Monthly Archives: April 2014

A Trewin Tidbit

Tuning fork (Wikimedia Commons- public domain)

Tuning fork (Wikimedia Commons- public domain)

I had to move some cobwebs around in my head, but I do remember seeing a very old-looking tuning fork somewhere along the line among old family papers and belongings. No doubt it will resurface again some day, and when it does I will now know what its significance is thanks to a recently discovered note left behind by my grandmother, Zillah Trewin: Tuning fork used by Grandpa Trewin [Thomas Trewin, 1817-1875] when he led the singing at the chapel in England.

A note left behind by Zillah Trewin, my grandmother

A note left behind by Zillah Trewin, my grandmother

Born on 12 August 1817 to Thomas Trewin and Sarah Larcom, Thomas was christened at the Wesleyan Methodist Church on William Street in Woolwich, Co. Kent, England. According to the Londonburials website, that chapel is now part of a Gurdwara (a Sikh temple).

Whether or not Thomas grew up in and then led the choir in the William Street chapel, I do not know. But I found it very interesting to discover that Thomas had such musical ability and devoted himself to leading choir activities at his church.

As always, comments, corrections, & additions are welcome.

 

Categories: Trewin, Woolwich, Greater London | 2 Comments

Was Maria Lesher Daniel Brodhead Jr.’s First Wife?

View of Bethlehem. Aquatint by Karl Bodmer from the book "Maximilian, Prince of Wied’s Travels in the Interior of North America, during the years 1832–1834" by Prince Maximilian of Wied (Publisher: Ackermann & Co., 1839) Source URL: http://www.gallery.oldbookart

View of Bethlehem. Aquatint by Karl Bodmer from the book Maximilian, Prince of Wied’s Travels in the Interior of North America, during the years 1832–1834 by Prince Maximilian of Wied (Publisher: Ackermann & Co., 1839) Source URL: http://www.gallery.oldbookart

I was recently contacted by Jean Brewer who is hoping to establish that Daniel Brodhead Jr., son of Brigadier General Daniel Brodhead and Elizabeth DuPuy, is her ancestor. With her permission, I am publishing the letter she sent me. If you can shed light on this topic to help Jean, please leave a comment at the end of this post and/or email Jean at ancestortracker2 at gmail dot com. Thank you!

Dear Author of Chips Off The Old Block,

I have looked for years for the correct Daniel BRODHEAD in my family. Yesterday I came across your 11 June 2013 article entitled “Daniel BRODHEAD, Jr.: A Timeline of Life Events.”

After reading your research on this Daniel I feel more strongly that ever this is the right Daniel for my connection. Back in December 1985 Charles SANDWICK also thought this was mostly likely the Daniel I needed. Here are the facts as I presently know them:

Old Moravian Chapel (est. 1751) & dead house (in the foreground). Wikimedia Commons: Image from NYPL collections is in public domain). Image date unknown-between 1865-1875 (?)

Old Moravian Chapel (est. 1751) & dead house (in the foreground). Wikimedia Commons: Image from NYPL collections is in public domain). Image date unknown-between 1865-1875 (?)

1) Abstract of Baptisms from Bethlehem Moravian Congregation, Bethlehem, Northampton CO., PA
Johann and Mar Cath LISCHER
had daughter Maria LISCHER b. 7 April 1761 at Bethlehem, bapt. same day at Bethlehem Moravian Church
{my note: Parents John LISCHER/LESHER and his wife Maria Catherine’s maiden name LOESCH – JMB}

2) 18th Century Vital Records from the Early Registers of the Moravian Church of Schoeneck, Northampton Co., PA, compiled by Charles SANDWICK, Jr.
Dan and Maria (LISCHER) BRADHOT (sic) {Daniel and Maria (LISCHER) BRODHEAD – JMB}
had daughter Anna Maria BRADHOT bapt. 23 Dec. 1781 at Schoeneck Moravian Church {my note: The mother Maria (LISCHER) BROADHEAD would have been about 20 years old. If Daniel BRODHEAD Jr., b. ca. 1756 is the father, he would have been about 25 years old. – JMB)

3) Will of Mary Catherine LISHER, Dated 3 May 1803, Proved 10 May 1803, File #2085, Northampton County Court house, Easton, PA
“I give and bequeath unto my granddaughter Mary BROADHEAD the only child of my daughter Mary, now the wife of Samuel RUSSELL, by her first husband Daniel BROADHEAD, deceased, the sum of ten pounds,…” {my note: Mary Catherine referred to Daniel as deceased – was he deceased or had he abandoned his family and gone to KY, VA, Philadelphia?

4) Will Book E-3, p. 407 Northampton Co., Courthouse, Easton, Northampton Co., PA
“I Mary BROADHEAD, alias Mary YOHE of Lower Saucon, in the county of Northampton, PA one of the granddaughters and legates named in the will of Mary Catherine LISHET late of Nazareth in the county of Northampton, PA the aforesaid the widow and relict of John LISCHER late of the same place, yeoman, deceased, do hereby acknowledge receipt of ten pounds from John LISCHER (uncle of Mary-JMB) and Nathaniel MICHLER, administrators of said will of Mary Catherine LISCHER, 20 Nov. 1803 {my note: In 1803 Mary (BROADHEAD) YOHE, b. ca. 1781 would have been 22 years old. – JMB}

5) In a letter dated 15 August 1985 from Charles SANDWICK – by going over possible Daniel’s he concluded – “I am of the opinion Daniel BRODHEAD, son of Daniel and Elizabeth (DEPUE) BRODHEAD, of whom so little has been recorded, did indeed die soon after his release as a prison of war, but only after a brief marriage with Anna Maria LISCHER.

Based on your research:
1776-78 – Daniel prisoner of war from Nov. 16, 1776 until 26 Aug. 1778
1779 – Daniel retired from Military
1781 – Daniel became a clerk in the office of Robert MORRIS, US Superintendent of Finance
1782 – Daniel fired by MORRIS on 29 May 1782
1782 – Daniel possible with his father in Reading, PA
1783 – Daniel first merchant to arrive in the new frontier town of Louisville, KY
1800-1802 you wrote – “The son appears to have taken a stab at married life,…” “I must say that I feel slightly suspicious that “Christian” may have been second wife since Daniel Jr. would have been between the ages of 47-58 when his six known children were born.”

I have a strong feeling Daniel married my Maria LESHER/LISCHER b. 1761 , fathered daughter Maria/Mary ca. 1781 and then left the family for “bigger and better things.”

Any input you have or ideas for further research are most welcome. Thank you for your time to read through this. My grandmother was the LESHER. I’ve worked on the family some 40 years or more.

Jean (CHRISTIAN) BREWER

**************************************************************************************************************************

 

Categories: Bethlehem Northamp Co, Brodhead, Lischer or Lesher, Moravian Church, Pennsylvania, Stroudsburg | 2 Comments

One Sargent (Slaymaker) family mystery solved—thanks to note about a button hook

Wikimedia Commons: Early 20th-century steel button hook with an art nouveau cherub design sterling silver handle. Author Sobebunny; 2009-0118.

Wikimedia Commons: Early 20th-century steel button hook with an art nouveau cherub design sterling silver handle. Author Sobebunny; 2009-0118.

Zillah Trewin, 1907, several years after 'Aunt Jennie' passed away

Zillah Trewin, 1907, several years after ‘Aunt Jennie’ passed away

Don’t you just love those ancestors to pieces who had the presence of mind to sit down and record notes about your family history? How fabulous it is to have those records. Don’t think you have any? Well, maybe not, but if you inherited boxes of papers you have yet to go through, you may just come across some real gems. My advice is to share them and preserve them as fast as you can.

My grandmother Zillah Trewin is one such angel in our family tree. Bless her heart. And yesterday, I came upon a piece of paper in an old file folder. The tides of time and multiple moves over a half century or more had separated it from the other notes she left behind. This paper has resolved one family mystery that emerged for me two years ago. I spoke about it in the post Cemetery Reveals New Mysteries about Sargent Family.

In that post I was left pondering whether my 2nd great grandfather William (Slaymaker) Sargent and his son William (Zillah’s uncle) had married sisters after the elder William’s first wife Mary Wills (Slaymaker) Sargent (my 2nd great grandmother) died of stomach cancer on 6 December 1877—about seven years after the family changed their name from Slaymaker to Sargent and emigrated to New Jersey from Northampton, England. Yes, I know, that’s a lot to digest. I have to re-read genealogy blog entries several times myself to get the whole ‘who’s who’. So feel free to pause here!

So, yesterday I came upon a yellowed piece of paper with pencil writing that confirmed just that and more! I was over the moon.

Zillah Trewin notes

Zillah Trewin notes from our family’s private archives

The note mentioned a button hook (for doing up shoes, which were buttoned in those days) belonging to “Aunt Jennie Sargent” (Sarah Jane Bowley, wife of William the son):

Button hook belonging to Aunt Jennie Sargent, my mother’s youngest brother’s wife. She was born in 1849, died 1904. She lived with us [in Jersey City, Hudson Co.] winters from the time Uncle Will died in 1896 [of ‘debilitation of the heart’] until she died when with us January 6, 1904. Spent summers with her sister at Manchester VT. She had the button hook from my earliest remembrance. Uncle Will was 7 when mother’s mother died and mother brought him up and [they] were very dear to each other. Aunt J. was youngest sister of Grandpa Sargent’s 2nd wife so father & son married sisters—one oldest and one youngest of 5 girls [Mary Bowley Pitt, widow, b. 1839, and Sarah Jane Bowley, b. 1849].

Now, I still don’t know where Wm Sr. and his wives are buried (I am amazed that Zillah and her mom did not pass that info down), but at least I have had my ‘wild’ suspicions confirmed about the father & son marriages to the two sisters. I sure would like to know how all that transpired! Wm Sr. remarried between 1877-1880 and Wm Jr. married in 1890, so I suppose Wm Jr. and Jennie’s romance blossomed over a decade of family gatherings, and although the age gap is a bit eye-opening, I suppose it was not uncommon back then, just as it is not that uncommon today.

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin, Zillah's mother, undated

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin, Zillah’s mother, undated

In any case, it was good to hear how close William was to my great grandmother Elizabeth Sargent Trewin (Zillah’s mom), and that she was critical in overseeing his upbringing after their mother Mary died. And it was wonderful of Elizabeth and her family to take in Jennie after William’s death. Zillah’s timeline is off, however, in that William Jr. could not have been 7 when Mary died. My records indicate that he was about 15 (an age corroborated by his death record); Elizabeth would have been 23 at the time. But perhaps Mary’s illness was a very extended one and Elizabeth took a leading role in his care from a much younger age.

Now, if an old button hook turns up one day, I’ll know who it belongs to!  Keep checking those old files and boxes!

William Trewin, Zillah's father, taken in 1895

William Trewin, Zillah’s father, taken in 1895

William Sargent Sr. circa 1869/70

William Sargent Sr. circa 1869/70

Categories: Death, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Jersey City, Hudson Co., Sargent, Trewin, Wills | Leave a comment

Century-old Brodhead wedding gift list offers family clues

Fannie Bishop Woodruff (1882-1965)

Fannie Bishop Woodruff (1882-1965)

When I first glanced at the list of my grandparents’ wedding gifts (Frank M. Brodhead & Fannie B. Woodruff) a number of years back, most of the names did not ring any bells. Now, six years into delving deeper into my family history, many of these names are familiar to me, and I even almost feel as if I know some of them, as odd as that may sound. Naturally, the list both offers clues and raises questions, but c’est la guerre when you’re peeling the six-ton onion that is your family tree.

The wedding took place in Hillside (adjacent to Elizabeth), NJ, at the Woodruff family home on Conant Street on 6 June 1908. For the 1900 census, the family was living at “258 Conant Street”, where today there is nothing but an empty field. However, I’d be willing to wager that 100+ years ago, the old Francis Woodruff home (built by Fannie’s grandfather Francis in 1845 and inherited by eldest son William–Fannie’s father—in 1883) was actually 258 Conant Street because it was a working farm until the land surrounding the home was sold for housing developments. So while I could be mistaken, I feel confident the Woodruff family lived in this home on Conant Street, which is still standing. I remember my dad taking us past this house as kids and telling us that that was where his mom (Fannie) and her sisters were born.

By the way, a brief mention of the Francis Woodruff home can be found in the six-page PDF Eight Colonial Homes, an undated publication put out by the staff of the Hillside National Bank: A third Woodruff house, while appearing to be the same vintage as the others, was erected about 1845. […] …it is frequently the subject of artists’ paint brushes because of its picturesque setting. It was built by Francis Woodruff, a descendant of Enos Woodruff. A letter from Mathias Woodruff in 1843 to his brother, another Enos Woodruff, comments that he is planning to return from Louisiana to help his cousin, Ezra Woodruff, erect a house for Frank. The letter jokingly said in part: “Frank will want him to put up a house next summer. I have advised him to find out from the neighbors what kind of house he wants, sort of architecture, on which side to put the kitchen, dog house, pig pens. If all parties are satisfied, it will save a great deal of talk.” Oddly enough it was constructed sideways to the road, but when the Westminster section was developed by Edward Grassman in the 1930’s, Revere Drive was placed in front of it, so today it faces a street. [On a sad side note, brother Matthias died of yellow fever in St. Francisville, LA, in 1844, and never made it home to help Frank build his house.]

My grandmother was 17 at the time of the 1900 census and worked as a stenographer. Before she was married eight years later, she was working as a secretary for Mr. Edward D. Duffield, then president of Prudential Insurance Co.

Wedding gift list, 1st page

Wedding gift list, 1st page (CLICK to enlarge)

Unfortunately, we have no photos from the big wedding day, which is disappointing. I feel very wistful when viewing others’ late 19th- and early 20th-century wedding photos—I sure wish we had some.

Notably absent from the wedding would have been Ophelia Easton Brodhead, grandmother of the groom and wife of Andrew Jackson Brodhead. She died in 1904, just shy of her 82nd birthday, and her husband Andrew’s gift is noted as being given in her memory. Also absent was Calvin Brodhead, Ophelia and Andrew’s son, who passed away in 1907, but two of his children—Alex and Emily—were in attendance. The bride’s grandparents had all passed away by then, one before she was born (James W. Angus) and two when she was just one year’s old (Francis Woodruff & Mary Jane Trowbridge). She would only have had memories of her grandmother Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus who died when Fannie was not quite ten. (Ironically, Fannie is the only grandparent I have any recollection of; all my other grandparents passed away before I was born.)

The gift list contains 133 items, so I won’t scan in and post all the pages, but I will list some of the gift-givers who stand out to me as well as some I would like to figure out. For example, Aunt Fannie Bishop. Who was she?—I wondered. She must have been someone important since my grandmother was named after her! Upon checking census records, I did indeed discover a Fannie Bishop (b. Feb 1852) living with her husband and children (Samuel, William, and Charles) in that very same neighborhood, so perhaps “Aunt Fannie” was a childhood friend of my grandmother’s mother. In short, there are names to be explored here, and as time goes by, it may be possible to figure out who more of these folks are. The Earls are no doubt all cousins, etc., via William Woodruff’s grandmother Mary Ogden Earl (married John Woodruff in 1817), and I have done nothing yet to research that line, so I am sure once I do get around to it, some of these names will start to pop up. Likewise with the Cranes, a very old Elizabeth, NJ, family.

A. D. Brodhead (father of the groom)

A. D. Brodhead (father of the groom)

Margaret Martin Brodhead (mother of the groom)

Margaret Martin Brodhead (mother of the groom)

The parents of the bride and groom were: Andrew Douglas (A. D.) Brodhead and Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead, and William Earl Woodruff and Wealthy Ann Angus Woodruff. The extended Woodruff and Angus families were very large, the former being among the original settlers of what became Union County. Andrew Brodhead, who hailed from Mauch Chunk, PA, and whose immediate and extended family was also very large, met and married Margaret Martin (a descendant of David Wait & Irene Bell) of Perth Amboy, NJ, and, after living for many years in that town, they and their children transitioned to Elizabeth.

Perhaps, you will find the name(s) of some of your ancestors on this list, and if you do, please feel free to give a ‘shout-out’ in the comment box. It’s fascinating to see so much family coming together for a big event, something that probably happened much more often back then given how enormous families were. Births, weddings, and funerals must have been quite common occasions.

Brodhead-Woodruff Wedding Announcement (Probably clipped from the Elizabeth Daily Journal) - from our family's private archives

Brodhead-Woodruff Wedding Announcement – CLICK to enlarge (Probably clipped from the Elizabeth Daily Journal) – from our family’s private archives

I’m including the wedding announcement, which I posted once previously on the blog, but I think it adds to this post so I am publishing it again. As for the necklace mentioned, I suspect it was sold to a new owner during the Great Depression; I never heard my Dad mention it or its whereabouts.

Well, here is the list! (As always, comments, corrections, additions, etc., are always welcome.)

  • Mr & Mrs Blakslee [sister and brother-in-law of father of the groom]—1 dozen silver knives
  • Mr. & Mrs. Alex Brodhead [son and daughter-in-law of the late Calvin Brodhead & Laura Leisenring; Calvin was father-of-the-groom’s older brother]—Berry set and silver spoon
  • Mrs. E. B. Earl—Silver tongs
  • Lizzie Earl—Sherbet glasses
  • Grace Earl—Picture
  • The Misses Crane—Doily
  • Miss Emily Easton Brodhead [daughter of the late Calvin Brodhead & Laura Leisenring; Calvin was father-of-the-groom’s older brother]—1/2 dozen orange spoons
  • Annie Earl—Cherry centerpiece
  • Florence Earl—Butter spreader
  • Mr. and Mrs. R. O. Van Horn [sister and brother-in-law of bride]—Old-fashioned chair
  • Mildred W. Woodruff [sister of bride]—Green (?)
  • Andrew J. Brodhead [ brother of the groom]—1/2 dozen sherbet glasses ivy leaf
  • Mr. Richard Brodhead  [brother of father of the groom] & family—cut-glass bowl
  • Mr. & Mrs. A. D. Brodhead [father and mother of groom]—Bread tray, mustard (?), and salt dish & cash
  • Aunt Vean & Elizabeth Booth [mother-of-the-bride’s younger sister Lavinia P. Angus Marthaler & her cousin]—Table center
  • Dr. G. Carlton Brown [future husband of Mildred W. Woodruff, sister of the bride]—Tabourette
  • Cal & Gertrude Brodhead [son and daughter-in-law of Garret Brodhead (father of groom’s brother) & Annie Kocher]—Gas Lamp
  • James E. Brodhead [brother of father of the groom] & family—$60
  • Mr. Charles C. Martin [brother of mother of the groom]—Cut-glass water pitcher
  • Mr. and Mrs. John Davidson [Likely a cousin of Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead, mother of the groom; the two shared a common great grandfather, John Oliver Wait]—cut-glass vase
Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

The bride's parents: Wm Earl Woodruff & Wealthy Ann Angus

The bride’s parents:
Wm Earl Woodruff & Wealthy Ann Angus

  • Mr. E. B. Earl—Cream & sugar (silver)
  • Mr. & Mrs. W. A. C. Earl—1/2 dozen spoons
  • Julia Crane —Salad bowl
  • Alice Crane—Glass vase
  • Fanny Crane—Cut-glass berry bowl
  • Mr. & Mrs. Walter H. Knowles [cousin of bride; son of Mary Martha Winans Angus and Austin F. Knowles]—Butter knife
  • Mr. & Mrs. Job W. Angus [mother-of-the-bride’s brother and sister-in-law Jeannette Tillou]—Cut-glass bowl
  • Mr. & Mrs. Morris Budd [parents of wife of Ogden Bonnell Woodruff, cousin of bride’s father]—cut-glass (?)
  • Aunt Fannie Bishop—China centerpiece
  • Aunt Edith & Uncle Walter [Walter Prince Angus and his wife Edith Marshall; Walter was the youngest brother of the bride’s mother]—Cucumber server
  • Celia Belle and Nell—Salt & pepper
Fannie Bishop Woodruff

Fannie Bishop Woodruff

Bertha Woodruff was maid of honor

Bertha Woodruff was maid of honor

  • Mr. & Mrs. John Woodruff [father-of-the-bride’s cousin, son of Ogden and Phebe Woodruff, and his wife Carrie Conover]—Sugar shaker
  • Aunt Annie Crane—Silver cream ladle
  • Mr. & Mrs. Scott O. Woodruff—Picture
  • Watts Knowles [cousin of bride; son of Mary Martha Winans Angus and Austin F. Knowles]—Silver sugar spoon
  • Mr. & Mrs. A. F. Knowles [Aunt of the bride–Mary Martha Winans Angus—and Austin F. Knowles]—Silver butter spoon
  • Gertrude Knowles [cousin of bride; daughter of Mary Martha Winans Angus and Austin F. Knowles]—Hand-worked towels
  • Lewis Brodhead [brother of the groom]—Knives – 2 dozen – 2 sizes; Carvers – 2 sets – 2 sizes; Pie knife, 1/2 dozen tablespoons, 1 dozen teaspoons
Categories: Angus, Ayers, Blakslee, Bonnell, Brodhead, Coleman, Crane, Dickinson, Elizabeth, Union Co., Jaques, Marthaler, Martin, Packer, Russum, Wait, Weddings, Woodruff | 2 Comments

Albert Gallatin Brodhead (1799-1880)

"Wheat Plains," the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

“Wheat Plains,” the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

The Albert Gallatin Brodhead of this post is the uncle of the Albert Gallatin Brodhead mentioned in the previous post. (I’ll refer to him here as Albert Sr. so as not to confuse the two.) Albert Sr., child #4 of twelve belonging to the Hon. Richard B. Brodhead (1771-1843), a Pike Co. judge, and Hannah Drake (1769-1832), was born at “Wheat Plains Farm” which was established by Richard’s father Garret Brodhead after the Revolutionary War. Albert’s oldest brother was my third great grandfather — also named Garret.

The family tree:

1-The Hon. Richard B. Brodhead b. 31 Jul 1771, Stroudsburg, PA, d. 11 Nov 1843, Milford, Pike Co., PA
+Hannah Drake b. 15 Nov 1769, d. 31 Jul 1832, Pike Co., PA
|—–2-Sarah Brodhead b. 12 Feb 1792, d. 21 Jan 1879,
|—–2-Garret Brodhead b. 2 Dec 1793, E Mauch Chunk Carbon Co PA, d. 18 Jan 1872,
|            E Mauch Chunk Carbon Co PA,
|—–2-William Brodhead b. 22 Feb 1796, d. 23 Oct 1880, Pike Co PA,
|—–2-Albert Gallatin Brodhead b. 16 Aug 1799, Wheat Plains Farm, Lehman Twp, Wayne Co., PA
|             d. 18 Jul 1880, Bethlehem, PA
|—–2-Anna Maria Brodhead b. 14 Feb 1801, d. 14 Mar 1868
|—–2-Rachel Brodhead b. 5 Jan 1803, d. 4 Apr 1864
|—–2-Jane Brodhead b. 13 Jan 1804, Lebanon Co., PA, d. 13 Nov 1867, Luzerne Co., PA
|—–2-Charles Brodhead b. 4 Aug 1805, d. 5 Sep 1831
|—–2-Richard Brodhead b. 5 Apr 1807, d. 16 Nov 1809,
|—–2-Elizabeth Brodhead b. 7 Feb 1809, d. 25 Nov 1809
|—–2-Hon. Richard Brodhead II b. 6 Jan 1811, Lehman Township, PA, d. 16 Sep 1863,
|           Easton, Northampton Co., PA
|—–2-Eliza Brodhead b. Feb 1814, d. 30 Dec 1814

Quite a bit can be found about various Brodhead family members in old books and newspapers—not to mention The Brodhead Family history volumes, copiously produced by diligent and dedicated members of the Brodhead Family Association—and Albert Sr. is no exception. Here, in Chapter 9 of the History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania, by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: R. T. Peck & Co., 1886), we find:

Wikimedia Commons: Northerly view of the Susquehanna River Valley from Council Cup Scenic Overlook, Conyngham and Salem Townships, Luzerne County. 14 October 2007. http://www.flickr.com/photos/nicholas_t/1573275643/ Upriver * Uploaded by User:Gary Dee

Wikimedia Commons: Northerly view of the Susquehanna River Valley from Council Cup Scenic Overlook, Conyngham and Salem Townships, Luzerne County. 14 October 2007. Author: Nicholas from Pennsylvania on Flickr. Uploaded by User:Gary Dee

Albert G. Brodhead, another son of Judge Richard Brodhead, was born at the old homestead, Wheat Plains, Lehman township, Pike County, (then Wayne), August 16, 1799. In 1823 he married Ellen Middagh, and removed to the village of Conyngham, in Luzerne County, Pa. He engaged largely in the mercantile and lumbering business, was elected four terms to the Legislature from Luzerne County, and during his residence there was probably as popular and respected a man as lived in the county. In 1838 he purchased the “Brodhead Homestead,” at Wheat Plains, from his father, where he resided, universally respected, until 1865, when he removed to Bethlehem, Pa., where his only son, Charles Brodhead, resided, and still lives, a popular, representative citizen of character and influence.

The Moravian Sun Inn, Bethlehem, PA (Wikimedia Commons - Jared Kofsky)

The Moravian Sun Inn, Bethlehem, PA (Wikimedia Commons – Jared Kofsky)

He is the owner [please see Ruth Bush’s guest comment below which appears to contradict this] of the Moravian Sun Inn, which was established in Bethlehem in 1758, the walls of which he has adorned with old and rare paintings. Here he resided until July 18, 1880, when he peacefully passed away, and is buried in the Moravian Cemetery in that place. [Actually, if he was buried here, he was eventually re-interred at the Nisky Hill Cemetery; see the Find a Grave entry here. Visit this National Park Service page for more on the Moravian Sun Inn, now a museum; click here for the Museum’s webpage]

And, below is an obituary from the Honesdale, PA, Wayne County Herald, 29 July 1880 (courtesy of www.fultonhistory.com). I only found it by chance, searching for “Albert Gallatin Broadhead” on a lark, although it does contain a mix of Brodhead and Broadhead, so maybe I would have found it eventually anyway. But, as many of you know, larks can be very worthwhile!—I must always remember that!:

Honesdale PA Wayne County Herald, 29 July 1880

Honesdale PA Wayne County Herald, 29 July 1880

Honesdale PA Wayne County Herald, 29 July 1880

Honesdale PA Wayne County Herald, 29 July 1880

Honesdale PA Wayne County Herald, 29 July 1880

Honesdale PA Wayne County Herald, 29 July 1880


As always, comments, corrections, additions, etc. are very welcome!

Categories: Bethlehem Northamp Co, Brodhead, Conyngham Luzerne Co, Death, Family Homes, Middagh, Nisky Hill Cemetery Bethlehem, Obituaries, Pike Co. | 4 Comments

The Hon. Albert Gallatin Brodhead (1815-1891) of Mauch Chunk, PA

Albert Gallatin Brodhead portrait, *between p. 260 and p. 261

Albert Gallatin Brodhead portrait, *between p. 260 and p. 261

An upcoming post is going to mention the Honorable Albert Gallatin Brodhead, oldest brother of my second great grandfather Andrew Jackson Brodhead, so I thought I would take this moment to post a bio about Albert. It was published in 1905 in Historic Homes and Institutions and Genealogical and Personal Memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, PA* (see end of this post for full citation and a link to view the book online). This fabulous 500-plus-page book is rich with biographical information and portraits of many prominent individuals in Lehigh Valley history. If you have prominent ancestors who lived in that area, it would be worth checking the book’s index to see if your ancestor’s name appears there. Albert was the son of Garret Brodhead (1793-1872) and Cornelia Dingman (1797-1885), and had two other brothers besides my second great grandfather: Daniel Dingman Brodhead and Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead. In his younger years, Albert worked for the venerable Asa Packer. whose daughter Lucy Evelyn was married to Albert’s cousin Dr. Garret B. Linderman, son of Rachel Brodhead (Garret’s sister) and Dr. John J. Linderman.

Brodhead_Albert_Gallatin_b1815

A much younger Albert Gallatin Brodhead

According to p. 674 of a different book The History of the Counties of Lehigh & Carbon, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, by Alfred Mathews & Austin N. Hungerford (published in Philadelphia, Pa., 1884), which is also rich in information, Albert settled in Mauch Chunk first, and his parents and brothers followed thereafter:  Hon. A. G. Brodhead came here in 1841, and has ever since been identified with railroad enterprises. He was made superintendent of the Beaver Meadow Railroad in 1850, and has filled the position with ability ever since, the name of his office changing with the ownership of the road, and now being superintendent of the Beaver Meadow Division of the Lehigh Valley Railroad. He has been prominently identified with the movements which brought the gas- and water-works into existence, and with other local enterprises, and in 1869 was elected to the State Senate. His father, Garret Brodhead, came to Mauch Chunk some years after his own settlement and died here, and his brothers, Andrew, Abram, and Daniel, also became residents in the valley.

If you read the below bio on Albert, you will discover a man of great accomplishment and fine character. It greatly impressed me that—in addition to family members—700 guests showed up from all over the country to help Albert and his wife Sally celebrate their golden anniversary on July 3, 1888. A few years after that, his death came unexpectedly at the hands of a bout of flu from which he failed to recover. Even on his deathbed, he was thinking of others and making provisions to ensure his family would be properly cared for. Until I read this bio, I’d never realized that he died on the same month and day (18 Jan.) as both his parents (Garret, 18 Jan 1872; Cornelia, 18 Jan 1885). Quite an alignment of stars, I must say. But somehow that seems fitting—Albert, with all his accomplishments and having been the first-born child, may well have been the apple of their eye. And, in his final moments, the significance of that month and day may well have crossed his mind.  The description of Albert’s funeral, included in this bio, is poignant and shows just how beloved a figure he was in the Mauch Chunk community. He and his parents are buried in the Upper Mauch Chunk Cemetery.

Note: Paragraph 1 of page 261 mentions an uncle ‘A. G. Gallatin’. This must be a reference to his uncle Albert Gallatin Brodhead, younger brother of Albert’s father Garret, and the person after whom young Albert was named.

*Between p. 260 & p. 261

*p. 260

*p. 261

*p. 261

*p. 262

*p. 262

p. 263

*p. 263

*p. 264

*p. 264

*Historic Homes and Institutions and Genealogical and Personal Memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, PA, Volume II, by John Woolf Jordan Edgar Moore Green, and George Taylor Ettinger (Lehigh Valley, PA: Lewis Publishing Co., 1905) is available on Google eBooks. Click the link.

Categories: Brodhead, Lehigh Valley, Linderman, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Mauch Chunk Cemetery Jim Thorpe PA, Packer, Tolan | Leave a comment

Isaac Jaques — a photograph guessing game

Isaac Jaques

Isaac Jaques

The reverse of this photo has “Isaac Jaques” written on the back, but unfortunately it is not dated. Could this be my third great grandfather Isaac Jaques (1791-1880)? I don’t think so, but I’m not absolutely sure.

Over the last year, I’ve discovered other “Isaac Jaques” in the family tree: one a son of the aforementioned Isaac, one a grandson, and one a great grandson (see accompanying tree image). Could this be a photo of one of them?

Isaacs_tree

CORRECTION: Walter Jaques was married to Catherine Nichols.

Could this be Isaac Sr’s son Isaac (born between 1820-1825)? There is somewhat of a resemblance to his sister (my second great grandmother) Wealthy Ann–around the eyes, maybe.

If it’s from the 1870s, the image seems like it could be that of Isaac Wellington Jaques (1851-1909), a pharmacist* who had a store at 854 Elizabeth Ave, Elizabeth, NJ, in the late 1890s. I think it is safe to rule out Isaac Jaques (b. 1872). N’est-ce pas?

If you have any thoughts on this topic, please don’t hesitate to share. I would love to solve this little family mystery. Thanks for reading, and have a great week.

UPDATE: SEE FOLLOW-UP POST
**********************************************************************************************************

*The Druggists’ Circular and Chemical Gazette, October 1898, Volume 43: p. cv; also, a brief obituary in The Pharmaceutical Era, issued January 7, 1909, stated: Isaac Wellington Jaques, aged fifty-nine, died recently at his home in Elizabeth, N. J. He had been engaged in the drug business in Newark, Trenton and Elizabeth. A second wife [Mary F. Randolph], whom he married three years ago, and a daughter survive him. He belonged to several organizations, including the Masons and Elks.

Categories: Elizabeth, Union Co., Jaques | 4 Comments

James Winans Angus (1810-1862) — The Early Years

James W. Angus

James W. Angus

My second great grandfather James Winans Angus was born in New York City on 10 May 1810 to carpenter Jacob Baker Angus (b. Albany, NY) and Mary Winans Angus, (b. Elizabeth, NJ). Two sisters and one brother followed: Abigail Winans Angus, b. 1812; Martha Winans Angus, b. 1818, and Job Winans Angus, b. 1821.

In 1820, the family was living at 123 Pump Street*. Pump Street has since been renamed. According to the website www.oldstreets.com, in the late 18th to early 19th centuries, Pump Street was initially a street in the Delancey Farm Grid, from the Bowery east to Division Street. About 1800 it absorbed Nicholas Street, thereby extending the name west to the present Centre Street. In 1829 Pump Street itself was merged into Walker Street. Since 1855. most of the former Pump Street has been part of Canal Street.

Of course, Lower Manhattan was a vastly different place +/- 200 years ago. If you’re familiar with Manhattan, you know that today Canal Street runs through Chinatown. The below image from 1836 shows the bustling world in which New Yorkers of that era went about their day-to-day activities.

Broadway, New-York. Showing each Building from the Hygeian Depot corner of Canal Street, to beyond Niblo's Garden. Date: 1836 Drawn & Etched by T. Hornor. Aquatinted by J. Hill. Printed by W. Neale. Published by Joseph Stanley & Co. Entered according to Act of Congress by Jos. Stanley & Co. in the Clerks Office of the Southern District of New York. January 26th, 1836.

Broadway, New-York. Showing each Building from the Hygeian Depot corner of Canal Street, to beyond Niblo’s Garden. Date: 1836; Drawn & Etched by T. Hornor. Aquatinted by J. Hill. Printed by W. Neale. Published by Joseph Stanley & Co. Entered according to Act of Congress by Jos. Stanley & Co. in the Clerks Office of the Southern District of New York. January 26th, 1836. From the Collections of the Museum of the City of New York – http://collections.mcny.org/

Tragedy struck the family on 27 November 1824, when Mary died, leaving Jacob with four children aged 3-14. Jacob remarried according to family records*, although unfortunately at the time, no one saw to it to write down the name of the second wife—so her identity remains a mystery, as far as I know. When Jacob died several years later on 29 March 1828, James, 17, and his siblings went to live with their *Uncle Elias Winans, their mother Mary’s brother. Elias’ wife, Abby, likely took the leading role in looking after the children.

Street Scenes, Canal, Copy of Old Time Engraving. Date: 1910 An engraving by G. Gibson (?); subject is Canal Street, depicted when the canal still existed, descriptive caption accompanies engraving. From the Collections of the Museum of the City of New York.

Street Scenes, Canal, Copy of Old Time Engraving. Date: 1910; An engraving by G. Gibson (?); subject is Canal Street, depicted when the canal still existed, descriptive caption accompanies engraving. From the Collections of the Museum of the City of New York. http://collections.mcny.org/

According to p. 6 of Harriet Stryker-Rodda’s genealogical research paper One Line of Descendants of James Angus (1751 – 1806 [grandfather of this James]):
Elias Winans was appointed “guardian of James W. Angus, minor, his father having died intestate* (Orphans Court Record Docket 2653, recorded in Guardianship Letters Book A:329, Essex
County, N. J.), but there are no court records showing that any of the other children were legally made wards of their uncle Elias.

James Angus attended elementary school in Elizabeth, N.J., where he lived with his uncle, Elias Winans, following the death of his parents. (Stryker-Rodda, p. 9) I am wondering if perhaps James went to live with Elias prior to his father’s death since he was already 17 at that time and would otherwise not have been in Elizabeth for more than his last year or two of high school. Certainly the two youngest children would have attended elementary school there, but not James.

**Tombstone inscription, 1st Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ

**Tombstone inscription, 1st Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ

Further down page 9, Stryker-Rodda records that On 25 April 1835 James [age 24] was working at his trade [carpenter, wood craftsman, & coach-maker] in Paterson, N. J., [Passaic Co.] where he purchased a house lot for $200 on the southeast corner of Parke Street (Essex County Deed Book Y3:38). In October of the same year he and George R. Skinner paid $1200 for a piece of land in Paterson on the west side of Union Street, 120′ x 167′(B4:280).

This was followed in November by the purchase for $550 of a house on a lot 15′ x 56′ on the west side of Marshall Street in Paterson. In May of 1836 he sold the land on Marshall Street for the same price he had paid for it (F4:53l). James Angus’ and George R. Skinner’s partnership ended about the time James married. On the 8th of February, 1839, orders were recorded for a Sheriff’s sale of their holdings in Elizabeth [Essex Co.], on the west side of Union Street, a lot 122’xl67’xl09«, which they had purchased from George W. Halsted. The sale was to satisfy debts owed to Jacob G. Crane and William Mulford. It was carried out on 3 December 1839 at Gaylord’s Hotel (Essex County Deed Book D5.-245 ff).

Men's Fashion plate,1826. Image from University of Washington Library Digital Collections http://content.lib.washington.edu (Wikimedia Commons: In public domain in US due to expired copyright)

Men’s Fashion plate,1826. Image from U. of Washington Library Digital Collections http://content.lib.washington.edu (Wikimedia: In public domain in US due to expired copyright)

It’s worth noting that the above just-mentioned happenings coincided with a major nationwide economic recession stemming from “the panic of 1837,” a financial crisis that went on to last almost a decade. The mood in the country was one of enormous pessimism. Economic policy was no doubt a hotly debated topic. Sounds strangely familiar…

James was bouncing around quite a lot back then, not surprising for a single young man in his twenties. Thanks to all that bouncing around, we are privileged to have more information about James from the publication Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election: May 26, 1840. Apparently his place of residence, and hence the legitimacy of his vote, was at issue in the 1838 NJ elections. And that hotly contested election was a really big deal at the time. For an excellent write-up on what all the fuss was about, visit this blog post on the Blue Jersey website.

Bergen, Passaic, and Union Counties, 1838. Image cropped from  David Rumsey Historical Map Collection Author: Bradford, Thomas G. Date: 1838; Short Title: New Jersey. Publisher: Weeks, Jordan & Co. Boston Publisher: Wiley and Putnam. New York (www.davidrumsey.com)

Bergen, Passaic, and Union Counties, 1838. Image cropped from David Rumsey Historical Map Collection Author: Bradford, Thomas G. Date: 1838; Short Title: New Jersey. Publisher: Weeks, Jordan & Co. Boston Publisher: Wiley and Putnam. New York (www.davidrumsey.com)

Various individuals testified about James’ vote. I’m including a map here that shows the 1838 borders of Bergen, Passaic, and Essex counties. You may find it useful to refer to as the borders have changed since then. According to Wikipedia’s entry for Essex County: In 1837, Passaic County was formed from portions of Essex and Bergen County. In 1857, Union County was created from parts of Essex County. Today Elizabeth is in Union County, but back then, it fell within Essex County. James’ 1838 vote was recorded in Elizabethtown (then part of Essex Co.).

Martin Van Buren, US President (1833-1837) Wikipedia

Martin Van Buren, US President (1833-1837) Wikipedia

From the testimony of Luke H. Higgins, we learn that James was working in Bergen Co. — either in Hoboken or Jersey City — in the summer of 1838. When Higgins challenged him for voting in Elizabethtown, James said he worked in Bergen Co., and had his washing and mending done in Elizabethtown, and considered Elizabethtown to be his residence. Higgins ascertained that James was a Whig and and that he stood in opposition to the Van Buren administration. (Many blamed Van Buren, who opted against government intervention during and after the panic of 1837, for the countries economic woes.)

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 335.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 335.

 Early Baltimore and Ohio Railroad passenger equipment of the 1830s, displayed at the B&O Railroad Museum in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. (Wikipedia: © James G. Howes)

Early Baltimore and Ohio Railroad passenger equipment of the 1830s, displayed at the B&O Railroad Museum in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. (Wikipedia: © James G. Howes)

The second individual to testify was John Chatterton, who claimed to have known James for about 10 years. He said James was in Jersey City in 1838, working for the railroad, building cars, and that he saw James in Elizabethtown, but could not say whether James resided in Elizabethtown or not. He knew James got his washing and mending done there. He also knew of James having work in Newark as well, and knew James’ political views and that he was in the Whig party. Upon cross-examination, Chatterton said he knew Mr. Winans [Elias, I presume] was one of James’ links to Elizabethtown and that he thought James boarded with a sister [Martha (never married) or Abigail Angus Woodruff (married to Henry King Woodruff)]. Chatterton stated James had a shop in town that still had James’ sign outside of it and that the shop may have been owned jointly with Skinner [a reference to the aforementioned George R. Skinner]. Chatterton knew nothing of how James voted during the 1838 election.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 336.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 336.

The Whig Party from The Whig Almanac and Politicians Register for 1838

The Whig Party from The Whig Almanac and Politicians Register for 1838

The last person to testify was the aforementioned Jacob G. Crane, who said he believed James’ place of residence the year prior to the elections was Elizabethtown, and that James lived with his aunt [Elias’s wife Abby Winans (Elias was still alive at this point) or one of Mary Winans Angus’s sisters?]. Jacob thought James was usually in Elizabeth from Fridays through Sundays, and thought James’ carriage-making business had been up and running in Elizabethtown for two-three years before the 1838 election, but that he broke it up right before the election. Crane said James worked in Jersey City building carriages and remained residing with his aunt until he married in February 1839 [the marriage actually took place on January 26, 1839]. Then when cross-examined, Crane said James and his new wife [Wealthy Ann Jaques] lived for a time with James’ aunt, but that they then moved to Jersey City, where James’ work was. Another reference to James’ business with Skinner was made. Crane commented that he knew James had paid his taxes in Elizabethtown.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 361.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 361.

Ultimately, a vote was taken as to whether James’ vote was lawful, and indeed it was:

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 76.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 76.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), pp. 718-719.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), pp. 718-719.

The World of Fashion, May 1838 (Wikimedia Commons - In Public Domain in US due to expired copyright)

The World of Fashion, May 1838 (Wikimedia Commons – In Public Domain in US due to expired copyright)

Well, that’s all I have for today. More on James Winans Angus in an upcoming post… As always, comments, corrections, additions are most welcome.

A side note: In my hunt for information on James, I also came across newspaper articles between 1834-1836 referring to a bill in the New Jersey legislature to allow “James Angus, of Patterson” to divorce his wife (once named as ‘Ann’ and another time as ‘Mary’). I’m sure this is a red herring, but for the sake of satisfying my curiosity, I would love to visit NJ state archives to find out what this case was about. Apparently, at that time, in certain situations, people were able to have their marriages dissolved by the legislature. In this case, the bill to dissolve this James Angus’ marriage was eventually passed on Saturday morning, January 24, 1835***.

Elias and Abby Winans' tombstone inscriptions, 1st Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ

Elias and Abby Winans’ **tombstone inscriptions, 1st Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ

June ?, 1843, ad in the  New York American newspaper

June ?, 1843, ad in the New York American newspaper; evidently, the family’s involvement with Crane was ongoing. (Ad courtesy of http://www.fultonhistory.com)

New-York American newspaper ad, October 2, 1841 (courtesy of www.fultonhistory.com)

New-York American newspaper ad, October 2, 1841 (courtesy of http://www.fultonhistory.com)

***************************************************************************************************************************
*ONE LINE OF DESCENDANTS OF JAMES ANGUS (1751 – 1806) including outlines of related Winans and Jaques Families of New Jersey by Harriet Stryker-Rodda, Certified Genealogist (Elizabeth, NJ, 1969) (Project commissioned by Alfred Carpenter Angus Jr., son of James Winans Angus Jr. and Anna M. Carpenter, grandson of James Winans Angus and Wealthy Ann Jaques)

**Wheeler, Wm Ogden. Inscriptions on tombstones and monuments in the burying grounds of the First Presbyterian church and St. Johns church at Elizabeth, New Jersey.1664-1892. New Haven: Press of Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, 1892.

***p. 228 of Minutes of Votes and Proceedings of the 59th General Assembly of the State of New Jersey, 1835
****************************************************************************************************************************

Categories: 1st Presbyterian Elizabeth NJ, Angus, Crane, Elizabeth, Union Co., Jersey City, Hudson Co., Manhattan, New York City, Newark, Essex Co., Patterson NJ, Winans, Woodruff | 2 Comments

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