US Federal 1920

Lavinia P. Angus (1858-1940s)—geometry whiz; who knew?!

1820 watercolor portrait of French mathematicians Adrien-Marie Legendre and Joseph Fourier; Boilly, Julien-Leopold. (1820). Album de 73 Portraits-Charge Aquarelle’s des Membres de I’Institut (Wikimedia Commons: Image in Public Domain)

1820 watercolor portrait of French mathematicians Adrien-Marie Legendre and Joseph Fourier; Boilly, Julien-Leopold. (1820). Album de 73 Portraits-Charge Aquarelle’s des Membres de I’Institut (Wikimedia Commons: Image in Public Domain)

I know, I’m breaking my self-imposed vow of ‘blog silence until the New Year’, but once I’ve assembled enough information about someone, I just feel compelled to get it ‘out there’ as quickly as possible! So here I go again–

My dad occasionally spoke of his [Great] ‘Aunt Vean’ (short for ‘Lavinia’). Unfortunately, so much time has passed since his passing, I can’t remember the context. I only recall that whatever he ever had to say about her was complimentary and implied that she was quite a pistol.

Beyond that, until recently, I did not know much else about her. I only knew she was the youngest daughter of Wealthy and James Angus and that she had once been married to a gentleman with the surname Marthaler. Lavinia’s father James passed away when she was just a toddler so her memories of him would have been minimal. She had numerous older brothers and sisters (including my great grandmother Wealthy who was about eight years her senior) who would have helped raise her.  (As an aside, one of her older brothers was Job Angus about whom I wrote a previous post containing a letter from Texas.)

With a bit of digging, more info about Aunt Vean has come to light, including the curious blurb entitled ‘Fast Mathematics’ that was published in 1875 in National Teachers’ Monthly, Vol. 2 (p. 192–see the accompanying image on this page). Lavinia, born in September 1858, would have been about 17 at the time, and obviously she was a very bright young lady. Somehow she managed to memorize in one night 17 geometry theorems of famed French mathematician Adrien-Marie Legendre, and then recite them all the next day in class in a record time of 1 minute 40 seconds. I looked up all these theorems (posted on this page as an image–click on it to enlarge) to see what was entailed, and indeed, her feat was incredibly impressive. While she never went on to attend college, it’s obvious if she had, she would have possessed the determination to succeed at whatever subject matter she put her mind to.

1875, p. 192

National Teachers’ Monthly, Vol. 2, 1875, p. 192

The 18 theorems Aunt Vine memorized and recited

The 17 theorems Aunt Vine memorized and recited; click on image to enlarge it.

‘Aunt Vean’ married John Philip Marthaler in Elizabeth, NJ, on 24 May 1879. She was 21 at the time, and he was roughly 7 years older than she. The 1880 census shows a Lavinia and Philip ‘Morthala’ living at 163 Kent Street in Brooklyn with a young man named Hulet Valentine, whose occupation is listed as “Root beer”. Philip was working as a clerk in a store. Sadly the marriage did not last for long—Philip must have died sometime before 1885. The NJ state census of that year shows Lavinia back living with her mom Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus, and the 1900 and subsequent censuses list her as a widow. There is no indication that she ever remarried, and as far as I am aware she and Philip never had any children.

I found ‘Vean’ in all the Federal censuses taken between 1900 and 1940, and also in the 1905 NJ census. As you can see below, further down the page, her first and last names were commonly misspelled. She lived in Newark, NJ, until sometime before 1940 when she is shown to be living in nearby Montclair. She was most often shown as a boarder, and a woman named Elizabeth Booth (a decade younger than ‘Vean’) seemed to be a friend who appeared alongside her in a number of these records. That surprised me a bit considering Lavinia had so many siblings–I would have thought someone would have taken her in; but perhaps she inherited sufficient funds to stay out on her own or simply preferred to remain independent from the family. In 1900 ‘Vean’ was working as a stenographer; from 1910 onward, her occupation is listed as ‘none’. Her friend Elizabeth continued working until sometime between 1920 and 1930; in the 1930 and 1940 census she also reported no occupation.

‘Aunt Vean’ was listed as 81 in the 1940 census. I don’t have a date of death for her. I may find it in my dad’s memoirs—but he was off fighting in the Pacific for some of the 1940s and may not have made record of it.

The only physical memento we have of ‘Vean’ is a little vase that she gave to her niece (my grandmother), Fanny (Woodruff) Brodhead. Meanwhile, some of Aunt Vean’s letters may exist somewhere out there. The family history paper, One Line of Descendants of James Angus, written by Harriet Stryker-Rodda and published in 1969 (available in the Family Search Library–see my Links page) reported:  Lavinia’s letters, written in her later years, have been preserved in the family because of her interest in the family’s history and the fact that she had a retentive mind even as she got older. Perhaps, those letters will come to light someday. It would be wonderful to know more of the family history from her recollections and to see what her relationships with others were like.

As always, corrections, additions, and comments welcome!!!

All of the below from the Family Search website:

Lavinia P Marthaler Boarder United States Census, 1940
birth: 1859 New Jersey
residence: 1940 Ward 3, Montclair, Montclair Town, Essex, New Jersey, United States
other: Martha E Macbeth, Bessie Wetherby, Signa Hjertstrom, Mabel V Crane, M Elizabeth Booth, Sarah E Vanduyne…
Lavinia Marthaler Boarder United States Census, 1900
birth: September 1864 New Jersey
residence: 1900 District 5 Newark city Ward 2, Essex, New Jersey, United States
other: Joseph O Nichols, Eliza D Nichols, Sayres O Nichols, Julia C Nichols, Mary E Booth, Dora Flithner
Lavenea P Marthaler Boarder United States Census, 1930
birth: 1859 New Jersey
residence: 1930 Newark (Districts 1-250), Essex, New Jersey, United States
other: Elizabeth M Booth
Lavania Marthaler Head United States Census, 1920
birth: 1860 New Jersey
residence: 1920 Newark Ward 8, Essex, New Jersey, United States
other: Elizbeth Baldwin, Emma Mackain, M Elizbeth Booth, Bonnie Lomax
Lavinia Marthalles Head United States Census, 1910
birth: 1860 New Jersey
residence: 1910 Newark Ward 8, Essex, New Jersey, United States
Lavenia Marthaler New Jersey, State Census, 1905
birth: 1860
residence: 1905 , Essex, New Jersey, United States
other: Mary E Booth
Lavinia Morthala Wife United States Census, 1880
birth: 1859 New Jersey, United States
residence: 1880 Brooklyn, Kings, New York, United States
spouse: Phillip Morthala
other: Hulet Valentine
Categories: Angus, Brodhead, Brooklyn, Marthaler, New Jersey 1885, New Jersey 1905, US Federal 1860, US Federal 1880, US Federal 1900, US Federal 1910, US Federal 1920, US Federal 1930, US Federal 1940, Woodruff | 7 Comments

George Wills Descendants in America — An Update

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin with daughter Zillah Trewin Boles, 1883, who later married Wm R. Boles of Dumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin with daughter Zillah Trewin Boles, 1883, who later married Wm R. Boles of Dumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin with ZillahTrewin Boles' daughter `Betty' Boles, August 12, 1923

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin with Zillah Trewin Boles’ daughter `Betty’ Boles, August 12, 1923

A few posts ago, I shared news of some photos having been taken of the grave markers in the Trewin-Ludey plot at Evergreen Cemetery in Hillside, NJ. I’d noted that Elizabeth Sargent Trewin’s brother William Sargent was buried there together with his wife Sarah. The whereabouts of Wm and Elizabeth’s sister Sarah was unknown. In fact, other than a date of birth, I knew nothing about her. The three siblings as well as another brother, Rev. Samuel Sargent, were the children of Mary Wills and William Sargent who left England with their parents to start a new life in America during the post-Civil War reconstruction. (Recall from numerous previous posts that Mary Wills’s was George Wills’s youngest daughter.)

2/15/1926 Obituary for Elizabeth Sargent Trewin (the 2 sons mentioned were stepsons, William Clarence and Albert Phillips; their mother was Edith Fry, William Trewin’s 1st wife); “Mrs. Coles” is a typo–should be “Mrs. Boles”

Well, one big clue as to what became of Sarah (b. cir. 1858-1860) has been right under my nose for months and I failed to realize it. Buried at the bottom of Elizabeth Sargent Trewin’s obituary notice was the name of a surviving sister, Mrs. R.O. Hemion! With that tidbit, I discovered some census records that revealed that Sarah went by the name Sadie, and that she was married to Richard O. Hemion, a machinist, who was born in 1857 in Rockland County, NY,  to John and Catharine Hemion. In 1880, he was working as a cigar maker in Jersey City, NJ, and living with an older sister, Amelia Curyansen, and her family.  [I saw some message boards stating the surname was actually Auryansen, and was misspelled in that record. Auryansen is a Dutch surname, and evidently the history of the family in America goes way back.] It is in Jersey City that he must have become acquainted with Sadie. According to the 1900 census, they were married in roughly 1882. The pair settled in East Rutherford, NJ, and had four children: Cora, Mabel, Everett, and Edith (see below for dates). By 1920, Sadie is listed as a widow and living with children Cora and Everett, by then in their thirties. I could not view the actual records for 1910 and 1920 since you have to be an ancestry.com subscriber to access them (one of my pet peeves). So, who knows what other little morsels lie within those records…

Hemion Family in 1900 Census

Another big plus was finding out the year of the Sargent family’s emigration to the US: 1870! I discovered this morsel in the original 1900 census record as well (available free of charge through FamilySearch).

So hip hip hooray–another little piece of the family puzzle solved! I would love to hear from any Hemion descendants out there.

GEORGE WILLS and MARY CAPON U.S. DESCENDENTS

1-Mary Wills b. 11 Nov 1829, Wolverton, Buckinghamshire, England, d. 6 Dec
1877, Jersey City, Hudson, New Jersey
+William Sargent b. 2 Sep 1828, Weedon Beck, Northamptonshire, c. 10 Dec 1829,
Weedon and Flore, Northamptonshire, England
|–2-Rev. Samuel Sargent b. 1852, Blisworth, Northamptonshire, England, d. 3
| Nov 1926, New Jersey
| +Ella Tunison b. Abt 1854, United States
| |—–3-Vivian T. Sargent b. 7 Aug 1891, Camden, New Jersey
| | +Packard
| |—–3-Rev. Norman Vincent Sargent b. Feb 1889, Kansas
|–2-Elizabeth Sargent b. 15 Sep 1854, St. Sepulchre, Northampton,
| Northamptonshire, England, d. 1926, Elizabeth, Union Co, NJ, bur. 6 Feb
| 1926, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union, NJ
| +William Trewin b. 21 Mar 1847, Hardin Street, Woolwich Dockyard, Co. Kent
| (now Greater London), England, d. 4 Dec 1916, Elizabeth General Hospital,
| Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. 7 Dec 1916, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside,
| Union, NJ
| |—–3-Zillah May Trewin b. 11 Jun 1883, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, d. 11 May
| | 1955, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside,
| | Union, NJ
| +William Robert Boles b. 24 Feb 1892, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland,
| d. 2 Mar 1950, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. Evergreen Cemetery,
| Hillside, Union, NJ
|–2-Sargent TWIN b. 15 Sep 1854, d. 1854
|–2-Sadie Sargent b. 1858, St. Sepulchre, Northampton, England
| +Richard O. Hemion b. Feb 1857, Rockland Co., New York
| |—–3-Cora S. Hemion b. Abt 1883, Rockland Co., New York
| |—–3-Mabel Hemion b. Abt 1885, Rockland Co., New York
| |—–3-Everett Hemion b. Abt 1887, Rockland Co., New York
| |—–3-Edith Hemion b. Abt 1889, Rockland Co., New York
|–2-William Sargent b. 1861, St. Sepulchre, Northampton, Northamptonshire,
| England, d. 24 Jul 1896, Elizabeth, Union Co, NJ, bur. 27 Jul 1896,
| Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union Co., NJ
| +Sarah Jane Bowley b. Abt 1844, United States, d. 3 Jan 1904, bur. 6 Jan
| 1904, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union Co., NJ
|–2-Sargent TWIN, died in infancy
|–2-Sargent TWIN, died in infancy
|–2-Sargent, died in infancy
|–2-Sargent, died in infancy
|–2-Sargent, died in infancy
|–2-Sargent, died in infancy
|–2-Sargent, died in infancy

Happy Easter to All!

Categories: East Rutherford, Bergen Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Hemion, Hillside Cemetery Lyndhurst NJ, Jersey City, Hudson Co., Obituaries, Sargent, Trewin, US Federal 1900, US Federal 1910, US Federal 1920, Wills | 6 Comments

Emma Trewin Ludey

The youngest of the three Trewin siblings was Emma. She was born on 4 May 1850 in England.  I found this date of birth in the leaflet distributed to guests at her funeral.

Emma Trewin Ludey funeral leaflet

According to this leaflet, her birthplace was “Cambellwell,” but I believe this was probably meant to be Camberwell as the former does not appear to exist, and the latter is situated in South London to the west of Woolwich Arsenal, which is where Emma’s father, Thomas Trewin, worked until the family emigrated to Canada in 1857.

Distance from Woolwich to Camberwell

Emma would have been 9 years old when her family relocated to Jersey City, NJ, from Toronto, Canada, where they had been living for the two years following their arrival in Quebec from England. On 15 February 1871, Emma, then 20 years of age, married Francis C. Ludey in Elizabeth, NJ. Together they had six children. I know this because the 1900 Census, which lists her incorrectly as “Susan Ludy,” states that there were six children altogether but that only two were living as of the 1900 Census (Mary Emma and Louisa). The couple spent a number of years living in Bayonne, NJ.

William & Elizabeth Trewin and Francis & Emma Ludey on Holiday, Bethlehem, PA, 1915 (Image from my family’s personal collection)

From what I have pieced together, the children were:

Francis T. Ludey, born in 1871. He married Metta S. Ryman on 18 June 1896 in Summit. NJ. Less than four years later, Francis (aka Frank) passed away. NJ Deaths and Burials shows a Frank T. Ludry passing away in Summit, NJ, on 11 January 1899. The occupation listed was “C Traveller.” I have no idea what that meant, unless “C” meant “Sea” in which case, perhaps he worked on ships? I believe this “Ludry” spelling to be a typo as “r” and “e” are neighbors on the keyboard and the birth year listed in the record (1871) fits with census records that estimate the year of birth as 1872. Our old family cemetery records show a Frank Ludey being buried in the family plot in Evergreen Cemetery on 13 January 1900. Perhaps the family had the year mistakenly written down as 1900? I have not checked with the cemetery yet. But in any case, a death on the 11th of the month would make a burial on the 13th plausible. (Update 4/14/12: see later posts on Frank T. Ludey which include cause of death)

Online, I found Metta working as a kindergarten teacher in 1896, as staff librarian at Pratt Institute in 1901, and from 1915-1920 working as the librarian-in-charge at Jarvie Memorial Library in Bloomfield, NJ. The 1920 Census shows her as a widow living with her parents in Essex, NJ. She died on 8 July 1952 and was buried with her parents, Charles S. Ryman and Mary Wells, in Milford Cemetery, Milford, Pike Co., PA. The grave can be found on Find a Grave’s website. I believe Metta lived most of her adult life as a widow since women back then typically gave up employment upon getting married and she obviously developed quite a career as a librarian. And being buried with her parents would also indicate she had lived most of her life as a single person. I would certainly be interested in knowing more about Frank Ludey and how/why he passed away so young. Update (1/3/2012): see photo of Frank in later post; click here.

Mary Emma Ludey (aka “Minnie”), born on 5 February 1873, in Elizabeth. She is also buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Hillside. Minnie was married twice, first to Herbert Duryea Crane (a life insurance salesman per the 1900 census; you must open the original census document to find that out) in Bayonne, NJ, on 23 September 1897 (I just love the NJ Marriage record which has his first name spelled “Herebert” and her surname spelled “Lendey”! See why you have to be creative with your searches?!). They had a daughter named Metta Beryl who was born in 1899. Minnie eventually divorced and was living at 17 West 32nd Street in Bayonne, NJ, when she met and married her second husband Lynn Everett Jennison, a professor of history at Bayonne High School, in April 1916. According to the announcement in the NY Times, Professor Jennison was Minnie’s daughter’s instructor and they became acquainted during a parent-teacher conference to discuss the daughter’s progress. The article refers to the daughter as May. I do not know yet whether this was daughter Metta Beryl’s nickname which she may have gone by in everyday life.  The Professor, who’d been a widower, had two daughters from his first marriage with Hestis Jennison: Eleanor S. Jennison (b. circa 1905) and Amelia W. Jennison (b. circa 1906). The 1920 Census showed the couple living in Bayonne. By 1930 they had relocated to Elizabeth, NJ. Mary Emma Ludey passed away on 20 October 1938 at the age of 65.  Lynne Jennison survived her by almost 30 years. He passed away in Duval, Florida, in June 1967 at the age of  88.

Louise Beryl Ludey was born circa 1875 in Union Co., NJ. She married George Bonney (b. 1873) on 13 January 1894 in Port Richmond, NY. The 1900 Census shows a son Harold L. Bonney (b. 1896) and Dorothy B. Bonney (b. June 1898; married Jonathan Beltz; daughter Elenor, b. 1929). At the time the family was living in Bayonne City, Hudson Co., NJ, and George was working as a boiler maker. In addition, Rhode Island Births and Christening records show a son, Francis George Bonney, born on 24 November 1905. The 1910 Census shows the family still living in Providence, Rhode Island, with George still working as a boiler maker.

William W.F. Ludey was born on 11 July 1877 in Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ. According to cemetery records he was buried that same day. See below.

Another child was born on 16 September 1878 per NJ Births and Christening records. Though no name is given in the record, I believe this was Anna L. Ludey who was buried on 28 December 1878. Our family cemetery records state that William W.F. Ludey and Anna L. Ludey died very young and were buried with their grandparents, one child sharing the plot with grandfather Thomas J. Trewin, and the other child sharing a plot with grandmother Mary Phillips Trewin.

Note: The 1880 Census for “Frank Ludy” and Emma Ludy” shows a daughter Lulu Ludey born in 1876. I suspect that “Lulu” and Louisa may be one in the same person. Or Lulu could have been the sixth child about whom Emma Ludey referred in the 1900 census.

___________________________

Emma lived with her daughter Mary Emma “Minnie” Jennison and Mary’s husband Lynn Jennison after Francis Ludey passed away, in Bayonne, NJ, and then in Elizabeth, NJ. Emma died at age 83 on 9 June 1933 in Elizabeth, NJ. She was buried three days later in Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, alongside her husband Francis C. Ludey. Some more about him in the next post.

Emma Trewin Ludey, obituary notices

Categories: Bayonne, Census Records, Elizabeth, Union Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Jennison, Ludey, Obituaries, Ryman, Trewin, US Federal 1880, US Federal 1900, US Federal 1910, US Federal 1920 | Leave a comment

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