Hartford

Regarding the possible Mayflower connection & “Marcia Toocker Cushman Keney”

Anyone with an ongoing interest in things discussed in my last post (Wealthy Ann Cushman Jaques and the possible Mayflower Connection) should check out page 102 of The Ancestry of Jane Maria Greenleaf: Wife of William Francis Joseph Boardman, Hartford, Connecticut by William F. J. Boardman, a book that was privately printed in Hartford, in 1906. Scroll down to see my red arrow below indicating a Marcia Toocker (daughter of Joseph and Hannah Toocker) who was married to 1) Cushman and 2) Timothy Keney.

I believe this ‘Marcia Toocker’ is the ‘Mary?  Zooker/s?’ (married to ‘Eleazer Cushman’ and then ‘? Keeney’) mentioned in the last post and that this ‘Marcia’ and ‘Cushman’ are the same people mentioned on page 206 of Families of Early Hartford: “Eleasur Cushman died Aug 9, 1795 ae 27 bur Center Church. Widow Mercy Cushman.”

The Cushman family website links this Eleasur/Eleazer buried in the Center Church Ancient Burying Ground to Seth Cushman (1734-1771) whose ancestry is documented back to Mayflower passenger Mary Allerton. The entry for Eleasur/Eleazer contains a bit of possibly conflicting info (e.g. place of death MA, not CT—states close together so the body could have been transported for burial in Hartford; and a wife named Sarah—she would have to have preceded Marcia/’Mercy’, spouse at time of death).

Referring back to the Toocker ancestry, we can see that Marcia was born between 1770 (birth of older sister Rhoda) and 1779 (birth of younger brother Joseph). Sibling Mary (aka Polly) preceded Marcia (‘Mercy’).  Marcia’s year of birth probably lies between  1775-1777/8, perhaps closer to the latter if this is the ‘Mercy Keeney’ found in “Connecticut Deaths and Burials, 1772-1934” on FamilySearch:
Name:     Mercy Keeney
Birth Date:     abt 1779
Age at Death:     70
Death Date:     7 Jul 1849
Death Place:     Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut
Gender:     Female
FHL Film Number:     1313828

So it appears highly possible that timeline-wise, my third great-grandmother Wealthy Ann Cushman (m. Isaac Jaques), born 11 November 1793, in Hartford, CT, is the daughter of Eleasur (Eleazer) and Marcia (Mercy). Now to prove it!  Anyone with thoughts, ideas, please feel free to share. And if/when I make any headway on this, I will let you know.

electa_dtr_jane

Jane Greenleaf Boardman, niece of ‘Marcia Toocker Cushman Keney’ and subject of this genealogical book

toocker_electa

Electa Toocker, Marcia’s younger sister and the mother of the subject of this genealogical book

p98_toocker

p98-99_toocker

p100-101_toocker

p102_toocker

Categories: Angus, Connecticut, Cushman, Hartford, Mayflower 1620, Toocker | Tags: , , | 4 Comments

Wealthy Ann Cushman Jaques and the possible Mayflower connection

View of Plymouth Harbor fall or spring of 1973

Happy Thanksgiving to all this blog’s readers! Thank you for your support and encouragement this past year, and thanks to all of you who have shared information, supplied material for guest posts, or written guest posts yourself.  I have seen this blog continue to help people connect with family members near and far, and for that I am also very grateful.

Today’s post may be of interest to descendants of Isaac Jaques and Wealthy Ann Cushman and it concerns the possible familial link between Wealthy and the youngest of the Mayflower’s 102 passengers—Mary Allerton. (Anyone out there with information on that link, please do get in touch via the comment box below or my email address which appears on the ‘About’ page.)

I had absolutely no idea when I visited Plimoth Plantation at age 12 that I may be related Mary Allerton. I recall wandering that open-air museum on a very cold and raw day, thinking about what it must have been like to get through just one day of life in the 1620s, let alone entire months and years. Brrr—just thinking about it makes me cold. (Ever see the episode of Colonial House where Oprah and her friend Gayle “go back in time” 400 years to experience life in a Maine settlement? See https://vimeo.com/2811969. Again, all I can say is Brrrrrrrrrrr….) Our foreparents were made of extremely tough stuff! (Four hundred years from now, they may be saying that about us, which is hard to imagine given how comfortable life is today, compared to 400 years ago.)

Angus_Job_W_obit 002

Elizabeth Daily Journal obit for Job Winans Angus Jr.

Forward to 2016. You may recall that I was somewhat flabbergasted this past summer to come across an obit for Job Winans Angus Jr. in which it was stated that Job had an ancestor who came over on the Mayflower. A little hand-written note I found from Job’s nephew Thomas Russum seemed to confirm that this was indeed something worth exploring even if it was, perhaps, wishful thinking on their part. The ancestor on whom all this hinged was Wealthy Ann Cushman: wife of Isaac Jaques, mother of Wealthy (Jaques) Angus, and my third-great-grandmother. Thomas’s note mentioned a father Eleazer and a mother Mary Zooker/s with a question mark next to her first and last names. The year of death for Eleazer was given as 1792, again with a question mark. The mother “Mary? Zooker/s?” was noted as having remarried someone named Keeney and having had two children with him: Aaron and Jane. I did find a death record for a Mercy Keeney who was presumably born around 1779. If the circa 1779 birth date is accurate, she would have given birth at age 14/15, so this may be a red herring; if the date is off and she was older when Wealthy was born, this could be the correct Mercy.

I subsequently found, on page 206 of Families of Early Hartford, an Eleasur Cushman listed as having been buried in the Center Church Ancient Burying Ground in Hartford, Connecticut: “Eleasur Cushman died Aug 9, 1795 ae 27 bur Center Church. Widow Mercy Cushman.”  I believe this Eleasur may very well be the father of Wealthy Ann Cushman, who was born in Hartford, CT, on November 11, 1793, and that “Mary? Zooker/s?” was Mercy Cushman, but proving that is an entirely different thing. (Wealthy Ann Cushman married Isaac Jaques on Feb 4, 1812, and they named their second son Eleazer (b. 1820), which may be more than coincidence).

Another thing to prove is the link back from Eleasur Cushman of Hartford to his parents—possibly Seth Cushman (1734-1771) and Abiah Allen. They had a son named Eleazer, born July 17, 1768 in Dartmouth, Massachusetts. If you add 27 years to 1768, you come up with 1795, the year of death of Hartford’s Eleasur Cushman.

life_1904

Life Magazine 1904

The links between Seth Cushman and Mary Allerton (1616-1699; wife of Thomas Cushman, 1608-1691) have all been proven and are all documented.

So the challenge is to definitively connect Wealthy Ann Cushman with Eleasur Cushman and Eleasur Cushman to Seth Cushman. If those connections don’t exist, it will be back to square one. I contacted the Connecticut State Archives hoping for some clues about the Cushman family of Hartford, but they had nothing new to tell me. I also contacted the Mayflower Society (MS), but they had no information on anyone using Seth and Abiah Cushman’s son Eleazer to prove Mayflower ancestry. It is up to us descendants to do it. The MS was very helpful and supportive, so as time goes on, maybe they will help steer me in some fruitful directions.

I know from reading some letters that Wealthy’s daughter Wealthy (Jaques) Angus of Elizabeth, NJ, stayed in contact with Hartford relatives and visited them periodically, but I have found no new clues that would better ID them. Perhaps, someone out there has a box of old letters that contains some answers?

Anyway, we are standing before a brick wall of sorts and hopefully, we’ll figure it all out. Perhaps, in time for next Thanksgiving – 2017? It would be fun to be able to pass this info on to the little ones in the family. We shall see!

Again, best wishes to you all for a very blessed Thanksgiving 2016.

Categories: Angus, Connecticut, Cushman, Elizabeth, Union Co., Hartford, Jaques, Mayflower 1620, New Jersey | Tags: , , | 7 Comments

Wealthy Ann Cushman Jaques (d. 13 Apr. 1856)

The small notice in the New York Times published on April 15, 1856, stated:  At Elizabeth, NJ, on Sunday morning [Apr 13], wife of Isaac Jaques, in the 62d year of her age. The relatives and friends of the family are respectfully invited to attend her funeral, this (Tuesday) afternoon, at 3 o’clock, from her late residence. Apart from the fact that Wealthy Ann (Cushman) Jaques was born in Hartford, Connecticut, I know little else about her. I’ve no idea where she got her interesting name, whether from her mother or another relative, but I do know that she was the namesake for a number of her female descendants including her daughter Wealthy Ann (Jaques) Angus.

I received her church and cemetery death record information in the mail last week from the NJ State Archives. One record came from Robt Boyle, Sexton of the 2nd Presbyterian Church of Elizabeth, who recorded “deaths in the Township of Elizabeth County of Union State of New Jersey, from the 8th day of April 1856 to the 1st day of June 1857”:

Date of death: April 14 [inaccurate according to the New York Times obit. info]
Name of deceased: Wealthy Ann Jaques
Sex of deceased: Female
Married or single: married
Age: 61 years 4 mos.
Occupation: none listed
Place of death: Elizabeth
Place of birth: Hartford, Conn.
Name of parents: Mr. & Mrs. Cushman
Cause of death: Consumption [a.k.a. pulmonary tuberculosis]
Time of making record: 20 March 1857

Evergreen Cemetery records kept by James Arness [spelling?], Superintendent, listed the following:
Date of death: April 13
Name of deceased: Wealthy Ann Jaques
Sex of deceased: Female
Married or single: married
Age: 61 years
Occupation: none listed
Place of death: Elizabeth City
Place of birth: none listed
Name of parents: none listed
Cause of death: Consumption
Time of making record: 16 April 1856

I am glad I sent off for the record. Not only does it clarify the place of burial and the cause of death, but it also helps pin down her previously elusive date of birth to circa 13 December 1794.

Categories: Connecticut, Cushman, Death, Death Certificates, Elizabeth, Union Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Hartford, Jaques, New Jersey, Obituaries | Leave a comment

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