Jersey City, Hudson Co.

1882 Marriage Certificate for William Trewin and Elizabeth Sargent

My great-grandfather William Trewin’s first marriage (1868) ended tragically on December 7, 1879, when his wife Edith H. Fry died in childbirth. He remarried and his two sons Bert and Clarence became the beloved sons of my great-grandmother Elizabeth Sargent. I’d never been able to find an exact date of William and Elizabeth’s marriage until earlier this summer when I found an envelope containing the original marriage certificate. The William Sargent listed as a witness was probably Elizabeth’s father rather than her brother who shared the same name. It appears that her brother Samuel, a Methodist minister, performed the ceremony. These new details, as few as they are, combined with images we have of these four, help paint a faint picture of the happenings of July 31, 1882, in the lives of these ancestors and those closest to them.

Marriage Certificate
This is to Certify
That William Trewin of Elizabeth, NJ
and Elizabeth Sargent of Jersey City, NJ
were by me joined together in
Holy Matrimony
in Jersey City according to the ordinance of God and the Laws
of the State of New Jersey on the 31st day of July 1882
Witnesses
William Sargent
Samuel Sargent, Minister of the Gospel

Trewin_Wm_web

William Trewin (1847-1916)

Trewin_Eliz_web

Elizabeth Sargent (born Slaymaker, but name changed to Sargent when emigrated to US after the Civil War) (1854-1926)

Trewin_Wedding_Certificate_

Trewin-Sargent Marriage Certificate

William Sargent Sr. circa 1869/70

William Sargent Sr. circa 1869/70

Rev. Samuel Sargent PhD (image courtesy of Frances S. Cowles)

Rev. Samuel Sargent PhD (image courtesy of Frances S. Cowles)

Categories: Elizabeth, Union Co., Jersey City, Hudson Co., Methodist, New Jersey, Sargent, Trewin, Weddings | Tags: , | 4 Comments

Sargent / Wills – quick update

In a recent post, I provided this update:

Sargent / Wills: I have located the final resting places of William Sargent and his first wife (my second great-grandmother Mary Wills Sargent) and his second wife (Mary Bowley Pitt). Their surname was Slaymaker until they changed it to Sargent when moving to the US after the Civil War. I was correct to think that they were in or around Hudson County, New Jersey—they are in what is known today as Bayview-New York Bay Cemetery. I have requested photos on Find a Grave, but that can take time. (For a past post on the family: click here)

Well, I may have been partly wrong about that. Mary Wills Sargent is indeed buried there in Grave no. 953, Row 6, Section O North, in a plot purchased for her by her husband William Sargent upon her death on 6 December 1877, but she is all by herself. The whereabouts of William and his second wife Mary Bowley Pitt are unclear. I suspect they are in that cemetery somewhere, but unfortunately I do not have death dates for either of them, and according to the pleasant lady I spoke with at the cemetery, the only way for them to do look-ups is with a death date. Apparently, a fire destroyed many of the older records, and a name is not enough. So (sigh) I am placing William and Mary II back on my “brick wall.”

I know it may sound strange, but I am a bit bothered by the fact that Mary Wills Sargent is alone in that plot. I’m very curious to learn whether there is a marker, and if so, what it says. If only Google Earth could zoom to that level. Fingers crossed a Find a Grave volunteer checks for me when they have time.

1919 map showing partial view of eastern side of Greenville Section of Jersey City along the Upper New York Bay, CM Hopkins & Co. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

1919 map showing partial view of eastern side of Greenville Section of Jersey City along the Upper New York Bay, CM Hopkins & Co. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

Categories: Jersey City, Hudson Co., Sargent, Wills | Tags: , | 3 Comments

Some descendants of the Nixon family of Fermanagh, Northern Ireland

Louise and Jennie Nixon, 1964

Photo from my family’s private collection: Sisters Louise (75) and Jennie Nixon (80) in 1964

These lovely elderly ladies are Louise E. Nixon and Jane ‘Jennie’ Bracken Nixon, nieces of my great-grandmother Sarah (Nixon) Boles of Co. Leitrim, Ireland, whose parents—William Nixon and Rachel Miller—and numerous siblings moved to the United States in the late 1860s. The ladies were my grandfather William Boles‘s cousins.

A previous post on Sarah Nixon Boles mentioned the fact that most, if not all, of her family relocated to New York after the US Civil War. This Nixon family is presumably part of the Nixon family of Fermanagh*—about which much has been written (e.g., The Families of French of Belturbet and Nixon of Fermanagh, and Their Descendants by Henry B. Swanzy, published in 1908).  However, I have yet to figure out the family’s location in the larger Nixon family tree.

William and Rachel Nixon were about 67 and 51, respectively when they arrived in America in 1869 (the year given me by the descendant of Benjamin, one of their sons). Joining them were supposedly all of their children (I’ve found 11, although my mother’s records list 14) except for my great-grandmother Sarah: Mark Nixon (b. cir. 1839/1845), Edward Nixon (b. cir 1845); Elizabeth ‘Lizzie’ Nixon (b. cir. 1849); Jane Nixon (b. 1851); Thomas Nixon (b. cir. 1852); Sarah Nixon (b. 1855); Rachel Nixon (b. cir 1865); Mary Nixon (b. cir 1858); Benjamin Nixon (b. cir 1862); Robert Nixon (b. 1863); Catherine Nixon (b. 1864); the last three (whom I have yet to find a trace of) were James, John, and William.

Passenger List - The Caledonia - sailed from Moville, Ireland to NY, NY on 14 Sep 1868 (Source Citation: Year: 1868; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: M237; Microfilm Roll: 301; Line: 22; List Number: 989.)

Passenger List – The Caledonia – sailed from Moville, Ireland to NY, NY on 14 September 1868 (Source Citation: Year: 1868; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: M237; Microfilm Roll: 301; Line: 22; List Number: 989.)

The passenger list inset for the ship Caledonia , which set sail from Moville on Lough Foyle at the northern tip of Northern Ireland to New York on 14 September 1868, shows the names of some Nixons–the names seem to fairly well coincide with some of the Nixon children’s names & ages. If these indeed are ‘our Nixons’, it would indicate that the older children may have come ahead of the parents and younger children.

While researching the family, I found William, Rachel and a number of the children in the 1870 US Federal Census, living in NYC Ward 18. William is listed as a ‘farmer’, an answer based certainly on his past occupation in Ireland. The children in the household were: Edward (30), Thomas (20), Eliza (22), Jane (18), Rachel (15), Mary (10), and ‘Bennett’ (10, this was probably ‘Benjamin’).

1870 Census Record ("United States Census, 1870," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M8X8-K4T : accessed 25 February 2015), Rachael Nixon, New York, United States; citing p. 34, family , NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,539.)

1870 Census Record (“United States Census, 1870,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M8X8-K4T : accessed 25 February 2015), Rachael Nixon, New York, United States; citing p. 34, family , NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,539.)

William Nixon died before the 1880 US Federal Census, as Rachel Nixon is listed in that census record as a widow ‘keeping house’ and living at 203 16th Street, NY, NY. and living with children Edward, Lizzie, Thomas, Rachel, Benjamin, Robert, Mary, and Kate, and several lodgers. The census record indicates that family members were involved in the dry goods business. Son Thomas (28 and now widowed) is listed as being a ‘dry goods buyer’ as is son Edward, age 35 and single. Benjamin (20) is listed as a ‘dry goods clerk’ as is Robert (18). (The 1900 Census indicates that Robert emigrated in 1879.)

Looking at old newspapers, I found the following mortuary notice in the New York Herald, dated 11 Aug 1871: At his [Gramercy] residence, 346 East 17th Street, on Thursday, August 10, William Nixon, aged 69 years. Funeral will take place on Saturday, August 12, at one o’clock PM from Seventeenth Street Methodist Episcopal Church, between First and Second avenues. Relatives and friends are invited to attend.

Wikimedia Commons: Manhattan neighborhoods (map); Author= Stilfehler; Oct. 15th, 2007

Wikimedia Commons: Manhattan neighborhoods (map); Author= Stilfehler; Oct. 15th, 2007

Almost two decades later, I found a notice for a Rachel Nixon (New York Herald, 12 May 1890): On Saturday, May 10, 1890, Rachel Nixon, age 72 years. The relatives and friends of the family are invited to attend the funeral services at her late [East Village] residence, No. 224 East 12th Street, on Monday evening, May 12, 1890 at eight o’clock. Interment in Green-wood.

A William Nixon (bur. August 1871, Find a Grave memorial #127997780) and a Rachel Nixon (bur. 5-13-1890; Find a Grave memorial #106845856) are buried in Green-wood Cemetery Lot 17245 Section 17, Grave 114. The grave is unmarked according to the Find a Grave photographer who kindly attempted to find the graves for me. I’m not yet certain that I have the correct Rachel and William, but hope to pin all this down at some point. Meanwhile I toss this info out there to my readers and future readers who may already have turned over these stones and arrived at some conclusions.

Son Edward Nixon and wife Anna (Bracken) Nixon, who emigrated from No. Ireland in 1883, had four children: Jane ‘Jennie’ (b. 1884), William (b. 1885), George (b. 1887), and Louise (b. 1889). The first two children were born in Manhattan. The second two were born in Bridgeport, CT. Edward died sometime between 1889 and 1900, as Anna is a widow as of the 1900 census. There is an Edward Nixon in the same plot at Green-wood Cemetery (Burial 1899-03-29, Lot 17245 Section 17, Grave 114; (Find a Grave #106846467), perhaps giving a bit more weight to the possibility that the Green-wood plot is indeed where our Nixon ancestors were laid to rest.

By the 1900 Census, Anna (Bracken) Nixon and her children (ages 16, 15, 13, 11), sister Mary J. Bracken, and a lodger are living at 160 Virginia Avenue in Jersey City Ward No. 8, Hudson Co., NJ, and it was there that the family remained for many years. Neither Jennie nor Louise ever married. Jennie devoted her life to working as a teacher in the Jersey City public school system, and Louise worked for many years as a stenographer and then executive secretary for the president or vice president of a company in NYC. Eventually the sisters joined forces with their brother William and his wife Marion to buy a large house at 680 Orchard Street in Oradell, NJ, where they spent happy years before moving into the Francis Asbury Manor Methodist rest home in Ocean Grove, NJ. Jane died in May of 1972, and Louise in October 1979.

Jennie Boles with Louise and Jennie Nixon, spring 1964

Photo form my family’s private collection: Jennie Boles (75) of Ireland with her American cousins Louise (75) and Jennie Nixon (80), early spring 1964, New Jersey

Serendipitously it was during their years in Jersey City that Jennie and Louise befriended my grandmother Zillah Trewin who lived there with her parents William Trewin and Elizabeth (Sargent) Trewin. According to my mother, Zillah was great friends with the Nixon sisters, as well as their cousins (the children of Jane Nixon and Wm Elliott Roberts), and it was through that friendship that she ultimately met and married their cousin (my grandfather) William Boles who emigrated to the US in 1912 at the encouragement of his uncle Robert Nixon who sponsored him.

I remember Jennie and Louise well. They were very fun ladies—full of good humor and always had a twinkle in their eyes. I always enjoyed the times spent with them, and best remember our visits to their Ocean Grove apartment. As I recall, we would drive down to see them on Saturdays since the roads in Ocean Grove are closed to all traffic on Sundays. We always took them out to lunch, and I remember taking them down to some restaurant near the ocean in Spring Lake, a short drive to the south. They were two sweethearts and it was very sad to lose them. I would love to have them here now to have some family history chats with them. When I was a teenager that topic was far from my mind.

I’ll close this post with a couple of Louise’s recipes (‘Chocolate Flake Candy’ and ‘Date Balls’) I recently came upon while re-binding my mom’s old recipe notebook. I haven’t tried either of them yet as I am trying to shift a bit of weight. Such temptations would surely sabotage my results! But they will stay on my radar!

If you’ve made it this far in the post, I wish you a great day. If you have anything to add, share, correct, etc., please don’t hesitate to get in touch or leave a comment!

Nixon_Louise_recipe

Recipes typed up by Louise Nixon for my mother

Jennie and Louise’s Nixon Tree Branch
1-William Nixon b. Cir 1802, Ireland, d. Bef 2 Jun 1880; possibly 10 Aug
1871 +Rachael Millar b. Cir 1818, Ireland, d. Possibly 10 May 1890, Manhattan, New
York, New York
|—–2-Edward Nixon b. Cir 1845, Ireland, d. Betw 1889 and 1900
| +Anna Bracken b. Aug 1847, Northern Ireland, d. After 1930
| |—–3-Jane Bracken Nixon b. 15 Apr 1884, Manhattan, New York, New York,
| | d. May 1972, Ocean Grove, Monmouth, NJ
| |—–3-William Thomas Nixon b. 24 Aug 1885, Manhattan, New York, New
| | York, d. Sep 1967, Suffolk, New York
| | +Marion Zoller
| |—–3-George Robert Bracken Nixon b. 12 Feb 1887, Bridgeport,
| | Connecticut
| | +May L. Swenarton b. Cir 1889, New Jersey
| | |—–4-George W. Nixon b. Cir 1914, New Jersey
| | |—–4-Frank L. Nixon b. Cir 1919
| |—–3-Louise E. Nixon b. 22 Jul 1889, Bridgeport, Connecticut, d. Oct
| | 1979, Ocean Grove, Monmouth, NJ

Categories: Boles, Co. Fermanagh, Drumkeeran, Co. Leitrim, Food: Family Recipes & Favorites, Green-Wood Cemetery Brooklyn NY, Ireland, Jersey City, Hudson Co., Manhattan, Methodist Episcopal, New York, Nixon, Trewin, US Federal 1880 | 2 Comments

Another image of some ‘unknowns’

I’ve stared at this 1917 photo a number of times, trying to figure out who the two ladies on the left were. They are obviously good friends of my great grandmother Elizabeth Sargent* Trewin and her daughter Zillah of Jersey City, NJ, pictured on the right. Elizabeth’s husband William Trewin passed away the previous December, so mother and daughter were on their own at this point. Zillah was still single.

That hat is quite something. Its owner looks like a stern gal. I’ve wondered whether the lady second from left could be my great grandmother’s younger sister Sarah Sargent* Hemion, but maybe that’s just wishful thinking on my part. Apart from the gray hair, their facial features are quite different. Anyone out there with some thoughts, please get in touch!

*Note: The sisters were born in England with the surname Slaymaker. That name was changed to Sargent before they emigrated to the US after the Civil War.

Unknown ladies on the left, Elizabeth Sargent Trewin & daughter Zillah

Unknown ladies on the left, Elizabeth Sargent Trewin & daughter Zillah

Categories: Jersey City, Hudson Co., New Jersey, Sargent, Slaymaker, Trewin | 9 Comments

One Sargent (Slaymaker) family mystery solved—thanks to note about a button hook

Wikimedia Commons: Early 20th-century steel button hook with an art nouveau cherub design sterling silver handle. Author Sobebunny; 2009-0118.

Wikimedia Commons: Early 20th-century steel button hook with an art nouveau cherub design sterling silver handle. Author Sobebunny; 2009-0118.

Zillah Trewin, 1907, several years after 'Aunt Jennie' passed away

Zillah Trewin, 1907, several years after ‘Aunt Jennie’ passed away

Don’t you just love those ancestors to pieces who had the presence of mind to sit down and record notes about your family history? How fabulous it is to have those records. Don’t think you have any? Well, maybe not, but if you inherited boxes of papers you have yet to go through, you may just come across some real gems. My advice is to share them and preserve them as fast as you can.

My grandmother Zillah Trewin is one such angel in our family tree. Bless her heart. And yesterday, I came upon a piece of paper in an old file folder. The tides of time and multiple moves over a half century or more had separated it from the other notes she left behind. This paper has resolved one family mystery that emerged for me two years ago. I spoke about it in the post Cemetery Reveals New Mysteries about Sargent Family.

In that post I was left pondering whether my 2nd great grandfather William (Slaymaker) Sargent and his son William (Zillah’s uncle) had married sisters after the elder William’s first wife Mary Wills (Slaymaker) Sargent (my 2nd great grandmother) died of stomach cancer on 6 December 1877—about seven years after the family changed their name from Slaymaker to Sargent and emigrated to New Jersey from Northampton, England. Yes, I know, that’s a lot to digest. I have to re-read genealogy blog entries several times myself to get the whole ‘who’s who’. So feel free to pause here!

So, yesterday I came upon a yellowed piece of paper with pencil writing that confirmed just that and more! I was over the moon.

Zillah Trewin notes

Zillah Trewin notes from our family’s private archives

The note mentioned a button hook (for doing up shoes, which were buttoned in those days) belonging to “Aunt Jennie Sargent” (Sarah Jane Bowley, wife of William the son):

Button hook belonging to Aunt Jennie Sargent, my mother’s youngest brother’s wife. She was born in 1849, died 1904. She lived with us [in Jersey City, Hudson Co.] winters from the time Uncle Will died in 1896 [of ‘debilitation of the heart’] until she died when with us January 6, 1904. Spent summers with her sister at Manchester VT. She had the button hook from my earliest remembrance. Uncle Will was 7 when mother’s mother died and mother brought him up and [they] were very dear to each other. Aunt J. was youngest sister of Grandpa Sargent’s 2nd wife so father & son married sisters—one oldest and one youngest of 5 girls [Mary Bowley Pitt, widow, b. 1839, and Sarah Jane Bowley, b. 1849].

Now, I still don’t know where Wm Sr. and his wives are buried (I am amazed that Zillah and her mom did not pass that info down), but at least I have had my ‘wild’ suspicions confirmed about the father & son marriages to the two sisters. I sure would like to know how all that transpired! Wm Sr. remarried between 1877-1880 and Wm Jr. married in 1890, so I suppose Wm Jr. and Jennie’s romance blossomed over a decade of family gatherings, and although the age gap is a bit eye-opening, I suppose it was not uncommon back then, just as it is not that uncommon today.

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin, Zillah's mother, undated

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin, Zillah’s mother, undated

In any case, it was good to hear how close William was to my great grandmother Elizabeth Sargent Trewin (Zillah’s mom), and that she was critical in overseeing his upbringing after their mother Mary died. And it was wonderful of Elizabeth and her family to take in Jennie after William’s death. Zillah’s timeline is off, however, in that William Jr. could not have been 7 when Mary died. My records indicate that he was about 15 (an age corroborated by his death record); Elizabeth would have been 23 at the time. But perhaps Mary’s illness was a very extended one and Elizabeth took a leading role in his care from a much younger age.

Now, if an old button hook turns up one day, I’ll know who it belongs to!  Keep checking those old files and boxes!

William Trewin, Zillah's father, taken in 1895

William Trewin, Zillah’s father, taken in 1895

William Sargent Sr. circa 1869/70

William Sargent Sr. circa 1869/70

Categories: Death, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Jersey City, Hudson Co., Sargent, Trewin, Wills | Leave a comment

James Winans Angus (1810-1862) — The Early Years

James W. Angus

James W. Angus

My second great grandfather James Winans Angus was born in New York City on 10 May 1810 to carpenter Jacob Baker Angus (b. Albany, NY) and Mary Winans Angus, (b. Elizabeth, NJ). Two sisters and one brother followed: Abigail Winans Angus, b. 1812; Martha Winans Angus, b. 1818, and Job Winans Angus, b. 1821.

In 1820, the family was living at 123 Pump Street*. Pump Street has since been renamed. According to the website www.oldstreets.com, in the late 18th to early 19th centuries, Pump Street was initially a street in the Delancey Farm Grid, from the Bowery east to Division Street. About 1800 it absorbed Nicholas Street, thereby extending the name west to the present Centre Street. In 1829 Pump Street itself was merged into Walker Street. Since 1855. most of the former Pump Street has been part of Canal Street.

Of course, Lower Manhattan was a vastly different place +/- 200 years ago. If you’re familiar with Manhattan, you know that today Canal Street runs through Chinatown. The below image from 1836 shows the bustling world in which New Yorkers of that era went about their day-to-day activities.

Broadway, New-York. Showing each Building from the Hygeian Depot corner of Canal Street, to beyond Niblo's Garden. Date: 1836 Drawn & Etched by T. Hornor. Aquatinted by J. Hill. Printed by W. Neale. Published by Joseph Stanley & Co. Entered according to Act of Congress by Jos. Stanley & Co. in the Clerks Office of the Southern District of New York. January 26th, 1836.

Broadway, New-York. Showing each Building from the Hygeian Depot corner of Canal Street, to beyond Niblo’s Garden. Date: 1836; Drawn & Etched by T. Hornor. Aquatinted by J. Hill. Printed by W. Neale. Published by Joseph Stanley & Co. Entered according to Act of Congress by Jos. Stanley & Co. in the Clerks Office of the Southern District of New York. January 26th, 1836. From the Collections of the Museum of the City of New York – http://collections.mcny.org/

Tragedy struck the family on 27 November 1824, when Mary died, leaving Jacob with four children aged 3-14. Jacob remarried according to family records*, although unfortunately at the time, no one saw to it to write down the name of the second wife—so her identity remains a mystery, as far as I know. When Jacob died several years later on 29 March 1828, James, 17, and his siblings went to live with their *Uncle Elias Winans, their mother Mary’s brother. Elias’ wife, Abby, likely took the leading role in looking after the children.

Street Scenes, Canal, Copy of Old Time Engraving. Date: 1910 An engraving by G. Gibson (?); subject is Canal Street, depicted when the canal still existed, descriptive caption accompanies engraving. From the Collections of the Museum of the City of New York.

Street Scenes, Canal, Copy of Old Time Engraving. Date: 1910; An engraving by G. Gibson (?); subject is Canal Street, depicted when the canal still existed, descriptive caption accompanies engraving. From the Collections of the Museum of the City of New York. http://collections.mcny.org/

According to p. 6 of Harriet Stryker-Rodda’s genealogical research paper One Line of Descendants of James Angus (1751 – 1806 [grandfather of this James]):
Elias Winans was appointed “guardian of James W. Angus, minor, his father having died intestate* (Orphans Court Record Docket 2653, recorded in Guardianship Letters Book A:329, Essex
County, N. J.), but there are no court records showing that any of the other children were legally made wards of their uncle Elias.

James Angus attended elementary school in Elizabeth, N.J., where he lived with his uncle, Elias Winans, following the death of his parents. (Stryker-Rodda, p. 9) I am wondering if perhaps James went to live with Elias prior to his father’s death since he was already 17 at that time and would otherwise not have been in Elizabeth for more than his last year or two of high school. Certainly the two youngest children would have attended elementary school there, but not James.

**Tombstone inscription, 1st Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ

**Tombstone inscription, 1st Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ

Further down page 9, Stryker-Rodda records that On 25 April 1835 James [age 24] was working at his trade [carpenter, wood craftsman, & coach-maker] in Paterson, N. J., [Passaic Co.] where he purchased a house lot for $200 on the southeast corner of Parke Street (Essex County Deed Book Y3:38). In October of the same year he and George R. Skinner paid $1200 for a piece of land in Paterson on the west side of Union Street, 120′ x 167′(B4:280).

This was followed in November by the purchase for $550 of a house on a lot 15′ x 56′ on the west side of Marshall Street in Paterson. In May of 1836 he sold the land on Marshall Street for the same price he had paid for it (F4:53l). James Angus’ and George R. Skinner’s partnership ended about the time James married. On the 8th of February, 1839, orders were recorded for a Sheriff’s sale of their holdings in Elizabeth [Essex Co.], on the west side of Union Street, a lot 122’xl67’xl09«, which they had purchased from George W. Halsted. The sale was to satisfy debts owed to Jacob G. Crane and William Mulford. It was carried out on 3 December 1839 at Gaylord’s Hotel (Essex County Deed Book D5.-245 ff).

Men's Fashion plate,1826. Image from University of Washington Library Digital Collections http://content.lib.washington.edu (Wikimedia Commons: In public domain in US due to expired copyright)

Men’s Fashion plate,1826. Image from U. of Washington Library Digital Collections http://content.lib.washington.edu (Wikimedia: In public domain in US due to expired copyright)

It’s worth noting that the above just-mentioned happenings coincided with a major nationwide economic recession stemming from “the panic of 1837,” a financial crisis that went on to last almost a decade. The mood in the country was one of enormous pessimism. Economic policy was no doubt a hotly debated topic. Sounds strangely familiar…

James was bouncing around quite a lot back then, not surprising for a single young man in his twenties. Thanks to all that bouncing around, we are privileged to have more information about James from the publication Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election: May 26, 1840. Apparently his place of residence, and hence the legitimacy of his vote, was at issue in the 1838 NJ elections. And that hotly contested election was a really big deal at the time. For an excellent write-up on what all the fuss was about, visit this blog post on the Blue Jersey website.

Bergen, Passaic, and Union Counties, 1838. Image cropped from  David Rumsey Historical Map Collection Author: Bradford, Thomas G. Date: 1838; Short Title: New Jersey. Publisher: Weeks, Jordan & Co. Boston Publisher: Wiley and Putnam. New York (www.davidrumsey.com)

Bergen, Passaic, and Union Counties, 1838. Image cropped from David Rumsey Historical Map Collection Author: Bradford, Thomas G. Date: 1838; Short Title: New Jersey. Publisher: Weeks, Jordan & Co. Boston Publisher: Wiley and Putnam. New York (www.davidrumsey.com)

Various individuals testified about James’ vote. I’m including a map here that shows the 1838 borders of Bergen, Passaic, and Essex counties. You may find it useful to refer to as the borders have changed since then. According to Wikipedia’s entry for Essex County: In 1837, Passaic County was formed from portions of Essex and Bergen County. In 1857, Union County was created from parts of Essex County. Today Elizabeth is in Union County, but back then, it fell within Essex County. James’ 1838 vote was recorded in Elizabethtown (then part of Essex Co.).

Martin Van Buren, US President (1833-1837) Wikipedia

Martin Van Buren, US President (1833-1837) Wikipedia

From the testimony of Luke H. Higgins, we learn that James was working in Bergen Co. — either in Hoboken or Jersey City — in the summer of 1838. When Higgins challenged him for voting in Elizabethtown, James said he worked in Bergen Co., and had his washing and mending done in Elizabethtown, and considered Elizabethtown to be his residence. Higgins ascertained that James was a Whig and and that he stood in opposition to the Van Buren administration. (Many blamed Van Buren, who opted against government intervention during and after the panic of 1837, for the countries economic woes.)

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 335.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 335.

 Early Baltimore and Ohio Railroad passenger equipment of the 1830s, displayed at the B&O Railroad Museum in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. (Wikipedia: © James G. Howes)

Early Baltimore and Ohio Railroad passenger equipment of the 1830s, displayed at the B&O Railroad Museum in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. (Wikipedia: © James G. Howes)

The second individual to testify was John Chatterton, who claimed to have known James for about 10 years. He said James was in Jersey City in 1838, working for the railroad, building cars, and that he saw James in Elizabethtown, but could not say whether James resided in Elizabethtown or not. He knew James got his washing and mending done there. He also knew of James having work in Newark as well, and knew James’ political views and that he was in the Whig party. Upon cross-examination, Chatterton said he knew Mr. Winans [Elias, I presume] was one of James’ links to Elizabethtown and that he thought James boarded with a sister [Martha (never married) or Abigail Angus Woodruff (married to Henry King Woodruff)]. Chatterton stated James had a shop in town that still had James’ sign outside of it and that the shop may have been owned jointly with Skinner [a reference to the aforementioned George R. Skinner]. Chatterton knew nothing of how James voted during the 1838 election.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 336.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 336.

The Whig Party from The Whig Almanac and Politicians Register for 1838

The Whig Party from The Whig Almanac and Politicians Register for 1838

The last person to testify was the aforementioned Jacob G. Crane, who said he believed James’ place of residence the year prior to the elections was Elizabethtown, and that James lived with his aunt [Elias’s wife Abby Winans (Elias was still alive at this point) or one of Mary Winans Angus’s sisters?]. Jacob thought James was usually in Elizabeth from Fridays through Sundays, and thought James’ carriage-making business had been up and running in Elizabethtown for two-three years before the 1838 election, but that he broke it up right before the election. Crane said James worked in Jersey City building carriages and remained residing with his aunt until he married in February 1839 [the marriage actually took place on January 26, 1839]. Then when cross-examined, Crane said James and his new wife [Wealthy Ann Jaques] lived for a time with James’ aunt, but that they then moved to Jersey City, where James’ work was. Another reference to James’ business with Skinner was made. Crane commented that he knew James had paid his taxes in Elizabethtown.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 361.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 361.

Ultimately, a vote was taken as to whether James’ vote was lawful, and indeed it was:

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 76.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 76.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), pp. 718-719.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), pp. 718-719.

The World of Fashion, May 1838 (Wikimedia Commons - In Public Domain in US due to expired copyright)

The World of Fashion, May 1838 (Wikimedia Commons – In Public Domain in US due to expired copyright)

Well, that’s all I have for today. More on James Winans Angus in an upcoming post… As always, comments, corrections, additions are most welcome.

A side note: In my hunt for information on James, I also came across newspaper articles between 1834-1836 referring to a bill in the New Jersey legislature to allow “James Angus, of Patterson” to divorce his wife (once named as ‘Ann’ and another time as ‘Mary’). I’m sure this is a red herring, but for the sake of satisfying my curiosity, I would love to visit NJ state archives to find out what this case was about. Apparently, at that time, in certain situations, people were able to have their marriages dissolved by the legislature. In this case, the bill to dissolve this James Angus’ marriage was eventually passed on Saturday morning, January 24, 1835***.

Elias and Abby Winans' tombstone inscriptions, 1st Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ

Elias and Abby Winans’ **tombstone inscriptions, 1st Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ

June ?, 1843, ad in the  New York American newspaper

June ?, 1843, ad in the New York American newspaper; evidently, the family’s involvement with Crane was ongoing. (Ad courtesy of http://www.fultonhistory.com)

New-York American newspaper ad, October 2, 1841 (courtesy of www.fultonhistory.com)

New-York American newspaper ad, October 2, 1841 (courtesy of http://www.fultonhistory.com)

***************************************************************************************************************************
*ONE LINE OF DESCENDANTS OF JAMES ANGUS (1751 – 1806) including outlines of related Winans and Jaques Families of New Jersey by Harriet Stryker-Rodda, Certified Genealogist (Elizabeth, NJ, 1969) (Project commissioned by Alfred Carpenter Angus Jr., son of James Winans Angus Jr. and Anna M. Carpenter, grandson of James Winans Angus and Wealthy Ann Jaques)

**Wheeler, Wm Ogden. Inscriptions on tombstones and monuments in the burying grounds of the First Presbyterian church and St. Johns church at Elizabeth, New Jersey.1664-1892. New Haven: Press of Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, 1892.

***p. 228 of Minutes of Votes and Proceedings of the 59th General Assembly of the State of New Jersey, 1835
****************************************************************************************************************************

Categories: 1st Presbyterian Elizabeth NJ, Angus, Crane, Elizabeth, Union Co., Jersey City, Hudson Co., Manhattan, New York City, Newark, Essex Co., Patterson NJ, Winans, Woodruff | 2 Comments

Northamptonshire Slaymakers

William Slaymaker (changed last name to Sargent before moving to the US in 1870)

William Slaymaker (changed last name to Sargent before moving to the US in 1870)

I’m not sure where our family line’s Slaymakers fit in with others of that surname dwelling in England in the late 18th century/early 19th century and prior to that. But I did recently stumble on an 1841 Census record that provided some more clues about my 2nd great grandfather William Slaymaker (who changed his name to Sargent prior to emigrating to the US in 1870).

Funnily enough, the way I came upon the record was by doing a search of the Wills line on Family Search. Up popped a record for a “Geoe Wills”. I found that spelling odd so I clicked it open, and through findmypast.co.uk was able to view the original record. Here I found not only our 3rd great grandfather George Wills and his second wife Elizabeth living at the Stoneworks in Blisworth, Northamptonshire, but also William Slaymaker and his parents, John & Mary, and siblings–Elizabeth, John, Sarah, and a female whose name may have been Harriet. For some reason, the census taker abbreviated many of the first names: George was “Geo e”; Mary was “Ma y”; William was “Wm”, Richard was “Rich d”. Those abbreviations had the last letter input as a superscript. I guess whoever transcribed all these records for Family Search simply left them “as is”, which I suppose was the right thing to do, but it would take a lot of creativity for anyone searching to think of looking for names in such a way.

Stoneworks in Blisworth, circa 1935

In any case, William’s father John (34) is listed as a laborer; Mary is 36; William was 12; Elizabeth 10, John 8; Sarah 6; and Harriet [spelling ?] 3. All lived at the Stoneworks (mentioned in previous posts, most notably this one).

Stoneworks, Blisworth, Northamptonshire, ca. 1910

When I compared this census record with the 1851 record, I could see that John the father had remarried someone named Esther who was born in Blisworth. Son John (18) was living with them as was a son by this new marriage: Joseph, age 4. So John’s first wife Mary must have passed away in or before 1847. William was 21 and by then had married George Wills’ youngest daughter Mary; William and Mary were living with George Wills and his 2nd wife Elizabeth.

I found John and Esther Slaymaker in the 1861 and 1881 census records. In 1861 they were living with son Joseph in Boughton, Northamptonshire, a small village north of the city of Northampton. John was working as a railway gateman. In 1881, they were living in “Needles” in Litchborough, Northamptonshire, a tiny village to the west of Northampton. He was 74 and working as an agricultural laborer, poor old chap. I “googled” Needles and up popped a fancy 22-page real estate brochure on a property in Litchborough called Needles; I gather this was once a substantial estate with multiple dwellings and buildings, farmland, etc. It would seem that John Slaymaker and his second wife Esther may well have lived and worked here. The 1881 census shows a granddaughter Beatrice living with them. She was 6, born in Belgrave, Leicestershire (some 40 miles north of Northampton), and may well have been a daughter of son Joseph, who by then would have been about 34.

As you can see from the below family tree, John Slaymaker, who was my 3rd great grandfather, had siblings named Sarah and Thomas. There were probably others, but these are the only ones I have found so far. All were the children of Thomas and Elizabeth Slaymaker who were probably born in the late 1760s or thereabouts.

So that’s a bit of a glimpse into our Northamptonshire Slaymaker line. We surely have numerous Slaymaker cousins out there in the UK and beyond; hopefully they’ll stumble upon this blog someday and drop us a line! Anyone new to this blog can find more posts on the Wills line and Slaymaker / Sargent line by searching under the relevant surnames in the Categories section (right side of blog; you may have to scroll down a bit; best to read them in chronological order).

Slaymaker Family Tree – 1st three generations
(View the Sargent line by going to the S-U tab above)

1-Thomas Slaymaker
+Elizabeth
|—-2-Sarah Slaymaker c. 20 May 1792, Weedon and Floore, Northampton, England
|—-2-Thomas Slaymaker b. 3 May 1803, c. 6 Jun 1803, Weedon and Floore,  Northampton, England
|—-2-John Slaymaker b. 19 Apr 1807, Weedon Beck, Northamptonshire, England, c. 21 Jun 1807,
|——-Weedon and Flore, Northampton, England
|——+Mary b. Abt 1805
|———3-William Sargent b. 2 Sep 1828, Weedon Beck, Northamptonshire, c. 10 Dec 1829,
|———–Weedon and Flore, Northamptonshire, England, |————d. New Jersey, United States
|————+Mary Wills b. 11 Nov 1829, Wolverton, Buckinghamshire, England, d. 6 Dec 1877,
|————–Jersey City, Hudson, New Jersey
|———3-Elizabeth (Betsey) Slaymaker b. 11 Oct 1830, c. 30 Nov 1830, Weedon and Floore, Northampton
|———3-John Slaymaker b. Abt 1835
|———3-Sarah Slaymaker b. 1836, Weedon, Northamptonshire
|———3-Harriet Slaymaker b. Abt 1838
|——+Esther b. Abt 1814, Blisworth, Northamptonshire, England
|———3-Joseph Slaymaker b. Abt 1847, Blisworth, Northamptonshire, England
|———-+Unknown
|————-4-Beatrice Slaymaker [daughter of Joseph?] b. Abt 1875, Belgrave, Leicestershire, England

Categories: Blisworth, Northamptonshire, Boughton, Northamptonshire, England 1841, England 1851, England 1861, England 1881, Jersey City, Hudson Co., Litchborough, Northamptonshire, Northampton, Northamptonshire, Sargent, Slaymaker, Weedon and Floore, Northamptonshire, Weedon Beck, Northamptonshire, Wills | Leave a comment

Thomas & Sarah Trewin Family of Woolwich, Co. Kent, England

I was excited to discover that the June 22, 1854, will of Thomas Trewin (the elder) is available online through the UK National Archives.

The document is very difficult to read but so far I have been able to make out the names of three sons—William, Thomas (my ancestor who immigrated to the US with wife Mary Anne Phillips and children in 1857), and John. The fact that a William was listed seems to confirm a previous post’s suspicions that the William Trewin born in Gosport, Hampshire, to a Thomas and Sarah Trewin and christened at the Wesleyan Church there, was indeed the William of this family. Previous research I did showed that Thomas and Sarah had four children who died as infants: two sons, John (the 1st) and Joseph, and two daughters, Mary and Sarah, and that all fits with the three brothers being the sole surviving heirs:

  • William Trewin  b. 23 Jan 1812, c. 23 Feb 1812, Wesleyan Church, Middle Street, Gosport, Hampshire, England
  • Thomas J. Trewin b. 12 Aug 1817, Woolwich, Kent, England, c. 7 Sep 1817,  Wesleyan Methodist Church, William St, Woolwich, Kent, England, d. 19 Sep 1875, Elizabeth, Union, NJ, bur. 22 Sep 1875, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union, NJ
  • John Trewin b. 17 Aug 1827, c. 14 Aug 1831, Wesleyan Methodist Church, William St, Woolwich, Kent, England

Section of an 1832 map* of London; see Woolwich & Plumstead on the right, well beyond what were then the borders of the city and surrounded by marshes and fields. You can see the Tower of London along the river (upper left corner).

Age-wise they would have been 42, 38, and 26 when the will was drawn up. The document was proved several years later on 12 November 1857. By then the “boys” would have been 45, 40, and 30.  Thomas would have left for Quebec City, Canada, on the ship Ion, with his family some four months prior to that, in July 1857 (they later relocated to Jersey City, NJ. See previous posts for details on the circumstances and journey). I have yet to see mention made in the will of Thomas Sr.’s wife Sarah. It seems likely she predeceased him.

In any case, I am going to try to transcribe the will for posting here. It mentions properties in Plumstead and Woolwich (neighboring areas) and a gift to the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Woolwich. It will take some head-scratching, but I will do my best to decipher it.

I would love to know what brought Thomas Sr. and Sarah from Gosport to Woolwich; I presume it was work-related–perhaps to work at the Royal Arsenal or to help build the Wesleyan Chapel in Woolwich. I’d also love to know what  happened to William and John, whether they remained in the Woolwich area, moved elsewhere, or also emigrated to North America.  Are there any descendants out there?

So there is plenty more to learn, but the will provides wonderful new evidence of their lives in Woolwich. Stay tuned…

SEE FOLLOW-UP POST: https://chipsofftheoldblock.wordpress.com/2013/05/13/thomas-trewin-will/

*Map is in the public domain and available for sharing for non-commercial purposes under Creative Commons.

Categories: Death, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Gosport, Hampshire, Jersey City, Hudson Co., Last Wills and Testaments, Quebec City, Quebec, The Ion, Trewin, Wesleyan Methodist, Woolwich, Greater London | 4 Comments

The Fate of Mary (Wills) Sargent–Cause of Death

Last year I did a series of posts about what became of Mary Wills, daughter of George and Mary Wills,  who was born in November 1829 in Wolverton, Buckinghamshire; met and married William Slaymaker in Blisworth, Northamptonshire; and then lived in Northampton, before moving with her husband and children to the US in 1870. They settled in Jersey City, New Jersey (click here for some historic images of the city). They changed their surname to Sargent before leaving England. I’ve no idea why they picked that surname. Slaymaker sounds okay to me.  According to Family Facts for Slaymaker at Ancestry, it’s an occupational name for a maker of slays. Altered form of German Schleiermacher, an occupational name for a maker or shawls or scarves, from Middle High German sleier ‘scarf’, ‘shawl’, ‘veil’ + macher ‘maker’. Surname Database has its own thoughts on the matter—-perhaps, makers of shoes or sleighs.

In any case, here is a list of past blog posts, the main ones anyway, about Mary and her family.
Post 1, Post 2, Post 3, Update Post, Most recent Post1

I always felt badly for her, being dragged away from her family in England at age 41 at her husband’s insistence, he wanting to make his fortune during post-Civil War reconstruction. At least that is what my great grandmother (Mary’s daughter) passed down. Husband William’s business affairs failed miserably and the family was on public assistance for a while. She also allegedly gave birth to 12 children over the course of her somewhat brief life, including 2 sets of twins, my great grandmother being one of them (her twin died). I presume that all those births happened when Mary was still living in England. The four of the twelve children who survived–Samuel, Elizabeth, William, and Sadie–emigrated to the US with her.

I’d always wondered how Mary died, because she was only in the US for seven years before she passed away. Well, today my answer arrived in the mail. The death record sent along to me by the NJ Dept. of Health Archives. And though lots of scenarios had played out in my mind with regards to a cause of death, I’d never thought of this: “stomach cancer, encephaloid variety.” My heart goes out even more to Mary; this must have been a very painful illness. There was no cure. According to a medical dictionary, encephaloid cancer is a very malignant form of cancer that manifests itself as a tumor of brain-like consistency. Encephaloid means “resembling the brain.”

Prior to June 1, 1878, individual certificates were not issued by the state of NJ, so Mary’s record appears in the ledger format used from May 1848 until May 1878.
Date of Death: 6 December 1877
Name of Deceased: Mary C. Wills
Age: 48
Occupation: none given
Place of Death: 96 Chestnut Ave.
Place of Birth: England
Names of Parents: George Wills and Mary C.
Cause of Death: Cancer of the stomach; Encephaloid family

I’d hoped the record would indicate a place of burial, but unfortunately it does not. On a positive note, her name appears with the middle initial “C.”—perhaps for “Capon,” her mother’s maiden name. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a middle initial for her.

The ledger format reveals so much about “life and death” in Jersey City in 1877. Listed are lots of infants and babies taken by meningitis, convulsions, cholera, diptheria, hydrocephalus, bronchitis,and asthenia (lack of body strength). A 16-year-old laborer died of a fractured skull from an injury working for the railroad, a 40-year-old mother died of exhaustion after “instrumental delivery,” other adults died of phthisis (per Merriam-Webster’s: a progressively wasting or consumptive condition; especially : pulmonary tuberculosis), uterine cancer, typhoid, and asthenia. Only one person on the list, a 79-year-old laborer from Germany, died of “old age.”

Mary Wills Sargent Death Record

The Practitioner, published 1897

Description of Stomach Cancer from the book The Practitioner, published in 1897, 21 years after Mary’s death

Mary Wills Sargent’s place of death (see red balloon)

Categories: Blisworth, Northamptonshire, Death Certificates, Jersey City, Hudson Co., New Jersey, Sargent, Stony Stratford, Buckinghamshire, Wills, Wolverton, Buckinghamshire | Leave a comment

Appomattox: Our Links to a Major Historic Event

Surrender at the Appomattox, Palm Sunday, Apr 9, 1865 (Image in public domain)

Well, it’s almost a year ago that I was posting Civil War letters written by the Trowbridge brothers, Uzal (Company A, 1st New Jersey Volunteer Regiment) and his older brother Henry. Uzal did not make it; he was killed early on during the Battle of Gaines’ Mill in June of 1862, a brutal event that shook those present that day to the core of their beings. The loss of Uzal must have been a major blow to the Trowbridge family. Brother Henry entered service shortly after Uzal was killed, in August 1862, serving in the 14th NJ Volunteer Infantry. Somehow he made it through to the end, and went on to marry and have children. I’ll never forget that one letter of his in particular, from February 1864, in which he spoke of wanting to get home for what may be his last chance to see his loved ones. He equated going into battle with being part of a flock of birds under fire. Who lived and who died was all so random:

I am sorrow you cannot give me some excuse to get home. for this winter may be my last chance. if I do not get home this winter, I may never get home.  It is all chance. it is the same as if you shoot into a flock of birds and those you hapen to hit must fall and the rest go on untill the next time and leave you behind. they may bury you and they may not just as it happens and how much time they have to do it. but there is no use in talking we may as well laugh as to cry and base it as we have done so far.

Imagine being my great grandfather William Woodruff, to whom the letter was written. He was only 15 at the time. I know when I was that age, a letter like that would have made a huge impression on me. Without a doubt, such frank talk would have lingered in William’s mind for a long time. Thankfully Henry had a happy ending, though who knows what terrifying scenes must have stayed with him until his passing in 1898 at 63.

Well, why am I bringing this up again? Well, I discovered something very interesting recently. I subscribe to Genealogy Bank and was doing some digging in a Jersey City newspaper called The Jersey Journal. My great grandfather William Trewin lived in Jersey City as did his sister Emma. William met his wife Elizabeth Sargent in Jersey City, and that may well be where Emma met her future husband Francis C. (FC) Ludey. Emma and Francis made their home in nearby Bayonne. William and Elizabeth settled in Elizabeth, a bit further away. Genealogy Bank does not have many New Jersey newspapers, unfortunately. I had been hoping I could access the old Elizabeth Daily Journal, but that’s not on there. But, there is a ton of stuff from the The Jersey Journal, so I was trolling for articles on the Trewins, Sargents, and Ludeys. In the process, I stumbled on an obituary notice for FC Ludey (published 19 Jan 1918) and it mentions that he was present at the Appomattox Courthouse for Lee’s surrender to Grant.  And, as Francis served in the 14th NJ Volunteer Regiment with Henry Trowbridge, something I discovered a while ago and mentioned in this blog at that time, that means (of course!) that Henry was present for the surrender, too. And I thought that was pretty amazing. Talk about having a front row seat to history. Uzal could not be there to witness the end; but at least Henry got to do that for him. So this great historic connection has been there all along, and I am only putting two and two together now. Shame on me, but better late than never I suppose. Still, I cannot help hearing the words of my old high school physics teacher who used to say in response to such a statement: “Better never late.” But that is neither here nor there.

The text of Francis’ obituary reads as follows:
Funeral services for Francis C. Ludey, 73 years old were held at his late home, 75 West 42nd Street last night. Rev. M.Y. Bovard, pastor of the First M.E. Church, officiated. There were present delegations from Bayonne Council, Royal Arcanum, Odd Fellows, and a number of C.A.R. men. Mr. Ludey, being a veteran of the Civil War and present when Gen. Lee surrendered to Gen. Grant at Appomattox. James S. Coward, who was closely associated with Mr. Ludey in affairs of the First M.E. Church Sunday School, was among the mourners.

Francis C. Ludey; this may well have been taken for the Memorial Day event of 1917 at which he was a speaker (Personal Collection of Ruth Kirby Dean)

Included here is a photo of F.C. Ludey, courtesy of his 2nd great granddaughter Ruth Dean. I found an article describing Memorial Day celebrations in Bayonne in May 1917, and Francis was a featured speaker at that event. It may well be that this photo was taken on that very day.

For details of service for the 14th NJ Volunteer Regiment, click here.
For a list of NJ Civil War units, click here.
For the monument to the 14th NJ Regiment at Monocacy, click here.

Categories: Appomattox, Bayonne, Civil War, Grant, Gen. Ulysses S., Jersey City, Hudson Co., Lee General Robert E, Ludey, Memorial Day, Obituaries, Sargent, Trewin, Trowbridge, Woodruff | Leave a comment

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