Lincoln’s funeral procession on Pennsylvania Avenue on April 19, 1865. Lincoln was being moved from the White House to the Capitol rotunda. Photo is attributed in some places to Alexander Gardner. Wikipedia: This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

A while ago, I published a post about Job Angus’s friendship with President Lincoln, and specifically Job’s role in the inauguration, both as a participant in the procession as Assistant Marshall and as the supplier of the location for the inaugural ball.

Photograph of the Lincoln Catafalque in the United States Capitol, taken by Rebel At, on June 30th, 2007. Wikipedia.

Photograph of the Lincoln Catafalque in the United States Capitol, taken by Rebel At, on June 30th, 2007. Wikipedia.

Reading the article “Maryland man may have found two lost or forgotten photos of Lincoln’s funeral procession” online over the weekend reminded me of an article I’d stumbled on some time later, after posting that piece about the ballroom. In it was another mention of Job W. Angus (brother of my second great grandfather James W. Angus), this time about his role on the exceedingly sad occasion of Lincoln’s funeral.

From the Washington Evening Star, 20 April 1865:

The corps was laid on a catafalque, which was designed by B.B. French, Jr., erected in the center of the rotunda by Mr. Job W. Angus and others. The base is one foot high, eight and a half feet long, and four feet wide, and is covered with fine black cloth. The dais is two feet high, seven feet long, and two and a half feet wide. At each corner of the dais is a sloping union column, representing bundles of fasces tied with silver lace. This dais is also covered with black cloth and heavy festoons of the same material, which is edged with silver fringe hung on either side, being gathered in the center with a black rosette of satin ribbon, with a silver star, and from this falls a fold of cloth, the end of which containing three stars. On either side of the dais are two muskets with bayonets, two carbines and two sword bayonets crossed.

(For the full text of this and other articles related to Lincoln’s funeral proceedings, visit abrahamlincolnonline.org.)

Now here’s something I never knew, and it completely blows me away, knowing that Job had a hand in erecting President Lincoln’s catafalque: The very same catafalque has been used for all those who have since lain in state in the Capitol Rotunda* as well as for those who have lain in state elsewhere in the Capitol. That just astounds me. Angus descendants can feel very proud to have such a weighty connection to our nation’s history, a connection that is ongoing! Amazing!

 

*In the Capitol Rotunda (For more information on the catafalque, visit: Architect of the Capitol)
Abraham Lincoln April 19-21, 1865
Thaddeus Stevens August 13-14, 1868
Charles Sumner March 13, 1874
Henry Wilson November 25-26, 1875
James Abram Garfield September 21-23, 1881
John Alexander Logan December 30-31, 1886
William McKinley, Jr. September 17, 1901
Pierre Charles L’Enfant
(re-interment) April 28, 1909
George Dewey January 20, 1917
Unknown Soldier of World War I November 9-11, 1921
Warren Gamaliel Harding August 8, 1923
William Howard Taft March 11, 1930
John Joseph Pershing July 18-19, 1948
Robert Alphonso Taft August 2-3, 1953
Unknown Soldiers of World War II
and the Korean War May 28-30, 1958
John Fitzgerald Kennedy November 24-25, 1963
Douglas MacArthur April 8-9, 1964
Herbert Clark Hoover October 23-25, 1964
Dwight David Eisenhower March 30-31, 1969
Everett McKinley Dirksen September 9-10, 1969
J. Edgar Hoover May 3-4, 1972
Lyndon Baines Johnson January 24-25, 1973
Hubert Horatio Humphrey January 14-15, 1978
Unknown Soldier of Vietnam Era May 25-28, 1984
Claude Denson Pepper June 1-2, 1989
Ronald Wilson Reagan June 9-11, 2004
Gerald R. Ford, Jr. December 30, 2006–January 2, 2007
Daniel K. Inouye December 20, 2012

Categories: Angus, Death, Lincoln, President Abraham, Washington DC | 6 Comments

“Angus Family Records Reveal Civil War Prices”

I am including an article clipped from a copy of the Elizabeth, NJ, Daily Journal sometime during the 1930s. Unfortunately, the year was clipped off by whoever did the clipping, but it must have been before 2 April 1936. I say that because the article mentions Attorney Job W. Angus (1856-1936, son of James Winans Angus & Wealthy Ann Jaques) dropping off an assortment of old family records with an historian for future safe-keeping, and Job died of bronchial emphysema on 2 April 1936. So the article was published sometime before then. I am including the opposite side of the article so you can see what is visible of the date. (The prices on blouses and spring bags can’t help but amuse!) Click on the article if you need to enlarge the print.

Elizabeth Daily Journal, Jan 27, 193?

Elizabeth Daily Journal, Jan 27, 193?

Elizabeth Daily Journal, Jan 27, 193?

Elizabeth Daily Journal, Jan 27, 193?

Categories: Angus, Civil War, Elizabeth, Union Co. | 2 Comments

Old Woodruff Family Homestead: Witness to American History

View Near Elizabethtown, N. J., oil painting by Régis François Gignoux, Honolulu Museum of Art (Wikipedia - public domain)

View Near Elizabethtown, N. J., oil painting by Régis François Gignoux, Honolulu Museum of Art- 1847 (Wikipedia – public domain)

The city of Elizabeth, New Jersey’s birthplace and a crossroads of the American Revolution, celebrates its 350th anniversary this year. The GoElizabethNJ website is dedicated to the city’s 2014 celebrations which appear to culminate in an historical reenactment in October. They hope to attract to their celebrations many of those whose roots hail back to that era of New Jersey’s history. There are millions of us out here, and you may be one of them!

As I read about the celebration plans, I was reminded of an article we have about the home of Timothy Woodruff (1715-1798; DAR record #A128744) whose ancestors, hailing from Fordwich, Kent Co., England, were among the city’s founders. For some reason, the house is absent from the GoElizabethNJ‘s map of county historic sites, although they do include the Woodruff House and Eaton Store Museum, which was built on land owned by John Woodruff (1637-1691), a great-grandfather of Timothy. (For a map of Elizabethtown at the time of the Revolutionary War, click here.)

The Woodruff House at 866 Salem Avenue - present day

The Woodruff House at 866 Salem Avenue – present day

The Timothy Woodruff house article was published in the Elizabeth Daily Journal on 21 November 1964. In the event you are a Woodruff descendant, I am including it here. Published almost 50 years ago during Elizabeth’s 300th anniversary year, the article is probably hard to dig up online. So I will save you a trip to the Elizabeth library :-), where it is no doubt available in their archives. At the time the article was written, the house had been out of the Woodruff family for four years. Its last owner, my 2nd great grandfather Francis Woodruff’s niece Carrie Woodruff (89 yrs old in 1964, daughter of Ogden Woodruff and Phebe Bonnell, and a sister of Rev. Frank Stiles Woodruff) had moved out and gone to to live in a rest home in nearby Cranford.

For the benefit of my immediate family members who may read this, our descent from Timothy is as follows:

1-Timothy Woodruff b. 1715, d. 26 Apr 1798, Elizabethtown, NJ, bur. First Presbyterian Church yard of Elizabeth, NJ +Elizabeth Parsons b. 1712, East Hampton, Long Island, NY, d. 16 Sep 1776, Elizabethtown, NJ, bur. First Presbyterian Church yard of Elizabeth, NJ

2-Enos Woodruff b. 1749, Elizabethtown, NJ, d. 5 Dec 1821, Elizabethtown, NJ, bur. Stone 0599 (missing), First Presbyterian Church yard of Elizabeth, NJ +Charity Ogden b. 19 Aug 1753, d. 5 Sep 1828, Elizabethtown, NJ, bur. Stone 0598 (missing), First Presbyterian Church yard of Elizabeth, NJ

3-John Woodruff b. 27 Feb 1795, Elizabethtown, NJ, d. 6 Aug 1857 +Mary Ogden Earl b. 3 Jan 1794, Connecticut Farm, NJ, d. 24 Jul 1878

Francis Woodruff

Francis Woodruff

Mary Jane Trowbridge Woodruff

Mary Jane Trowbridge Woodruff

4-Francis Woodruff b. 30 Oct 1820, Elizabethtown, NJ, d. 8 Aug 1883, Conant Street, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. 10 Aug 1883, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ +Mary Jane Trowbridge b. 20 Sep 1821, New Providence, Essex Co., NJ, d. 27 Feb 1883, Lyons Farms, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. 1 Mar 1883, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union Co., NJ

Wm Earl Woodruff & Wealthy Ann Angus

Wm Earl Woodruff & Wealthy Ann Angus

5-William Earl Woodruff b. 4 Oct 1848, Elizabeth, NJ, d. 18 Oct 1928, Elizabeth, NJ, bur. Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union, NJ
+Wealthy Ann Angus b. 5 Aug 1850, d. 27 May 1927, bur. Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union Co., NJ

It goes without saying that there is much to glean from an article like this. I hope you will find it of interest, and if you have anything to add or share, please do. (For some links to online material pertaining to the Woodruffs, visit my Links page and scroll down to the bottom.) Enjoy, and have a great weekend!

The Daily Journal, Elizabeth, NJ, 21 November 1864, p. 1.

The Daily Journal, Elizabeth, NJ, 21 November 1964, p. 1.

The Daily Journal, Elizabeth, NJ, 21 November 1864, p. 1.

The Daily Journal, Elizabeth, NJ, 21 November 1964, p. 1.

The Daily Journal, Elizabeth, NJ, 21 November 1964, p. 1.

The Daily Journal, Elizabeth, NJ, 21 November 1964, p. 1.

The Daily Journal, Elizabeth, NJ, 21 November 1964, p. 1.

The Daily Journal, Elizabeth, NJ, 21 November 1964, p. 1.

The Daily Journal, Elizabeth, NJ, 21 November 1964, p. 1.

The Daily Journal, Elizabeth, NJ, 21 November 1964, p. 1.

Categories: Anniversaries, Elizabeth, Union Co., Family Homes, Revolutionary War, Woodruff | 8 Comments

Mary Martha Angus Knowles (1846-1922)

Lawrence D. Knowles

Lawrence D. Knowles

Newspaper clippings on weddings, anniversaries, engagements, and funerals can contain a goldmine of family information. Here’s one we’ve kept all these years about the 50th wedding anniversary of Mary Martha Angus (fourth child of James Winans Angus and Wealthy Ann Jaques) and Austin F. Knowles. The article is not dated but it must have been from 4 September 1917, which would have been 50 years from their wedding day.

Marie Gertrude Knowles, married Edward Chamberlain

Marie Gertrude Knowles married Edward Chamberlain

I’ve already mentioned some of Mary Martha’s siblings in this blog: James Winans Angus Jr., Wealthy Ann Angus (my great grandmother), Charles Dujah Angus, Job Winans Angus, Lavinia P. Angus, and Walter P. Angus. (There were 11 children in all). Both Martha (b. 1846) and her older brother Jacob (died in 1850 at age 6, buried in First Presbyterian Church of Elizabeth churchyard) were born in Pueblo, Mexico, while their father was working there, handing supplies for the troops taking part in the Mexican-American War. Their mom Wealthy was quite a pistol and had her share of adventures in that city. More on them both in an upcoming post.

A long news item outlining Mary Martha’s life and activities appeared in the Elizabeth Daily Journal on 17 January 1922, the day after passed away. Unfortunately, I don’t have that article, but if I get hold of it at some point I will post it here.

The Knowles had six children: William H. Knowles, James A. Knowles, Austin F. Knowles Jr., Watts T. R. Knowles (initial T. may be incorrect, another source says it’s ‘J.’),  Marie Gertrude Knowles (married Edward Chamberlain) and Lawrence D. Knowles.  Photos of Marie Gertrude and Lawrence as children are shown here. I’ll let you read the article; if you are an Angus/Knowles descendant, perhaps, you’ll find out something new! As always, corrections, additions, updates, etc. always welcome.

wedding_anniversary

Knowles’ 50th Wedding Anniversary, probably clipped from the Elizabeth Daily Journal, September 1917

Categories: Angus, Anniversaries, Elizabeth, Union Co., Knowles, New Jersey | 3 Comments

Friday’s for the Birds

Every now and then I interrupt this family history blog to entertain you with some photos of our South Florida wildlife. Winter brings lots of interesting birds our way: painted buntings, cardinals, blue jays, red-bellied woodpeckers, great crested flycatchers, catbirds, mourning doves, wood storks, etc. We had an incident a while back between a hawk (short-tailed?), a mockingbird, and a blue jay. I always thought blue jays were tough, but the mockingbird stood his/her ground much better. Must have had a nest nearby. Why is the hawk standing on one leg? The answer can be found in All about Birds. Have a great weekend!

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hawk-2

hawk-3

hawk-4

hawk-5

hawk-6

hawk-7

hawk-8
hawk-9

hawk-9a
hawk-9b

Categories: Miscellaneous, Nature | Leave a comment

Job W. Angus (1856-1936) – Letter from San Antonio, Texas, 7 January 1877

William E. Woodruff, b. October 4, 1848; photo taken on 20 April 1872 at Bostwick's, 743 Broadway, NY, NY (From our family's personal collection)

William E. Woodruff, b. October 4, 1848; Engagement photo taken on 20 April 1872 at Bostwick’s, 743 Broadway, NY, NY
(From our family’s personal collection)

I must be challenged with dates since I came across yet another letter written by young Job W. Angus that predates the last three! I apologize for yet another instance of going off the ‘chronological grid’, so to speak. This letter, dated 7 January 1877, was written to my grandfather William ‘Will’ Woodruff who was married to Job’s sister Wealthy.

Prior to his marriage, William had dabbled in raising sheep for wool out in San Ysidro, CA (see previous post). Perhaps William was one of the ones who encouraged Job to go off and try his hand at something before settling down. But unfortunately, Job seems to think that William’s past experiences out in California were much better than his current life in Texas. Here, he says, there are nothing but thieves and desperadoes and Texas is getting worse every year….

Job says he wishes William and ‘Charlie’ were with him there as he does not like being on his own. I can understand that. But at least from the other letters, we know that his Uncle Job Angus was close by to give him help if needed. I’m sure that gave the family back home some peace of mind. I think ‘Charlie’ must be a reference to his older brother, Charles Dujah Angus (1852-1938) who was an ‘oil dealer’ living in Elizabeth, NJ, according to the 1880 census.

I have two more letters of Job’s to post. One more from Texas and one from Mobile, Alabama. Thanks for visiting the blog, and have a great weekend!

Job W. Angus Letter, 7 January 1877, from our family's personal collection (p. 1)

Job W. Angus Letter, 7 January 1877, from our family’s personal collection (p. 1)

Job W. Angus Letter, 7 January 1877, from our family's personal collection (p. 2)

Job W. Angus Letter, 7 January 1877, from our family’s personal collection (p. 2)

Job W. Angus Letter, 7 January 1877, from our family's personal collection (p. 3)

Job W. Angus Letter, 7 January 1877, from our family’s personal collection (p. 3)

Job W. Angus Letter, 7 January 1877, from our family's personal collection (p. 4)

Job W. Angus Letter, 7 January 1877, from our family’s personal collection (p. 4)

Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., San Antonio, Texas, Woodruff | 4 Comments

Job W. Angus (1856-1936) – Letter from San Antonio, Texas, 19 January 1877

Mission Espada Chapel at San Antonio, TX (Wikimedia Commons: Liveon001 © Travis K.Witt, Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License)

Mission Espada Chapel at San Antonio, TX (Wikimedia Commons: Liveon001 © Travis K.Witt, Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License)

I found a letter written by Job W. Angus (the younger) that predates the previous two letters of his that were posted on this blog (see previous letters No. 1 and No. 2). Dated 19 January 1871, it was written in San Antonio, Texas. It’s winter, obviously, and he speaks of never-ending rain that is preventing him from doing any work. The letter is addressed to my great grandparents William and Wealthy Woodruff. (Wealthy was one of Job’s older sisters.)  On page no. 1, he mentions having just written ‘Vine’ — a reference to his younger sister Lavinia P. Angus — and that all his news was in that letter. Shame we don’t have that one!

Anyway, the fact that this letter survives to this day is wonderful nonetheless. The most interesting bit comes at the very end where he mentions his well-known uncle, builder, friend of President Lincoln, and namesake Job Winans Angus: …Uncle Job is going to build the Post Office here in a month. He is tired of his partner and don’t want to do much till he gets rid off him. Of a night, Uncle and I play Don Pedro. I don’t think that you know what it is. But they play with cards. that is how we spend our evenings.

The handwriting is very legible so I won’t bother transcribing it. Enjoy!

Lithograph - Map of San Antonio, Texas, 1886 (Wikimedia - Image in public domain)

Lithograph – Map of San Antonio, Texas, 1886 (Wikimedia – Image in public domain)

Job W. Angus Letter 01.19.1877

Job W. Angus Letter 01.19.1877

Job W. Angus Letter 01.19.1877

Job W. Angus Letter 01.19.1877, from my family’s private collection of family papers

Job W. Angus Letter 01.19.1877, from my family's private collection of family papers

Job W. Angus Letter 01.19.1877, from my family’s private collection of family papers

Job W. Angus Letter 01.19.1877

Job W. Angus Letter 01.19.1877, from my family’s private collection of family papers

Job W. Angus Letter 01.19.1877

Job W. Angus Letter 01.19.1877, from my family’s private collection of family papers

Categories: Angus, San Antonio, Texas, Woodruff | 2 Comments

1920’s children’s book: Frowzy Frump, Horace Bristle, et al

The Did and Didn't Book by Paul Wing, pub. 1925

Our personal copy of the The Did and Didn’t Book by Paul Wing, pub. 1925

“A New Book for Boys and Girls,” The Westfield Leader, Nov. 11, 1925, p. 16

When I was a small child, I could stare at Harry Linnell’s  illustrations in The Did and Didn’t Book for what seemed like hours. The cover image, in particular, left me completely transfixed.

The book, written by Paul Wing and published in 1925 by C.E. Rock Co., NY, belonged to my mother, who would have been two at the time of its publication. It ended up on her shelf of children’s books for her own children many years later. It’s still under copyright, so I can’t publish the contents here (yet, anyway).

Suffice it to say, it is a short book containing a persuasive story as to why little children should bathe and brush their teeth. The main characters are David and Lorraine, Horace Bristle, a little white Teletubby-like creature called Igloo, a fellow with no teeth named ‘Didn’t’, and a mud-covered character (obviously not a regular bather!) called Frowzy Frump.

At the end of the book, a surprise awaited the children of the 1925 purchasers of the book: a ‘Does It Kit,’ containing a little cake of soap, a wash cloth, toothpaste, and a toothbrush resembling Horace Bristle. Mom has no memory of those inclusions; but no matter, they were destined to disappear quite quickly anyway. But the book–now in very worn condition–still sits on our shelves. And I still occasionally leaf through it, enjoying the illustrations more than anything. I don’t know how much of a rarity this book is, but like many other children’s books with captivating illustrations, it is a testament to the power of an illustrator’s paint brush and the lingering impact their images can have on a child’s imagination.

New York Sun, 8 December 1925 (Credit: FultonHistory.com)

New York Sun, 8 December 1925 (Credit: FultonHistory.com)

Some children who may well have been recipients of The Did and Didn’t Book appear in the photo below. I treasure this photo of my dad’s 1927 birthday party which was attended by my mother! For the moment, I’ll leave it to my family of regular readers to try to figure out which children they are.

Brodhead_Charles_BdayParty

How about you? Any favorite illustrated books from your childhood come to mind? (Frankly, I recall none devoted to the topic of bathing and tooth brushing!) As a child of the sixties, my personal favorites are The Adventures of Mr. Gilfump, many of the Dr. Seuss books, and of course, Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are.

Note: Another children’s hygiene book from that era is 1913’s Yourself and Your Wonderful House. Full of all sorts of advice for parents on raising children, it is viewable online on the Open Library website. Some images from that book can be seen below.

*From: http://archive.wmlnj.org/TheWestfieldLeader/1925/1925-11-11/pg_0016.pdf

Categories: Antiquarian publications, Children's books, Westfield Union Co NJ | 4 Comments

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