London

Rebuilding London’s Crystal Palace

Crystal Palace General view from Water Temple, 1854. Author: Philip Henry Delamotte, Negretti and Zambra (Wikimedia Commons: PD-Art, copyright expired 70+ years ago)

Crystal Palace General view from Water Temple, 1854. Author: Philip Henry Delamotte, Negretti and Zambra (Wikimedia Commons: PD-Art, copyright expired 70+ years ago)

I just read in The Telegraph of London’s plans to rebuild the famed Crystal Palace, which was built in Hyde Park for the Great Exhibition of 1851 and later relocated to South London. There in 1936, it was destroyed by a massive fire. To view the October 3rd online article & accompanying video clip, which includes animated schematics of the planned rebuild, click here.

You may recall that this blog mentioned the Crystal Palace once before. It was there that famous chemist George S. V. Wills‘ granddaughter Dorothy Hope Wills (m. Frederick James Warren) played piano with the Palace’s orchestra.

A Chinese investment firm is responsible for the redevelopment which will also include the restoration of the vast grounds and gardens. Work is expected to begin in winter 2015.

Once the reconstruction is complete, I imagine it will be extremely exciting for Dorothy’s descendants to visit and get a sense of the wonderful world in which she adored sharing her enormous musical talent with the visiting public.

Dorothy Hope Wills wedding to Frederick Warren, circa 1920

Dorothy Hope Wills’ wedding to Frederick Warren, circa 1920 (Photo from personal family collection of Colin Newton)

Crystal Palace interior during the Great Exhibition of 1851. (Wikimedia Commons: PD-1923 – published before 1923 and public domain in the US)

Crystal Palace interior during the Great Exhibition of 1851. (Wikimedia Commons: PD-1923 – published before 1923 and public domain in the US)

Plan of Crystal Park Palace in 1857 (Wikimedia Commons: Public domain in US; copyright expired 70+ years ago)

Plan of Crystal Park Palace in 1857 (Wikimedia Commons: Public domain in US; copyright expired 70+ years ago)

Categories: London, Wills | 4 Comments

George Sampson Valentine Wills

Just a quick post for this pre-fourth-of-July Monday:

Have a good holiday, all!

Categories: London, South Croydon, London, Wills | Leave a comment

An Update on the Thomas & Sarah Trewin Family of Woolwich, Co. Kent

Two posts ago, I was wondering what became of my great great grandfather Thomas Trewin’s brothers, William and John. There was quite an age difference between the brothers. William was roughly five years older than Thomas, and John was roughly ten years younger. Thomas emigrated to the US via Canada, and I’d thought perhaps one or both of the brothers may have done the same. Well, I am still not sure about William, but I found three World Connect family trees corroborating that John, house and ship joiner, was already married (Sept 1852) to Susannah Barrett Coad of Lambeth (Surrey, London) at the time Thomas Sr.’s will was written and proved. Susannah was also of the Wesleyan Methodist faith as is evidenced by her baptism on August 20, 1832, at the China Terrace Wesleyan Church in Lambeth. Her parents were originally from Cornwall, her father having been born in Polperro, and her mother in Talland.

Cornwall, 1830 Map; Talland can be seen closer to the northeast corner (for map credit, see below)

Census records presumably (I say presumably, because I have not seen these records with my own eyes) indicate that John and family lived at 4 Watkins Terrace, Bow, Bromley, in 1861; at 62 Fore Street, St. Anne, Limehouse, in 1871; and at New Cross, 33 Brunswick Rd., St. Leonard, Bromley, in 1881. The 1871 Census shows Susannah keeping a coffee shop.

Proximity of Polperro and Talland, Cornwall, UK

John and Susannah had nine children according to all three World Connect Trees; only one tree lists the children and that list contains eight children, so I don’t know about the ninth. The eight listed are Sarah, Thomas, Henry, Jessie, William, Merriam, John, and Arthur. By the 1881 Census, Henry is working as a warehouseman, and William as an “asst. measurer” at the docks. Eldest daughter Sarah married Walter James Odgers Jane in Stepney, London, in 1877. She had five children: John, Edith, Mabel, Lillie, and Arthur.

London Map from 1831, with Woolwich, Lambeth, Limehouse, Bromley and Poplar circled in red (for map credit, see below)

My impression is that these World Connect trees were done by individuals researching the Coad family. Unfortunately, they provide no clues that can take us back to prior generations of our Trewin line. I am going to search the census records to see if I can find older brother William. I doubt he emigrated as age and family commitments probably would have ruled out such a huge undertaking, but you never know. Below is an updated tree showing what we now know about the three brothers.

 Thomas & Sarah Trewin Children*  
1-William Trewin b. 23 Jan 1812, c. 23 Feb 1812, Wesleyan Church, Middle Street, Gosport, Hampshire, England
1-Thomas J. Trewin b. 12 Aug 1817, Woolwich, Kent, England, c. 7 Sep 1817, Wesleyan Methodist Church, William St, Woolwich, Kent, England, d. 19 Sep 1875, Elizabeth, Union, NJ, bur. 22 Sep 1875, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union, NJ
|   +Mary Anne Phillips b. 1820, Deptford, Co. Kent, England, d. 30 May 1878, Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey, bur. 2 Jun 1878, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union, NJ
|     |–2-Thomas John Trewin b. 31 Dec 1839, 9 Powis Street, Woolwich, Co. of
|     |    Kent (now Greater London), d. Jul 1913, bur. 31 Jul 1913, Evergreen
|     |    Cemetery, Hillside, Union, NJ
|     |–2-William Trewin b. 21 Mar 1847, Hardin Street, Woolwich Dockyard, Co.
|     |    Kent (now Greater London), England, d. 4 Dec 1916, Elizabeth General
|     |    Hospital, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. 7 Dec 1916, Evergreen
|     |    Cemetery, Hillside, Union, NJ
|     |–2-Elizabeth Trewin b. 12 Apr 1848, 18 Maxey Rd., Plumstead, Charlton, Co.
|     |    of Kent, d. Bef 1857
|     |–2-Emma Trewin b. 4 May 1850, Campbellwell, England, d. 9 Jun 1933, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ,
|     | bur. 12 Jun 1933, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ
1-John Trewin b. 17 Aug 1827, c. 14 Aug 1831, Wesleyan Methodist Church, William St, Woolwich, Kent, England
|   +Susannah Barrett Coad b. 1832, Lambeth, Surrey, London, c. 20 Aug 1832, China Terrace Wesleyan Church, Lambeth, Surrey, England
|     |–2-Sarah J. Trewin b. Abt 1854, Poplar, London, England
|     |   +Walter James Odgers Jane b. Sep 1852, Limehouse, Middlesex, England
|     |     |–3-John W. Jane b. Abt 1878, Poplar, London, England
|     |     |–3-Edith S. Jane b. Abt 1881, Paddington, London, England
|     |     |–3-Mabel J. Jane b. Abt 1883, Paddington, London, England
|     |     |–3-Lillie M. Jane b. Abt 1886, Paddington, London, England
|     |     |–3-Arthur T. Jane b. Abt 1890, Paddington, London, England
|     |–2-Thomas Trewin b. Abt 1856, Bromley, London, England
|     |–2-Henry Trewin b. Abt 1858, Plumstead, Kent, England
|     |–2-Jessie Trewin b. Abt 1860, Bromley, London, England
|     |–2-William Trewin b. Abt 1862, Bromley, London, England
|     |–2-Merriam Trewin b. Abt 1865, Poplar, London, England
|     |–2-John Trewin b. Abt 1867, Poplar, London, England
|     |–2-Arthur Trewin b. Bef 1870, Bromley, London, England

*There were additional children who did not survive to adulthood. See S-U tab of this blog for full tree.

Below are some photos of the children of Thomas and Mary Anne (Phillips) Trewin who left England in 1857. At the time, Thomas Jr. would have been about 18, William about 10, and Emma about 7.

Thomas John Trewin (Jr), bookbinder, son of Thomas and Mary Ann Trewin; Thomas never married and, in his later years, lived with his sister Emma and brother-in-law. (PHOTO COURTESY of Ruth Kirby Dean, descendant)

William Trewin, son of John & Mary Ann Trewin; William married Edith Fry who died after giving birth to their third child; William then married Elizabeth Sargent with whom he had one child, Zillah.

William Trewin, son of John & Mary Ann Trewin; William married Edith Fry who died after giving birth to their third child; William then married Elizabeth Sargent with whom he had one child, Zillah.

Emma Trewin, daughter of Thomas and Mary Ann Trewin

Emma Trewin, daughter of Thomas and Mary Ann Trewin

Jersey City, NJ, where the Thomas Trewin Family eventually settled after leaving England in 1857

Maps from David Rumsey Map Collection Cartography Associates:

  • Cornwall close-up: England IV. Published under the superintendence of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge. Published by Baldwin & Cradock, 47 Paternoster Row, June 15th. 1830. J. & C. Walker, sculpt. (London: Chapman and Hall, 1844)
  • East London close-up: The environs of London. Drawn & engraved by H. Waters. Published by Baldwin & Cradock, Paternoster Row, under the superintendence of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, February 1st, 1832. (London: Chapman & Hall, 1844)
Categories: Bromley, London, Coad, England 1861, England 1871, England 1881, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Lambeth, Surrey, Limehouse, London, London, Trewin, Wesleyan Methodist, Woolwich, Greater London | Leave a comment

The George Wills Line: Some Fresh Information

I was recently contacted by Tim Laker, who lives in England and is a descendant of George Will’s son, Jabez. Tim has provided some fresh information on the Wills line.

First, he brought to my attention the fact that George had all his children baptized in a Wesleyan Chapel in St. Mary-le-bone, London. I don’t recall having heard or read that, but it makes complete sense since George had converted to Methodism and was living in London prior to taking over his father Sampson’s business after the latter’s fatal accident.

Second, Tim alerted me to additional children of Jabez who were missing from my tree: Frederick Arthur and Beatrice. You may remember that Jabez was a stone carver in the tradition of his father and grandfather, Sampson Wills. Frederick Arthur continued in that tradition as did one of his sons, also named Frederick, who died in 1984. According to Tim, the two Fredericks worked together on the restoration of many London buildings including the Houses of Parliament.

And lastly, Tim advised me that he had been doing research on the Family Search site and believes he has ascertained that Sampson Wills’ parents names were Thomas Wills and Elisabeth Rainbow (married 19 June 1761). The marriage date makes it likely that Thomas and Elizabeth were born around 1740. They also resided in the Wolverton, Buckingham, England, area. I love that surname–Rainbow. How exciting to make it back yet another generation! I think Tim may well be right about Thomas and Elizabeth; with a bit of fiddling on the website, I came upon some of Sampson’s siblings and presumably Sampson himself. The tree my grandmother left behind showed Sampson’s birth date as 26 December 1767. A christening on 20 March 1768, as the record indicates, would be very plausible. There was an Elisabeth Wills born the year after Sampson to a Thomas and Elisabeth Wills, but because the birth took place in Bobbing, Kent, and that is a good distance from Wolverton, it seems likely that a different Thomas and Elisabeth Wills were involved there.

1-Thomas Wills b. Cir 1740, Wolverton, Buckingham, England
+Elisabeth Rainbow b. Cir 1740
|–2-Mary Wills c. 17 Jan 1762, Holy Trinity, Wolverton, Buckingham, England
|–2-Wills c. 4 Jan 1763, Holy Trinity, Wolverton, Buckingham, England
|–2-Sarah Wills c. 14 Jun 1764, Holy Trinity, Wolverton, Buckingham, England
|–2-Sampson Wills b. 26 Dec 1767, c. 20 Mar 1768, Holy Trinity, Wolverton, Buckingham, England

Many thanks to Tim for sharing. He promises to fill us in on more as he finds it out!

NOTE: I will be adding more pages to the GSV Wills Memoirs post sometime next week.

Categories: London, Wesleyan Methodist, Wills, Wolverton, Buckinghamshire | 2 Comments

George Sampson Valentine Wills’ Memoirs

Here is George Sampson Valentine Wills’ self-published memoir, A Jubilee Souvenir. The Work of George S.V. Wills and The Westminster College of Chemistry and Pharmacy, which dates back to February 1899. The copyright is expired, so I will be photographing pages (20-30 at a time) and publishing them here. Check back periodically as I will be adding to this post until all 200+ pages are included. For past posts on G.S.V. Wills and his family, please click on the surname Wills in the categories column. Note: Anyone who would like to avoid downloading the pages can contact me via the email address in the About page. I can send the pages to you in zip files.

Categories: Blisworth, Northamptonshire, London, Newport Pagnell, Buckinghamshire, Roade, Northants, South Croydon, London, Stony Stratford, Buckinghamshire, Wills | Leave a comment

Some G.S.V. Wills Descendants

Lucy and George S. V. Wills (photo courtesy of D. Gilbert)

George S. V. Wills and his wife, Lucy, had four daughters and one son (see the most recent post on the well-known chemist and his family). The son’s name was Harry Sampson Wills and he married Lillian Mary King.

Dorothy Hope Wills wedding to Frederick Warren, circa 1920 (photo courtesy of Colin Newton)

The Crystal Palace, copyright-free image from Wikipedia

Dorothy (Wills) Warren (standing) with mother-in-law Catherine Warren and Dorothy’s firstborn, daughter Cathy, 1928 (photo courtesy of Colin Newton)

The pair had two daughters—Dorothy Hope Wills and Constance Gertrude Wills—and two sons—Eric Victor Wills and Reginald Arthur Wills, born in that order. (See the S-Z tab at the top of the blog for dates & scroll down to the “Wills” surname.)

Colin Newton of Nottingham, England, who is Dorothy Hope Wills’ grandson has provided information for this blog post including the two photos pertaining to Dorothy and her family. The first photo is of Dorothy on her wedding day, circa 1920. She married Frederick James Warren. According to Colin, Dorothy played piano with an orchestra at London’s famed Crystal Palace which was built in Hyde Park to house the Great Exhibition of 1851 and later moved to a different part of London, where sadly it was destroyed by fire in 1936. For further details on the Crystal Palace, click here.

Colin says that Dorothy was a fantastic piano player and that her work at the Palace was a defining feature in her life. She was, he says, a larger-than-life character who had a fabulous sense of humor! The next photo was taken in 1928. It is of Dorothy standing behind her mother-in-law Catherine Warren who is holding Dorothy and Fred’s daughter Cathy, their first child and eldest sister to Connie, Margaret, Freda, and Beryl.

Colin has also provided a link to some 1970’s video footage of Constance Gertrude (Wills) Gilbert and Dorothy, her sister, chatting with each other and members of Dorothy’s daughter Margaret (Warren) Newton’s family. To view the clip, click here.

Also on YouTube: Margaret (Warren) Newton’s memories of her aunt Lillian Maude Wills, her reminiscences about her uncle Eric Victor Wills, and her memories of her Aunt Leila, wife of Reginald Arthur Wills. All three recordings were made on November 28, 2011.

Anyone with an interest in or more information about the G.S.V. Wills family line is welcome to contact Colin at e-mail: inclusive (dot) solutions @ me (dot) com.

Categories: Ipswich, Suffolk, London, Wills | Leave a comment

More on G.S.V. Wills

Further to the earlier post about G.S.V. Wills, I am posting a few photographs from his self-published work, The Works of George S. V. Wills and The Westminster College of Chemistry and Pharmacy (dated February 14, 1899). (Note: the initials G.S.V. stand for George Sampson Valentine; George for his grandfather George Wills, Sampson for his great grandfather Sampson Wills, and Valentine because he was born on Valentine’s Day.) According to his preface, the occasion for writing the book was four-fold: he was about to celebrate “his Jubilee Birthday, his Silver Wedding Anniversary, the coming of age of his only son, and the 25th year of the establishment of the Westminster College”.

As time goes on, I will endeavor to scan the book in its entirety for posting on this blog (the copyright is long expired). But for now, here are the few photographs that appear in the book. The first is of GSV Wills with his family. Unfortunately there are no explanations as to who’s who, though he does mention earlier in the text that he married a “Miss Goode” (September 30, 1874) so we can presume that she is seated to his right. Update (12/7/11): from details kindly supplied by Colin Newton, we can do our best to piece together who’s who. Front row: Lucy A. (Goode) Wills, Beatrice A. Wills (b. 1888), G.S.V. Wills. Rear: Son Harry Sampson Wills (b. 1878) is surrounded by his sisters Georgina (b. 1876), Edith (b. 1880), and Lillian Maude (b. 1882). Unfortunately, the sisters are so close in age, it’s hard to guess which daughter is which.

Next are two of the homes he resided in. The first one pictured was located in Southwark. From there, the book says he “removed to Tulse Hill and thence South Croydon”. The other photo is of the South Croydon house. I always wonder whether such buildings are still standing. On a lark, I went on Google Streetview and quickly came upon a house at 27 Croham Road CR2 next to an embankment. I’d be willing to bet that this was GSV Wills’ home. Take a look and see what you think. Even the chimneys of the house next door look identical to those in the book’s photo. I think I have found the one in Southwark as well. Go on Google Streetview to the corner of St. George’s Road and Gladstone Road. It is most definitely the same house. Amazing how we can see what streets look like half way around the world!!!

Lastly, I am including an obituary notice dated May 6, 1932, that I found tucked in the back of the book.

GSV Wills Family

GSV Wills House in Southwark

GSV Wills House in South Croydon

GSV Wills obituary notice, 6 May 1932

Categories: London, Obituaries, South Croydon, London, Southwark, London, Wills | 10 Comments

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