Monthly Archives: March 2015

Easter—a century ago

Vintage Scrapbook, Wikimedia image, contributed 1/12/02 by KirNata, source Vintage Scrapbook, Tulane Public Relations (File licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license)

Vintage Scrapbook, Wikimedia image, contributed 1/12/02 by KirNata, source Vintage Scrapbook, Tulane Public Relations (File licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license)

Easter 1915. Ever wonder what things may have ‘looked like’ back then? Thanks to the Library of Congress and the Fulton History website, I’ve been able to gather a few items to share with you today that give a glimpse into that moment in the past.

I love old photos—I enjoy seeing the outfits and faces, and, in this case, checking out all the ladies bonnets floating about the images of Easter parades and throngs of churchgoers. This was the big opportunity for those of means to show off their new spring wardrobes and a chance for bystanders to witness quite a spectacle.  Irving Berlin’s 1948 musical Easter Parade, starring Fred Astaire and Judy Garland and set in the Manhattan of 1912-1913, brings to life the fabulous parades of that era.

Judy Garland as Hannah Brown and Fred Astaire as Don Hewes in the finale of the 1948 musical Easter Parade

Judy Garland as Hannah Brown and Fred Astaire as Don Hewes in the finale of the 1948 musical Easter Parade (Image from Wikipedia)

And what would Easter be without bunnies? Check out the article about the ‘bunny trade’ back then—it was quite a brisk business. American bunnies. Bunnies from Australia. Bunnies from Belgium. The Australian bunnies ruled supreme. And apparently some folks took their bunny purchases very seriously, accommodating their tiny, new little friends in elaborate apartment-like ‘digs’! Thankfully I think (and I hope) a bit more common sense prevails nowadays when it comes to acquiring—or should I say ‘not acquiring’ bunnies at Easter time. Back then, it appears to have been de rigueur.

And, as always, the advertisements are very revealing. Ladies, don’t forget to purchase the ‘hair switches’ you’ll need to enhance the look of your Easter bonnet! And, gents, it may be time to invest in a new $15 balmacaan*!

Anyway, I hope you find something of interest here~ Best wishes to you all for a very Happy Easter!

*Per Merriam-Webster’s: “a loose single-breasted overcoat usually having raglan sleeves and a short turnover collar”

Fifth Avenue Easter Parade (Library of Congress -  LC-DIG-ggbain-09337)

Fifth Avenue Easter Parade (ca 1910 – ca 1915, Library of Congress – LC-DIG-ggbain-09337)

Easter - entering St. Thomas's (ca 1910 - ca 1915 - Library of Congress, LC-DIG-ggbain-11681)

Easter – entering St. Thomas’s (ca 1910 – ca 1915 – Library of Congress, LC-DIG-ggbain-11681)

Easter egg rolling, White House, [Washington, D.C.], 1915 (Library of Congress,  LC-DIG-npcc-27674)

Easter egg rolling, White House, [Washington, D.C.], 1915 (Library of Congress, LC-DIG-npcc-27674)

Easter egg rolling, White House, [Washington, D.C.], 1915 (Library of Congress,  LC-DIG-npcc-27675)

Easter egg rolling, White House, [Washington, D.C.], 1915 (Library of Congress, LC-DIG-npcc-27675)

EASTER. CHILDREN OF RODIER, WHITE HOUSE TELEGRAPH OPERATOR, READY FOR EGG ROLLING, 1915 (Library of Congress,  LC-DIG-hec-06371)

EASTER. CHILDREN OF RODIER, WHITE HOUSE TELEGRAPH OPERATOR, READY FOR EGG ROLLING, 1915 (Library of Congress, LC-DIG-hec-06371)

Easter Bunnies in Great Demand (The Troy Times, 1 April 1915)

Rabbits for Easter souvenirs are unusually large and varied this season. The prices are comparatively high. A little bunny, which would be dear at a quarter of a dollar at any other time, is quickly snapped up for a dollar, sometimes more, just before Easter. As is customary at this time of year, the supply is far behind the demand.

The little fellows are offered for sale in expensive nests in great variety. These vary from simply little baskets just large enough for a single occupant to miniature kennels or houses with every modern convenience. These little homes often contain several apartments, carpeted with cotton or even raw silk. It often costs many dollars, to provide an Easter rabbit with one of these luxurious homes.

The pure white rabbits, as is customary, bring the best prices. They are generally preferred above any other color. The supply of white rabbits is very limited. They are imported especially for the Easter trade from Australia. This particular market is very difficult to supply, since it is necessary for the little bunnies to be not more than a few days old on Easter Sunday They quickly outgrow the size most in demand by the Easter trade.

The young of the native-born American rabbits are a grayish white in color. The color makes all the difference in the world when it comes to selling them at Easter.

The growth of late of the Belgian hare industry has made a large supply of their young available at Easter, but the color is not satisfactory. They are reddish brown in color and slightly larger than the older breeds. It is hoped by the trade that the young of the Belgian hare will eventually come into favor, thus solving the difficult problem of the Easter rabbit supply.

Illustrated is an Easter bunny that came to live with two little boys. These little boys have a game which they invariably play, on Easter morning. “Hunting the eggs” it is called. Their mamma buys candy eggs in beautiful colors, and on the night before Easter when the kiddies are slumbering she makes little nests of hay, using as a foundation old hats; then she fills these nests with the colored candy Easter eggs and secretes them in the most unheard of places. With shouts of glee these youngsters pass the early morning hours of Easter day searching for these nests.

The Troy Times, 1 April 1915

The Troy Times, 1 April 1915

The Troy Times, 1 April 1915

CLICK TO ENLARGE – The Troy Times, 1 April 1915

easter_clothes_1915

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle, 31 March 1915

The Post-Standard, Syracuse, NY, 3 April 1915

The Post-Standard, Syracuse, NY, 3 April 1915

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle, 31 March 1915

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle, 31 March 1915

Categories: 1900s, Advertisements, Easter, Holidays & Festivities | 4 Comments

Vintage Easter cards

Easter will soon be upon us. Seems an appropriate moment to post some vintage Easter cards. These belonged to my mother’s side of the family. Two are from her Aunt Jessie Trewin—the top card and the one with the little girl holding the yellow bonnet full of chicks. The rest are unlabelled or from ‘aunties’, i.e., friends of my grandmother’s. I think I like the top one and the one used in the blog’s header the best. Very sweet!
card7

card1

card2

card3

card4

card5

card6

card8

Categories: Easter, Holidays & Festivities, Vintage cards | 2 Comments

More traces of Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead & Cornelia M. Ely

Down Among the Coal Mines -- Chutes Loading the Canal-Boats on the Lehigh Canal, a wood engraving published in Harper's Weekly, February 1873. Coal was loaded at Mauch Chunk (Image found on Wikimedia Commons; public domain in the US)

Carbon County Scene: “Down Among the Coal Mines — Chutes Loading the Canal-Boats on the Lehigh Canal,” a wood engraving published in Harper’s Weekly, February 1873. Coal was loaded at Mauch Chunk (Image found on Wikimedia Commons; public domain in the US)

One of this blog’s new readers, whose spouse is a descendant of Abram & Cornelia Brodhead, kindly pointed me in the direction of some wonderful Carbon County resources that are available online thanks to the amazing contributions of a Mr. Tony Bennyhoff.  They reveal some interesting details, and I encourage anyone whose ancestors spent time in Carbon County to check them out. You never know what you may find.

What I found were several newspaper notices related to Abram’s passing, and I am sharing them here:

The Lehighton Press, Volume 2, Number 2, Thursday, October 27, 1892:
Death of A. C. Brodhead. Abram C. Brodhead died on Tuesday morning at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Garrett B. Linderman, South Bethlehem. Mr. Brodhead was 68 years of age, and lived for many years in Lehighton. About two months ago he went to South Bethlehem to visit his daughter, and while there he was taken ill. Mr. Brodhead was the youngest brother of the late Judge A. G. Brodhead , of Mauch Chunk; D. D. Brodhead , of Wilkes-Barre; A. J. Brodhead , of Flemington, N. J., and W. F. Brodhead, of Packerton. He was a staunch Democrat, having held several offices in the gift of his party. He was well known and greatly respected. The funeral of the deceased will take place to-day. Interment at Bridgeport, Conn. [Note: W. F. Brodhead, of Packerton, was a cousin on the Dingman side,  the son of William Franklin Brodhead (b 1807) and Jane Dingman (b 1808; Cornelia Dingman’s younger sister).]

Carbon Advocate, Volume 20, Number 50, Saturday, October 29, 1892:
Death of Abr. Brodhead. After an illness dating back a long time Abraham Brodhead died at the home of his daughter at Bethlehem on Monday night at the age of 68 years. For many years deceased resided in this city and was the superintendent of the Lehigh Stove Foundry. During the Grover Cleveland administration he held a lucrative position in the Philadelphia mint. He was an eccentric character in many ways. The news of his death was heard with regret by many old friends here.

View of Mauch Chunk, Carbon County, Pennsylvania, a wood engraving sketched by Theodore R. Davis and published in Harper's Weekly, September 1869 (Found on Wikimedia Commons; image is in public domain in US)

“View of Mauch Chunk, Carbon County, Pennsylvania,” a wood engraving sketched by Theodore R. Davis and published in Harper’s Weekly, September 1869 (Found on Wikimedia Commons; image is in public domain in US)

The Lehighton Press, Volume 2, Number 3, Thursday, November 3, 1892:
Funeral of A. C. Brodhead – The funeral of A. C. Brodhead, of Lehighton, took place on Thursday morning last from the residence of Mrs. G. B. Linderman, the daughter of the deceased, at South Bethlehem. The services were conducted by Rev. Gilbert H. Sterling, after which the remains were taken to Bridgeport, Conn., and there interred beside Mr. Brodhead’s wife. Mr. Brodhead was born in Pike county, August 6, 1824. In his early years Mr. Brodhead was connected with the Lehigh Valley Railroad and was subsequently in the government employ, in the custom house, in New York, and in later years in the mint, in Philadelphia. He was the youngest son of Garrett Brodhead and his wife, Cornelia Dingman , of Delaware, Pa. He was married January 6, 1862, to Cornelia Ely , of Bridgeport, Conn., but his wife died in the second  year thereafter, leaving but one child, Jennie, wife of Garrett B. Linderman. The funeral was largely attended by relatives and friends of the deceased from Lehighton and Mauch Chunk.

And, I found a morsel about Cornelia M. Ely in George Burritt Vanderpoel’s The Ely ancestry: lineage of Richard Ely of Plymouth, England who came to Boston, Mass., about 1655 & settled at Lyme, Conn, in 1660… (NY: Calumet Press, 1902, p. 369):

137313- Cornelia Maria Ely, b. 1842, d. 1864, dau. of Henry Gideon Ely and Cornelia Maria Whiting; m. 1863, Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead, Lehighton, Carbon Co., Pa., who was b. 1824, son of Garrett Brodhead and Cornelia Dingman. Their children:

1. Jennie S, b. 1863.

So Abram was ‘well known and greatly respected’ and ‘an eccentric character in many ways.’ I enjoy hearing little details like that, don’t you?

I am so grateful for this blog’s readers and appreciate all the feedback and help you so generously provide!

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Pennsylvania | 2 Comments

James Easton Brodhead’s fish story – summer 1916

James Easton Brodhead

James Easton Brodhead – image from my family’s personal collection

Just a quick post to share a little article “A Fisherman’s Scales” which I came across online and found rather funny. It’s from Fur-Fish-Game Volumes 23-24 (A. R. Harding Publishing Company, 1 January 1916) and gives a bit of a glimpse into the life of my great-grandfather A. D. Brodhead’s brother James Easton Brodhead who lived in that grand house in Flemington, NJ, and about whom I wrote in a past post. I imagine that once this little piece was published, his siblings (those still alive at that point) and children gave him a bit of a razz. James would have been about 68 at the time, and likely went on to catch many more fish. He was child number four of A. J. Brodhead and Ophelia Easton‘s ten children but he outlived all of them, dying on 10 November 1943 at the ripe old age of 92. Enjoy the fish story and feel free to share one of your own in the comment box below!

Do not tell fish stories where the people know you; but particularly, don’t tell them where they know the fish. ~Mark Twain

Fur_News_Aug_1916

Fur-Fish-Game Volumes 23-24 (A. R. Harding Publishing Company, 1 January 1916) – CREDIT: Google Books

salmon_flies

Salmon and Sea Trout Flies from Fly Fishing (1899), Sir Edward Grey, 1920 edition (Wikimedia – Public domain in US)

 

Categories: Brodhead, Fishing, Flemington, Hobbies and Pastimes, Nature | 8 Comments

Traces of Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead & wife Cornelia M. Ely

Over the years, I’ve been trying to connect the dots on Find a Grave, linking relatives together. Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead, brother of my 2nd great-grandfather Andrew Jackson Brodhead, about whom I know very little, has long eluded me. But, I just discovered his and his wife’s graves on the Find a Grave site, and with the permission of ‘Nashvillerambler’, I am publishing the images here. The graves are located in Mountain Grove Cemetery & Mausoleum, Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT.

I’ve put in a request to have Abram linked to his parents Garret Brodhead and Cornelia Dingman Brodhead. Just goes to show what a wonderful gift Find a Grave can be when searching for one’s ancestors!

Abram and Cornelia married in 1863 when she was about 21 and he was 39. A daughter Jennie Seymour Brodhead was born later that year. Cornelia died the following year, and I believe Abram remained a bachelor for the rest of his days. Daughter Jennie married into the Linderman family, making her a direct descendant of Richard Brodhead (b. 1771) and Hannah Drake (b. 1769) along two Brodhead family lines.

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Abram C Brodhead grave in Mountain Grove Cemetery and Mausoleum in Bridgeport, CT (PHOTO PERMISSION: Find a Grave’s ‘Nashvillerambler’)

Brodhead graves

Cornelia M. (Ely) Brodhead grave in Mountain Grove Cemetery and Mausoleum in Bridgeport, CT (PHOTO PERMISSION: Find a Grave’s ‘Nashvillerambler’)

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Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832)

Parents: Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832)

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851)

Parents: Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851)

Albert Gallatin Brodhead portrait

Brother: Albert Gallatin Brodhead portrait from 1905’s Historic Homes and Institutions and Genealogical and Personal Memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, PA (p. 260)

Andrew Jackson Brodhead

Brother: Andrew Jackson Brodhead, my 2nd great-grandfather

 

Categories: Brodhead, Linderman, Mountain Grove Cemetery & Mausoleum Bridgeport CT | 8 Comments

Some feline chips off the old block…

If you’re a fan of vintage cartoons, check out the amusing seven-minute-long Chips Off the Old Block from 1942 on DailyMotion (click here).

Some 1967 chips off the old block

1967 – some new chips off the old block appeared at our house

It reminded me of lots of the kittens who appeared at our old farmhouse 40-50 years ago. I dug out this old slide of two little 1967 chips. We never discovered who their ‘dad’ was.

Somewhere we have a handwritten ‘cat family tree tree’ that my mom started but abandoned after documenting the first few generations of barnyard cats, realizing that it was a losing battle. If I find her chart again, I’ll add it to this post. It’s very amusing. Our all-time favorite cat from that era was a Tabby cat named ‘Jeff’ who disappeared one fall and was gone for six months. We assumed he’d been eaten by something, but he eventually returned—one leg almost completely severed. The vet amputated it, and miraculously Jeff survived to a pretty ripe old age.

Categories: Miscellaneous, Pets | 2 Comments

Family recipe Friday — Four sweet bread recipes from Violet Boles

My grandfather's cousin Violet Boles with a furry friend, 1957.

My grandfather’s cousin Violet Boles with a furry friend, 1957.

To close out the week, I will leave you with four recipes left us by Violet Boles, my mom’s 1st cousin (once removed). Violet was born in Knocknagrally, County Laois, Ireland, in 1904. According to my mother she worked in the hotel industry on the Isle of Wight for a number of years. She emigrated to the US after her marriage to James Newton Boles (b. 1898, Tipperary, Ireland) in the early 1960s. Ordinarily I would not write about folks in the family tree who lived so close to the present day, but Newton (who went by his middle name) and Violet had no children; so, I hope they would not mind me sharing a bit about them here.

My mom’s father William Boles was very close to Newton, his cousin six years his junior. William, who emigrated to the US in 1912, was at least some of Newton’s inspiration to do the same, according to my mother. Newton emigrated in 1925 to Ontario, Canada, and from there made his way to Detroit, where he worked for Uniroyal for many years.

Newton and Violet  eventually retired to 800 20th Avenue North in St. Petersburg, FL, tending their backyard fruit trees and enjoying the warm temperatures and steady sunshine. I remember them showing us their avocado and orange trees—an exotic sight for us. They were wonderfully kind and caring people; both had a twinkle in their eye, and Newton especially had a terrific sense of humor. He was a very fun-loving man. My mother thought the world of him.

Boles_Newt_and_Violet_StPete_house

Newton & Violet Boles in front of their St. Petersburg home

I’ll never forget visiting them in February 1975 or 1976 when Newton was already in his 70s, and how Newton took us up I-4 to ride on Disney’s newly opened ‘Space Mountain’ roller coaster. We were amazed that he took the roller coaster with us and that he seemed to take it all in stride. Newton was a rather wild driver, so between the journey itself and the nerve-shattering, vertebrae-jarring ‘Space Mountain’ ride, we had a very memorable time!

Violet’s banana bread recipe is the best one I’ve ever come across. I’ve made it many times (I love the typo: ‘chapped walnuts’!) The date loaf is delicious, too (that recipe is cut off at the end, but you just add the remaining ingredients, mix, and bake at 350 for 50-60 min., depending on your altitude).

I’ve yet to try the carrot and cranberry breads, but know I will get to them eventually.

So enjoy these, if you are so inclined, and let me know how things turn out. Have a good weekend!

(Note: Newton died in 1983 at 84, and Violet in 1993 at 89. They were interred at St. Petersburg’s Memorial Park Cemetery.)

Boles_Violet_breads1

Boles_Violet_breads2

Categories: Boles, Co. Laois, Co. Tipperary, Food: Family Recipes & Favorites, St. Petersburg | 6 Comments

1805/1806: Luke Brodhead and “The Battle of the Butcher Boys and Delaware River Raftmen”

"The City and Port of Philadelphia, on the River Delaware from Kensington". Frontispiece to The City of Philadelphia..., plate 2. Engraving, hand-colored. Wikimedia Commons: In public domain in US due to publication prior to January 1, 1923. (Image shown has been cropped)

“The City and Port of Philadelphia, on the River Delaware from Kensington”. Frontispiece to The City of Philadelphia…, plate 2. Engraving, hand-colored. Wikimedia Commons: In public domain in US due to publication prior to January 1, 1923. (Image shown has been cropped at the top)

Now here’s an interesting tale dating back to 1805/1806 about a memorable ‘David vs. Goliath’ brawl featuring one Luke Brodhead. I found it in The Evening Gazette (Port Jervis, NY), dated Tuesday, May 28, 1878. The paper is one of thousands archived on the free Fulton History website.

Having checked some Brodhead family genealogies, I believe this Luke was probably the son of Luke Brodhead of Revolutionary War fame (my fifth great-grandfather Garret Brodhead‘s younger brother).  I could be wrong, of course, but there have never been that many Luke Brodheads in the family tree, and age-wise Luke Jr. (1777-1845) is a good fit. He would have been about 28 or 29 at the time of this incident, and still a bachelor. Luke Sr., who was left quite disabled by the war, passed away in 1806 at age 65.

On a side note, you may remember one of last July’s posts: “The 1868 murder of Theodore Brodhead of Delaware Water Gap.” Luke Brodhead Jr. was Theodore’s father. Luke Jr. was married to Elizabeth Wills (1789-1873), and together they had nine children—one girl (b. 1812) and eight boys (born between 1814 and 1831), all very tall in stature. Remember how Elizabeth joked that she had “48 feet of sons”?

Luke Jr. and Elizabeth ran an inn* at the Delaware Water Gap beginning circa 1820 to accommodate the influx of tourists to the area. From the “Theodore” post, you know that some of Luke Jr’s sons carried on this tradition, most notably Luke Wills Brodhead, who is deserving of a separate post of his own.

But, back to the story. It’s quite a tale, and I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. It obviously stood the test of time to be featured in a newspaper article some seven decades later! As always, comments, corrections, suggestions are welcome. And of course if you have different thoughts as to which Luke this was, please let me know.

The Evening Gazette. 28 May 1878

The Evening Gazette. 28 May 1878

— — — — — — —

MEMORABLE ENCOUNTER.
BATTLE OF THE BUTCHER BOYS AND DELAWARE RIVER RAFTMEN.
A HAND TO HAND CONTEST IN PHILADELPHIA OVER 70 YEARS AGO—HOW 10 RAFTMEN WHIPPED 30 BUTCHERS—DEATH OF THE LAST RAFTMAN ENGAGED IN THE FIGHT.

In the year of 1805 or 1806 a fierce fight took place in Philadelphia between about 30 butchers and 10 Delaware river raftmen. Some of the latter we have the names of. There was Major Ebeneezer Wheeler, his brother Joseph, Squire Holmes, John Weiss, Rock Run and William Tyler [**], Royal Warner, Luke Brodhead, and Captain C. Fennington of Delhi, N.Y.

Joseph Wheeler owned a very fleet black mare. The spring before the fight truth his horse had a race with one owned by the association of butchers. He won the race, but the butchers refused to give up the stakes, and it was finally agreed to have a second trial the following spring.

When the spring came around the race took place, and again there was a controversy as to which was the winning horse. This dispute led to the memorable conflict. Joseph Wheeler was challenged by the butchers to a single combat. This be declined to accept for the reason, as he said to his brother, that there was no prospect of fair play being shown him, the butchers outnumbering the raftmen three to one.

Ebeneezer Wheeler then stepped forward and accepted the challenge offered to his brother. He is represented to have been a man of wonderful strength and at the same time as fleet as a deer. He was just six feet two. Luke Brodhead was the same height, and was a man of great courage.

It was proposed by the butchers that the fight should take place with a rope between the combatants. To this Major Wheeler would not concede, saying: “Gentlemen, if I fight I fight to win, and want nothing between us.” An adjoining field was selected for the contest. The butcher who was to be Mr. Wheeler’s antagonist put one hand on the fence and as if to show his agility sprang over into the lot with a bound. The Major followed and jumped the fence without touching it.

Luke Brodhead and Mr. Weiss happened at the place by accident, not knowing any of the parties. They were mere spectators and not called upon to form a part of the ring around the fighters. The fight between the two men began. Mr. Wheeler’s antagonist fell at the first blow. He arose and the second blow from Mr. W’s big fist again sent him to the earth.

At this juncture Mr. Brodhead saw a butcher strike Wheeler with a heavy whip. (It afterward appeared that all the butchers were armed with loaded whips.) Mr. Brodhead went to one of the butchers and told him of the occurrence. He was thrust aside and told it was none of his business. But he persisted and said he would not stand by and see such foul play practiced. He had scarcely done speaking when he received a heavy blow on the head with a whip. The blow nearly stunned him.

Delaware River. An extract of an 1806 map of New Jersey, depicting the area around Philadelphia and Trenton. Credit: Wikimedia Commons. Source: Source=http://maps.bpl.org/details_12444/?mti

Delaware River. An extract of an 1806 map of New Jersey, depicting the area around Philadelphia and Trenton. Credit: Wikimedia Commons. Source: Source=http://maps.bpl.org/details_12444/?mti

In the mean time the fight in the field had progressed, and Wheeler had given his antagonist such a blow that it nearly killed him. Of course he retired at once from the contest.

But the fight now became general. The butchers used their loaded whips freely and the numbers being greatly in their favor gave them courage. Unfortunately, however, for the butchers every time one of them received a square blow from the raftmen he was forced to leave the field. Their numbers soon became less, none of them caring to risk a second blow. The contest thus steadily grew in favor of the raftmen, none of them becoming disabled. They stood their ground to the last, the butchers dropping away one by one until the field was cleared and the victory won for the sturdy raftmen, the butchers finally running from the field.

The mistake the butchers made was in using their whips instead of their fists. They were large, strong men, yet they could not strike the whip with sufficient force to prostrate one of the sturdy raftmen. Nevertheless some very severe blows were given them. Messrs. Wheeler, Brodhead, and Fennington were cut badly and were confined to their boarding-houses several days under medical treatment.

It is said that Mr. Eb. Wheeler and Brodhead each disabled five butchers from as many blows. Captain Fennington of Delhi was a giant in strength and rendered very efficient aid to the raftmen. Mr. Weiss was badly scared and climbed a tree when the fight became general. He was not to be blamed, however, for he was a little fellow and would not have stood much of a chance. Royal Warner also showed the white feather. Joseph Wheeler got over the fence to see the fight when he received the blow of a loaded whip. He picked up a new beaver hat and left.

Luke Brodhead and the Wheelers became warm friends after this fight. The latter insisted on his accompanying them home after their recovery, which he did and remained with them several months. He frequently visited them. They afterward presented him with a tract of land on the Delaware river in Delaware county, which he declined to accept.

Brodhead was one of the most peaceable of men, and was esteemed for his good character and sound judgment, integrity and love of justice. The characters of Mr. Fennington and the Wheelers were also beyond reproach. Rock Run Tyler, the last of the survivors of this fight, ever memorable among raftmen, died in November, 1877, at a very old age.

That part of the family tree

How we are related

*Better in the Poconos by Lawrence Squeri (Penn State Press, 2010), p. 23.

**I think they mean “William ‘Rock Run’ Tyler” judging from the brief bio about him on p. 634 in the book History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886)

Categories: Brodhead, Delaware Water Gap, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia | 2 Comments

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https://www.amazon.com/Jane-Eyre-Gets-Real-Annabelle-ebook/dp/B00FAS3I7O

Momoe's Cupboard

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Generations of Nomads

On the Trail of Family Faces, Places, and Stories Around the World

Your daily Civil War newspaper [est. 1995]

All the Civil War news fit to re-print

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The Writing Life at Middlemay Farm

Travels with Janet

Just another WordPress.com weblog

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