Fashion & Beauty

Another descendant of the Nixon family of Fermanagh Co., Northern Ireland

My grandmother Zillah May Trewin’s best friend Catherine Mae Roberts, April 1905; they appear together in the 2nd photo from the right.

My grandmother Zillah May Trewin’s best friend Catherine Mae Roberts, April 1905; they appear together in the 2nd photo from the right.

This is Catherine Mae Roberts, one of my grandmother Zillah Trewin’s best friends from childhood, in April 1905. Catherine was a cousin of the Nixon sisters (Jennie & Louise), about whom I have previously written. From the second photo from the right, in which my grandmother appears with Mae, you can tell they were good chums. Fourteen years after these photos were taken, my grandmother would marry Mae’s cousin William Robert Boles whose mother Sarah was a sister of Mae’s mother Jane. Below is a family tree of sorts in the event one of you wants to see the details. (Anyone who wants to help me fill in some of the blanks, please give me a shout at ‘chipsoff at gmail dot com’!)

I love the smiles. And the hats!!! What were they made of?!

{{Information |Description=Advertisting poster for hats for C.A. Browning & Co., Boston. French, 1904–05. France. Lithograph, printed in color, on paper. Anonymous firm. Poster advertising hats for C. A. Browning and Co., 32 Franklin Street Boston. (In public domain is US due to being published before

Advertising poster for hats for C.A. Browning & Co., Boston. French, 1904–05. France. Lithograph, printed in color, on paper. Anonymous firm. Poster advertising hats for C. A. Browning and Co., 32 Franklin Street Boston. (In public domain is US — see below *)

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Courtesy of Fulton History dot com

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Sunday, March 26, 1905 (Courtesy of Fulton History dot com)


1-William Nixon b. Cir 1802, Ireland, d. 10 Aug 1871, Manhattan, New York, 
  New York
 +Rachael Millar b. Cir 1818, Ireland, d. Possibly 10 May 1890, Manhattan, New 
  York, New York, bur. Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, 
  USA
|--2-Edward Nixon b. Cir 1839-1845, Ireland, d. Betw 1889 and 1900
|   +Anna Bracken b. Aug 1847, Northern Ireland, d. After 1930
|  |--3-Jane Bracken Nixon b. 15 Apr 1884, Manhattan, New York, New York, d. 
|  |    May 1972, Ocean Grove, Monmouth, NJ
|  |--3-William Thomas Nixon b. 24 Aug 1885, Manhattan, New York, New York, d. 
|  |    Sep 1967, Suffolk, New York
|  |   +Marion Zoller 
|  |--3-George Robert Bracken Nixon b. 12 Feb 1887, Bridgeport, Connecticut
|  |   +May L. Swenarton b. Cir 1889, New Jersey
|  |  |--4-George W. Nixon b. Cir 1914, New Jersey
|  |  |--4-Frank L. Nixon b. Cir 1919
|  |--3-Louise E. Nixon b. 22 Jul 1889, Bridgeport, Connecticut, d. Oct 1979, 
|  |    Ocean Grove, Monmouth, NJ
|--2-Mark Nixon b. Cir 1845, Ireland, d. 28 Mar 1893, New York, New York, bur. 
|    31 Mar 1893
|   +Mary Quaile b. Abt 1846, Derrintober, Drumshambo, Ireland, d. possibly 25 
|    Nov 1876, Derrintober, Drumshambo, Ireland
|  |--3-Florence Katherine Nixon b. 25 Sep 1869, New York, New York, d. 21 Aug 
|  |    1944, Porter Hospital, Middlebury, Addison, Vermont
|  |--3-Evangeline Roberta Nixon b. Sep 1873, bur. 15 Dec 1960, Green-Wood 
|  |    Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, USA
|      +Joseph Russell Parker b. 29 Sep 1879, d. 1950, bur. Green-Wood 
|       Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, USA
|--2-Elizabeth Nixon b. Cir 1849, Ireland, d. After 2 Jun 1880
|--2-Jane Nixon b. 28 Dec 1851, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 7 Feb 
|    1938, East Orange, Essex Co., NJ, bur. 9 Feb 1938, Jersey City, Hudson 
|    Co., NJ
|   +William Elliott Roberts b. 12 Dec 1842, Enniskillen, Co. Fermanagh, 
|    Ireland, d. 4 Apr 1907, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, bur. Jersey City, 
|    Hudson Co., NJ
|  |--3-William Roberts b. 1876, d. 10 Mar 1942
|  |--3-Charles Benjamin Roberts b. 9 Aug 1878, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 
|  |    14 Mar 1962
|  |   +Grace Yates b. 1882
|  |--3-Edward Roberts b. 1880, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 22 Sep 1951
|  |   +Ruth Deming 
|  |--3-Catherine Mae Roberts b. 3 May 1882, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 13 
|  |    Dec 1966
|  |   +Emory Chenoweth b. 1878
|  |--3-Harry James Roberts b. 12 Dec 1886, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 2 
|  |    Feb 1974, Novato, Marin Co., CA, bur. 8 Feb 1975, Cheyenne, Laramie 
|  |    Co., WY
|  |   +Mary Elizabeth Baldwin b. 21 Nov 1884, d. 3 Feb 1971
|  |  |--4-Paul Nixon Roberts b. 30 Jul 1922, East Orange, Essex Co., NJ, d. 26 
|  |  |    Jan 1941
|  |--3-Herbert George Roberts b. 17 Oct 1888, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 
|  |    19 Nov 1972
|      +Ella Marjorie Harrison b. 1892
|--2-Thomas Nixon b. Cir 1852, Ireland, d. After 2 Jun 1880
|   +Eliza d. Bef 2 Jun 1880
|--2-Sarah Nixon b. 26 May 1855, Ireland, d. Sep 1938, Dublin South, 
|    Ireland, bur. Kentstown Cemetery, Co. Meath, Ireland
|   +Edward Boles b. 4 Jun 1855, Fingreagh Upper, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 24 
|    Oct 1940, Meath Hospital, Dublin, Ireland, bur. Kentstown Cemetery, Co. 
|    Meath, Ireland
|  |--3-Jane Kathleen Boles b. 7 Jul 1889, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 
|  |    5 Jun 1982, Belfast, Northern Ireland
|  |--3-John James Boles b. 10 Jan 1891, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 
|  |    Dec 1935
|  |--3-William Robert Boles b. 24 Feb 1892, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, 
|  |    Ireland, d. 2 Mar 1950, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. 4 Mar 1950, 
|  |    Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union, NJ
|  |   +Zillah May Trewin b. 11 Jun 1883, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, d. 11 May 
|  |    1955, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. 13 May 1955, Evergreen Cemetery, 
|  |    Hillside, Union, NJ
|  |--3-Edward Benjamin Boles b. 9 Apr 1894, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, 
|  |    d. 21 Nov 1970, bur. Clandeboye Cemetery, Bangor, Northern Ireland, UK
|  |--3-Beulah Sarah Boles b. 9 Apr 1894, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 
|  |    1900, co. Leitrim, Ireland
|  |--3-Mary Elizabeth Boles b. 5 Jun 1896, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, 
|  |    d. 26 Jul 1928, Cloneen, near Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland
|--2-Rachael Nixon b. Cir 1856, Ireland, d. After 1886, United States
|   +Charles F. Hodgson 
|  |--3-Elizabeth Hodgson b. 18 May 1886, Manhattan, New York, New York
|--2-Mary Nixon b. Cir 1858, Ireland, d. After 2 Jun 1880
|--2-Benjamin Nixon b. 2 Aug 1862, Ireland, d. 5 Aug 1939
|   +Mary Graham Clark b. 9 Mar 1864, New York, NY, d. 23 Jan 1948
|--2-Robert Nixon b. Jan 1863, Ireland, d. After 1912
|   +Blanche Shaw b. Mar 1868, d. After 1912
|  |--3-Nixon b. Betw 1891 and 1900, d. Betw 1891 and 1900
|  |--3-Dorothy R. Nixon b. Aug 1895
|  |--3-Marguerite Nixon b. Cir 1902
|  |--3-Margaret A. Nixon b. Cir 1906
|--2-Catherine Nixon b. 3 Jan 1864, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. After 
|    Oct 1886
|   +Charles Hugh Larkin 
|--2-James Nixon 
|--2-John Nixon 
|--2-William Nixon

********************************************************************************

*This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published (or registered with the U.S. Copyright Office) before January 1, 1923. This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 70 years or less.

Categories: Boles, Chenoweth, Elizabeth, Union Co., Fashion & Beauty, New Jersey, Roberts | Tags: , , , , | 9 Comments

A Brodhead family New Year’s Eve wedding 170 years ago

One hundred seventy years ago yesterday, a significant Brodhead marital union took place in Pike County, Pennsylvania, in the presence of family and, perhaps, some close friends—I say significant because had it not occurred, I would not be writing this blog, and many of you would not be reading it!

drinks_music copyAnd so, today—New Year’s Day 2016—let’s raise our glasses to that union and remember a very special couple.

On 1 January 1846, a Thursday, vibrant and young 22-year-olds Andrew Jackson Brodhead and Ophelia Easton were waking up as man and wife. They’d just celebrated a family New Year’s Eve wedding the night before, with parents Garret and Cornelia (Dingman) Brodhead, and Charlotte Newman Easton* present, and here they were embarking on Day 1 of their 59-year marriage. They could not have known anything of what the future held for them—not the long marriage, the ten healthy children who all survived and thrived well into adulthood, the ups and downs that any marriage brings, Andrew’s zig-zagging career, and the moves they were to make in life–from the Bushkill, Pennsylvania area, to East Mauch Chunk (present-day Jim Thorpe, PA), and to Flemington, New Jersey–nor the 35 grandchildren and their myriad descendants (two great big thumbs up there). (Many of the aforementioned details were documented in a previous post.)

Godey’s Lady’s Book (1864); Creative Commons license: Public Domain Mark 1.0

Godey’s Lady’s Book – “Going to a Party in Winter” (1864); Creative Commons license: Public Domain Mark 1.0

What was the weather like when they woke up on 1 January 1846? Well, probably cold and probably snowy. Apparently, they’d just endured a brutal cold December; according to p. 71 of The Literary Record and Journal of the Linnaean Association of Pennsylvania College (pub. by The Association, 1846):  “The month of December 1845 was remarkable for the severity of its cold On the first day there was a fall of snow of the depth of nine inches and at various other times during the progress of the month there were others which increased the total amount to twenty-three inches and a half from the very commencement the temperature was greatly reduced and it continued so with but little abatement to the close of the month.”

I am extremely grateful to James and Barbara Brodhead for sharing with me the below images of Andrew & Ophelia as a young couple. Prior to seeing these images, I’d only viewed the pair as a couple in old age. It’s delightful to see them in their much younger years, and it seems highly plausible that these photos were taken specifically to mark the occasion of their marriage. The clothing matches the fashions of that era; long ago, I wrote a post on wedding traditions in which I mentioned that before Queen Victoria started the trend of the white wedding dress, brides wore their “best dress,” so this may well have been Ophelia’s “best dress.”

Brodhead_Andrew_J_young

Andrew Jackson Brodhead, son of Garret Brodhead and Cornelia Dingman (Image copyright: James and Barbara Brodhead)

Brodhead_OpheliaEaston

Ophelia Easton, daughter of Calvin Easton & Charlotte Newman (Image copyright: James and Barbara Brodhead)

It’s fun to think about the planning that commenced once Andrew and Ophelia were engaged. I imagine them thinking about when to have their wedding and deciding to make it New Year’s Eve so they could start their marriage off on such a festive occasion—with the added bonus of never having to worry about forgetting their anniversary ;-). I’ve always thought that Andrew (in his senior picture) had such a merry twinkle in his eyes—perhaps the idea of a holiday wedding was his.

It’s hard for me to imagine Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Jackson Brodhead at a time in their lives when they did not have any children—the fleeting moment in their marriage that lasted all of 11 months and 28 days. So the year 1846 must have been an especially carefree and contented time. And, all these years later, I look back and can’t help but feel very happy for them. Happy 2016, all!

*Calvin Easton died in 1826.

"The Last & Newest London & Paris Fashions 1845 Morning & Wedding Dresses" Steel engraved print with original hand colouring published in The World of Fashion, 1845. Close cropped to left side. Size 17.5 x 21 cms plus narrow margins. Ref F4037 (Credit: ancestryimages dot com)

“The Last & Newest London & Paris Fashions 1845 Morning & Wedding Dresses” Steel engraved print with original hand colouring published in The World of Fashion, 1845. Close cropped to left side. Size 17.5 x 21 cms plus narrow margins. Ref F4037 (Credit: ancestryimages dot com)

"The Last & Newest London & Paris Fashions 1845 Morning & Evening Dresses" Steel engraved print with original hand colouring published in The World of Fashion, 1845. Close cropped to left side with slight loss. Size 17.5 x 21 cms plus narrow margins. Ref F4027 (Credit: Ancestryimages dot com)

“The Last & Newest London & Paris Fashions 1845 Morning & Evening Dresses” Steel engraved print with original hand colouring published in The World of Fashion, 1845. Close cropped to left side with slight loss. Size 17.5 x 21 cms plus narrow margins. Ref F4027 (Credit: Ancestryimages dot com)

Men's and children's fashion, 1848

Men’s and children’s fashion, 1848. Image from U. of Washington Library Digital Collections http: //content. lib. washington. edu (Wikimedia: In public domain in US due to expired copyright)

Categories: 1840s, Brodhead, Fashion & Beauty | 12 Comments

1878: A Fashionable Woman’s Prayer: “Save me from my wrinkles…”

Copy of a Godey’s print, purchased by my mother from McCall’s magazine in 1970. The prints were offered by McCall’s to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Godey prints.

 

From the December 7, 1878, issue of The Independent Hour, Woodbridge, Middlesex County, New Jersey, a weekly newspaper:

“A Fashionable Woman’s Prayer”

Prayer_1Prayer_2

Categories: 1870s, Fashion & Beauty | 2 Comments

Some ‘common sense’ beauty tips from 1910

Los Angeles Herald, 25 December 1910

CLICK to ENLARGE – Los Angeles Herald, 25 December 1910

I got a kick out of these 1910 Los Angeles Herald images showing an early 20th-century American woman really putting her long tresses through their paces.

Holy cow—there’s a lot of fussin’ goin’ on there! But long hair was the style back then, and I suppose caring for all that hair did require quite a lot of effort…

When I looked more closely at this photo assortment, something really struck me. Check out the third photo from the left, up top under the headline… What do you see? A blow dryer! Wow!—and I thought handheld blow dryers got their start in the 60s/70s.

A visit to Wikipedia informed me that the first hair dyer was invented in the late 19th century by a Frenchman named Alexander Godefroy. It was a sit-under version, the type you see at hair salons. Prior to that, apparently many women used vacuum cleaners (!) to dry their hair.

The year 1911 witnessed the first U.S. handheld blow dryer being patented; it was the invention of an Armenian-American named Gabriel Kazanjian. (Go Gabriel!). The first models for consumers, however, did not come out until 1915 (…which makes it hard to explain why this Christmas Day 1910 newspaper is carrying this image! Thoughts anyone?).

woodruff_sisters

Did Grandma and her sisters fight over who got to use the hair dryer first?

As you can imagine, the initial models were heavy (approx. 2 lbs.–real bicep-builders) and cumbersome, and not anywhere near as powerful as the blow dryers of today. It would have taken quite a while to dry tresses as long and thick as these. And the early dryers could be dangerous, overheating or (worst-case scenario) causing electrocution. Thankfully, they have come a long way since then. So next time you power up your blow dryer, which will likely be today or tomorrow (am I right?), say a little ‘thank you’ to Alexander and Gabriel!

To read the accompanying article, which contains all sorts of advice on hair care and growing old gracefully:

Click the newspaper image once and then use Ctrl + to enlarge to your preferred size; or, for a very enlarged view, click the image twice, and use the sliding bars to move to different sections of the page:

Los Angeles Herald, 25 December 1910

Los Angeles Herald, 25 December 1910

Credit: California Digital Newspaper Collection – “A Freely Accessible Repository of Digitized California Newspapers from 1846 to the Present” – California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside; All newspapers published before January 1, 1923 are in the public domain and therefore have no restrictions on use.

Categories: 1910s, Fashion & Beauty, Miscellaneous | 6 Comments

Wealthy Angus’s Trendy Autographed Fan

Godey's 1870 Fashion: May (reprinted in Italy, purchased from McCall's magazine in 1970)

Godey’s 1870 Fashion: May (reprinted in Italy, purchased from McCall’s magazine in 1970)

I don’t know what it’s like where you are, but here it is blazing hot and way too humid. Thank heavens for air-conditioning. Most of our ancestors did not have it as good as we do in that regard. The earliest electric fans appeared in the early 1880s, but they weren’t manufactured for residential use until around 1910. And, of course, you can imagine that while fans offered relief, they were no substitute for the air-conditioners we enjoy today.

So, apart from serving as a fashion accessory, the handheld fan must have saved the day for many ladies, especially when you consider the fashions of the time. (For a history of the fan, visit Victoriana dot com.)

Wealthy Ann Angus

Wealthy Ann Angus

Wooden autographed fans gained popularity in the 1860s, and here is one that belonged to my great grandmother, Wealthy Ann Angus. The fan dates back to 1870-1871, before she married my great grandfather William Woodruff in 1872. It was common for the signers of these fans to leave some sort of verse or message. A couple of signatures appear to have been collected at an Armenian social club. Others, appear to have been collected while visiting Utica, NY, and traveling on some sort of pleasure cruise. A few are clearly from her home town of Elizabeth.

Wealthy wrote her address on the fan: 176 Elizabeth Avenue in Elizabeth, NJ. Somewhat puzzling is the fact that on the opposite side of the fan is written “The owner of this fan Jennie Angus, Elizabeth”.  I have no idea who this Jennie Angus was.  Wealthy’s dad James Angus had a cousin named Jane (b. 1805), but I don’t know if there is any connection there. Wealthy named her first daughter Jennie. Any thoughts, anyone? Well, I’ll leave you to enjoy the images of the fan. Stay cool, all!

Links:
Antique Fan Collectors Association – Museum

Categories: 1870s, Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., Fashion & Beauty, New Jersey, Woodruff | 4 Comments

1870s fashions from Godey’s magazine

Godey's 1870 Fashion: September (reprinted in Italy, offered by McCall's magazine)

Godey’s 1870 Fashion: September (reprinted in Italy, purchased from McCall’s in 1970)

The day after I finished the post on the 1870 letter from Francis Woodruff to his son, William, I found four Godey reprints dating back to 1970 that probably had not seen the light of day since my mom purchased them through the mail from McCall’s that year; they were still in their original cardboard mailing envelope.

From Antique Images website (free clipart)

A Victorian hairstyle from Antique Images

The Woodruffs were well-to-do farmers in Elizabeth, NJ, but whether daughters Emma and Phebe would have been adorned to such an extent at that time, I have no idea. But, perhaps, like many people today who have subscriptions to Vogue and other fashion magazines, the Woodruff girls enjoyed leafing through whatever Godey’s magazines may have been in their possession.

In any event, this is what we ladies may have been wrapped up in 143 years ago had we been members of the upper middle-class—one thing’s for sure, the weight of those outfits would have made them great calorie-burners! (For more on Godey and his magazine, click here. For tips on how to sit in an 1870s Victorian bustle dress or create a Victorian dress of your own (!), visit Historical Sewing.)

Godey's 1870 Fashion: December (reprinted in Italy, purchased from McCall's magazine in 1970)

Godey’s 1870 Fashion: December (reprinted in Italy, purchased from McCall’s in 1970)

Godey's 1870 Fashion: March (reprinted in Italy, purchased from McCall's magazine in 1970)

Godey’s 1870 Fashion: March (reprinted in Italy, purchased from McCall’s in 1970)

Godey's 1870 Fashion: May (reprinted in Italy, purchased from McCall's magazine in 1970)

Godey’s 1870 Fashion: May (reprinted in Italy, purchased from McCall’s in 1970)

Categories: 1870s, Fashion & Beauty, Woodruff | Leave a comment

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