Monthly Archives: October 2016

Photograph of Isaac Jaques (1791-1880) of Elizabeth, NJ

Courtesy of San Benito County Historical Society

Isaac Jaques (1791-1880) –  Courtesy of San Benito County Historical Society

An amazing discovery: the existence of an image of Isaac Jaques of Elizabeth, New Jersey, father of my second-great-grandmother Wealthy Jaques (wife of James W. Angus).

I have written rather extensively about Isaac and some of his family members, as you know. First wife Wealthy Cushman of Hartford, CT, died in 1856; and he and Wealthy had nine children: Jane (1814-1843), Wealthy (1815-1892), Isaac (1817-bef. 1880), Eleazer (1820-?), John (1822-1895), Samuel (1824-1858), Walter (1826-1850), Christopher (1831-1851), and Charles (1834-1866).

Isaac’s second wife was Rebecca Ann Gold Robinson (widow of William J. Robinson); and, at some point, descendants of one of Rebecca’s sisters donated an album containing old Gold family photos to the San Benito County [California] Historical Society. In the album was this image of “Uncle Isaac,” as well as one of Rebecca.  I am indebted to an Ancestry dot come member for telling me about the image. She is a descendant of one of Rebecca’s sisters.

The photo of Isaac is not dated, but it must have been taken not too long before he passed away, in August 1880 at the age of 89.

Note: I had to pay a small fee to acquire this low-resolution image and get permission to publish it on this blog. If you want a high-resolution copy for your personal use (no sharing via email, no posting on Ancestry, social media, etc.), you can contact the San Benito Historical Society directly and officially request one (for a fee). You can also request an image of Rebecca Robinson Jaques. I paid for the high-res image of her but did not pay the extra fee to be able to post a low-res image here.

Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., Jaques, New Jersey | Tags: , | 2 Comments

Guest Post: “Grave Marker Dedication of Revolutionary War Soldier Benjamin Woodruff on May 14, 2016”

This post was contributed by Sue Woodruff Noland. Her previous post on the topic of the Woodruff family can be found here.

Benjamin Woodruff Grave Marker - PHOTO COPYRIGHT: SUE WOODRUFF NOLAND

Benjamin Woodruff Grave Marker – PHOTO COPYRIGHT: SUE WOODRUFF NOLAND

Benjamin Woodruff, born 26 November 1744 to James Woodruff* (1722-1759) and Joanna ? (1722-1812), attended the Morristown Presbyterian Church.  He served during the Revolution with the New Jersey militia, leaving behind his wife and 3 children; his wife, Phoebe Pierson Woodruff, died 21 January 1777, aged 36, and one can only hope that Benjamin was able to be there with her and the children.  Benjamin married again 8 July 1778, to Patience Lum, daughter of Obadiah Lum, with whom he had more children he left behind as he served our country.  It has been certified that Benjamin served one monthly tour in 1776 as a drummer; three monthly tours as a sergeant in 1776, including an engagement near Elizabeth, NJ, on 17 December 1776.  He served under various captains to the close of the war.  [information from the genealogical history provided by Charles Marius Woodruff]

Grave marker - Note the misspelling of Freelove Sanford's first name - IMAGE COPYRIGHT: SUE WOODRUFF NOLAND

Grave marker – Note the misspelling of Freelove Sanford’s first name – IMAGE COPYRIGHT: SUE WOODRUFF NOLAND

Those of you who are familiar with Michigan and the Great Lakes, which is where I live, know how variable the weather can be; mid-May average temperature is mid-60s.  On May 14, 2016, the day of the Grave Marker Dedication Ceremony for Benjamin Woodruff, son Andrew and I, both descendants of Benjamin, encountered temperatures in the low 40s and brisk breezes that carried sleety-snowy-rain as we gathered at Forest Hill Cemetery in Ann Arbor, Michigan!

As was common in 1837, when Benjamin died, he was buried the following day and therefore was not accorded a military funeral.  The DAR and SAR strive to provide a service for our forgotten patriots; on this day another Revolutionary War soldier, Josiah Cutler, was honored with our ancestor, Benjamin.

Benjamin Woodruff Grave Market Dedication Ceremony – At podium: Phil Jackson, Huron Valley Chapter SAR – PHOTO COPYRIGHT: SUE WOODRUFF NOLAND

The ceremony began with a welcome from Phil Jackson, Huron Valley Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR).  Following Phil’s remarks, we watched the posting of colors and standards with bearers dressed in Revolutionary War period uniforms.  Thomas Pleuss, Chaplain of the Huron Valley Chapter SAR, gave the invocation, and then Kate Kirkpatrick, from the local Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) chapter made some remarks, followed by remarks from a representative from each patriot’s family.  Thomas Woodruff and Frank Ticknor (Josiah’s family) each presented a brief history of our respective ancestor.  This portion of the ceremony was conducted about mid-way between the two patriot’s graves.  After family remarks, the ceremony was conducted separately at each grave site.

Thomas Woodruff receiving flag - IMAGE COPYRIGHT: CHUCK MARSHALL - USED WITH PERMISSION

Descendant Thomas Woodruff receiving flag – Sue Woodruff Noland in purple shawl looking on; her son Andrew is on the left in a plaid jacket – IMAGE COPYRIGHT: CHUCK MARSHALL – USED WITH PERMISSION

Benjamin’s grave site is a family memorial with several of his family interred there.  Tom and his son, Michael, generously purchased a marker for Benjamin indicating his service as a Revolutionary War patriot.  (The US government ‘declined’ to provide a marker.)  Our grateful thanks to Tom and Michael’s families for researching Revolutionary War markers and commissioning the marker to be made.  The marker was unveiled before our nation’s tribute, the folding of the flag.  Since there was no flag pole, the ceremony actually involved unfolding a flag brought by the SAR/DAR for the occasion, and then refolding it as a story was told about the meaning of the folds, the last fold being a representation of a mother tucking in her child for the night—a story made up sometime in the past, but a touching story nonetheless.  Once folded, the flag was presented to Tom.  We were then cautioned that the next part of the ceremony would be the military tribute, a 21-gun (and 2 muskets) salute—startlingly loud!

Twenty-one gun salute - IMAGE COPYRIGHT: CHUCK MARSHALL - USED WITH PERMISSION

Twenty-one gun salute – IMAGE COPYRIGHT: CHUCK MARSHALL – USED WITH PERMISSION

The veterans Honor Guard of Washtenaw County (Michigan), the Indiana Society Color Guard, and the Ohio Society Color Guard performed the tribute of three volleys.  The 21 spent shells were given to Tom, who offered one to each of the family as a memento of the day.

Sword Ceremony - IMAGE COPYRIGHT: CHUCK MARSHALL - USED WITH PERMISSION

Sword Ceremony – IMAGE COPYRIGHT: CHUCK MARSHALL – USED WITH PERMISSION

The Sword Salute was by far the most touching part of the ceremony for me.  Three of the Color Guard detached from the group.  The leader explained that, on command, the three of them would tip their tri-corn hats to honor our patriot and then bow, touching the ground with their swords, to show humility for Benjamin’s service to us and our country.  To conclude the ceremony there was a sounding of taps by two buglers.

Both families (Woodruff and Cutler) came together once again after Josiah’s ceremony, for floral tributes from several SAR, DAR, and CAR groups (Children of the American Revolution).  These organizations developed at various times with the objective of keeping alive their ancestors’ stories of patriotism and courage “in the belief that it is a universal one of man’s struggle against tyranny….” [from SAR website]  The conclusion of the entire ceremony was a bagpipe tribute to both soldiers, by Herm Steinman.

Bagpiper who performed at the ceremony - IMAGE COPYRIGHT: SUE WOODRUFF NOLAND

Bagpiper who performed at the ceremony – IMAGE COPYRIGHT: SUE WOODRUFF NOLAND

Chilled to the bone, but eager to meet cousins we didn’t even know existed a few short weeks before, we gathered with Benjamin’s other descendants at Conor O’Neill’s Irish Pub in Ann Arbor, as guests of Tom and his wife, Jane, and Mike and his wife and tiny daughter.  We met ‘new’ cousins, including Tom and Mike’s families, as well as Pam Olander from the Chicago area and reacquainted ourselves with cousins who had attended one of the Woodruff family reunions we organized during the mid-2000s.  The room was quite abuzz with everyone sharing history and asking questions.  Tom told us the motto on our Woodruff Coat of Arms, “Sit Dux Sapientia,” translates as “Let wisdom be your guide;” we had not known the motto, only the shield design.

The day before the ceremony, Andrew and I had met Pam at the Bentley Historical Library on the U of M campus in Ann Arbor.  We spent over two hours poring through Woodruff documents stored at the Library and were finally able to answer a question:  Why would John Woodruff leave England in 1640?  The answer: he seems to have decided that King Charles I was taking too much of the family income via taxes.  Later, it seems our Benjamin, living in the colonies, may not quite have agreed with King George III’s Stamp Act of 1765 (and a few others: sugar tax, currency, etc.), thus leading to his participation in the Revolutionary War a few years later.

If any of you should travel to Michigan in the future, for research at the Library or simply to visit Benjamin’s final resting place (he was moved to Forest Hill from another site), we would love to meet any ‘new’ cousins.

 

*James Woodruff (b. 1722, Elizabethtown, NJ) was the son of Benjamin Woodruff (1684-1726) and Susanna (1686-1727), both of whom were born and died in Elizabethtown, NJ.

Categories: Ann Arbor, CAR, DAR, Lineage Societies, Michigan, New Jersey, Revolutionary War, SAR, Woodruff | Tags: , | 12 Comments

An image of Mrs. Lewis Dingman Brodhead (a.k.a. Mildred Elizabeth Hancock)

Lewis Dingman Brodhead (undated; probably circa 1904)

Lewis Dingman Brodhead (undated; probably circa 1904) – Image copyright James and Barbara Brodhead

As long-time readers of this blog know, Mildred Elizabeth Hancock (1892 – Aft 1940) eloped with my Great Uncle Lewis Dingman Brodhead (1884-1934) on June 23, 1911, at the Church of the Transfiguration in Manhattan.

(My previous blog posts about them include: Another Brodhead elopes, this time in 1911 at NYC’s Little Church Around the Corner; More on Lewis D. Brodhead; and Survived by ‘Mrs. R. J. Cole of Philadelphia’)

Well, some good news! The Baltimore Sun has kindly given me permission to publish the photo of Mildred that appeared on p. 14 of the July 12, 1911, issue of that paper.

Mildred’s hat is pretty fabulous; it’s a shame we can’t see her or her hat in full living color, but under the circumstances, B&W will definitely do!

Below Image: Reprinted with permission from The Baltimore Sun.  All rights reserved.

Mildred

Reprinted with permission from The Baltimore Sun. All rights reserved.

Categories: Brodhead, Hancock, Lutherville, Maryland, New York City | Tags: | 7 Comments

Another descendant of the Nixon family of Fermanagh Co., Northern Ireland

My grandmother Zillah May Trewin’s best friend Catherine Mae Roberts, April 1905; they appear together in the 2nd photo from the right.

My grandmother Zillah May Trewin’s best friend Catherine Mae Roberts, April 1905; they appear together in the 2nd photo from the right.

This is Catherine Mae Roberts, one of my grandmother Zillah Trewin’s best friends from childhood, in April 1905. Catherine was a cousin of the Nixon sisters (Jennie & Louise), about whom I have previously written. From the second photo from the right, in which my grandmother appears with Mae, you can tell they were good chums. Fourteen years after these photos were taken, my grandmother would marry Mae’s cousin William Robert Boles whose mother Sarah was a sister of Mae’s mother Jane. Below is a family tree of sorts in the event one of you wants to see the details. (Anyone who wants to help me fill in some of the blanks, please give me a shout at ‘chipsoff at gmail dot com’!)

I love the smiles. And the hats!!! What were they made of?!

{{Information |Description=Advertisting poster for hats for C.A. Browning & Co., Boston. French, 1904–05. France. Lithograph, printed in color, on paper. Anonymous firm. Poster advertising hats for C. A. Browning and Co., 32 Franklin Street Boston. (In public domain is US due to being published before

Advertising poster for hats for C.A. Browning & Co., Boston. French, 1904–05. France. Lithograph, printed in color, on paper. Anonymous firm. Poster advertising hats for C. A. Browning and Co., 32 Franklin Street Boston. (In public domain is US — see below *)

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Courtesy of Fulton History dot com

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Sunday, March 26, 1905 (Courtesy of Fulton History dot com)


1-William Nixon b. Cir 1802, Ireland, d. 10 Aug 1871, Manhattan, New York, 
  New York
 +Rachael Millar b. Cir 1818, Ireland, d. Possibly 10 May 1890, Manhattan, New 
  York, New York, bur. Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, 
  USA
|--2-Edward Nixon b. Cir 1839-1845, Ireland, d. Betw 1889 and 1900
|   +Anna Bracken b. Aug 1847, Northern Ireland, d. After 1930
|  |--3-Jane Bracken Nixon b. 15 Apr 1884, Manhattan, New York, New York, d. 
|  |    May 1972, Ocean Grove, Monmouth, NJ
|  |--3-William Thomas Nixon b. 24 Aug 1885, Manhattan, New York, New York, d. 
|  |    Sep 1967, Suffolk, New York
|  |   +Marion Zoller 
|  |--3-George Robert Bracken Nixon b. 12 Feb 1887, Bridgeport, Connecticut
|  |   +May L. Swenarton b. Cir 1889, New Jersey
|  |  |--4-George W. Nixon b. Cir 1914, New Jersey
|  |  |--4-Frank L. Nixon b. Cir 1919
|  |--3-Louise E. Nixon b. 22 Jul 1889, Bridgeport, Connecticut, d. Oct 1979, 
|  |    Ocean Grove, Monmouth, NJ
|--2-Mark Nixon b. Cir 1845, Ireland, d. 28 Mar 1893, New York, New York, bur. 
|    31 Mar 1893
|   +Mary Quaile b. Abt 1846, Derrintober, Drumshambo, Ireland, d. possibly 25 
|    Nov 1876, Derrintober, Drumshambo, Ireland
|  |--3-Florence Katherine Nixon b. 25 Sep 1869, New York, New York, d. 21 Aug 
|  |    1944, Porter Hospital, Middlebury, Addison, Vermont
|  |--3-Evangeline Roberta Nixon b. Sep 1873, bur. 15 Dec 1960, Green-Wood 
|  |    Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, USA
|      +Joseph Russell Parker b. 29 Sep 1879, d. 1950, bur. Green-Wood 
|       Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, USA
|--2-Elizabeth Nixon b. Cir 1849, Ireland, d. After 2 Jun 1880
|--2-Jane Nixon b. 28 Dec 1851, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 7 Feb 
|    1938, East Orange, Essex Co., NJ, bur. 9 Feb 1938, Jersey City, Hudson 
|    Co., NJ
|   +William Elliott Roberts b. 12 Dec 1842, Enniskillen, Co. Fermanagh, 
|    Ireland, d. 4 Apr 1907, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, bur. Jersey City, 
|    Hudson Co., NJ
|  |--3-William Roberts b. 1876, d. 10 Mar 1942
|  |--3-Charles Benjamin Roberts b. 9 Aug 1878, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 
|  |    14 Mar 1962
|  |   +Grace Yates b. 1882
|  |--3-Edward Roberts b. 1880, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 22 Sep 1951
|  |   +Ruth Deming 
|  |--3-Catherine Mae Roberts b. 3 May 1882, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 13 
|  |    Dec 1966
|  |   +Emory Chenoweth b. 1878
|  |--3-Harry James Roberts b. 12 Dec 1886, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 2 
|  |    Feb 1974, Novato, Marin Co., CA, bur. 8 Feb 1975, Cheyenne, Laramie 
|  |    Co., WY
|  |   +Mary Elizabeth Baldwin b. 21 Nov 1884, d. 3 Feb 1971
|  |  |--4-Paul Nixon Roberts b. 30 Jul 1922, East Orange, Essex Co., NJ, d. 26 
|  |  |    Jan 1941
|  |--3-Herbert George Roberts b. 17 Oct 1888, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 
|  |    19 Nov 1972
|      +Ella Marjorie Harrison b. 1892
|--2-Thomas Nixon b. Cir 1852, Ireland, d. After 2 Jun 1880
|   +Eliza d. Bef 2 Jun 1880
|--2-Sarah Nixon b. 26 May 1855, Ireland, d. Sep 1938, Dublin South, 
|    Ireland, bur. Kentstown Cemetery, Co. Meath, Ireland
|   +Edward Boles b. 4 Jun 1855, Fingreagh Upper, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 24 
|    Oct 1940, Meath Hospital, Dublin, Ireland, bur. Kentstown Cemetery, Co. 
|    Meath, Ireland
|  |--3-Jane Kathleen Boles b. 7 Jul 1889, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 
|  |    5 Jun 1982, Belfast, Northern Ireland
|  |--3-John James Boles b. 10 Jan 1891, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 
|  |    Dec 1935
|  |--3-William Robert Boles b. 24 Feb 1892, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, 
|  |    Ireland, d. 2 Mar 1950, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. 4 Mar 1950, 
|  |    Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union, NJ
|  |   +Zillah May Trewin b. 11 Jun 1883, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, d. 11 May 
|  |    1955, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. 13 May 1955, Evergreen Cemetery, 
|  |    Hillside, Union, NJ
|  |--3-Edward Benjamin Boles b. 9 Apr 1894, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, 
|  |    d. 21 Nov 1970, bur. Clandeboye Cemetery, Bangor, Northern Ireland, UK
|  |--3-Beulah Sarah Boles b. 9 Apr 1894, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 
|  |    1900, co. Leitrim, Ireland
|  |--3-Mary Elizabeth Boles b. 5 Jun 1896, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, 
|  |    d. 26 Jul 1928, Cloneen, near Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland
|--2-Rachael Nixon b. Cir 1856, Ireland, d. After 1886, United States
|   +Charles F. Hodgson 
|  |--3-Elizabeth Hodgson b. 18 May 1886, Manhattan, New York, New York
|--2-Mary Nixon b. Cir 1858, Ireland, d. After 2 Jun 1880
|--2-Benjamin Nixon b. 2 Aug 1862, Ireland, d. 5 Aug 1939
|   +Mary Graham Clark b. 9 Mar 1864, New York, NY, d. 23 Jan 1948
|--2-Robert Nixon b. Jan 1863, Ireland, d. After 1912
|   +Blanche Shaw b. Mar 1868, d. After 1912
|  |--3-Nixon b. Betw 1891 and 1900, d. Betw 1891 and 1900
|  |--3-Dorothy R. Nixon b. Aug 1895
|  |--3-Marguerite Nixon b. Cir 1902
|  |--3-Margaret A. Nixon b. Cir 1906
|--2-Catherine Nixon b. 3 Jan 1864, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. After 
|    Oct 1886
|   +Charles Hugh Larkin 
|--2-James Nixon 
|--2-John Nixon 
|--2-William Nixon

********************************************************************************

*This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published (or registered with the U.S. Copyright Office) before January 1, 1923. This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 70 years or less.

Categories: Boles, Chenoweth, Elizabeth, Union Co., Fashion & Beauty, New Jersey, Roberts | Tags: , , , , | 9 Comments

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