New York

Memories of a Madame de Ryther recipe lead to a fun eBay discovery

John George Brown (American, 1831-1913) Claiming the Shot – After the Hunt in the Adirondacks

A long time ago, I did a post about 19th-century food writer Madame Jules de Ryther‘s recommendations on how to prepare “roast saddle of venison” from deer killed during hunting expeditions in New York’s Adirondack Mountains. Perhaps you remember that post.

Well, I was scrolling through some antique postcards on eBay last week, and one in particular caught my eye–it was of two men in a canoe arriving at the side of a lake with at least a couple of dead deer in their vessel. The title was: “Adirondack Mountains. Bringing in the spoils.”

That Madame de Ryther post came to mind, so I paused to take a closer look at the scene. On the front right side was a small note written by the sender, someone named Ripley Watson: “Am up at Lake George, having a fine time. Remember me to your brothers, please. Ripley Watson.”

Adirondack Mountains. Bringing in the spoils

Then I turned the postcard over and was absolutely shocked to discover that the recipient was someone I knew from my family history research and had actually met over a half century ago when visiting my late grandmother in Plainfield, NJ. I was only a few years old at the time and don’t remember the visit, but I do have a photo to prove that I was there!

How amazing! I am still pinching myself. Life is full of strange little surprises. I felt compelled to buy the postcard, and it arrived the day before yesterday from Pennsylvania.

Postcard addressed to Miss Cecelia Russum, postmarked 10 July 1906

Miss Cecelia Bell Russum (1090 East Jersey Street, Elizabeth, NJ) was the postcard recipient, and she would have been 18 at the time. Some of you may know who Cecelia was. For those who do not: she was the only daughter of Cecelia Bensley Angus (1855-1933) and Thomas Bayley Russum (cir. 1850-1938) of Elizabeth, New Jersey, who also had four sons (Thomas; Charles, who died before Cecelia was born; Frank; and William).

Cecelia Bensley Angus was a daughter of James Angus & Wealthy Ann Jaques and one of my great-grandmother Wealthy Angus Woodruff’s younger sisters.

These two Angus sisters were five years apart, but each gave birth to a daughter in 1888: Cecelia Bell Russum was born in June, and Wealthy’s daughter Bertha Woodruff in October. They all appear in the below group photo taken, I believe, in 1892 on the occasion of the funeral gathering for Wealthy Ann (Jaques) Angus. (Note: I have posted this group photo before. I think I have the Russum kids shown incorrectly apart from William and Cecelia, but plan to fix that label soon.)

William and Wealthy Woodruff with extended family, Elizabeth, NJ, circa 1893 (Photo from my family’s personal archives)

I took a quick look to see who Ripley Watson may have been. Cecelia’s brothers all went to Rutgers College (classes of 1895, 1902, and 1910), and I found a Ripley Watson who was in the class of 1908. A few tidbits I found about him indicated that he was gifted academically and played varsity football (6′ tall, 186 pounds). Published almost a decade after his graduation, The Catalogue of the Officers and Alumni of Rutgers College… 1766 to 1916, published by Rutgers, gives the following information about Ripley: Born at Jersey City, NJ, Mch. 15, 1886. Lawyer. L.L.B. (N.K. Law School,1910). A.M. (Rutgers, 1911).

So here was Ripley in July of 1906 sending Cecelia a postcard from the Adirondacks. Perhaps, he had romantic intentions? If he did, nothing came of it. Cecelia remained single, living at home with her parents, into her early forties, when she met and married the much older Reverend George Rutger Brauer (b. 1871) in 1931. Unfortunately the marriage was short lived as George died in 1935 of a cerebral hemorrhage. His Find a Grave memorial has some photos of him as well as a long obituary that appeared in the New York Times. Click here if you are interested in seeing that memorial page (and here if you want to see the page for his first wife Eugenia Lathrop Brauer, who died in 1929).

Back to Cecelia. She died in Los Angeles in 1981 at the age of 93, outliving her cousin Bertha by almost a decade. Remarkably, we have the photo showing the two as young children and another showing them some seven decades later, sitting on the front porch at my grandmother’s house—with me and my sister the young children this time around. The ladies had remained good friends. I don’t know what happened to Cecelia after this or why she moved to California. But, how amazing is it that 114 years after that postcard was sent to Cecelia, it’s ended up here with me!

Circa 1964: Bertha Woodruff (left) and Cecelia Russum Brauer (right) with two little mischief-makers in between

Cecelia Bell Russum and her cousin Bertha Winans Woodruff back in their mischief-making days

Categories: Adirondacks, Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., New Jersey, New York, Russum, Woodruff | Tags: , , | 4 Comments

Daguerreotype of Richard Brodhead still available on eBay

The daguerreotype of Richard Brodhead mentioned in last week’s post is still available on eBay: Click here. The one of his daughter Elizabeth Dorcas Brodhead sold for just over the opening bid amount of $99.

1-Capt. Daniel Brodhead b. 20 Apr 1693, Marbletown, NY, d. 22 Jul 1755,
Bethlehem, PA
+ Hester Gerritse Wyngart b. 1697, d. After 1743
|–2-Capt. Charles Brodhead b. 7 Sep 1729, d. 7 Feb 1789, (Modena Rural
| Cemetery, Modena, Ulster Co, NY)
| + Mary Oliver b. 1740, d. 7 Sep 1814, (Modena Rural Cemetery, Modena,
| Ulster Co, NY)
| |–3-Charles C. Brodhead b. 20 Apr 1772, Oneida County, NY, USA, d. 14 Sep
| | 1852, Utica, Oneida Co., NY
| |–3-Oliver C. Brodhead b. 1775, d. 1858
| + Dorcas Hallock b. 1787, d. 1853
| |–4-Charles C. Brodhead b. 1806, d. 1890
| |–4-Richard Brodhead b. 1815, d. 1865
| + Eliza Maria Jansen b. 1823, d. 1908

Categories: Brodhead, Marbletown, Memorabilia, New York | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Ebay auction: Daguerreotype of Elizabeth D. Brodhead (1851-1938) as a child & one of her father, too

THE KINGSTON DAILY FREEMAN. TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 5, 1916. (Credit: FultonHistory.com)

Just a quick post to say that a daguerreotype of Elizabeth Dorcas Brodhead is up for auction on eBay. To view the item, click here.  Shown here as a child, she went on to marry Philetus Kortright (1846-1916). She was the daughter of Richard Brodhead (1815-1865) and Eliza Maria Jansen Brodhead (1823-1908); see Find a Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/19501036

A search of Ancestry trees shows that this Richard Brodhead appears to have been the the son of Oliver C. Brodhead (1774-1858) and Dorcas Hallock (1787-1853). Oliver was a grandson of Daniel Brodhead (1693-1755) and Hester Wyngart (1687-1758) via their son Revolutionary War captain Charles W. Brodhead (1729-1789). (I am, as are some of you, a direct descendant of Charles’s brother Garret Brodhead.)

Just wanted to pass this auction info along in case some Brodheads out there who read this blog and are closely related to Elizabeth would be interested in trying to acquire this unique and precious item.

Oops! After posting this, I noticed a daguerreotype of Richard is up for auction, too. Click here.

Categories: Brodhead, Heirlooms, Memorabilia, New York | Tags: , , | 8 Comments

Rev. Dr. Jacob Brodhead DD (1772-1855)

Rev. Dr. Jacob Brodhead DD, circa 1837. Image from Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA. LC-DIG-pga-08224.

Image from Services at the funeral of Rev. Jacob Brodhead DD in the North Dutch Church of the City of New York on Friday, the 8th of June 1955 (NY: John A. Gray, 1855)

I came across this print on the left while visiting the Library of Congress website. It was labeled “J. Brodhead D.D.” I decided to figure out who this was and eventually identified him as Rev. Jacob Brodhead DD, who was born on May 14, 1772, in Marbletown, Ulster, New York.

In addition to the below image of the Reverend in his later years, the publication Services at the Funeral of Rev. Jacob Brodhead DD in the North Dutch Church of the City of New York on Friday, the 8th of June 1955, published by John A. Gray, New York, in 1855, contains a wealth of biographical information about this member of the Brodhead family tree. Click the above link and pay special attention to pages 13-17, which talk about his early years and familial connections.

Of the five children he had with his first wife Eliza Bleecker, only two survived beyond the age of 21. One of these was John Romeyn Brodhead (1814-1873), famous for his books on the history of New York State.  I’d always wondered where the middle name “”Romeyn” came from, and apparently there was a Rev. Dr. John Brodhead Romeyn (1770-1825, son of Elizabeth Brodhead and Rev. Dirck Romeyn), who was a much-admired first cousin of Jacob’s. And these two first cousins married sisters Harriet and Eliza Bleecker. The name Romeyn was passed along.

Below is how Jacob fits into the Brodhead Family Tree:

Captain Daniel Brodhead (A-2) and Ann Tye

  • Charles Brodhead (B-2) (c. 1663-1724) and Maria Ten Broeck
  • Wessel Brodhead (C-5) (1703-1774) and Catherine DuBois
  • Charles Wessel Brodhead (D-11) (1742-1799) and Sarah Hardenberg
  • Reverend Jacob Brodhead (E-63) (1772-1855) and Eliza Bleecker (2nd Fanny Sharp)
  • Note: The above numbers pertain to the individual entries in Volume I and Volume II of The Brodhead Family: The Story of Captain Daniel Brodhead, His Wife, Ann Tye, and Their Descendants. Refer to these volumes for more information on these ancestors.

    Categories: Brodhead, Death, Marbletown, New York, Obituaries | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

    “Broadhead Worsted Mill” in Jamestown, New York

    A Broadhead Worsted Mill advertisement – http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.09486
    Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-09486 (digital file from original print) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

    If you stroll around eBay long enough looking for memorabilia related to the Brodhead family and make use of alternate spellings to increase your odds, you’ll eventually run into advertising posters for Broadhead Worsted Mill in Jamestown, New York.

    No, as the spelling strongly suggests, a descendant of Captain Daniel Brodhead and Ann Tye (arrived on these shores in1664, and both from Royston, West Riding, Yorkshire) was not involved in the Mill’s founding. Nonetheless, at some point it seems likely that we, the descendants of the Captain and his wife, share a common ancestor given the Mill’s founder, William Broadhead (1819-1910), also hailed from Yorkshire (from a town called Thornton). Royston is a very tiny village located to the northeast of Barnesley, and Thornton is a bit to the west of Bradford. The two are just about 25 miles apart.

    Thornton and Royston are about 25 miles apart (cropped from the “New and improved map of England & Wales ” London : William Darton, 16th April 1823; Library of Congress Geography and Map Division Washington, D.C. 20540-4650)

    Per the Jamestown, New York, website, William had worked in Thornton as a blacksmith before emigrating to the US in 1843. He would have been about 24 years of age when he undertook that great adventure. It appears that initially he took up similar work in Jamestown, but eventually became interested in the textile industry.

    “Wm. Broadhead” Image from The History of Chatauqua County, New York, Illustrated, Boston: W.A. Ferguson & Co., 1894, p. 808

    Follow the website link above for the brief version of his life and career (or read the long version below). His was a fabulous success story. Like many who’ve achieved “the American dream,” he made significant contributions to his community. His two mills “employed thousands of persons”. The impact this one ambitious immigrant had was clearly exponential.

    See Find a Grave for the grave of William Broadhead and other family members
    See this listing on Realtor to view the home mansion William built for his family at 130 South Main Street in Jamestown, New York

    Biographical information from The History of Chatauqua County, New York, Illustrated, Boston: W.A. Ferguson & Co., 1894, pp. 808-811




    Categories: 1870s, Advertisements, Broadhead, England, Jamestown, New York, Royston Yorkshire, Thornton Yorkshire | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

    November 17, 1917: Wedding of Alvira Anness, niece of Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead

    Last week, while browsing articles on Fulton History, I came across this one in The Yonkers Statesman (November 19, 1917) describing the wedding of Alvira W. Anness, daughter of Mary Marsh Martin Anness and the (then) late Winfield S. Anness, in the Anness family home at 223 Warburton Avenue in Yonkers, NY. The house still stands! Click here.

    Winfield S. Anness (b. 1861, Stamford, CT) was a widower when he married Mary M. Martin. He had a son with his first wife Mamie E. Valentine (b. 1864): Harold W. Anness (b. 1885). Winfield died in November 1899. I don’t know anything about Harold. If he was still alive in 1917, he was not at this wedding.

    My Dad always referred to Great Aunt Mary as “Aunt Mame”, and apparently she was quite a pistol. Born in 1863, she was a younger sister of my great-grandmother, Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead (b. 1859).  This wedding was in November; Margaret had lost her husband Andrew Douglas Brodhead six months before, in May. Margaret, Alvira’s aunt, is named in the article as one of the attendees.

    Woodruff M. Brodhead, b. 1912, with his mother Fannie Woodruff Brodhead

    Giving the bride away was my Dad’s Great Uncle Charlie (Charles Conrad Martin); my Dad’s older brother Woodruff, then age 5 1/2, wore a little sailor suit and carried white baskets filled with yellow asters.

    Woodruff’s parents (my grandparents) were also present at the wedding, of course. To the left is a photo of Woodruff (“Woody”) and his mother Fannie Woodruff Brodhead. At that stage, he was their only child. He’s wearing a little sailor suit here, so perhaps this photo was also taken during that period. I’m a bad judge of ages, but I’d say he looks about 5 here?

    According to the family tree information of Ancestry user “KrehT,” the newlyweds, Alvira and Walter Douglas Barry, eventually had two children: Alvira Martin Barry (b. 1920) and Walter Douglas Barry (b. 1923). Interestingly, this user shows Alvira’s middle name as “Woodruff,” but did not provide any clues as to where that middle name came from. I’d love to know since my grandmother was a Woodruff, one of the original Elizabeth, NJ, families.

    Categories: Anness, Brodhead, Martin, New York, Weddings, Woodruff | 1 Comment

    Brodhead Reunion in Kingston, New York, in June 1964

    Some of you may remember the post I did several years ago on the 1964 Brodhead family reunion in Kingston, NY, which was held to commemorate the 300th anniversary of Daniel Brodhead and Ann Tye’s arrival in America. Click here to head back to it. Recently I found the below article and photo on Fulton History. I don’t recognize any of these folks, but I thought some of you may. Give a shout out in the comments section if you see one of your family members or want to comment on the reunion in general. Thanks!

    Brodhead family reunion in 1964 – just a few of the many Brodheads present for the event

    Categories: Anniversaries, Brodhead, Kingston, New York | Tags: , | Leave a comment

    Fowler T. Brodhead (1828-1902), famed linguist and foreign language teacher to President Grover Cleveland

    New York. Grand ovation to Governor Cleveland in the city of Buffalo, October 2nd. Scene on Main Street / From sketches by C. Upham. 1884. (Credit Library of Congress digital archives http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c07331); Cleveland was 28th Governor of NY (1983-1985) and prior to that had been Mayor of Buffalo in 1882.

    While perusing some old papers on Fulton History, I came across several exceedingly sad obituaries for the very gifted and talented Fowler Thayer Brodhead, who at one point in his life had taught foreign languages to a young Grover Cleveland (1837-1908), but in later years seems to have completely withdrawn from society. He died at 75 from what appears to have been a great deal of self-neglect, in spite of having substantial financial means at his disposal. While the articles seize strongly upon what became of Fowler after his mother’s passing in 1885, an event that supposedly sparked his mental and physical decline, his gifts and talents cannot be denied and deserve to be remembered, especially by those of us who share his Brodhead DNA.

    From the Illustrated Buffalo Express, February 16, 1902: “Fowler T. Brodhead, famed as a linguist, teacher of Grover Cleveland, later a hermit, was buried in the Brodhead family plot in Forest Lawn last Friday. […] The story of his life is a tale of sadness. His father came to Buffalo from Hudson in 1830, a lawyer and graduate of Williams College, whose wife was Miss Nancy Thayer of Lee, Mass. The first American Brodhead was Captain Daniel Brodhead of the Yorkshire Regiment that came from England in 1664 and wrested New Netherlands from the Dutch. The Brodheads lived at Washington and Huron streets in 1837 and for years thereafter. The father was a law partner of Judge Masten. Fowler Brodhead was born in Hudson in 1828. He attended Fay’s Academy at Washington and Huron streets and then went to Albany to study medicine. He returned to Buffalo without finishing his course and studied French and German. He taught in the high school and gave private lessons. He became known as a proficient linguist, speaking several languages fluently. It, was related of him that be once sat down with a Frenchman, German, Italian and Spaniard and conversed with the four, each in his own language, fluently, and with ease. He wrote poems in several languages and wrote a play, The Burning of Buffalo, for the old Metropolitan Theater.”

    I checked the online records for Forest Lawn Cemetery in Buffalo and found Fowler and his parents William W. Brodhead and Nancy Thayer Brodhead. I went ahead and created memorial pages for them on the Find a Grave website. The three are located in Section: BB Lot: 143-N PT Spaces 1, 2, 3.

    Volume 4 of The Brodhead Family has William listed on page 303. William Wheeler Brodhead (F-401) was the son of Luke Brodhead (1777-1845); Luke was a son of Daniel Brodhead and Hester Wyngart and a brother of my fifth-great-grandfather Garret Brodhead. William was baptized on 10 September 1797 at Linlithgo RDC, Livingston, Columbia County, NY, and married Nancy Lucretia Thayer on May 25, 1825 in Westfield, MA.  William “lived in Red Hook, NY at the time of his marriage and later lived Buffalo, NY where he was an attorney in 1850 and a private school teacher in 1860.” Fowler is listed as G-1226, but no information is given for him.

    The newspaper articles point to Fowler’s withdrawal from society as coinciding with the death of his mother Nancy in 1885; he died with $4,000 to his name which was a substantial sum in 1902 (about $111,000 today). He lived at 82 10th Street in Buffalo; where the house once stood is now a vacant lot.

    A notice of sale that appeared in the Buffalo New York Courier on October 24, 1903, offers the names of several Brodheads: two of Fowler’s nieces and a great-nephew. Charlotte Brodhead and Mary Gertude Brodhead (b. 1829 and 1837 respectively) were daughters of James Oliver Brodhead (1803-1841; Brodhead Family F-404) and wife Caroline Wackerhagen. James Oliver Brodhead was the brother of William W. Brodhead. Francis Reynolds Brodhead (b. 1863) was a nephew of the two sisters via their brother Thomas C. Brodhead (1835-1877), son of James Oliver Brodhead.

    As sad as Fowler’s end was, clearly his was a life well lived at least up to a certain point. I’m glad I came upon his story. I do not want him to be forgotten especially since he had no wife or children to pass his story down along the line to today’s generations.

    Illustrated Buffalo Express – 16 February 1902 (Credit: FultonHistory dot com)

    ***************************************

    Buffalo Morning Express, 12 February 1902 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

    Buffalo Morning Express, 12 February 1902 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

    ***************************************

    Buffalo NY Courier 12 Feb 1902 (Credit: Fulton History)

    ***************************************

    Buffalo New York Courier, 24 October 1903

    Categories: Brodhead, Cleveland Grover, Death, New York, Obituaries | Tags: , | 2 Comments

    “Family” recipe Friday: 1904—Madame de Ryther writes about custards and blackberry pie

    I’ve written so much about opera-singer-turned-food-writer Madame de Ryther, she almost feels like family, so I think it is safe to include her thoughts and recipes in this Friday’s post.

    The Rome Citizen, October 1, 1884; Credit: Fulton History dot com

    But before I do that, I wanted to mention that quite some time ago, blog reader Bill S., who also developed a bit of an obsession with Jule, alerted me to the fact that he’d come across information proving that Madame de Ryther had indeed once been married. Prior to that, I’d wondered whether she had adopted the name because it sounded somewhat exotic and would have been useful for her singing career.

    Bill sent me a couple of obituaries for Jule’s husband John de Ryther, who died “at home” in his room at the Arlington Hotel in Rome, New York, on September 30, 1884. He was roughly 50 years of age. The cause of death was given as lung congestion and “asthmatic difficulty.”

    The Rome Citizen article indicates that John had not been well for a number of years. I wonder whether a fall he’d taken in an elevator shaft the previous year had perhaps hastened his demise. Surely it could not have helped.

    The Syracuse Sentinel, October 3, 1884; Credit: Fulton History dot com

    The Utica Morning Herald, April 18, 1883, reported under the heading “Rome Matters”: “John De Ryther. who fell thro’ the elevator well at the Arlington yesterday, is much more comfortable this evening.” I found another article in the Rome Citizen dated July 13, 1883, that mentioned a little girl had fallen the same distance as John down an elevator shaft (24 feet), but that she came away unscathed, while he had been “disabled for weeks”. Such a fall certainly could not have helped someone who already had a history of health problems.

    In any case, it’s clear from the obituaries that John was a highly beloved and popular citizen who had held many important positions. At the time of John’s death, Jule was in her late 40s and living in New York City, where her singing career was still going strong.

    Bill also sent me a ton of links to loads of Jule’s food and recipe articles, and he even managed to find an image of Jule’s face in an old newspaper he found on Newspapers.com. Unfortunately, I cannot display it here until I find it on a website like Fulton History that places no restrictions on usage. Bill wondered why, given Jule’s success in life as an opera singer and food writer, that he could find no bona fide photos of her anywhere. I find that quite strange too. But hopefully one or more surface some day so I can include them here.

    I found the two Jules De Ryther articles below on Fulton History; they are from 1904. The custard article, which includes instructions and ideas for custard pies and baked and boiled custards, would have been good to include in the post I did with my great-grandmother’s custard recipe, but, alas, that ship has sailed.

    As for the blackberry pie recipe, it really sounds heavenly. I am going to give it a whirl when blackberries are in season and at their best (and the price is reasonable). Her recipe calls for 1.5 quarts per pie, and she insists that no lard be used for the crust and that the pie should be eaten immediately and never refrigerated.

    Finally, for anyone planning to try Jule’s recipes that require baking, a reminder that oven temperatures were referred to differently back then:

    • Slow Oven = 325°F (163°C)
    • Moderate Oven = 375°F (191°C)
    • Hot or Quick Oven = 425 °F (218°C)
    • Bread or Pastry Oven = 360°F (182°C)

    Happy Friday!

    Custards_NY_Press_1MAY1904

    New York Press, 1 May 1904 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

    Blackberry_PIe_NY_Press_1904_FS

    New York Press, 1904 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

    Categories: Food: Family Recipes & Favorites, Madame Jule de Ryther, New York, Rome | Tags: , | 2 Comments

    An image of Mrs. Lewis Dingman Brodhead (a.k.a. Mildred Elizabeth Hancock)

    Lewis Dingman Brodhead (undated; probably circa 1904)

    Lewis Dingman Brodhead (undated; probably circa 1904) – Image copyright James and Barbara Brodhead

    As long-time readers of this blog know, Mildred Elizabeth Hancock (1892 – Aft 1940) eloped with my Great Uncle Lewis Dingman Brodhead (1884-1934) on June 23, 1911, at the Church of the Transfiguration in Manhattan.

    (My previous blog posts about them include: Another Brodhead elopes, this time in 1911 at NYC’s Little Church Around the Corner; More on Lewis D. Brodhead; and Survived by ‘Mrs. R. J. Cole of Philadelphia’)

    Well, some good news! The Baltimore Sun has kindly given me permission to publish the photo of Mildred that appeared on p. 14 of the July 12, 1911, issue of that paper.

    Mildred’s hat is pretty fabulous; it’s a shame we can’t see her or her hat in full living color, but under the circumstances, B&W will definitely do!

    Below Image: Reprinted with permission from The Baltimore Sun.  All rights reserved.

    Mildred

    Reprinted with permission from The Baltimore Sun. All rights reserved.

    Categories: Brodhead, Hancock, Lutherville, Maryland, New York City | Tags: | 7 Comments

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