Bayonne

Charles Reginald Brodhead (1886-1899) and a 4th of July injury that spelled disaster

4th of July fireworksAnother sad story, I’m afraid; can’t seem to get away from them. This one dates back to July 4, 1899, a day that was surely a celebratory one for most Americans. But, sadly, injuries that day from toy pistols and firecrackers left a trail of misery for many families whose young boys died or were near death from tetanus within the subsequent two weeks. The area in and around the south shore of Long Island experienced an unprecedented number of cases of tetanus that July, circumstances that were widely reported upon in the NY/NJ newspapers.

This media comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Public Health Image Library (PHIL), with identification number #7220; image is in Public Domain.

This media comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Public Health Image Library (PHIL), with identification number #7220; image is in Public Domain.

Tetanus, a dangerous bacterial infection commonly referred to as ‘lockjaw’, can lead to an excruciatingly painful death if left untreated. It was only in 1924 that a vaccine appeared. Coincidentally the cause of tetanus was identified in 1899, and it was around that time that a treatment was developed whereby serum was injected directly into the brain to relieve symptoms. Today we take tetanus shots for granted, often forgetting our booster shots every 10 years. But tetanus was once a real killer.

One of the boys affected was Charles Reginald Brodhead, the 13-year-old son of Daniel Dingman Brodhead Jr. and Leonora Hubbard, and brother of Clement P., Maude, Mary Ann, and Lenore. (Daniel Dingman Brodhead Jr.’s dad, also named Daniel Dingman Brodhead, was my 2nd great grandfather‘s brother; Daniel Dingman Brodhead Jr.’s brother was the Wm H. Brodhead whose elopement was the topic of a recent post). There are some photos of Daniel and Leonora Brodhead with their three daughters on Ancestry dot com. I have not come across any of their two boys (the oldest son, Clement, died in 1968).

Painted by Sir Charles Bell in 1809; Painting showing opisthotonos in a patient suffering from tetanus (Wikimedia: Image in Public Domain)

Painted by Sir Charles Bell in 1809; Painting showing opisthotonos in a patient suffering from tetanus (Wikimedia: Image in Public Domain)

At the time of the incident, Charles and his family were living at La Tourette Place, Bergen Point, Hudson Co., New Jersey. Charles was injured slightly by a blank cartridge. His wound healed, and he felt well enough to take a steamboat excursion on the Long Island Sound on Friday, July 7. However, lockjaw set in soon thereafter and he was admitted to Bayonne Hospital where he experienced convulsions for several days and was treated with serum, before succumbing to tetanus on Thursday, July 13. He was buried in the Moravian Cemetery in New Dorp, Staten Island, two days later. Note: Anyone researching this family will find Charles’ father Daniel D. Brodhead buried here as well.

Some of the other boys lost to tetanus that summer included:  Joseph Rezhofsky, 13; Martin Breen, 10; Wm. McNulty, 12; Joseph Lavinsky; Samuel Greenburg, 14; Charles Roth, 12; Christian Wm. Ritachel, 15; Gustavus Salinski, 16; Harry Morrisey, 11;  Harry W. Squier, 11; Giuseppe Consumanno, 14; Lionel Briggs; Samuel Charles, 15; John Dowd, 11; and Dominick Stanton, 12.

Sometimes I get the impression that those who die young and/or childless tend to get short shrift when it comes to genealogical research. So I am glad I came upon this information on Charles Reginald Brodhead. The family trees I have seen that include him only contain a date and/or place of birth. It’s good to know what happened to him even if it was tragic. I think it’s important to remember these individuals; their lives were extremely precious to those closest to them; their presence in a family even for a brief time would have created a dynamic unlikely ever to have been forgotten.

The New York Evening Post, 15 July 1899 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Evening Post, 15 July 1899 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Evening Post, 15 July 1899 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Evening Post, 15 July 1899 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Evening Post, 15 July 1899 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Evening Post, 15 July 1899 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Additional Resources

  • July 14, 1899: New York Times, “Death from Lockjaw in Bayonne“.
  • July 14, 1899: New York Tribune, “Lockjaw Baffles Skill. Boys Die in Agony in Spite of Serum Treatment. Doctors Cannot Cope With the Terrible Disease”.
  • July 15, 1899: The Jersey Journal, obit.
Categories: Bayonne, Brodhead, Brodrick, Death, Dingman, Fourth of July, Moravian Cem Staten Island | 6 Comments

Appomattox: Our Links to a Major Historic Event

Surrender at the Appomattox, Palm Sunday, Apr 9, 1865 (Image in public domain)

Well, it’s almost a year ago that I was posting Civil War letters written by the Trowbridge brothers, Uzal (Company A, 1st New Jersey Volunteer Regiment) and his older brother Henry. Uzal did not make it; he was killed early on during the Battle of Gaines’ Mill in June of 1862, a brutal event that shook those present that day to the core of their beings. The loss of Uzal must have been a major blow to the Trowbridge family. Brother Henry entered service shortly after Uzal was killed, in August 1862, serving in the 14th NJ Volunteer Infantry. Somehow he made it through to the end, and went on to marry and have children. I’ll never forget that one letter of his in particular, from February 1864, in which he spoke of wanting to get home for what may be his last chance to see his loved ones. He equated going into battle with being part of a flock of birds under fire. Who lived and who died was all so random:

I am sorrow you cannot give me some excuse to get home. for this winter may be my last chance. if I do not get home this winter, I may never get home.  It is all chance. it is the same as if you shoot into a flock of birds and those you hapen to hit must fall and the rest go on untill the next time and leave you behind. they may bury you and they may not just as it happens and how much time they have to do it. but there is no use in talking we may as well laugh as to cry and base it as we have done so far.

Imagine being my great grandfather William Woodruff, to whom the letter was written. He was only 15 at the time. I know when I was that age, a letter like that would have made a huge impression on me. Without a doubt, such frank talk would have lingered in William’s mind for a long time. Thankfully Henry had a happy ending, though who knows what terrifying scenes must have stayed with him until his passing in 1898 at 63.

Well, why am I bringing this up again? Well, I discovered something very interesting recently. I subscribe to Genealogy Bank and was doing some digging in a Jersey City newspaper called The Jersey Journal. My great grandfather William Trewin lived in Jersey City as did his sister Emma. William met his wife Elizabeth Sargent in Jersey City, and that may well be where Emma met her future husband Francis C. (FC) Ludey. Emma and Francis made their home in nearby Bayonne. William and Elizabeth settled in Elizabeth, a bit further away. Genealogy Bank does not have many New Jersey newspapers, unfortunately. I had been hoping I could access the old Elizabeth Daily Journal, but that’s not on there. But, there is a ton of stuff from the The Jersey Journal, so I was trolling for articles on the Trewins, Sargents, and Ludeys. In the process, I stumbled on an obituary notice for FC Ludey (published 19 Jan 1918) and it mentions that he was present at the Appomattox Courthouse for Lee’s surrender to Grant.  And, as Francis served in the 14th NJ Volunteer Regiment with Henry Trowbridge, something I discovered a while ago and mentioned in this blog at that time, that means (of course!) that Henry was present for the surrender, too. And I thought that was pretty amazing. Talk about having a front row seat to history. Uzal could not be there to witness the end; but at least Henry got to do that for him. So this great historic connection has been there all along, and I am only putting two and two together now. Shame on me, but better late than never I suppose. Still, I cannot help hearing the words of my old high school physics teacher who used to say in response to such a statement: “Better never late.” But that is neither here nor there.

The text of Francis’ obituary reads as follows:
Funeral services for Francis C. Ludey, 73 years old were held at his late home, 75 West 42nd Street last night. Rev. M.Y. Bovard, pastor of the First M.E. Church, officiated. There were present delegations from Bayonne Council, Royal Arcanum, Odd Fellows, and a number of C.A.R. men. Mr. Ludey, being a veteran of the Civil War and present when Gen. Lee surrendered to Gen. Grant at Appomattox. James S. Coward, who was closely associated with Mr. Ludey in affairs of the First M.E. Church Sunday School, was among the mourners.

Francis C. Ludey; this may well have been taken for the Memorial Day event of 1917 at which he was a speaker (Personal Collection of Ruth Kirby Dean)

Included here is a photo of F.C. Ludey, courtesy of his 2nd great granddaughter Ruth Dean. I found an article describing Memorial Day celebrations in Bayonne in May 1917, and Francis was a featured speaker at that event. It may well be that this photo was taken on that very day.

For details of service for the 14th NJ Volunteer Regiment, click here.
For a list of NJ Civil War units, click here.
For the monument to the 14th NJ Regiment at Monocacy, click here.

Categories: Appomattox, Bayonne, Civil War, Grant, Gen. Ulysses S., Jersey City, Hudson Co., Lee General Robert E, Ludey, Memorial Day, Obituaries, Sargent, Trewin, Trowbridge, Woodruff | Leave a comment

Ludey Family Photos

Here is a group of wonderful photos of the Ludey family courtesy of descendant Ruth Dean. It is especially fabulous to see the photo of Frank Jr. who was mentioned in a previous post. How sad to think that he passed away just eight years after this photo was taken and two years after he was married. He was a very good-looking young man. I recently sent off for a copy of his death certificate to learn the cause of death–I have long wondered what took him so early. For more on the Ludey family, click on “Ludey” under surnames in the Categories column on the right side of the blog.

Francis C. Ludey (1845-1918)

Emma Trewin Ludey (1850-1933)

Mary ("Minnie") Emma Ludey (1873-1938), age 21

Frank T. Ludey Jr. (1871-1900), age 21

Categories: Bayonne, Ludey, Trewin | Leave a comment

Trewins, Ludeys, Bonneys, and Cranes

Wonderful Group Photo of the Trewins and Ludeys (note: it is Francis Bonney in the photo, not Harold Bonney as listed)

In this post I am sharing some more photos kindly shared with me by a new found distant cousin, Ruth Dean, a direct descendant of Emma and Francis C. Ludey via their daughter Minnie Ludey Crane and her daughter Metta Beryl Crane. You may remember reading about Thomas Trewin Jr., the bookbinder, in a previous post. He lived for many years with his sister and brother-in-law (Emma and Francis Ludey). Well, finally we have a photo of him! We also have photos of Minnie Ludey Crane with her daughter, Beryl, and Francis and Emma’s other daughter Louise Beryl Ludey Bonney with several of her children–all of these also mentioned in a past post. It is extraordinary to put faces to names. I’m not sure of the dates; the best guideline seems to be to go by how old Metta appears to be. She was born in 1899, so the group shots may be from around 1906-1910. Thomas passed away in 1913 at 73, Francis in 1918 at 72, and Emma in 1933 at 83. They appear to be a very happy, close-knit group.

Thomas Trewin, Emma Trewin Ludey, and Emma's granddaughter Metta Beryl Crane

Mary Ludey Crane and Louise Beryl Ludey Bonney with some of their children, circa 1916 (note: it is Francis Bonney in the photo, not Harold Bonney)

Mary (Minnie) Ludey Crane with daughter Metta Beryl, circa 1900

Metta Beryl Crane, daughter of Mary (Minnie) Crane and Herbert Crane, circa 1906

Categories: Bayonne, Bonney, Crane, Elizabeth, Union Co., Ludey, Trewin | 1 Comment

Francis C. Ludey — new photos

Francis Chetwood Ludey

A recently discovered distant cousin, Ruth Dean, who is a direct descendant of Francis Ludey and Emma Trewin, has kindly provided some wonderful photographs of the family. For this post, I am including two photos of Francis. The first appears to have been taken in his twenties, perhaps shortly after his service in the Union Army ended. The second photo was taken at a much later point in life. He appears to be dressed at least partly in his old Union Army uniform. Those look like a couple medals on his chest. I did find evidence that he was actively involved in activities related to his past service as a soldier in NJ’s 14th Regiment, Company C. The book, Proceedings of the Thirty-Seventh Annual Encampment of the Department of New Jersey, G.A.R., published in 1904, shows that he was involved with Mansfield Post, No. 22, Bayonne (see p. 12).

Francis C. Ludey

We are still searching for information on Francis’s parents, Jacob and Eliza, and any siblings he may have had. The parents were born in the German-speaking part of Switzerland and emigrated to the US sometime before Francis’s birth in 1845. A search of ship records has thus far been unfruitful. Most likely, the original spelling of “Lüdy” was changed to Ludey here in the US. Sometimes I have seen the name spelled as “Ludy”. Perhaps to differentiate from the Irish surname Luddy, the spelling Ludey became more dominant. I find it interesting that Francis’s middle name is “Chetwood” given his German-Swiss ancestry. Chetwood sounds very English to me.

Categories: Bayonne, Ludey, Trewin | Leave a comment

F.C. Ludey and the End of a Family Line

Emma Trewin had married Francis C. Ludey on 15 February 1871 in Elizabeth, NJ. Born in May 1845, Francis would have been 25. Emma, born in May 1850, would have been 20.

F.C. Ludey, age 70

Francis was the son of German immigrants, Jacob and Eliza, whose names I found on the marriage record. If Francis had any siblings, I have yet to find them. I have seen the surname spelled a variety of ways: Ludy, Ludey, Luddy, etc., and this tends to make searches complicated.

Francis served in the Civil War Union Army in New Jersey’s Company C, 14th Regiment, from 26 August 1862 – 18 June 1865. His Civil War Pension Index Card spelled his name “Ludy.” The Find a Grave website has documented his resting place with a photograph of the memorial. The interment took place in January 1918 in the family’s Evergreen Cemetery plot.

It appears that Francis and Emma started out residing in Elizabeth, but moved to Bayonne, NJ, sometime between 1880-1900.

Sunday School March, 7 Jun 1908

Francis was evidently a very devout Christian given his involvement with the Methodist Episcopal Church in Bayonne, NJ, where he served as Sunday School superintendent and head of a Missionary Society. As for Francis Ludey’s everyday life, it appears from the 1880 census that he worked as a gas fitter. The 1910 census described him as a mechanic.

I can only imagine how sad it must have been for Francis and Emma Ludey to lose so many of their children so young. And the loss of son Frank, whose school notebook we found amidst family papers, must have been a particularly devastating blow given he’d made it to adulthood, was just married, and appeared to have his whole life ahead of him. His death eliminated the possibility that the Ludey name would be carried on by a male descendent.

Photo found in Ludey Family Bible; Reverse says either “1886” or “1866” and then “age 47”. Was this the church pastor?

Auxillary Missionary Society certificate with Ludey signature

Ludey Family Bible

Ludey Family Bible Title Page

Date of printing of Ludey Family Bible

Bookmark in Ludey Family Bible: Mrs. FC Ludey “Mery Christmas” in a child’s handwriting

Categories: Bayonne, Census Records, Civil War, Elizabeth, Union Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Ludey, Methodist Episcopal, Trewin, US Federal 1860, US Federal 1910 | Leave a comment

Emma Trewin Ludey

The youngest of the three Trewin siblings was Emma. She was born on 4 May 1850 in England.  I found this date of birth in the leaflet distributed to guests at her funeral.

Emma Trewin Ludey funeral leaflet

According to this leaflet, her birthplace was “Cambellwell,” but I believe this was probably meant to be Camberwell as the former does not appear to exist, and the latter is situated in South London to the west of Woolwich Arsenal, which is where Emma’s father, Thomas Trewin, worked until the family emigrated to Canada in 1857.

Distance from Woolwich to Camberwell

Emma would have been 9 years old when her family relocated to Jersey City, NJ, from Toronto, Canada, where they had been living for the two years following their arrival in Quebec from England. On 15 February 1871, Emma, then 20 years of age, married Francis C. Ludey in Elizabeth, NJ. Together they had six children. I know this because the 1900 Census, which lists her incorrectly as “Susan Ludy,” states that there were six children altogether but that only two were living as of the 1900 Census (Mary Emma and Louisa). The couple spent a number of years living in Bayonne, NJ.

William & Elizabeth Trewin and Francis & Emma Ludey on Holiday, Bethlehem, PA, 1915 (Image from my family’s personal collection)

From what I have pieced together, the children were:

Francis T. Ludey, born in 1871. He married Metta S. Ryman on 18 June 1896 in Summit. NJ. Less than four years later, Francis (aka Frank) passed away. NJ Deaths and Burials shows a Frank T. Ludry passing away in Summit, NJ, on 11 January 1899. The occupation listed was “C Traveller.” I have no idea what that meant, unless “C” meant “Sea” in which case, perhaps he worked on ships? I believe this “Ludry” spelling to be a typo as “r” and “e” are neighbors on the keyboard and the birth year listed in the record (1871) fits with census records that estimate the year of birth as 1872. Our old family cemetery records show a Frank Ludey being buried in the family plot in Evergreen Cemetery on 13 January 1900. Perhaps the family had the year mistakenly written down as 1900? I have not checked with the cemetery yet. But in any case, a death on the 11th of the month would make a burial on the 13th plausible. (Update 4/14/12: see later posts on Frank T. Ludey which include cause of death)

Online, I found Metta working as a kindergarten teacher in 1896, as staff librarian at Pratt Institute in 1901, and from 1915-1920 working as the librarian-in-charge at Jarvie Memorial Library in Bloomfield, NJ. The 1920 Census shows her as a widow living with her parents in Essex, NJ. She died on 8 July 1952 and was buried with her parents, Charles S. Ryman and Mary Wells, in Milford Cemetery, Milford, Pike Co., PA. The grave can be found on Find a Grave’s website. I believe Metta lived most of her adult life as a widow since women back then typically gave up employment upon getting married and she obviously developed quite a career as a librarian. And being buried with her parents would also indicate she had lived most of her life as a single person. I would certainly be interested in knowing more about Frank Ludey and how/why he passed away so young. Update (1/3/2012): see photo of Frank in later post; click here.

Mary Emma Ludey (aka “Minnie”), born on 5 February 1873, in Elizabeth. She is also buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Hillside. Minnie was married twice, first to Herbert Duryea Crane (a life insurance salesman per the 1900 census; you must open the original census document to find that out) in Bayonne, NJ, on 23 September 1897 (I just love the NJ Marriage record which has his first name spelled “Herebert” and her surname spelled “Lendey”! See why you have to be creative with your searches?!). They had a daughter named Metta Beryl who was born in 1899. Minnie eventually divorced and was living at 17 West 32nd Street in Bayonne, NJ, when she met and married her second husband Lynn Everett Jennison, a professor of history at Bayonne High School, in April 1916. According to the announcement in the NY Times, Professor Jennison was Minnie’s daughter’s instructor and they became acquainted during a parent-teacher conference to discuss the daughter’s progress. The article refers to the daughter as May. I do not know yet whether this was daughter Metta Beryl’s nickname which she may have gone by in everyday life.  The Professor, who’d been a widower, had two daughters from his first marriage with Hestis Jennison: Eleanor S. Jennison (b. circa 1905) and Amelia W. Jennison (b. circa 1906). The 1920 Census showed the couple living in Bayonne. By 1930 they had relocated to Elizabeth, NJ. Mary Emma Ludey passed away on 20 October 1938 at the age of 65.  Lynne Jennison survived her by almost 30 years. He passed away in Duval, Florida, in June 1967 at the age of  88.

Louise Beryl Ludey was born circa 1875 in Union Co., NJ. She married George Bonney (b. 1873) on 13 January 1894 in Port Richmond, NY. The 1900 Census shows a son Harold L. Bonney (b. 1896) and Dorothy B. Bonney (b. June 1898; married Jonathan Beltz; daughter Elenor, b. 1929). At the time the family was living in Bayonne City, Hudson Co., NJ, and George was working as a boiler maker. In addition, Rhode Island Births and Christening records show a son, Francis George Bonney, born on 24 November 1905. The 1910 Census shows the family still living in Providence, Rhode Island, with George still working as a boiler maker.

William W.F. Ludey was born on 11 July 1877 in Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ. According to cemetery records he was buried that same day. See below.

Another child was born on 16 September 1878 per NJ Births and Christening records. Though no name is given in the record, I believe this was Anna L. Ludey who was buried on 28 December 1878. Our family cemetery records state that William W.F. Ludey and Anna L. Ludey died very young and were buried with their grandparents, one child sharing the plot with grandfather Thomas J. Trewin, and the other child sharing a plot with grandmother Mary Phillips Trewin.

Note: The 1880 Census for “Frank Ludy” and Emma Ludy” shows a daughter Lulu Ludey born in 1876. I suspect that “Lulu” and Louisa may be one in the same person. Or Lulu could have been the sixth child about whom Emma Ludey referred in the 1900 census.

___________________________

Emma lived with her daughter Mary Emma “Minnie” Jennison and Mary’s husband Lynn Jennison after Francis Ludey passed away, in Bayonne, NJ, and then in Elizabeth, NJ. Emma died at age 83 on 9 June 1933 in Elizabeth, NJ. She was buried three days later in Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, alongside her husband Francis C. Ludey. Some more about him in the next post.

Emma Trewin Ludey, obituary notices

Categories: Bayonne, Census Records, Elizabeth, Union Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Jennison, Ludey, Obituaries, Ryman, Trewin, US Federal 1880, US Federal 1900, US Federal 1910, US Federal 1920 | Leave a comment

Thomas Trewin Jr. — Bookbinder

Traveling on the ship Ion was also Thomas (12/1839 – 7/1913), son of Thomas Trewin and Mary Anne Phillips. He would have been 18 at the time of the trans-Atlantic crossing and 20 when the family relocated to Jersey City, NJ. His date of birth I found in the 1900 Census. His name was transcribed (incorrectly) as “Thomas ? Frenen.”  His date of death is based on family burial records, showing he was buried in Evergreen Cemetery on 31 July 1913 in the Trewin family plot. He was 73.

I don’t know a lot about Thomas. The 1885 NJ state census shows him living with his sister Emma and her husband Francis C. Ludey in Bayonne, Hudson Co., NJ. According to 1900 and 1910 Census records, he was still residing with Emma and Francis in Bayonne. His status, when listed, was single. He may have lived with is parents until their passing in the late 1870s and then moved in with Emma who had married in 1871. So it could well be that Thomas never married. The 1910 Census lists his occupation as “Bookbinder.”

That unfortunately is about all I know about Thomas. He was active in the religious life of his church as is evidenced by his signature on the below document, a certificate for an auxiliary missionary society of the Methodist Episcopal Church dated 1877. Thomas Trewin served as Secretary and Francis C. Ludey as President. The certificate is for Ludey’s son, Francis T. Ludey. Update: 12/11, please see this follow-up blog post with photos of Thomas!

Auxillary Missionary Society certificate with Trewin signature (Image from my family’s personal collection)

Categories: Bayonne, Census Records, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Ludey, Methodist Episcopal, New Jersey 1885, Trewin, US Federal 1900, US Federal 1910 | Leave a comment

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