Flemington

Obits for James Easton Brodhead (1851-1943) & son Nathaniel (1891-1956)

Brodhead_JE_obit

James Easton Brodhead

James Easton Brodhead

Today I’m posting a couple of obits saved by my grandmother—one for James Easton Brodhead, who lived until the ripe old age of 92, and one for his son Nathaniel Boyd Brodhead (1891-1956) who sadly was not so fortunate in the longevity department. He died at age 64 of a heart attack while aboard a Naples-bound train in Lakeland, Florida.

Other sons died fairly early as well. John Romeyn Brodhead (1880-1936) died of a heart attack in May 1936 while playing tennis in Flemington, NJ. He was just 55. And brother Walter died in the same year as his father. He was 65. I don’t know the circumstances of his death.

Please see past post(s) for more about this family.

Brodhead house

James Easton Brodhead family residence on Main Street in Flemington, Hunterdon Co., NJ

Brodhead_NB_obit

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Categories: Brodhead, Connecticut, Death, Flemington, New Jersey, Obituaries, Stamford | 2 Comments

May 6, 1912, poem commemorates Andrew Jackson Brodhead’s 90th birthday

Andrew Jackson Brodhead

Andrew Jackson Brodhead

This coming Friday, May 6, is the anniversary of Andrew Jackson Brodhead‘s birth in 1822. Below is a copy of a poem his daughter Emily wrote for him to mark his 90th birthday, in 1912. By then his wife Ophelia (d. 1905) and son Calvin (d. 1907) had passed away, and she makes reference to them in her verse.

At the time, Andrew was living with his daughter Mrs. Franklin C. Burk (Charlotte) in Flemington, NJ, the town he and Ophelia had called home since 1884. Many people, including his nine remaining children, paid their respects to him that special day, whether in person or by telegram, letter, or postcard. He was very well known in the community and much admired for his positive outlook on life and cheerful demeanor.

Brodhead_AJ_90th_birthday2

Categories: Anniversaries, Brodhead, Flemington | Tags: | 1 Comment

A 1915 Brodhead family road trip

Cover

1915 AUTOMOBILE TRIPS AND SIGHT-SEEING GUIDE (Used with permission of mapsofpa.com)

I love the little morsels that can be gleaned from old newspapers (and the fact that old newspapers published personal tidbits that would never make it into today’s papers). Here’s a little morsel about a road trip taken in October 1915 by three of A. J. Brodhead & Ophelia Easton Brodhead‘s surviving adult children: Garret Brodhead (67), Jean Struthers (Brodhead) Blakslee (57), and Charlotte Elizabeth (Brodhead) Burk (60).

Trenton Evening Times' Flemington news section --- 24 October 1915

Trenton Evening Times‘ Flemington news section — 24 October 1915

Along for the ride were their brother James Easton Brodhead‘s wife (Harriet Locklin Boyd) and youngest son (Nathaniel Boyd Brodhead – 24), Garret’s wife Annie Kocher, Jean’s husband Charles Blakslee, and Charlotte’s husband Franklin C. Burk. Destination — Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. This was two years after the 50th anniversary events took place at the historic battleground.

Charlotte E. Brodhead Burk

Charlotte E. (Brodhead) Burk

Jean Struthers Brodhead

Jean Struthers (Brodhead) Blakslee

Garret Brodhead

Garret Brodhead

Overland Model 82 Touring 1915 |Source: Wikimedia: contributed by author Lglswe on 2008-08-09

Overland Model 82 Touring 1915 |Source: Wikimedia: contributed by author Lglswe on 2008-08-09

The distance from Flemington to Gettysburg is about 168 miles. Today, it’s a 2-hour and 40-minute journey. Back in 1915 (see map below—click to enlarge), I imagine it must have taken quite a bit longer given road conditions and vehicle capabilities. Of course, we don’t know what they were driving. I perused the vehicles showcased on the Early American Automobile website, which has many amazing vehicles on display, and my eyes settled on the 1915 Overland Model 82 Touring Automobile. Imagine taking a road trip over the roads of that era in a setup like that. An earlier vehicle, the 1909 Thomas Flyer 6/40 Touring car, is shown inset to give you an idea of what a packed touring car could look like. They could really ‘pack ’em in’—the more the merrier, I suppose, especially since getting stuck in muddy unpaved roads was more of a possibility back then, and you’d need plenty of man- and woman-power to get out of a jam. But hopefully the weather was fine and dry and the Brodhead contingent had only to admire the autumn leaves and the splendid scenery as they made their way to Gettysburg!

Overland automobile 1909

Advertisement for the Overland 1909

Osborne Auto Party, Salt Lake City, 1909. Car is a 1909 Thomas Flyer 6/40 Touring car with optional wind screen. (Source: WIkimedia Commons, Photographer:Shipler Commercial Photographers; Shipler, Harry. First published circa 1909.

Osborne Auto Party, Salt Lake City, 1909. Car is a 1909 Thomas Flyer 6/40 Touring car with optional wind screen. (Source: WIkimedia Commons, Photographer:Shipler Commercial Photographers; Shipler, Harry. First published circa 1909.

 The Official Automobile Bluebook 1914, Volume 3 New Jersey-Pennsylvania and Southeast

Map (cropped) – from The Official Automobile Bluebook 1914, Volume 3 ,New Jersey-Pennsylvania and Southeast. I’ve added pink arrows to highlight the two locations. (Used with permission of mapsofpa.com)

The below clip is from YouTube (published by manowaradmiral on June 7, 2012). If you go to the YouTube page the contributor has posted a lengthy, interesting description of the 1915 Overland Model 80’s specifications and capabilities. Click here.

An aerial view of Gettysburg from the observation tower on Oak Hill, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 1909. Caption [back side of the post card] reads:

An aerial view of Gettysburg from the observation tower on Oak Hill, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 1909. Caption [back side of the post card] reads: “Immediate foreground was scene of first day’s Battle; across the plain Ewell hurled the main body of his corps on the Federal column, which was driven through the Streets of Gettysburg, but reformed on the unconquered heights of Cemetery Hill. Culps Hill shows to the left: Cemetery Hill in centre background; The Round Tops to the right.” Postcard number: 221. (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Devil's Den — Gettysburg National Military Park, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Dansk: Devils Den, Library of Congress,LC-USZ62-40269, foto fra 1909 (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Devil’s Den — Gettysburg National Military Park, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.
Dansk: Devils Den, Library of Congress,LC-USZ62-40269, foto from 1909 (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Postcard collection of the Presbyterian Historical Society (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

Postcard collection of the Presbyterian Historical Society (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

Categories: Auto touring, Brodhead, Flemington, Gettysburg, New Jersey, Pennsylvania | 2 Comments

James Easton Brodhead’s fish story – summer 1916

James Easton Brodhead

James Easton Brodhead – image from my family’s personal collection

Just a quick post to share a little article “A Fisherman’s Scales” which I came across online and found rather funny. It’s from Fur-Fish-Game Volumes 23-24 (A. R. Harding Publishing Company, 1 January 1916) and gives a bit of a glimpse into the life of my great-grandfather A. D. Brodhead’s brother James Easton Brodhead who lived in that grand house in Flemington, NJ, and about whom I wrote in a past post. I imagine that once this little piece was published, his siblings (those still alive at that point) and children gave him a bit of a razz. James would have been about 68 at the time, and likely went on to catch many more fish. He was child number four of A. J. Brodhead and Ophelia Easton‘s ten children but he outlived all of them, dying on 10 November 1943 at the ripe old age of 92. Enjoy the fish story and feel free to share one of your own in the comment box below!

Do not tell fish stories where the people know you; but particularly, don’t tell them where they know the fish. ~Mark Twain

Fur_News_Aug_1916

Fur-Fish-Game Volumes 23-24 (A. R. Harding Publishing Company, 1 January 1916) – CREDIT: Google Books

salmon_flies

Salmon and Sea Trout Flies from Fly Fishing (1899), Sir Edward Grey, 1920 edition (Wikimedia – Public domain in US)

 

Categories: Brodhead, Fishing, Flemington, Hobbies and Pastimes, Nature | 8 Comments

New Year’s Eve 1895: An Unbroken Family Celebrates a 50th Wedding Anniversary

James E. Brodhead's palatial home in Flemington, NJ, where celebrations took place on New Year's Eve

James E. Brodhead’s palatial home in Flemington, NJ, where celebrations took place on New Year’s Eve

After bombarding my readers with posts on a variety of disasters, tragedies, and scandals (please accept my apologies!), finally some good news. I’ve come upon a little news brief marking the 50th wedding anniversary of my 2nd great grandparents, Andrew Jackson Brodhead and Ophelia Easton Brodhead. It was a remarkable gathering in that all 10 of their children were present—quite a feat considering all the illnesses around back then that could easily have diminished the family’s size. The article described the odds of such a gathering as being one in 100,000. Of the 12 family members, mother Ophelia was the first to pass away–on 26 April 1904. Had she made it another 20 months, the family would have achieved an astounding 60 years of togetherness, but 58 years is still pretty darned good!

(Note: The article incorrectly states that Andrew J. Brodhead was a direct descendant of Gen. Daniel Brodhead of Revolutionary fame. He was a direct descendant of the General’s brother, Garret.)

New York Press, 2 January 1896 (credit: www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Press, 2 January 1896 (credit: http://www.fultonhistory.com)

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904 (Names and dates added by me)

Categories: Anniversaries wedding, Brodhead, Easton, Flemington, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe) | 5 Comments

The James Easton Brodhead Flemington, NJ, home

All mopped up!

Lady, I know how you feel!

I hate cleaning, don’t you? Because cleaning has always seemed to land on my shoulders, I often wonder (well, not too often, but I do occasionally wonder) how others — including those who lived in different centuries — have managed with their household chores. Clearly those who could afford help, procured it. Manor homes and estates had armies of help behind the scenes. Britain’s “Downton Abbey” comes to mind. Our Gilded Age was the American equivalent–a period when having domestic workers signaled one’s wealth and upward mobility. As for my ancestors–no major estates or mansions discovered so far, sadly, although if I go wayyyyyyy back, we do have a link with Holy Roman Emperor Charlemagne (742-814), and some Welsh princes and kings. In census records, I have seen an occasional household helper recorded as residing with some of my ancestors or their extended family. Just every once in a while; usually 1, rarely 2. I presume the vast majority of my female ancestors spent plenty of time engaged in household chores, although perhaps if they had 6-16 kids, as was frequently the case, they could delegate plenty of their “favorite” tasks to the children. Sounds perfect to me.

James E. Brodhead house, Flemington, NJ

James E. Brodhead home: the grounds, Flemington, NJ

James E. Brodhead house, Flemington, NJ

James E. Brodhead house, Flemington, NJ

James Easton Brodhead

James Easton Brodhead

The only one in our not-too-distant tree who comes immediately to mind in terms of having a sizable home and a seemingly nice level of household help was James Easton Brodhead (b. 1851), brother of my great grandfather Andrew Douglas Brodhead. James was a very successful businessman, who lived with wife Hattie Boyd in Flemington village, Hunterdon Co., NJ. The house they lived in on Main Street still stands today–it appears to be home to a business or two; it’s a grand, three-story Victorian home with an expansive wrap-around porch and, in its heydey had lovely grounds. James and Hattie had four sons, Walter Easton, John Romeyn, Frederick Moon, and Nathaniel Boyd. As a boy, my father remembered watching his parents head off to Flemington to “Uncle Jim’s” for grand holiday parties that were always big family occasions (James had 9 siblings) and very much looked forward to. When Hattie died in 1935, James donated seven Tiffany stained-glass windows to the Flemington Presbyterian Church in her memory. I imagine they may be some of the ones visible in the main photo on the church’s website.

In 1910, the census shows the couple as having three live-in domestic workers–a cook, a waitress, and a chambermaid. Perhaps there were other household helpers who came during daytime hours. I have a feeling Hattie did not have to do much cleaning or dusting in that house! In 1930, census records show three live-in workers residing with them. By that time, the kids had all flown the coop, but no doubt they returned often to visit, together with their spouses and children.

James E. Brodhead house, Flemington, NJ

James E. Brodhead house, Flemington, NJ

Main Street, Flemington, NJ, circa 1904

Main Street, Flemington, NJ, circa 1904

Upon his passing at 92, James E. Brodhead’s obituary was published as a special to The New York Times, on November 11, 1943. He was a year older than my great grandfather but outlived him by some 26 years. James may well have outlived all his nine siblings. I know for sure that he outlived 6 of them (Andrew, Richard, Calvin, Emily, Jean, and Andrew); I don’t have dates of death for the others. None are mentioned in the obituary, so perhaps that’s a clue.

James Brodhead, 92, Helped Build U.P.
Flemington’s Oldest Resident Worked on Railroad as a Boy
Special to the New York Times

Flemington, NJ, Nov. 10 — James E. Brodhead, Flemington’s oldest resident, died this morning in his home at age 92. He began his career in a construction camp of the Union Pacific Railroad in 1867, two years before that line, the first transcontinental system, was opened to the Coast. He continued in that field until 1879, when he entered business for himself as a wholesale dealer in heavy lumber and railroad cross-ties, retiring in 1911.

For thirty years, Mr. Brodhead was a member of the Maritime Exchange in New York and served on its board of arbitration, and for a similar period he was vice president of the Trenton Potteries Company. He was formerly president of the Prospect Hill Cemetery Association here.

Before the incorporation of the borough, in 1910, Mr. Brodhead served as a village trustee. When the high school was erected in 1915 he was a member of the Board of Education and donated the kitchen equipment for the home economics department. Mr. Brodhead was born in Bushkill, Pike Co., Pa., and was a son of the late Andrew Jackson Brodhead and Mrs. Ophelia Easton Brodhead.

On May 1, 1877, he married Harriet Lochlin Boyd who died in 1935. They had four sons, Frederick Moon Brodhead of Manchester, Mass., Nathaniel Boyd of Stamford, Conn., Walter Easton Brodhead who died this year, and Romeyn Brodhead, who died in 1936.

You can find James, Hattie and some of their children listed on Find a Grave. Interestingly, son Nathaniel planted the seed for Parade magazine!

That’s all for now. Time to go put that robotic floor cleaner to work!

Categories: Brodhead, Flemington, Miscellaneous, Prospect Hill Cemetery Flemington NJ | 4 Comments

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904, (watermark and labeling added by me)

You may recall a previous post about Robert Packer Brodhead in which I related that much material was available about the Brodhead family from the book Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania. We are very fortunate to have a large framed photo display of Robert’s father and mother, Andrew Jackson Brodhead and Ophelia Easton, together with Robert’s nine siblings. The display was assembled in Flemington, NJ, in 1904, and must have been compiled in the early part of the year since Ophelia passed away that April, some 18 months shy of what would have been her and her husband’s 60th wedding anniversary. Son Calvin died several years later, in 1907, from gastritis*. Andrew Jackson Brodhead died at 91 in 1913. So this assembly of photos is a wonderful thing to have.  My great grandmother Margaret Lewis Martin can be credited with identifying each person. She died in the mid-1940s but at some point before then created a diagram showing who was who, and attached it in an envelope to the reverse side of the frame.

Andrew Jackson Brodhead

Andrew Jackson Brodhead

Brodhead_Ophelia_Easton

Ophelia Easton Brodhead

Below in italics is material on the Andrew Jackson & Ophelia (Easton) Brodhead family excerpted from John W. Jordan’s 1911 book, Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania, in three volumes, published by Lewis Publishers of New York. Note: I cropped the individual photos from the compiled version above; also, please note that Mauch Chunk in Carbon County, Pennsylvania, is now known as the town of Jim Thorpe. Click the preceding link to peruse the interesting materials on the Mauch Chunk Historical Society’s website.

Andrew Jackson Brodhead, third son of Garret and Cornelia (Dingman) Brodhead, was born in Northampton (now Pike county), Pennsylvania, May 6, 1822. He received his early education in the common schools of the towns in which his parents lived, at the Dingman Academy, and a term at the Stroudsburg Academic School. He taught school one year, and in 1850 began working in Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania, where he removed his family in 1851. From 1851 to 1857 he was employed as clerk and bookkeeper, and for five years was in business with a partner, repairing cars used by the pioneer coal company of that region. About 1861 Mr. Brodhead began shipping coal for other producers, and in 1877 opened a general store at Hickory Run, Pennsylvania, where he lived until 1883, when he returned to Mauch Chunk. In 1884 he removed to Flemington, New Jersey, his present home. In 1868-69 he was treasurer of Carbon county, Pennsylvania, for several years he was school director of East Mauch Chunk, and served as justice of the peace.

Calvin Easton Brodhead

Calvin Easton Brodhead

1. Calvin Easton, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, December 27, 1846; married (first) December 6, 1870, Laura Clewell Leisenring, born at Mauch Chunk, August 9, 1848, daughter of Alexander William and Ann (Ruddle) Leisenring.  They had Anna Leisenring, born November 12, 1871; Emily Easton, born November 3, 1872; Alexander William, January 1, 1874; married (second) at Oakville, Canada, Mary Lewis, who died March 31, 1905.

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Garret Brodhead

Garret Brodhead

2. Garret, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, February 11, 1848; married, September 17, 1872, Annie Kocher, born in Mauch Chunk, August 25, 1849, daughter of Conrad and Catherine (Wasser) Kocher.  Seven children: Conrad and Andrew Jackson (twins), born July 19, 1873; Alonzo Blakeslee, December 26, 1875; Calvin Easton and Laura Leisenring (twins), born September 21, 1878; Ruth Randall, born March 7, 1884; and Garrett, born January 3, 1888.

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John Romeyn Brodhead

John Romeyn Brodhead

3. John Romeyn, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, June 11, 1849; married, November 13, 1882, Mary Martha Holbert, born in Chemung, New York, March 22, 1858, daughter of Joshua Sayre and Catherine Van Houton (Ryerson) Holbert.  They had Henry Holbert, born September 29, 1883, and Arthur Sayre, born November 26, 1886.

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James Easton Brodhead

James Easton Brodhead

4. James Easton, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, February 22, 1851; married, May 1, 1877, Hattie Lochlin Boyd, born July 11, 1852, daughter of Nathaniel and Jane (Curran) Boyd.  They have Walter, born March 9, 1878; John Romeyn, born September 25, 1880; Frederick Moon, born July 31, 1883; and Nathaniel Boyd, born June 22, 1891.

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Andrew Douglas Brodhead

Andrew Douglas Brodhead

5. Andrew Douglass [misspelling by author, should be Douglas], born in Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania, August 17, 1852; married Margaret Lewis Martin, born January 15, 1859, daughter of Moses and Sarah Augusta (Lewis) Martin.  They have Edith Easton, born November 3, 1879; Frank Martin, born February 5, 1882; Lewis Dingman, born October 5, 1884; Andrew Jackson, born October 3, 1886.

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Charlotte E. Brodhead

Charlotte E. Brodhead

6. Charlotte Easton, born in Mauch Chunk, December 11, 1855; married, October 5, 1887, Franklin Clark Burk, born in Flemington, New Jersey, April 8, 1853, son of Peter Wilson and Clarinda (Bellis) Burk.

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Jean Struthers Brodhead

Jean Struthers Brodhead

7. Jean Struthers, born in Mauch Chunk, November 21, 1857; married, October 15, 1885, Charles Ashley Blakslee, born in Mauch Chunk, July 4, 1859, son of James Irwin and Caroline Jones (Ashley) Blakslee.  They have Gertrude Easton, born June 21, 1887, and Ophelia Easton Blakslee, born January 9, 1895.
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Robert Packer Brodhead

Robert Packer Brodhead

8. Robert Packer, see forward [of book].

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Emily L. Brodhead

Emily L. Brodhead

9. Emily Linderman, born in East Mauch Chunk, June 1, 1862; married Frederick Moon, born September 30, 1851, son of Samuel and Matilda White Moon. They have Frederick Wiles Moon, born July 27, 1882.

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Richard H. Brodhead

Richard H. Brodhead

10. Richard Henry, born in East Mauch Chunk, November 4, 1864; married, March 6, 1890, Jane Vanderveer Smock, born October 15, 1861, daughter of Daniel Polheim and Sarah Jane Smock. They have Estelle Smock, born November 26, 1890; Mary Ophelia, born April 2, 1892; Jean Blakslee, born July 3, 1893, died July 27, 1893, and Richard Henry.

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Quite a few of their resting places have been documented, and in some cases photographed, on Find a Grave’s website. If you go to Andrew Jackson Brodhead’s entry (click here), you can click on links to others of the family who have been documented.

*Note re: Calvin Easton Brodhead, his May, 1, 1907, obituary in The Reading Eagle stated: Calvin E. Brodhead died suddenly in New York City of gastritis. He was born in Pike County in 1846. He was widely known in contract affairs, having served as chief engineer of the Lehigh Valley Railroad for some time. In 1872 he supervised the construction of the Easton and Amboy division of the road. He was well known in Flemington, NJ, where he lived before locating at Mauch Chunk.

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Easton, Flemington, Lewis, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Obituaries | 8 Comments

The Robert P. Brodhead Bio

One of our great great uncles was Robert Packer Brodhead (b. 1859), one of Andrew J. Brodhead and Ophelia Easton Brodhead’s sons. Here he is in a photo that is part of our family collection.

Robert Packer Brodhead

Robert Packer Brodhead

One of the benefits of researching him is that you’ll easily come across an interesting biography on Robert in the out-of-print Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania by John W. Jordan (published in 1911 by Lewis & Co., pp. 906-911). These pages give extensive information on many Brodhead names, details, and significant dates. I could swear I downloaded it on Google Books for free last year, but now it does not appear to be downloadable. So instead, go to the interesting genealogical website “Diana, Goddess of the Hunt–for Ancestors,” and you can read it there.

Image of William Loveland (father of Fannie V. Loveland) from the book: The Wyoming Valley in the 19th Century. Art Edition, by S. R. Smith, published in 1894.

Image of William Loveland (father of Fannie V. Loveland) from the book: The Wyoming Valley in the 19th Century. Art Edition, by S. R. Smith, published in 1894.

Marriage announcement

I also came across Robert’s May 1889 marriage announcement in another book (published in 1892, hence copyright is expired), History of the Loveland Family in the United States of America (p. 143). Sounds like an absolutely gorgeous ceremony, with the bride decked out a la Kate Middleton. Certainly some lovely gifts as well. Somehow you can’t imagine anyone advertising such things today–burglars would have quite a heyday, especially knowing bride and groom were away for three weeks of honeymoon! Indeed, times have changed!

The John Jordan book gives a good glimpse of where things went post-ceremony: “numerous and exceedingly weighty” business interests in a wide variety of places and six children born between 1890 and 1906, Robert Packer, William Loveland, Lydia Hurlburt, Frances Loveland, James Easton, and Charles Dingman, all likely deceased by now sadly, but no doubt they left behind numerous children and grandchildren. I’d be interested to hear from any descendants who may have details on the family to share, especially about Andrew and Ophelia Brodhead and their predecessors and other children.

Update, 5/2/2013: Those with access to old Pennsylvania newspapers can find a 25th Anniversary celebration article in the Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader, Friday, 22 May 1914. I found it on Genealogy Bank (headline: 25th Anniversary by Mr. and Mrs. R. Broadhead Today; note incorrect spelling of Brodhead), but their terms of use prohibit me from including it here. The event, a lavish luncheon, took place at the couple’s home at 134 South Maples Avenue in Kingston, PA. Forty of their immediate relatives were in attendance. The article describes the decorations and Mrs. Brodhead’s dress and flowers. Oppenheim’s orchestra entertained the group. Among the guests were my great grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. A.D. Brodhead, and my grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank M. Brodhead. Many other representatives of the AJ Brodhead family were there.

Caledonia NY Advertiser, Thursday, 18 October 1917 Source: www.fultonhistory.com

Caledonia NY Advertiser, Thursday, 18 October 1917
Source: http://www.fultonhistory.com

Later in the evening, daughter Lydia made “her social bow” to society during a special evening reception “principally for the younger set.” Coincidentally, I found her wedding announcement, which came out three years later, on the wonderful http://www.fultonhistory.com (they allow snippets of articles to be used, so I am posting it below). I looked up the Kingston address; I found no Google street view or real estate listings for it, but I found a neighboring property listed for sale which looks very much like it could have been of that era.

Update 10/2/13: I’ve come across the below bios of Robert P. Brodhead and William Loveland in the book The Wyoming Valley in the 19th Century. Art Edition, by S. R. Smith, published in 1894.

Bio from The Wyoming Valley in the 19th Century. Art Edition, by S. R. Smith, published in 1894.

Bio from The Wyoming Valley in the 19th Century. Art Edition, by S. R. Smith, published in 1894.

From The Wyoming Valley in the 19th Century. Art Edition, by S. R. Smith, published in 1894.

From The Wyoming Valley in the 19th Century. Art Edition, by S. R. Smith, published in 1894.

Categories: Brodhead, Flemington, Kingston, Luzerne Co., Loveland | Leave a comment

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