Monthly Archives: May 2014

The Woodruff Sisters decades later

Unfortunately, the Woodruff sisters (the six children of William Earl Woodruff & Wealthy Ann Angus) did not pose together later in life as they did in their younger years (see previous post). But I do have a photo of four of them together from the 1950s. As time goes by, I will try to piece together more information about them and perhaps do a few more individual posts. (Note: A post about Bertha already appeared on this blog some time ago.) All the ladies made it into their eighties: Wealthy Mildred Brown – 86, Jennie Belle Coleman – 82, Cecelia Van Horn 87+ (still looking for an exact DOD), Fannie Brodhead – 84, Bertha Woodruff – 85, Flora May Baker Ulrich (married twice) – 85.

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The Woodruff sisters, circa 1905 (?)

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The Woodruff Sisters minus Cecelia & Bertha: Jennie, Flora, Mildred, and Fannie (spring 1952)

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Cecelia Woodruff Van Horn with husband Robert Osborn Van Horn, sharing a happy moment. Married circa 1902, perhaps this was on the occasion of their 50th anniversary?

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Bertha enjoying the French Riviera on her 1950’s Grand Tour of Europe

Categories: Angus, Baker, Brodhead, Coleman, Van Horn, Woodruff | 2 Comments

The Woodruff Sisters

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Woodruff_Sisters_adults_labelled

Categories: Baker, Brown, Coleman, Van Horn, Woodruff | 11 Comments

Longevity & some random news from 1882

Antonio Casanova y Estorach's ''Monk Testing Wine'', 1886, oil on canvas; current location: Brooklyn Museum (Public domain per Wikimedia Commons)

Antonio Casanova y Estorach’s ”Monk Testing Wine”, 1886, oil on canvas; current location: Brooklyn Museum (Public domain per Wikimedia Commons)

My takeaway from watching Leslie Stahl’s piece “Living to 90 and Beyond” on Sixty Minutes last Sunday? Drink one-two glasses of wine daily (red or white; it makes no difference), skip the vitamins, walk or do some form of exercise 45 minutes daily, play board games whenever possible, say “yes” to dessert, and keep a little meat on ‘dem’ bones! (Did I miss anything?)

George La Bar at 107

George La Bar at 107

While perhaps not as common as it is today, examples of extraordinary longevity can be found in centuries past. In my family tree, the first people who come to mind are Richard Brodhead (1666-1758), who reached 92, and his second wife Wyntie Pawling who reached 91. My second great grandfather Andrew Jackson Brodhead (1822-1913) reached 90. Another fellow who comes to mind, although he is not an ancestor of mine, is George LaBar. I did a blog post on him ages ago . He was born in 1763 and lived to be 112, still chopping wood when interviewed for a book at age 107. George’s dad—George Sr.—picked up sticks at age 85 to move from eastern Pennsylvania to less-crowded Ohio, lost his wife when he was 98, and remarried at 100. He lived to be 105.

A while back, I clipped the below article from the Grand Forks Herald dated 24 January 1882. This seems like an appropriate post for it—it contains some interesting slices of life, including some amazing examples of longevity. How about you? Anyone in your tree from past centuries who reached 90 or beyond? Give that some thought over a nice glass of wine, and if the answer is yes, share the names of your family members in the comment box below. They deserve a good shout-out!

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Resources:
Gerontology Research Group

Categories: Brodhead, LaBar, Miscellaneous, Pawling | Leave a comment

Brodhead family descendants repair Cornelia D. Brodhead headstone

Mauch Chunk Cemetery sign, Jim Thorpe, PA

Mauch Chunk Cemetery sign, Jim Thorpe, PA (PHOTO CREDIT: James and Barbara Brodhead)

I recently heard from James and Barbara Brodhead, who are cousins of mine—James and I share the same great grandparents, Andrew Douglas Brodhead and Margaret Lewis Martin. It was only a few years ago that we made initial contact, quite by chance, on the Internet. This post is part one of two posts on this blog being devoted to their efforts to tidy up and restore some Brodhead family headstones, and with so many old headstones crumbling all across America, perhaps their work will inspire you just as much as it has me! I asked them whether they required permission to undertake this work, and they were advised that since they were family, they were welcome to do what they could. So here, without further ado, is Part I of their project, in James’ own words. Enjoy!

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851)

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851)

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead was born on October 3, 1797, in Dingmans Ferry, Pennsylvania. Her father was Judge Daniel W. Dingman and her mother was Mary Westbrook. Cornelia is buried next to her husband, Garret Brodhead, whom she married at age 16 on November 25, 1813. They are both buried in the Upper Mauch Chunk Cemetery in Jim Thorpe, PA. I am the third great-grandson of Cornelia and Garret.

Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832)

Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832)

As I have a great interest in my family history, in the fall of 2011, my wife, Barbara, and I went to Pennsylvania in search of family history information. We visited the cemetery in Jim Thorpe and located the family plot owned by the Hon. Albert Gallatin Brodhead, Garret and Cornelia’s oldest son. It is situated on the edge of the hill next to the Asa Packer Family Plot. Sadly, we found Cornelia’s headstone had been knocked/fallen over, the center stone was missing, and the base had been moved about 6 feet from its original location. Cornelia’s headstone was laying face up but was about 2/3 buried in the ground.

The Albert Gallatin Brodhead plot in Upper Mauch Chunk Cemetery, Jim Thorpe, PA; Garret Brodhead's stone is visible in the foreground right corner.

The Albert Gallatin Brodhead plot in Upper Mauch Chunk Cemetery, Jim Thorpe, PA; Garret Brodhead’s stone is visible in the foreground right corner.

During our travels, as a way to show respect for our ancestors, we determined to clean the moss and dirt from any family headstones we had found. We carried a kit with a bucket, jugs of water, Simple Green, brushes, plastic putty knives, etc. We knew that Cornelia’s headstone was going to take a lot more effort to fix, so we began planning to make the necessary repairs the next time we would visit.

Cornelia's headstone lying on the ground next to Garret's marker

Cornelia’s headstone lying on the ground next to Garret’s marker

In August of 2013, we were able to return to Pennsylvania; the repair of Cornelia’s headstone a priority on this trip. We were staying in Milford, and we took the 70 mile drive to Jim Thorpe. I began by digging around her headstone and standing it up. (The estimated weight for the base and headstone was approximately 250 lbs each.) A neighbor boy loaned us a shovel. The base, I skidded on wood strips that we had brought, until I returned it to its original location. The base was then leveled. I walked, (tipped back and forth); her headstone over next to the base, then tipped it on to its back onto the base.

4_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 5 copy

5_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 7 copy

6_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 10 copy

7_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 12 copy

8_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 14 copy

9_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

Because of the limited space and the weight, and after several attempts, I was unable to stand the headstone up onto the base. I began to say a silent prayer, asking for help. As I finished and looked up, I could see that Barbara was also praying. It was late, and so we drove back to our motel.

The next morning we went for a walk and found that our planned route was unsafe, (no sidewalks), and so we took a different route. As we were going down a side street I saw a bridge crane and said, “That’s what we need to lift the headstone up!” We realized that we were looking at a shop where they engraved headstones. The foreman, after listening to our dilemma, told us that we would have to slide the stone off the base and stand it up. Then using wood blocks, (cribbing), the stone is tilted side to side and front to back and the blocks are inserted under it. Thus the stone is walked up to the required height and slid into position. He also gave us four small plastic squares to place under each corner and then told us to use 50-year silicone to seal the stone to the base. It worked just as he said.

9a_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

9b_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

9c_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

9d_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

9e_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

9f_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy copy

9g_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

9h_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy copy

9i_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy
When we return next time we will thoroughly clean all of the Brodhead headstones and put gravel where there is a rain water runoff problem.

This project has helped us feel closer to Garret and Cornelia.

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Dingmans Ferry, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Mauch Chunk Cemetery Jim Thorpe PA | 8 Comments

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