Gen. Lafayette

Mary Rebecca Brodhead Pike (1815-1922) — New Hampshire DAR member — achieved age 106

DAR Magazine Vol52, pub. 1918 This striking black and white image of Mary Brodhead Pike comes from Daughters of the American Revolution Magazine, Volume 52 (Jan. 1918),  p. 678.

Mary, daughter of Reverend John Brodhead and Mary Dodge, died on May 17, 1922, at the age of 106, and was buried in Locust Grove Cemetery, Newfields, Rockingham Co., New Hampshire.

The photo was ...taken the day after her 101st birthday, and is a very good likeness, but it does not express the charm of this intellectual gentlewoman. For 101, she looks remarkable!

The article mentions a DAR meeting taking place at Mary’s house in July of Mary’s 103rd year. What an honor it would have been to be a guest in her home.

Volume 55, published several years later (December 1921), gives us an update on the amazing Mary Pike. The Granite Chapter reported:

Our July meeting was held at the home of our oldest member, Mrs. Mary R. Pike, widow of Rev. James Pike, of Newfields. […]

Mrs. Pike at the age of 106 years is active in mind, keen and witty in conversation and gracious in manner. A few years ago this Magazine published a likeness of Mrs. Pike which holds good. She seems not to have changed mentally or physically except that a recent fall has confined her to her room.

Her health is good, she is cheerful and strong in her faith in God, and in her love for humanity. Granite Chapter would like to know if any other Chapter can claim so old a Daughter.

I, for one, would have loved to have been among those who got to sit down with Mary in her later years to hear her discuss her life experiences. As a member of the DAR, she would have been someone extremely interested in family history and the history of our great country.

As is often the case, this is an image I came across while searching for information about someone else. I was intrigued, and wanted to learn more about her. As it turns out, much has been written about Mary’s Brodhead family line, and I won’t go into too much detail here; I’ll just try to give you a sense of where she is located in the overall family tree:

Mary was a granddaughter of Revolutionary War Captain Luke Brodhead (1741-1806), youngest brother of my fifth great grandfather, Lt. Garret Brodhead (1733-1804). (Luke and Garret were sons of Dansbury (East Stroudsburg) founders Daniel Brodhead and wife Hester Wyngart.)

Luke* was wholeheartedly devoted to the cause of independence and was a devoted friend to General Lafayette. Wounds received in battle and in prison eventually forced him to retire from active duty after spending the winter in Valley Forge.

Luke’s June 28, 1806, obituary in the Northampton Farmer & Easton Weekly Advertiser described him as being: …an active patriot in the 1st Pennsylvania Rifle Regiment which marched on Boston in 1775, in opposition to tyranny. He was wounded, and made prisoner on Long Island, where he experienced savage cruelty in a British prison ship [Jersey], and afterwards [he was exchanged on December 8, 1776] served his country with reputation… […] Justice and gratitude had induced his country to dignify him with an annuity for life, and his amiable simplicity of manners endeared him to his friends. He was a tender parent, and an affectionate husband, and an immatable friend...

Luke’s son Rev. John Brodhead**, an ordained Methodist minister, and Mary Dodge, were Mary Rebecca Brodhead Pike’s parents. In 1809, the parents ultimately settled in Newfields, New Hampshire, and that is where Mary was born.

Rev. John Brodhead served in the NH State Senate from 1817-1827, and was a member of Congress from 1829-1833. John and Mary Dodge Brodhead had twelve children: Daniel Dodge Brodhead, John Montgomery Brodhead, Elizabeth Harrison Brodhead, Ann Mudge Brodhead, Joseph Crawford Brodhead, Mehitabel Smith Brodhead, George Hamilton Brodhead, Mary Rebecca Brodhead, Olive Brodhead, Brevet Brigadier General Thornton Fleming Brodhead, Col. Josiah Adams Brodhead, and Almena Cutter Brodhead.

The Reverend was not the only parent who led a remarkable life. His wife Mary Dodge Brodhead’s September 5, 1875’s obituary in the New York Times stated that she conversed and shook hands with every President of the United States, from George Washington on down. With the martyr President Lincoln, she was on terms of great familiarity.

Brevet Brigadier General Thornton Fleming Brodhead, (1820-1862); Wikipedia (Public Domain--contributed by IcarusPhoenix)

Mary’s brother, Brevet Brigadier General Thornton Fleming Brodhead, (1820-1862); Credit: Wikipedia (Public Domain–contributed by IcarusPhoenix)

Of their children, Brig. Gen. Thornton Fleming Brodhead is particularly well known, for his service in the Civil War. He was mortally wounded at Bull Run after heroically leading his men into battle. George Hamilton Brodhead was once president of the NYSE. John Montgomery Brodhead served as second controller of the US Treasury, Joseph Crawford Brodhead was a Deputy Naval Officer, and Josiah Adams Brodhead was Paymaster in the US Army.

Mary Rebecca Brodhead (subject of this post) married Rev. James Pike***, who similarly to Mary’s father started out as a Methodist clergyman but later entered politics. James also served in the Civil War as a Colonel in New Hampshire’s 16th Infantry.

Mary and James had three children: James Thornton Pike (1841-1911), Anna Gertrude Pike Kendall (1844-1926), and Mary Brodhead Pike (1855-1855).

In closing, I’ll just say that there is a wealth of information available about this family line both online and in the Brodhead Family History volumes; I can’t really do justice to it here, and since it’s not my direct line, I don’t know how soon I will likely be returning to it. For anyone interested, the Brodhead Family History volumes may be available at your local library, particularly if you live in the Northeast, or through interlibrary loan. You can also purchase individual volumes from The DePuy / Brodhead Family Association (find them on Facebook).

Have a great day, all! As, always, comments, corrections, and additions welcome.

**************************************************************************************************************

*Source for Luke Brodhead & family: Vol. I of The Brodhead Family, published by the Brodhead Family Assn, 1986, pp. 80-84

**Source for Rev. John Brodhead & family: Vol. II of The Brodhead Family, published by the Brodhead Family Assn, 1986, pp. 143-153.

***Source for Rev. James Pike & family: Vol. IV of The Brodhead Family, published by the Brodhead Family Assn, 1986, pp. 311.

Categories: Brodhead, Civil War, Gen. Lafayette, Lincoln, President Abraham, New Hampshire, Obituaries, Pennsylvania, Revolutionary War | 8 Comments

Isaac Jaques (1791-1880), Manhattan tailor & prominent Elizabeth, NJ, resident

Note: The surname is pronounced “Jay-quiss”; there is no “c”.

Isaac Jaques' calling card

Isaac Jaques’ calling card

On August 25, 1880, the Elizabeth Daily Journal (Elizabeth, NJ) carried a wonderful memorial article about one of my 3rd great grandfathers: Isaac Jaques. He had passed away the day before at the age of 89 and until then had been one of Elizabeth’s oldest and most revered residents.

My grandmother’s sister’s daughter Jennie Belle Coleman typed the article out some 50-60 years ago, and copies were then distributed to family members whose descendants may very well still have one in their treasure trove of family information. Those researching Isaac Jaques have no doubt come across this interesting tribute before, but for the benefit of others who may find this man and his era of interest, I am posting the tribute here. The wealth of information it contains is precious–each time I read it, I pick out something new.  (Note: some of the paragraph breaks are mine for readability.)

Jennie Bell Angus Coleman and daughter, Jennie Belle; Image from my family's private archives of  Jennie Belle Woodruff Coleman with her daughter, 1914

Jennie Bell Angus Coleman and daughter, Jennie Belle; Image from my family’s private archives of Jennie Belle Woodruff Coleman with her daughter, 1914

Elizabeth Daily Journal of 25 August 1880

IN MEMORIAM
****
Mr. Isaac Jaques

As a shock of corn fully ripe, this venerable man, our oldest citizen, has at last been gathered to his fathers, full of years, and in the fullness of Christian faith and hope. Mr. Jaques was born August 8th, 1791, and as he died on the 24th of this month, he had therefore attained the ripe old age of eighty-nine years and sixteen days, Of this long period, about one-half was passed in the city of New York, where he began to live in boyhood , and where he learned the trade and business of his life, which was that of a merchant tailor and clothier. Some forty-three years ago, before the era of Elizabeth’s modern growth had begun, and when it had its old name and stereotyped surroundings of “Elizabethtown”, Mr. Jaques removed hither from New York and purchased the ancient Ricketts property, or a portion of it, with other tracts in the neighborhood of the present “Cross Roads”, where he soon built the house in which he died and in which he lived nearly the whole time of his residence in this place. At that era, there were but few scattering houses between the “old Barber mansion”, which he subsequently purchased, now and long the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Angus [Wealthy Ann Jaques — widow of James Winans Angus], and the Port. But forest trees were numerous, and the road was a rough one indeed, with no sidewalks or attractions for the traveler, either on foot or in a carriage. But the advent of Mr. Jaques in that neglected quarter was the signal of a change for the better, which he inaugurated in person by laying a plank walk for a considerable distance in front of his premises. Time and space do not permit us here to mention other acts manifesting the public spirit and good taste of our aged departed friend at theat initial epoch of this city’s growth, even were we sufficiently familiar with his then history. The story of his early life and the record of his useful and exemplary Christian career, now claim attention and have points of more interest. And as Mr. Jaques was not only very old and a very worthy man, but also a man of rare good sense, extensive experiences of life, large acquaintance with men, great powers of observation and rich reminiscences of the past when among his friends, we may, with much propriety, extend this notice to more length than would otherwise be fitting.

Elizabeth, NJ, US Census map (in public domain - Wikimedia)

Elizabeth, NJ, US Census map (in public domain – Wikimedia)

The writer would also premise that having been favored with some knowledge of Mr. Jacques in early life, where for a few months residing in a friend’s family who knew him and who lived near his store, then between William and Gold on John Street, he feels a special interest in his memory, and desire to do justice to it in the following imperfect sketch. That was in 1826, and we did not enjoy an opportunity of a personal acquaintance until about the year 1870, when beginning our later connection with this city. For the last ten years this has been maintained, during which time we have frequently met with Mr. Jacques in his pleasant family circle, and, occasionally, in the old city, his former home. From his familiar New York, he was never weaned going over daily as along as strength would permit, and particularly drawn thither for many years past, by the honored Fulton Street prayer meeting, where his heart seemed greatly at home, and the consecrated noon hours of which he evidently enjoyed as little entepasts of heaven. Thither he would often direct his trembling steps and age-bent form, when more prudence or less zeal for the Master’s service would have kept him within his own doors. For several years past he has been notably the most aged attendant there, and it would also have been a rare thing to meet an older man walking along alone in the busy streets of New York. But the old gentlemen, though fragile in figure and tottering under the burden of nearly four-score and ten, never seemed to distrust either hinself or the protecting care that guided and guarded him through the friendly eyes and hand of others, acquaintances or strangers.

View near Elizabethtown, NJ, 1847

View near Elizabethtown, NJ, oil painting by Régis François Gignoux, 1847; Honolulu Academy of Arts (in public domain, copyright expired)

Mr. Jacques was a Jerseyman by birth – his native place being our near neighbor-town of Woodbridge, when his father lived at Inbery’s Point, near Woodbridge Creek, two miles this side of Perth Amboy. His father was Samuel B. Jacques, who commanded a Rahway company in the Revolution. He was brother of Col. Moses Jacques, a distinguished officer. The family was of French Huguenot origin. Several brothers came over, one of whom settled on Long Island, one in Connecticut and two in New Jersey. His grandfather was lost at sea on his way to America. The mother of Isaac Jacques was Mary Coddington, a daughter of Jotham Coddington, of Woodbridge. His father died about the year 1798, at Gravel Hill, near Rahway, called Milton. He was in the brick-making business, and built one of the first erected large brick houses on Whitehall Street, New York. His father’s partner in brick-making was James Patton, Aid-de-camp of Governor Livingston during the Revolution. He had a ball pass through his head from ear to ear and yet survived. His father’s brother, Col. Moses Jacques, was also in business with him. The old Jacques homestead and house at Locust Grove, in Woodbridge, is now the property and residence of Mrs. Doketty, a niece of Mrs. Jacques. It is about two miles back of Rahway. There were two farms, one called “the wild cat farm”. Both are in her hands. When Isaac Jacques was a little boy, perhaps seven years old, about the time of his father’s death, he went to live with his grandfather Coddington, near “Hartshorns”, a Quaker, and he had an impression that he then saw Washington as he passed through Woodbridge in a stage. If so, it must have been only a year or two before the death of that great man. Is there any account of his having been on north as late in his life as that?

There were four physicians of the Jacques family. Doctors Moses and John died in New York. We were told by our old friend that he learned his trade of Thompson & Logan in New York. Thompson was an Irishman who married a niece of Robert Lenox, the famous old New York Scotch merchant. A sister of his, Mrs. Tait, died at Lyons Farms a few years ago. His first store in New York was in John Street, near William, and he built a store right opposite. Over his store was a public room where he used to hear Thomas Addis Emmett speak three hours at a time, as also Thornton, and many other eminent orators. Mr. Jacques’ recollections of former citizens of New York were extensive and very interesting. His memory and well-preserved mental faculties generally was remarkable. As to his religious record, he believed that he experienced conversion in early life under the preaching of his father’s pastor, the Rev. Dr. Roe, of the Woodbridge Presbyterian Church, but with confirmed impressions by a sermon of Dr. McDowell in the city of New York. There he regularly attended, and there he heard the late distinguished Dr. Spring, so many years the pastor of the “Brick” church, preach his “trial” sermon. He was an early Sabbath-school teacher, and once in the lecture-room in Rose Street, when he had eleven boys in his class, four of whom became clergymen – the late Rev. Dr. Murray of this city, being one of them. He was converted in the old John Street Methodist Church. Mr. Jacques enjoyed the esteem and confidence of the good citizens of New York. Thus when quite a young man he was invited to take charge of the New York Hospital. It was then located in a large stone building at the upper end of Pearl Street, in Broadway. This position, however, he declined.

This venerable man naturally dwelt much upon past scenes, and respected old landmarks and historical associations, although keenly enjoying present blessings end modern improvements. His walking cane, for example, was from an ancient white oak tree that stood in front of the gate of the Ricketts place, and under which, as he had been told by a number of old persons, Washington and Lafayette once dined together during the Revolutionary War, It was killed by a “wanton girdling”. The visit of the noble Frenchman to this country in 1824-5 as the “Nation’s Guest”, he used to speak of with warm interest. Mr. Jacques’ mother married for her second husband a Mr. Force, a Methodist minister of old Hanover. Of his father’s children, an aged sister, now the only survivor, lies at the point of death at her residence in New York. Mr. Jacques was twice married, first to Miss Wealthy Ann Cushman, of Hartford, Connecticut, and his surviving wife and widow was Mrs. Rebecca Robinson, of Westfield. New Jersey. And now we, too, must bid last farewell to another of earth’s pilgrims long familiar to us by early associations, long before us in life’s crowded thoroughfare, far longer than most men in the active battlefield of duty, more successful than many in winning the day, and yet closing it with no trust in self, but all in God. It was a true euthanasia at last with our aged brother, a peaceful departure from the city of this world, a peaceful victory over the last enemy of our nature, but one long before assured to the faith of his waiting heart – for thus “He giveth his beloved sleep.”

More on Isaac Jaques next week…

Categories: Angus, Coddington, Death, Elizabeth, Union Co., Force, Gen. Lafayette, Geographical Locations, Jaques, New York City, Obituaries, Pitt, Pime Minister William, Washington, President George, Woodruff | Leave a comment

Our Ancestors Who Fought for Independence

Washington at the Battle of Trenton. An engraving by Illman Brothers. From a painting by. E.L. Henry, 1870. Image in public domain due to expired copyright.

This 4th of July, we remember our ancestors who served in the Revolutionary War and, if they were married at that time, the wives who supported them in their service. Yes, nieces and nephews, these patriots are all directly related to you! They are your fifth/sixth great grandfathers!

      • James Angus (b. 1751 in Scotland; d. 14 Mar 1806) Served in Albany County (NY) militia under Colonel Philip P. Schuyler (DAR ancestor no A002822); married Mary Magdaline Baker after the War (in 1781)
      • Lt. Garrett Brodhead (b. 1733 Marbletown, NY; d. 1804 Stroudsburg, PA), served in the Northampton County, PA militia under Col. Brinigh, and served on the frontier. Somewhere I remember reading that he was friends with Gen. LaFayette, but I can’t remember where; I’ll try to search that out. Married to Jane Davis whose father Frederick also served in the War. Garret signed oath of allegiance. (DAR ancestor no. AO14785). Garrett was the brother of Brig. General Daniel Brodhead whose exploits are well documented. The brothers and their siblings and parents were among the earliest settlers of Pennsylvania’s Minisink Valley, having moved there in 1737 from Marbletown, NY, to settle 1000 acres of purchased land. Stroudsburg was initially known as Dansbury, after Garrett’s father Daniel. Another brother, Luke, also served in the Revolutionary War, attaining the rank of captain and serving on the staff of General Lafayette. From the book Colonial Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania: “He [Luke]enlisted in the spring of 1776 as third lieutenant. First American Rifle Regiment, Colonel William Thompson commanding. He was appointed second lieutenant, October 24, 1776, in Major Simon Williams’ regiment. He was wounded and taken prisoner at battle of Long Island. Later he was commissioned captain of the Sixth Pennsylvania Regiment under Colonel Magaw in Continental service. He retired in 1778 incapacitated by wounds received in battle.”

Brigadier General Daniel Brodhead (1736-1809)

      • Lt. Col. Samuel Crow, b. 1741, Woodbridge, NJ; d. 1801 Woodbridge, NJ; Service in NJ militia. (DAR Ancestor no: A028247); married to Elizabeth Potter.
      • Frederick Davis b. 1701, Marbletown, NY; d. 1804 Stroudsburg, PA; Per Sylvester’s History of Ulster Co., NY, p. 74, Frederick signed articles of association for Ulster Co. (DAR Ancestor no: A030300); married to Margerie Van Leuven.
      • Andrew Dingman Jr. b. 1752 Northampton Co., PA; d. 1839 Pike Co., PA. Served in the NJ militia as a staff officer with Captains Van Etten, Nelson, Homer, Westbrook; Took oath of allegiance in 1777. (DAR ancestor no. A032282).  Married to Jane Westbrook. Father of Daniel Westbrook Dingman whose daughter Cornelia was married to Garret Brodhead (1793-1872).
      • Andrew Dingman Sr. b. 1711 Kinderhook, Albany Co. NY; d. 1796 Dingman’s Ferry, Northampton Co., PA. Signed oath of allegiance in 1777; suffered depredations (DAR ancestor no. A032281). Married to Cornelia Kermer. Father of the aforementioned Andrew Dingman Jr.
      • Capt. Samuel Drake, b. 1740 New Jersey; d. 1789 Lower Smithfield, Northampton Co., PA. Served in Capt. Jacob Stroud’s company (4th Battalion) of Pennsylvania militia, 1775, and as captain, 1776. (DAR ancestor no. A033472); married to Sarah Handy.
      • Colonel James Easton (1728-96), was with Ethan Allen at Ticonderoga; commanded a Berkshire County regiment in the Canadian expedition, 1775.  B. Hartford, CT; d. Pittsfield, MA. (DAR ancestor no. A035836); married to Eunice Pomeroy.
      • Normand Easton b. 25 Jun 1758, Litchfield, CT; d. 1806, Greenville, NY; Private; served under Capt. Hine, Lt. Wm Preston, 13th Regiment Militia (DAR Ancestor no: A035842); married Merab Perry after the war.
      • Pvt. Hezekiah Hand, b. cir 1730, d. ante 28 April 1800 in Westfield, NJ; private in the Essex Co., NJ militia, serving under Captain Benjamin Laing. (DAR ancestor no. A050961); married to Nancy.
      • Samuel Barron Jaques, b. abt. 1740, d. 1798 Woodbridge, Middlesex Co., NJ; commanded Rahway Company during the Revolutionary War; married to Mary Coddington.
      • Pvt. Isaac Newman (1731-1808), served as a private in the Associated Exempts of Westchester County at the battle of White Plains. b. Stamford, CT., d. Charlton, N. Y. (DAR ancestor no. A082986); married to Abigail Webb.

Campaigns of the American Revolution 1775-1781 (copyright-free image from Ookaboo)

      • Shubael Trowbridge, b. 1739 Morristown, NJ; d. 1782 Hanover, Morris Co., NJ. Served as a private in Capt. James Keene’s Company, Eastern Battalion, Morris County (NJ) Militia (also known as “The Rams Horns Brigades” (DAR ancestor no. A116272); married to Mary Bayles.
      • David Wait, b. 1754 Edinburgh, Scotland; d. 1810 Perth Amboy, NJ. According to the 1893 Biographical and portrait cyclopedia of the Third congressional district of New Jersey, he came to the colonies as a British soldier, took part in an engagement at Manhattan Island, and was taken prisoner by Americans and retained as a POW in Jamestown, VA, until peace was proclaimed. He then went to Sussex, Essex Co., NJ, and finally settled in Perth Amboy, where he began working as a carpenter in the building known as the “Old Castle” on Water Street, the oldest building in the city. An entirely different account was offered by Harlan Mendenhall in his 1903 book, Presbyterianism in Perth Amboy, New Jersey: “He ran away from his native land to escape service in the army, but the troublous times in America aroused his sympathy and he enlisted in the Continental army. He was captured by the British forces and incarcerated in the Barracks. When peace was declared he became a resident in the city and his descendants are now on the rolls of our church.” Married Irene Bell after the war (in 1784).
      • Johannis Westbrook (DAR Ancestor no: A123311); married to Marie.
      • Capt. Martinus Westbrook, b. 1754, Sussex Co., NJ; d. 1813, Sussex Co., NJ. Served as a captain, 3rd Regiment, Sussex Co., NJ, Militia. (DAR ancestor no. A123311); married to Margaret Lowe.
      • Lt. Elias Winans, b. 1742, Elizabethtown, NJ; d. 1789, Elizabethtown, NJ. Service: New Jersey (DAR ancestor no. A128111); married to Esther Perlee.
      • Pvt. Enos Woodruff, b. 1749 Elizabethtown, NJ; d. 1821 Elizabethtown, NJ; served as a private in the Essex Co., NJ, militia. (DAR ancestor no. A128636); married to Charity Ogden.
      • Major Reuben Potter, b. 1717 Woodbridge, NJ; d. 1799 Woodbridge, NJ; served under Col. Nathaniel Heard, lst Regiment, New Jersey Militia; married to Deborah (last name?, d. Oct 1, 1762).

Happy 4th of July!

Categories: Angus, Brodhead, Crow, DAR numbers, Dingman, Drake, Easton, Fourth of July, Gen. Lafayette, Hand, Jaques, Newman, Revolutionary War, Trowbridge, Veteran's Day, Westbrook, Winans, Woodruff | 1 Comment

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