Manhattan

We love our dogs

The Evening Telegram - New York, Monday, 15 September 1912 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

The Evening Telegram – New York, Monday, 15 September 1912 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

We humans sure love our dogs. Take a look at the above 1912 headline about “Mike” who went missing from 70 West 57th St. in Manhattan nearly 103 years ago. Even private detectives were put on the trail. I’m sure the article helped sell some papers, and hopefully it, and all the hoopla surrounding his disappearance, got him found. I know I’d be as grief-stricken as this poor lady if any dog (or cat) of mine went missing.  Not long ago, I watched PBS’s fascinating NOVA show “Dogs Decoded” which really helps explain our remarkable 10,000+-year-old bond with Canis familiaris. As life goes on, I’ve discovered that it’s hard to have a really bad day when you have a dog.

Luigi

Luigi

I was going to post last week about my own little Pomeranian dog, Luigi, who’s marking an anniversary this month, but then I thought it would be better not to mix the blog anniversary post with his story. And now that over a week has gone by, I’ve decided to give you the very abbreviated version, since all that really matters is that he is still alive and doing well.

We’ve been blessed to have Luigi since 2006. He came to us as a toothless rescue dog who’d been abandoned by a breeder who had no more use for him. He is in his 19th year and was diagnosed with pulmonary hypertension when hospitalized two years ago for acute pneumonia. At that time, the options were to put him down straight away or put him on medication (Sildenafil & Vetmedin) and see how long he’d last. The doctor gave him 6 months and said to monitor for seizures, fainting, or any other clearly alarming development. With TLC, Luigi slowly rebounded. Six months came and went. Then a year. Then 18 months. And just about now, we are at the two-year mark. A week ago Friday, we thought we’d hit the final bump in the road with him, and almost had him put to sleep. But, thank heavens, it was a false alarm, and we are back to sailing calm waters again.

Luigi enjoying an Atlantic beach, 2011

Luigi enjoying an Atlantic beach, 2011

So, this month we’re marking his two-year anniversary of surviving with pulmonary hypertension—an anniversary we never expected to see. When his time does come, it will be too difficult to talk about it—you’ll probably just see a brief RIP here—so let this post speak to how much this little guy is loved and cherished.

Resources:
“Why Every Man Should Own a Dog” by Jim Thornton for Men’s Health dot com
“Man’s Best Friend” in the Economist online
“Dogs Are Man’s Best Friend Thanks to Bonding Hormone” in the Guardian (UK) online

Categories: Manhattan, Miscellaneous, New York City, Pets | 10 Comments

Some descendants of the Nixon family of Fermanagh, Northern Ireland

Louise and Jennie Nixon, 1964

Photo from my family’s private collection: Sisters Louise (75) and Jennie Nixon (80) in 1964

These lovely elderly ladies are Louise E. Nixon and Jane ‘Jennie’ Bracken Nixon, nieces of my great-grandmother Sarah (Nixon) Boles of Co. Leitrim, Ireland, whose parents—William Nixon and Rachel Miller—and numerous siblings moved to the United States in the late 1860s. The ladies were my grandfather William Boles‘s cousins.

A previous post on Sarah Nixon Boles mentioned the fact that most, if not all, of her family relocated to New York after the US Civil War. This Nixon family is presumably part of the Nixon family of Fermanagh*—about which much has been written (e.g., The Families of French of Belturbet and Nixon of Fermanagh, and Their Descendants by Henry B. Swanzy, published in 1908).  However, I have yet to figure out the family’s location in the larger Nixon family tree.

William and Rachel Nixon were about 67 and 51, respectively when they arrived in America in 1869 (the year given me by the descendant of Benjamin, one of their sons). Joining them were supposedly all of their children (I’ve found 11, although my mother’s records list 14) except for my great-grandmother Sarah: Mark Nixon (b. cir. 1839/1845), Edward Nixon (b. cir 1845); Elizabeth ‘Lizzie’ Nixon (b. cir. 1849); Jane Nixon (b. 1851); Thomas Nixon (b. cir. 1852); Sarah Nixon (b. 1855); Rachel Nixon (b. cir 1865); Mary Nixon (b. cir 1858); Benjamin Nixon (b. cir 1862); Robert Nixon (b. 1863); Catherine Nixon (b. 1864); the last three (whom I have yet to find a trace of) were James, John, and William.

Passenger List - The Caledonia - sailed from Moville, Ireland to NY, NY on 14 Sep 1868 (Source Citation: Year: 1868; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: M237; Microfilm Roll: 301; Line: 22; List Number: 989.)

Passenger List – The Caledonia – sailed from Moville, Ireland to NY, NY on 14 September 1868 (Source Citation: Year: 1868; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: M237; Microfilm Roll: 301; Line: 22; List Number: 989.)

The passenger list inset for the ship Caledonia , which set sail from Moville on Lough Foyle at the northern tip of Northern Ireland to New York on 14 September 1868, shows the names of some Nixons–the names seem to fairly well coincide with some of the Nixon children’s names & ages. If these indeed are ‘our Nixons’, it would indicate that the older children may have come ahead of the parents and younger children.

While researching the family, I found William, Rachel and a number of the children in the 1870 US Federal Census, living in NYC Ward 18. William is listed as a ‘farmer’, an answer based certainly on his past occupation in Ireland. The children in the household were: Edward (30), Thomas (20), Eliza (22), Jane (18), Rachel (15), Mary (10), and ‘Bennett’ (10, this was probably ‘Benjamin’).

1870 Census Record ("United States Census, 1870," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M8X8-K4T : accessed 25 February 2015), Rachael Nixon, New York, United States; citing p. 34, family , NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,539.)

1870 Census Record (“United States Census, 1870,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M8X8-K4T : accessed 25 February 2015), Rachael Nixon, New York, United States; citing p. 34, family , NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,539.)

William Nixon died before the 1880 US Federal Census, as Rachel Nixon is listed in that census record as a widow ‘keeping house’ and living at 203 16th Street, NY, NY. and living with children Edward, Lizzie, Thomas, Rachel, Benjamin, Robert, Mary, and Kate, and several lodgers. The census record indicates that family members were involved in the dry goods business. Son Thomas (28 and now widowed) is listed as being a ‘dry goods buyer’ as is son Edward, age 35 and single. Benjamin (20) is listed as a ‘dry goods clerk’ as is Robert (18). (The 1900 Census indicates that Robert emigrated in 1879.)

Looking at old newspapers, I found the following mortuary notice in the New York Herald, dated 11 Aug 1871: At his [Gramercy] residence, 346 East 17th Street, on Thursday, August 10, William Nixon, aged 69 years. Funeral will take place on Saturday, August 12, at one o’clock PM from Seventeenth Street Methodist Episcopal Church, between First and Second avenues. Relatives and friends are invited to attend.

Wikimedia Commons: Manhattan neighborhoods (map); Author= Stilfehler; Oct. 15th, 2007

Wikimedia Commons: Manhattan neighborhoods (map); Author= Stilfehler; Oct. 15th, 2007

Almost two decades later, I found a notice for a Rachel Nixon (New York Herald, 12 May 1890): On Saturday, May 10, 1890, Rachel Nixon, age 72 years. The relatives and friends of the family are invited to attend the funeral services at her late [East Village] residence, No. 224 East 12th Street, on Monday evening, May 12, 1890 at eight o’clock. Interment in Green-wood.

A William Nixon (bur. August 1871, Find a Grave memorial #127997780) and a Rachel Nixon (bur. 5-13-1890; Find a Grave memorial #106845856) are buried in Green-wood Cemetery Lot 17245 Section 17, Grave 114. The grave is unmarked according to the Find a Grave photographer who kindly attempted to find the graves for me. I’m not yet certain that I have the correct Rachel and William, but hope to pin all this down at some point. Meanwhile I toss this info out there to my readers and future readers who may already have turned over these stones and arrived at some conclusions.

Son Edward Nixon and wife Anna (Bracken) Nixon, who emigrated from No. Ireland in 1883, had four children: Jane ‘Jennie’ (b. 1884), William (b. 1885), George (b. 1887), and Louise (b. 1889). The first two children were born in Manhattan. The second two were born in Bridgeport, CT. Edward died sometime between 1889 and 1900, as Anna is a widow as of the 1900 census. There is an Edward Nixon in the same plot at Green-wood Cemetery (Burial 1899-03-29, Lot 17245 Section 17, Grave 114; (Find a Grave #106846467), perhaps giving a bit more weight to the possibility that the Green-wood plot is indeed where our Nixon ancestors were laid to rest.

By the 1900 Census, Anna (Bracken) Nixon and her children (ages 16, 15, 13, 11), sister Mary J. Bracken, and a lodger are living at 160 Virginia Avenue in Jersey City Ward No. 8, Hudson Co., NJ, and it was there that the family remained for many years. Neither Jennie nor Louise ever married. Jennie devoted her life to working as a teacher in the Jersey City public school system, and Louise worked for many years as a stenographer and then executive secretary for the president or vice president of a company in NYC. Eventually the sisters joined forces with their brother William and his wife Marion to buy a large house at 680 Orchard Street in Oradell, NJ, where they spent happy years before moving into the Francis Asbury Manor Methodist rest home in Ocean Grove, NJ. Jane died in May of 1972, and Louise in October 1979.

Jennie Boles with Louise and Jennie Nixon, spring 1964

Photo form my family’s private collection: Jennie Boles (75) of Ireland with her American cousins Louise (75) and Jennie Nixon (80), early spring 1964, New Jersey

Serendipitously it was during their years in Jersey City that Jennie and Louise befriended my grandmother Zillah Trewin who lived there with her parents William Trewin and Elizabeth (Sargent) Trewin. According to my mother, Zillah was great friends with the Nixon sisters, as well as their cousins (the children of Jane Nixon and Wm Elliott Roberts), and it was through that friendship that she ultimately met and married their cousin (my grandfather) William Boles who emigrated to the US in 1912 at the encouragement of his uncle Robert Nixon who sponsored him.

I remember Jennie and Louise well. They were very fun ladies—full of good humor and always had a twinkle in their eyes. I always enjoyed the times spent with them, and best remember our visits to their Ocean Grove apartment. As I recall, we would drive down to see them on Saturdays since the roads in Ocean Grove are closed to all traffic on Sundays. We always took them out to lunch, and I remember taking them down to some restaurant near the ocean in Spring Lake, a short drive to the south. They were two sweethearts and it was very sad to lose them. I would love to have them here now to have some family history chats with them. When I was a teenager that topic was far from my mind.

I’ll close this post with a couple of Louise’s recipes (‘Chocolate Flake Candy’ and ‘Date Balls’) I recently came upon while re-binding my mom’s old recipe notebook. I haven’t tried either of them yet as I am trying to shift a bit of weight. Such temptations would surely sabotage my results! But they will stay on my radar!

If you’ve made it this far in the post, I wish you a great day. If you have anything to add, share, correct, etc., please don’t hesitate to get in touch or leave a comment!

Nixon_Louise_recipe

Recipes typed up by Louise Nixon for my mother

Jennie and Louise’s Nixon Tree Branch
1-William Nixon b. Cir 1802, Ireland, d. Bef 2 Jun 1880; possibly 10 Aug
1871 +Rachael Millar b. Cir 1818, Ireland, d. Possibly 10 May 1890, Manhattan, New
York, New York
|—–2-Edward Nixon b. Cir 1845, Ireland, d. Betw 1889 and 1900
| +Anna Bracken b. Aug 1847, Northern Ireland, d. After 1930
| |—–3-Jane Bracken Nixon b. 15 Apr 1884, Manhattan, New York, New York,
| | d. May 1972, Ocean Grove, Monmouth, NJ
| |—–3-William Thomas Nixon b. 24 Aug 1885, Manhattan, New York, New
| | York, d. Sep 1967, Suffolk, New York
| | +Marion Zoller
| |—–3-George Robert Bracken Nixon b. 12 Feb 1887, Bridgeport,
| | Connecticut
| | +May L. Swenarton b. Cir 1889, New Jersey
| | |—–4-George W. Nixon b. Cir 1914, New Jersey
| | |—–4-Frank L. Nixon b. Cir 1919
| |—–3-Louise E. Nixon b. 22 Jul 1889, Bridgeport, Connecticut, d. Oct
| | 1979, Ocean Grove, Monmouth, NJ

Categories: Boles, Co. Fermanagh, Drumkeeran, Co. Leitrim, Food: Family Recipes & Favorites, Green-Wood Cemetery Brooklyn NY, Ireland, Jersey City, Hudson Co., Manhattan, Methodist Episcopal, New York, Nixon, Trewin, US Federal 1880 | 2 Comments

Henry Conrad Brodhead & Eva Wilder McGlasson: late 19th- / early 20th-century “power couple”

Eva Wilder Brodhead (The Book Buyer: A Summary of American and Foreign Literature, Volume XIII, February 1896 – January 1897 (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons) - page 457)

Eva Wilder Brodhead (Image from The Book Buyer: A Summary of American and Foreign Literature, Volume XIII, February 1896 – January 1897 (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons) – page 457)

Two families came together in Manhattan, New York, on 5 December 1894, to celebrate the marriage of Henry Conrad Brodhead, a wealthy, never-before-married, 46-year-old mining engineer, and the adored and admired Eva Wilder McGlasson, a 24-year-old Kentucky woman widely regarded as one of the most accomplished young literary talents of her era, said to be the youngest magazinist in the country*. She was especially known for her short stories and her use of dialect.

This marriage was mentioned in fleeting in a past post on Henry’s brother William H. Brodhead‘s elopement, which took place on that very same day, Henry’s wedding serving as just the diversion William needed to go off and marry his beloved, and much younger, Mary Van Tassel. (I know the age difference between Mary and William appalled their parents, but the age gap between Henry and Eva was even more vast–granted Eva was 24, but she was still very much old enough to be Henry’s daughter.) The brothers were two of the six sons of Daniel Dingman Brodhead (b. 1818) and Mary Ann Brodrick (b. cir. 1826), and nephews of my second great grandfather, Andrew Jackson Brodhead, and cousins of my great grandfather, Andrew Douglas Brodhead.

Henry C. Brodhead (image from Wyoming Valley in the 19th Century. Art Edition by SR Smith, Vol I, Wilkes-Barre Leader Print, 1894)

Henry C. Brodhead (image from Wyoming Valley in the 19th Century. Art Edition by SR Smith, Vol I, Wilkes-Barre Leader Print, 1894)

From Manhattan, Henry and Eva embarked on a lengthy European honeymoon tour that included a Mediterranean cruise.

Their 21-year journey of marriage was set against the backdrop of Colorado’s mountains, bustling Manhattan, and European cities. How and where did they meet? What led them to each other?

Their relationship must have been the source of tremendous curiosity for Eva’s multitude of fans, and I must admit that even all these years later, I myself am intrigued to know how, where, and when their paths first crossed. At the time of their marriage, they must have been viewed as a sort of “power couple”—one whose movements and activities were traced and actively talked about as much as that would have been possible back then.

Impending wedding news from the New York Times, 2 December 1894

Impending wedding news from the New York Times, 2 December 1894

H.C. Brodhead
Henry was not exactly a spring chicken when he finally took the plunge into marriage, but the wait was likely well worth it—he would have been hard-pressed up to that point to have found a prettier, more intelligent, and more accomplished wife than Eva. Perhaps, his maturity, rich life experience, acquired wisdom, passionate work ethic, and financial security provided Eva with the valued partner she needed personally, as well as the freedom she needed spiritually and artistically, to pursue her talents and career to the fullest.

The 1894 book The Wyoming Valley in the Nineteenth Century. Art Edition offers this about Henry’s pre-marriage years: H. C. Brodhead, born at Mauch Chunk and educated in Philadelphia. Began his mining career at Wanamie in the early 70’s for the Lehigh Coal and Navigation Company. Upon their purchase of the Red Ash collieries in Plymouth, he was made engineer in charge and served in such capacity for several years. When the same collieries were absorbed into the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, he was made a Division Superintendent of said Company, and after a time was transferred to Sugar Notch, at that time the most difficult division in the company’s possession. After several years service there he was in 1883, promoted to the Assistant General Outside Superintendency, which place he held till his resignation in 1888. His large experience obtained in early life he has been able to utilize profitably in the care of his individual interests in several collieries, all of which have been successful. The 1860 and 1870 census records corroborate the Philadelphia location, and 1880 census record confirms Henry’s residence as being located in Sugar Notch, Luzerne Co., PA.

A later publication, the 1906 book Genealogical and Family History of the Wyoming and Lackawanna Valleys, Pennsylvania provides a few more clues about those early years: …Henry was educated in Philadelphia. He graduated at the Philadelphia high school, A. B., and later A. M. He began his business career as civil engineer, later became a mining engineer, and was for several years in the employ of the Lehigh Coal and Navigation Company and afterward with the Lehigh and Wilkes-Barre Coal Company. Still later he began operating in his own behalf, developing coal lands and organizing companies for mining operations…

(Image from the Los Angeles Herald, March 3, 1895; California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu>. All newspapers published before January 1, 1923 are in the public domain and therefore have no restrictions on use)

CLICK to ENLARGE (Image from the Los Angeles Herald, March 3, 1895; California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu>. All newspapers published before January 1, 1923 are in the public domain and therefore have no restrictions on use)

Eva Wilder McGlasson
Henry’s young bride Eva had accomplished much in her 24 years. At the time of her wedding, she was a celebrated young writer and an object of fascination for her adoring readers. Snippets appeared about her in various newspapers and other publications:

In the Montreal Herald on September 8, 1892: Mrs. Eva Wilder McGlasson the author of Diana’s Livery and An Earthly Paragon (which was written in three weeks), is probably the youngest writer before the public who has attained as much reputation and accomplished as remarkable work. Mrs. McGlasson is Kentuckian, and began to write a few years ago, when she was eighteen. Her stories are strong and vivid, and her dialogue is especially dramatic without being untrue. She has devoted herself almost entirely to describing the “life of her native State,” but her friends have advised her broadening her field of observation by going to New York to live, which she will probably do.

In the Patterson Daily Press on May 6, 1893: Mrs. Eva Wilder McGlasson is one of the most remarkable women of the age, Not only is she remarkable for her brilliancy, but on account of her extreme youth and the ease with which she has attained the pinnacle of fame. Mrs. McGlasson is still less than 24, and yet she has written and published two successful books. She is petite and pretty and exhibits the fresh, ingenuous charm of an extremely bright schoolgirl.

In the New York Times on July 30, 1893: Mrs. Eva Wilder McGlasson, whose writings are as delicate and artistic as the frostwork one finds on the Winter window pane, confesses to her impossibility to produce more than six short stories in a year’s time.

Eva Wilder McGlasson

Eva Wilder McGlasson (Image from the Los Angeles Herald, March 3, 1895; California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu>. All newspapers published before January 1, 1923 are in the public domain and therefore have no restrictions on use)

The article “Women of the Authors’ Club”, published by the New York Times on January 21, 1894, gave this wonderful description of Eva: Mrs. Eva Wilder McGlasson, who, shy, tiny, and looking very young in a dainty pink gown, with a great cluster of pink roses at her belt, no one would suspect of being one of the most powerful fiction writers now contributing to the magazines.

And, from the April 7, 1895, New York Times article “Woman’s Sense of Humor: It is Frequently Alleged that She Does Not Possess Any. American Facts to Contradict This”: Eva Wilder McGlasson has interwoven much that is delightfully funny with the somberer tints of her stories. A Monument to Corder is likewise a monument to humor.

Born in Covington, Kentucky, to a mother and father hailing from Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and Nova Scotia, Canada, respectively, Eva was educated in Covington and later in New York. According to the 1914 book Kentucky in American Letters: 1784–1912:

Featured with other women writers, the Los Angeles Herald (see image above for source details)

Featured with other women writers, the Los Angeles Herald (see Eva’s image above for source details)

She began to write when but eighteen years of age, and a short time thereafter her first novel appeared, Diana’s Livery (New York, 1891). This was set against a background most alluring: the Shaker settlement at Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, into which a young man of the world enters and falls in love with a pretty Shakeress, Her second story, An Earthly Paragon (New York, 1892), which was written in three weeks, ran through Harper’s Weekly before being published in book form. It was a romance of the Kentucky mountains, laid around Chamoum, the novelist’s name for Yosemite, Kentucky. It was followed by a novelette of love set amidst the salt-sea atmosphere of an eastern watering place, Ministers of Grace (New York, 1894). Hildreth, the scene of this little story, is anywhere along the Jersey coast from Atlantic City to Long Branch. Ministers of Grace also appeared serially in Harper’s Weekly, and when it was issued in book form Col. Henry Watterson called the attention of Richard Mansfield to it as a proper vehicle for him, and the actor promptly secured the dramatic rights, hoping to present it upon the stage; but his untimely death prevented the dramatization of the tale under highly favorable auspices. It was the last to be published under the name of Eva Wilder McGlasson, as this writer was first known to the public, for on December 5, 1894, she was married in New York to Mr. Henry C. Brodhead, a civil and mining engineer of Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania.

Colorado

Rand, McNally & Co.'s Colorado. Rand McNally & Co., Map Publishers and Engravers, Chicago, 1912  (Source: www.davidrumsey.com)

Part of a 1912 map of Colorado, showing Brodhead in Las Animas County, just outside the town of Aguilar (look to middle of the map);  Rand, McNally & Co.’s Colorado. Rand McNally & Co., Map Publishers and Engravers, Chicago, 1912 (Source: http://www.davidrumsey.com)

Two years before marrying Eva, Henry’s business interests had shifted from Pennsylvania to Colorado—he and his two younger brothers, Albert Gallatin Brodhead and Robert Sayre Brodhead, had set their sights on the coal riches of that state, ultimately founding the town of Brodhead, Las Animas County, Colorado (today a ghost town), and locating several mines in and around that place. Close to Brodhead is the small town of Aguilar (“Gateway to the Spanish Peaks”); if you look it up on Google maps you will see ‘Brodhead Canyon’ nearby. Aguilar is 178 miles south of Denver.

Trinidad, Colorado, to the south of Aguilar and the Brodhead mines, 1905 (Wikipedia: Public domain image)

Trinidad, Colorado, to the south of Aguilar and the Brodhead mines, 1905 (Wikipedia: Public domain image)

Genealogical and Family History of the Wyoming and Lackawanna Valleys, Pennsylvania (1906) offers some insight into the brothers’ activities out West: In October of the same year [1893] Albert Gallatin Brodhead and his brothers, Henry C. and Robert S. Brodhead, journeyed through Colorado, making careful investigation of its mineral resources. Having prospected coal lands in Las Animas county, they purchased two large tracts, one of four thousand acres at Brodhead, Colorado, and six hundred acres at Walsenburg, near the foot of the Spanish Peaks, which rise to an altitude of nearly fourteen thousand feet. The Brodheads have leased both their coal tracts, one to the Green Canon Coal Company, and the other to the Las Animas Coal Company. They market their output in South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Texas, Oklahoma and Indian Territory. Expert authority has passed upon the quality of the coal, and grade it as semi-anthracite. It is distributed in six workable veins, and the quantity capable of being mined is estimated at millions of tons. The Brodhead properties are held by an incorporated company, of which the officers are: Henry C. Brodhead, president; Robert S. Brodhead, vice-president; and Albert G. Brodhead, secretary and general manager, with the principal office in Denver, Colorado.

So, those of you in Colorado today may be curious to pass through Aguilar if you are ever in that area to check out what, if anything, remains of the ghost town of Brodhead, Colorado!

I will continue this post another day. Meanwhile, I will leave you with a poem* by Eva that was published in Harper’s Weekly on May 14, 1892:

The Daguerreotype

You
hev to hold it sidewise
Fer to make the lightness show,
‘Cuz its sort uh dim an’ shifty
Till you git it right—’bout
so!
An’ then the eyes winks at yeh,
An’ the mouth is cherry ripe
Law! it beats your new-style picters,
This old digerrytype!
Thar’s a blush across the dimples
Thet burrows in the cheeks;
F’om out them clumps o’ ringlets
Two little small ears peeks,
Thet brooch thet jines her neck-gear
Is what they used to wear;
A big gold frame thet sprawled around
A lock of ‘o—some ones hair.
‘Twas took ‘fore we was married,
Thet there—your maw an’ me.
An’ time I study on it,
Why, ‘t fazes me to see
Thet fifty year ‘aint teched her
A lick! She’s jest the same
She was when Susie Scriggens
Took Boone C. Curd’s name.
The hair is mebby white
‘An it was in ’41.
But her cheeks is jest as pinky.
An’ her smiles ‘ain’t slacked up none.
I reckon—love—er somethin’
Yerluminates her face,
Like the crimsont velvet linin’
Warms up the picter-case.
‘S I say, these cyard boa’d portraits,
They make me sort uh tired ,
A-grinnin’ forf upun yeh
Like their very lips was wired!
Give me the old digerrytype,
Whar the face steals on your sight
Like a dream that comes by night-time
When your supper’s actin’ right!

 

*****************************************************************************************

*Mansfield Daily Shield, February 17, 1895

References:

Hayden, Rev. Horace Edwin Hayden, Hon. Alfred Hand, and John W. Jordan, eds. 1906. Genealogical and Family History of the Wyoming and Lackawanna Valleys, Pennsylvania,  Vol. I. New York/Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Co. (pp. 202-203).

McGlasson, Eva Wilder. 1892. “The Daguerreotype” Harper’s Weekly: A Journal of Civilization 36(1847): 463.

Smith, S. R. 1894. The Wyoming Valley in the Nineteenth Century. Art edition Vol I. Wilkes-Barre, PA: Wilkes-Barre Leader Print  (p. 78).

Townsend, John Wilson. 1913. Kentucky in American Letters: 1784–1912 Vol. II. Cedar Rapids: The Torch Press (pp. 267–69).

Pennsylvania Mines

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See additional posts:

June 24, 2014

July 15, 2014

Categories: Brodhead, Brodhead, Colorado, Denver, Fairmount Cem Denver CO, Kentucky, Manhattan, McGlasson, New York, New York City, Sugar Notch Luzerne Co, US Federal 1860, US Federal 1870, US Federal 1880 | Leave a comment

James Winans Angus (1810-1862) — The Early Years

James W. Angus

James W. Angus

My second great grandfather James Winans Angus was born in New York City on 10 May 1810 to carpenter Jacob Baker Angus (b. Albany, NY) and Mary Winans Angus, (b. Elizabeth, NJ). Two sisters and one brother followed: Abigail Winans Angus, b. 1812; Martha Winans Angus, b. 1818, and Job Winans Angus, b. 1821.

In 1820, the family was living at 123 Pump Street*. Pump Street has since been renamed. According to the website www.oldstreets.com, in the late 18th to early 19th centuries, Pump Street was initially a street in the Delancey Farm Grid, from the Bowery east to Division Street. About 1800 it absorbed Nicholas Street, thereby extending the name west to the present Centre Street. In 1829 Pump Street itself was merged into Walker Street. Since 1855. most of the former Pump Street has been part of Canal Street.

Of course, Lower Manhattan was a vastly different place +/- 200 years ago. If you’re familiar with Manhattan, you know that today Canal Street runs through Chinatown. The below image from 1836 shows the bustling world in which New Yorkers of that era went about their day-to-day activities.

Broadway, New-York. Showing each Building from the Hygeian Depot corner of Canal Street, to beyond Niblo's Garden. Date: 1836 Drawn & Etched by T. Hornor. Aquatinted by J. Hill. Printed by W. Neale. Published by Joseph Stanley & Co. Entered according to Act of Congress by Jos. Stanley & Co. in the Clerks Office of the Southern District of New York. January 26th, 1836.

Broadway, New-York. Showing each Building from the Hygeian Depot corner of Canal Street, to beyond Niblo’s Garden. Date: 1836; Drawn & Etched by T. Hornor. Aquatinted by J. Hill. Printed by W. Neale. Published by Joseph Stanley & Co. Entered according to Act of Congress by Jos. Stanley & Co. in the Clerks Office of the Southern District of New York. January 26th, 1836. From the Collections of the Museum of the City of New York – http://collections.mcny.org/

Tragedy struck the family on 27 November 1824, when Mary died, leaving Jacob with four children aged 3-14. Jacob remarried according to family records*, although unfortunately at the time, no one saw to it to write down the name of the second wife—so her identity remains a mystery, as far as I know. When Jacob died several years later on 29 March 1828, James, 17, and his siblings went to live with their *Uncle Elias Winans, their mother Mary’s brother. Elias’ wife, Abby, likely took the leading role in looking after the children.

Street Scenes, Canal, Copy of Old Time Engraving. Date: 1910 An engraving by G. Gibson (?); subject is Canal Street, depicted when the canal still existed, descriptive caption accompanies engraving. From the Collections of the Museum of the City of New York.

Street Scenes, Canal, Copy of Old Time Engraving. Date: 1910; An engraving by G. Gibson (?); subject is Canal Street, depicted when the canal still existed, descriptive caption accompanies engraving. From the Collections of the Museum of the City of New York. http://collections.mcny.org/

According to p. 6 of Harriet Stryker-Rodda’s genealogical research paper One Line of Descendants of James Angus (1751 – 1806 [grandfather of this James]):
Elias Winans was appointed “guardian of James W. Angus, minor, his father having died intestate* (Orphans Court Record Docket 2653, recorded in Guardianship Letters Book A:329, Essex
County, N. J.), but there are no court records showing that any of the other children were legally made wards of their uncle Elias.

James Angus attended elementary school in Elizabeth, N.J., where he lived with his uncle, Elias Winans, following the death of his parents. (Stryker-Rodda, p. 9) I am wondering if perhaps James went to live with Elias prior to his father’s death since he was already 17 at that time and would otherwise not have been in Elizabeth for more than his last year or two of high school. Certainly the two youngest children would have attended elementary school there, but not James.

**Tombstone inscription, 1st Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ

**Tombstone inscription, 1st Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ

Further down page 9, Stryker-Rodda records that On 25 April 1835 James [age 24] was working at his trade [carpenter, wood craftsman, & coach-maker] in Paterson, N. J., [Passaic Co.] where he purchased a house lot for $200 on the southeast corner of Parke Street (Essex County Deed Book Y3:38). In October of the same year he and George R. Skinner paid $1200 for a piece of land in Paterson on the west side of Union Street, 120′ x 167′(B4:280).

This was followed in November by the purchase for $550 of a house on a lot 15′ x 56′ on the west side of Marshall Street in Paterson. In May of 1836 he sold the land on Marshall Street for the same price he had paid for it (F4:53l). James Angus’ and George R. Skinner’s partnership ended about the time James married. On the 8th of February, 1839, orders were recorded for a Sheriff’s sale of their holdings in Elizabeth [Essex Co.], on the west side of Union Street, a lot 122’xl67’xl09«, which they had purchased from George W. Halsted. The sale was to satisfy debts owed to Jacob G. Crane and William Mulford. It was carried out on 3 December 1839 at Gaylord’s Hotel (Essex County Deed Book D5.-245 ff).

Men's Fashion plate,1826. Image from University of Washington Library Digital Collections http://content.lib.washington.edu (Wikimedia Commons: In public domain in US due to expired copyright)

Men’s Fashion plate,1826. Image from U. of Washington Library Digital Collections http://content.lib.washington.edu (Wikimedia: In public domain in US due to expired copyright)

It’s worth noting that the above just-mentioned happenings coincided with a major nationwide economic recession stemming from “the panic of 1837,” a financial crisis that went on to last almost a decade. The mood in the country was one of enormous pessimism. Economic policy was no doubt a hotly debated topic. Sounds strangely familiar…

James was bouncing around quite a lot back then, not surprising for a single young man in his twenties. Thanks to all that bouncing around, we are privileged to have more information about James from the publication Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election: May 26, 1840. Apparently his place of residence, and hence the legitimacy of his vote, was at issue in the 1838 NJ elections. And that hotly contested election was a really big deal at the time. For an excellent write-up on what all the fuss was about, visit this blog post on the Blue Jersey website.

Bergen, Passaic, and Union Counties, 1838. Image cropped from  David Rumsey Historical Map Collection Author: Bradford, Thomas G. Date: 1838; Short Title: New Jersey. Publisher: Weeks, Jordan & Co. Boston Publisher: Wiley and Putnam. New York (www.davidrumsey.com)

Bergen, Passaic, and Union Counties, 1838. Image cropped from David Rumsey Historical Map Collection Author: Bradford, Thomas G. Date: 1838; Short Title: New Jersey. Publisher: Weeks, Jordan & Co. Boston Publisher: Wiley and Putnam. New York (www.davidrumsey.com)

Various individuals testified about James’ vote. I’m including a map here that shows the 1838 borders of Bergen, Passaic, and Essex counties. You may find it useful to refer to as the borders have changed since then. According to Wikipedia’s entry for Essex County: In 1837, Passaic County was formed from portions of Essex and Bergen County. In 1857, Union County was created from parts of Essex County. Today Elizabeth is in Union County, but back then, it fell within Essex County. James’ 1838 vote was recorded in Elizabethtown (then part of Essex Co.).

Martin Van Buren, US President (1833-1837) Wikipedia

Martin Van Buren, US President (1833-1837) Wikipedia

From the testimony of Luke H. Higgins, we learn that James was working in Bergen Co. — either in Hoboken or Jersey City — in the summer of 1838. When Higgins challenged him for voting in Elizabethtown, James said he worked in Bergen Co., and had his washing and mending done in Elizabethtown, and considered Elizabethtown to be his residence. Higgins ascertained that James was a Whig and and that he stood in opposition to the Van Buren administration. (Many blamed Van Buren, who opted against government intervention during and after the panic of 1837, for the countries economic woes.)

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 335.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 335.

 Early Baltimore and Ohio Railroad passenger equipment of the 1830s, displayed at the B&O Railroad Museum in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. (Wikipedia: © James G. Howes)

Early Baltimore and Ohio Railroad passenger equipment of the 1830s, displayed at the B&O Railroad Museum in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. (Wikipedia: © James G. Howes)

The second individual to testify was John Chatterton, who claimed to have known James for about 10 years. He said James was in Jersey City in 1838, working for the railroad, building cars, and that he saw James in Elizabethtown, but could not say whether James resided in Elizabethtown or not. He knew James got his washing and mending done there. He also knew of James having work in Newark as well, and knew James’ political views and that he was in the Whig party. Upon cross-examination, Chatterton said he knew Mr. Winans [Elias, I presume] was one of James’ links to Elizabethtown and that he thought James boarded with a sister [Martha (never married) or Abigail Angus Woodruff (married to Henry King Woodruff)]. Chatterton stated James had a shop in town that still had James’ sign outside of it and that the shop may have been owned jointly with Skinner [a reference to the aforementioned George R. Skinner]. Chatterton knew nothing of how James voted during the 1838 election.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 336.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 336.

The Whig Party from The Whig Almanac and Politicians Register for 1838

The Whig Party from The Whig Almanac and Politicians Register for 1838

The last person to testify was the aforementioned Jacob G. Crane, who said he believed James’ place of residence the year prior to the elections was Elizabethtown, and that James lived with his aunt [Elias’s wife Abby Winans (Elias was still alive at this point) or one of Mary Winans Angus’s sisters?]. Jacob thought James was usually in Elizabeth from Fridays through Sundays, and thought James’ carriage-making business had been up and running in Elizabethtown for two-three years before the 1838 election, but that he broke it up right before the election. Crane said James worked in Jersey City building carriages and remained residing with his aunt until he married in February 1839 [the marriage actually took place on January 26, 1839]. Then when cross-examined, Crane said James and his new wife [Wealthy Ann Jaques] lived for a time with James’ aunt, but that they then moved to Jersey City, where James’ work was. Another reference to James’ business with Skinner was made. Crane commented that he knew James had paid his taxes in Elizabethtown.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 361.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 361.

Ultimately, a vote was taken as to whether James’ vote was lawful, and indeed it was:

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 76.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 76.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), pp. 718-719.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), pp. 718-719.

The World of Fashion, May 1838 (Wikimedia Commons - In Public Domain in US due to expired copyright)

The World of Fashion, May 1838 (Wikimedia Commons – In Public Domain in US due to expired copyright)

Well, that’s all I have for today. More on James Winans Angus in an upcoming post… As always, comments, corrections, additions are most welcome.

A side note: In my hunt for information on James, I also came across newspaper articles between 1834-1836 referring to a bill in the New Jersey legislature to allow “James Angus, of Patterson” to divorce his wife (once named as ‘Ann’ and another time as ‘Mary’). I’m sure this is a red herring, but for the sake of satisfying my curiosity, I would love to visit NJ state archives to find out what this case was about. Apparently, at that time, in certain situations, people were able to have their marriages dissolved by the legislature. In this case, the bill to dissolve this James Angus’ marriage was eventually passed on Saturday morning, January 24, 1835***.

Elias and Abby Winans' tombstone inscriptions, 1st Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ

Elias and Abby Winans’ **tombstone inscriptions, 1st Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ

June ?, 1843, ad in the  New York American newspaper

June ?, 1843, ad in the New York American newspaper; evidently, the family’s involvement with Crane was ongoing. (Ad courtesy of http://www.fultonhistory.com)

New-York American newspaper ad, October 2, 1841 (courtesy of www.fultonhistory.com)

New-York American newspaper ad, October 2, 1841 (courtesy of http://www.fultonhistory.com)

***************************************************************************************************************************
*ONE LINE OF DESCENDANTS OF JAMES ANGUS (1751 – 1806) including outlines of related Winans and Jaques Families of New Jersey by Harriet Stryker-Rodda, Certified Genealogist (Elizabeth, NJ, 1969) (Project commissioned by Alfred Carpenter Angus Jr., son of James Winans Angus Jr. and Anna M. Carpenter, grandson of James Winans Angus and Wealthy Ann Jaques)

**Wheeler, Wm Ogden. Inscriptions on tombstones and monuments in the burying grounds of the First Presbyterian church and St. Johns church at Elizabeth, New Jersey.1664-1892. New Haven: Press of Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, 1892.

***p. 228 of Minutes of Votes and Proceedings of the 59th General Assembly of the State of New Jersey, 1835
****************************************************************************************************************************

Categories: 1st Presbyterian Elizabeth NJ, Angus, Crane, Elizabeth, Union Co., Jersey City, Hudson Co., Manhattan, New York City, Newark, Essex Co., Patterson NJ, Winans, Woodruff | 2 Comments

Charles T. Brodhead in 1899: NYC’s Lower East Side girls are “saucy” and “self-reliant” (Part II of II)

[Continued from previous post]

L. L. Roush photographic illustration for the article

L. L. Roush photographic illustration for the article

…In the summer this young girl, who does not think the hand of fate is turned against her, spends her evenings on the piers that line the East River. There she finds congenial company. She meets Tommy and Maggie, and Mike and Mamie, and all the rest of what she affectionately terms “the mob.” They sit out on the string-piece and sing the popular sentimental songs of the day. One of the young men plays a waltz on a mouth harmonica or an accordion, and they dance the hours away on the rough planking of the pier and are happy. She goes to as many picnics as she can. If she is fortunate as to invited to four picnics in one week she goes to all of them, and is among the last to leave the dancing pavilion for dancing is her chief and almost only diversion.

New York circa 1903. "East River from Brooklyn tower of Williamsburg Bridge." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. Link to full-size image: http://www.shorpy.com/node/8483?size=_original#caption

New York circa 1903. “East River from Brooklyn tower of Williamsburg Bridge.” 8×10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. Link to full-size image: http://www.shorpy.com/node/8483?size=_original#caption

When she earns what she calls “real money,” which is anything from four dollars a week upward, she pays three dollars a week to her mother for board and keeps the balance for her own needs. She buys her own clothing and pays half a dollar for a seat in one of the down-town theatres whenever she can afford it, which is not often.

Our young friend is also fond of the theatre because she can see there the dresses worn by women more fortunate than she. She is fond of dress and has a love for pretty things. When the opportunity offers she stops before the show-windows of the big dry-goods stores in the shopping district, and gazes wistfully at the handsome gowns displayed there, and turns away with a sigh from the things that can never be hers. Yet she feels that she is as much entitled to them as the grand dame who sweeps out of the establishment and across the walk to her handsome brougham**.

L. L. Roush photographic illustration for the article

L. L. Roush photographic illustration for the article

Though her clothing is inexpensive, Miss East-Side dresses neatly. Occasionally she runs to a blaze of color as to hats, and now and then flashes a fifty-cent diamond in the faces of her associates; but they “guy” her so, she soon gives up such things.

It happens often that she is the sole support of the family. The East-Side girl works harder and just as cheerfully as ever, and turns every cent into the house as fast as she makes it. She assists with the household duties before she leaves in the morning and when she returns at night. The few articles of clothing she manages to get are made over and over again, patched, darned, and cleaned many times. In the winter she suffers from lack of proper clothing. She walks to her work every morning—it costs too much to ride—through sunshine and storm, and back again at night. So she trudges on, month in and month out; and when the quiet young truck driver who lives around the corner asks her to marry him, she regards him seriously and says:

“Honest, Mike, I’d like ter marry yer, because yer know I like yer, and ye’re on the level, but me ole man and me ole woman ain’t in it anny more for workin’, and if I left ’em they’d be in the soup. No, I don’t stand for no game like that.”

So, he goes away, and she grieves because of it, but her conscience is clear—she is doing her duty.

Summer 1913. "Bird's eye view of N.Y.C. from roof of Consolidated Gas Building." 5x7 glass negative, George Grantham Bain Collection. For full image: http://www.shorpy.com/node/4521?size=_original#caption

Summer 1913. “Bird’s eye view of N.Y.C. from roof of Consolidated Gas Building.” 5×7 glass negative, George Grantham Bain Collection. For full image: http://www.shorpy.com/node/4521?size=_original#caption

However, the young men who come wooing are not all treated thus. Jimmie may have been escorting Mamie to picnics during the season. This is a public acknowledgement that he is deeply interested in her. She has permitted him to kiss her; she has fallen asleep with her head against his shoulder when returning from the picnics on boat or car in the early morning hours.

Finally, one evening as they are chatting in the front doorway, the only place Miss East-Side has to see her friends, Jimmie exclaims: “Hay, Mame, I’m stuck on yer! Kin we get married?”

But Mame is wary and inquires if he has work, and if he has ever been arrested. Her investigation resulting satisfactorily she is prompt to reply. “Yer wait here till I go up’n tell me old woman and see if she’s got any kicks comin’. If she has it’s all right, for they don’t go. I’m doin’ the marryin’.” And thus Miss East-Side becomes engaged to be married.

—Charles T. Brodhead, Ladies’ Home Journal, September 1899, with illustrations by L. L. Roush

**Pronounced “broom” or “brohm”. Per Merriam-Webster’s: a light closed horse-drawn carriage with the driver outside in front

Categories: Brodhead, Manhattan, Miscellaneous, New York City | 4 Comments

Charles T. Brodhead in 1899: NYC’s Lower East Side girls are “saucy” and “self-reliant” (Part I of II)

Ladies' Home Journal, September 1899 issue

Ladies’ Home Journal, September 1899 issue, page 3 (image is of my personal copy of the original page)

The September 1899 issue of The Ladies’ Home Journal contained the article “The East-Side Girl of New York” by journalist Charles T. Brodhead, with illustrations by L. L. Roush. Spotting the Brodhead surname piqued my interest; I wondered how we may be related. As anyone researching the Brodheads knows, many ancestors in the extended family tree have borne the first name ‘Charles’. BTW, just realized that this is my third post in a row about a Charles Brodhead, so that proves my point quite nicely! 🙂  At least in this case, we have a middle initial “T.” (Middle initials can be godsends.)  This particular Charles may have been the son (b. 1841) of Charles W. Brodhead (b. 1794); or he could be the Charles T. Brodhead I found in the 1880 census in NYC: born circa 1864 to a Theodore (mineral water salesman) & Josephine Brodhead, and married to one Elisabeth Lane on 1 October 1889. (This Theodore’s father was born in England, so this family was not descended from the ‘1664 Daniel Brodhead.’) Any Brodhead descendants reading this are welcome to opine!

Lower East Side girl, 1899

Lower East Side girl, 1899, image from article in my personal collection

I’m transcribing the article here and including some images of the Manhattan of that era from the marvelous Shorpy website. Be sure to click on the links for the full-size versions of the images. The detail will amaze you! You really do feel like a time-traveler perched above the scene witnessing all the minutiae of daily life a century or more ago. I must say the Lower East Side girls of 1899 were made of very strong stuff; their descendants can certainly take pride. Would love to be able to go back in time to have a chat with some of them!

Anyway, I’ll step aside now. Enjoy the read! As always, comments and thoughts welcome.

The East-Side Girl of New York by Charles T. Brodhead, photographic drawings by L. L. Roush

Nowhere in New York is to be found a character more interesting and less understood than that of the girl born and bred on the now famous lower East Side. Even in the city in which she lives and has her being but little is known of the “East-Side Girl.”

The typical East-Side girl is simply a product of her environments. She is surrounded by the good, bad and indifferent. She is in an atmosphere in which no girl should be reared. Her eyes and ears are closed to many disagreeable things around her. And she shuts them simply because she does not care to see and hear.

New York's First Avenue at East 29th Street during the annual Little Italy festa circa 1908. 5x7 glass negative, George Grantham Bain Collection. Full-size image: http://www.shorpy.com/node/1781?size=_original#caption

New York’s First Avenue at East 29th Street during the annual Little Italy festa circa 1908. 5×7 glass negative, George Grantham Bain Collection. Full-size image: http://www.shorpy.com/node/1781?size=_original#caption

Yet the East-Side girl is no saint. Far from it. The typical girl of that section is self-reliant, saucy, impertinent, slangy, quick-tempered, ready to fight with the tongue, and even with the fists if necessary. She will dance all night and work all day, repeat it three or four times a week, then declare she isn’t tired, and look bright and fresh all the while. She will upbraid her mother whom she calls “me ole woman”; and abuse her father, referred to as “me ole man”; cuff the ears of her younger brothers; have a hair-pulling with a sister; yet, if any one should dare utter a word derogatory to the members of her family, “Miss East-Side” would go at them like a wildcat.

New York circa 1903. "East River and Brooklyn Bridge from Manhattan." Among the many signs competing for our attention are billboards for "Crani-Tonic Hair Food" and Moxie. 8x10 glass negative, Detroit Publishing Co. For full image: http://www.shorpy.com/node/11497?size=_original#caption

New York circa 1903. “East River and Brooklyn Bridge from Manhattan.” Among the many signs competing for our attention are billboards for “Crani-Tonic Hair Food” and Moxie. 8×10 glass negative, Detroit Publishing Co. For full image: http://www.shorpy.com/node/11497?size=_original#caption

She calls the young policeman on the “beat” by his first name, flirts outrageously with motor-men, conductors and the like, and will laugh derisively at or slap the face of the well-dressed man who presumes to become acquainted with her on the street; stand in a thoroughfare blocked with traffic and exchange badinage [banter] with car-men; remain night after night at the bedside of a girl friend who is ill, and follow a begging cripple half a block to give her last cent for charity.

December 1911. Family of Mrs. Mette making flowers in a very dirty tenement, 302 Mott Street, top floor. Josephine, 13, helps outside school hours until 9 P.M. sometimes. She is soon to be 14 and expects to go to work in an embroidery factory. Says she worked in that factory all last summer. Nicholas, 6 years old and Johnnie, 8 yrs. The old work some. All together earn only 40 to 50 cents a day. Baby (20 months old) plays with the flowers, and they expect he can help a little before long. The father drives a coach (or hack) irregularly. Full size: http://www.shorpy.com/node/2213?size=_original#caption

December 1911. Family of Mrs. Mette making flowers in a very dirty tenement, 302 Mott Street, top floor. Josephine, 13, helps outside school hours until 9 P.M. sometimes. She is soon to be 14 and expects to go to work in an embroidery factory. Says she worked in that factory all last summer. Nicholas, 6 years old and Johnnie, 8 yrs. The old work some. All together earn only 40 to 50 cents a day. Baby (20 months old) plays with the flowers, and they expect he can help a little before long. The father drives a coach (or hack) irregularly. Full size: http://www.shorpy.com/node/2213?size=_original#caption

Miss East-Side isn’t handsome as a rule, but pleasant-featured, cleanly, quick-witted, sometimes philosophical, often a mistress of crude sarcasm, and shows an ugly temper when things go not to her liking. She is intensely patriotic, free in speech and manner, and of good morals. Here is seen the influence of the church. Without it there would be no East-Side girl worth writing about.

An organ grinder on the streets of New York's Lower East Side circa 1910. 5x7 glass negative, George Grantham Bain Collection. Full image: http://www.shorpy.com/node/2097?size=_original#caption

An organ grinder on the streets of New York’s Lower East Side circa 1910. 5×7 glass negative, George Grantham Bain Collection. Full image: http://www.shorpy.com/node/2097?size=_original#caption

The world which Miss East-Side sees first is one in which want and misery predominate. As soon as she is able to look after herself, which is generally at the age of four or five years, she is pressed into service as a helper in the family. The struggle for existence is so hard that there can be no idle hands in the household, no matter if they are tender and chubby. And so to her, mere tot though she may be, is assigned the task of caring for her smaller brother or sister, and frequently both. As the girl grows older her duties increase. She helps her mother to arrange the table, which is never an elaborate proceeding, runs errands, washes dishes, and, if the mother be a seamstress, assists with that work so far as she is able. Whenever she can do so she slips down the street, for there only can she find amusement.

New York City circa 1900-1906. "Clam seller in Mulberry Bend." Detroit Publishing Company glass negative. For full-size: http://www.shorpy.com/node/6263?size=_original#caption

New York City circa 1900-1906. “Clam seller in Mulberry Bend.” Detroit Publishing Company glass negative. For full-size: http://www.shorpy.com/node/6263?size=_original#caption

The typical East-Side girl of to-day receives but little schooling. She reads and writes, but cannot tell with certainty when or how she learned either. She just “picked it up,” as she did the slang and other undesirable things. She is more certain when it comes to religion. Her father and mother may not keep a sharp eye on her in other things, but one or the other (generally the mother) sees to it that the girl attends strictly to her religious duties every Sunday.

Circa 1900. "Heat wave. Free ice in New York." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative by Byron for the Detroit Publishing Company. Full image: http://www.shorpy.com/node/8480?size=_original#caption

Circa 1900. “Heat wave. Free ice in New York.” 8×10 inch dry plate glass negative by Byron for the Detroit Publishing Company. Full image: http://www.shorpy.com/node/8480?size=_original#caption

As soon as she is able, which is before she is in her teens, she is obliged to go to work—if she can find it. Somehow she generally succeeds in getting something to do probably because she makes every endeavor to secure a situation. For her it means emancipation for household duties, which she detests. She takes to working in a factory as a duck to water. As long as she can remember, she has been obliged to do something to help along. The idea that she can ever get on without working has never entered her mind. She usually obtains a situation in a shop, mill or store by answering advertisements,, and works as hard as she knows how to retain the situation. She is glad to have a chance to work where she will be paid in cash at the end of the week, and shows it. Yet as much as she wants work—and she is always eager for employment—she will never, under any circumstances, accept a place as a domestic servant.

Because she is employed throughout the day she is permitted to go out at night for a little recreation and fresh air. She usually goes down to the front door and loiters about. There she received her friends; there she makes all her confidential communications to her girl chum, for, as she sees it, on the streets only can she be alone. She has no other place in which to observe social obligations. With a family of six or seven members occupying three or four rooms, there is no place to be alone with a caller.

[Conclusion of article in next post…]

Categories: Brodhead, Manhattan, Miscellaneous | 2 Comments

John B. Jaques – Part II – The ‘Infamous’ Brooklyn Case

header

1856 — New York City and Environs, showing Newark, NJ, on the left & Brooklyn, NY, on the right (Map Credit: David Rumsey Historical Map Collection – details and link to full map below)

Just after the New Year in 1858, John Jaques resurfaced in the newspapers in a story that one paper referred to as ‘one of the most infamous cases ever placed on record.’ He was 34 years old, his wife Mary — in her early 30s, and their eldest child Wealthy Ann — about 13 years of age. Walter, their youngest, was about five. John’s dad, the respected Isaac Jaques of Elizabeth, NJ, was about 67 and long retired after a successful career as a Manhattan tailor and an Elizabeth, NJ, real estate investor. John’s mom (also named Wealthy Ann) had died of consumption some two years prior, in April 1856. Sometime between Wealthy’s death and the 1860 census, Isaac remarried — to Rebecca Robinson, so he could have already been married to Rebecca at the time this ‘infamous’ Brooklyn case was the talk of the town, state, and tri-state area (the story even made it into the Boston Herald and the Philadelphia Press).

As far as John’s siblings go, Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus (my 2nd great grandmother) was married to carriage maker and respected Elizabethtown businessman James Angus, Walter was a dentist, and Charles was in the process of becoming a doctor. I’m not sure about Jane, Christopher, and Isaac Jr., but (provided they were still around–and I know at least Isaac Jr. was) I suspect they were busy living respectable lives. So, John’s propensity for alcohol must have been a source of disruption and great worry for his friends and family, and the third article included in this post states just that. At some point down the road, they may well have washed their hands of him, but it appears that at this point at least some of his friends and family were standing by him. And he had not yet trashed his reputation with the community; one paper described him as ‘a man of respectable standing, except that occasionally he drinks too much.’

Brooklyn, NY, in 1868, showing location of the IX Ward (Map Credit: David Rumsey Maps -- full credit and link below)

Brooklyn, NY, in 1868, showing location of the IX Ward (Map Credit: David Rumsey Maps — full credit and link below)

But, on with the story of what happened. On the cold winter’s night of January 4, 1858, John was discovered lying unconscious and near death in a pond in Brooklyn’s 9th Ward. The incessant barking of a dog, whose master eventually came outside to see what the fuss was all about, is the only thing that saved him. Allegedly he was severely beaten and left there to die by two shady characters who were trying to prevent him from testifying at a trial taking place the next day in New Jersey. I’ll let you do your own reading of the tale as it unfolds. Suffice it to say, you’re going to get some background on John (residing in Newark, NJ, at this time) and his own recounting of the events, and you’re going to ‘hear’ courtroom testimony from John’s long-suffering wife Mary F. (Briggs) Jaques and his daughter Wealthy Ann. There are twists and turns, and things are not always what they seem. Is he a victim, or is there more to the story? The last clipping included contains the verdict which came in mid-February 1858; this clipping is a bit hard to read, so I am including a transcription of the most illegible section below it.  (As an aside, those interested in Brooklyn of that era will enjoy the website Whitman’s Brooklyn: A Virtual Visit Circa 1850) There are some views of old Brooklyn from about this period which help set the scene for this story. Worth a look, if you have time.)

Currier & Ives, View of Brooklyn, 1879 (In public domain in US - credit below)

Currier & Ives, View of Brooklyn, 1879 (In public domain in US – credit below)

Thanks to the generosity of the Fulton History website’s lack of copyright restrictions, I can post the articles here. And that’s a great thing because, just like the previous post’s article about John (the ‘Prodigal Son’ returns), these articles are (naturally) written in a way that reflects the tone of that era, something I’d find impossible to convey should I be forced to paraphrase or re-word. So enjoy the read. This post will be followed by 1-2 more as we are still in the 1850s, and John lived another 37 years. As always, comments, thoughts, corrections, and additions welcome.

Jamaica, NY, Long Island Farmer, January 7, 1858

Jamaica, NY, Long Island Farmer, January 7, 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com).

Jamaica, NY, Long Island Farmer, January 7, 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com).


The New York Evening Express, 7 Jan 1858

crime

The New York Evening Express, 7 Jan 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Times, 7 January 1858

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Herald, 8 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Herald, 8 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, Friday evening, 8 January 1858

Crime

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, Friday evening, 8 January 1858

Trenton State Gazette (8 January 1858): Mr. John B. Jaques, of Newark, New Jersey, was found insensible in a pond in the Ninth Ward of Brooklyn, on Wednesday morning. It appears that he had been inveigled from New York by a man named Smith, the keeper of a saloon, and against whom a charge was pending for selling liquor without license, and Jaques was the principal witness for the prosecution. Arrived in Brooklyn, Smith was joined by one Myers, the keeper of a saloon on Fulton Avenue, when they robbed and threw Jaques into the pond where he was found.

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, 9 January 1858

Crime

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, 9 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, Monday evening, 11 January 1858

Crime

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, Monday evening, 11 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Times, Friday, 15 January 1858

Crime

The New York Times, Friday, 15 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Crime

The New York Times, Friday, 15 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Crime

The New York Times, Friday, 15 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Herald, 18 January 1858

Crime

The New York Herald, 18 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Herald, 19 February 1858

New York Herald, 19 February 1858

New York Herald, 19 February 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Herald, 19 February 1858: …the defendants were arrested and had a partial examination before Justice Morehouse, when they waived further examination, and were committed to await the action of the Grand Jury. That body indicted  Myres and Smith for assault and battery with intent to kill, and also for highway robbery. The present trial was for assault and battery with intent to kill. The evidence of Jaques was substantially as above; that of Dr. Ball went to show the extent of the injuries which were at the time thought to be of a serious nature, although Jaques had subsequently entirely recovered from them. The witnesses for the defence went to show that Jaques could not be believed under oath, and that he had been arrested for various offences in New Jersey, and that indictments were there pending against him. They sought to prove that Myres and Smith separated from Jaques on the night of the affair, and that the injuries were the result of his falling while intoxicated. The trial was concluded yesterday  afternoon and the case given to the jury, who, after a long absence, returned a verdict of “not guilty.” The defendants were then discharged, their own recognizances being taken to appear and answer the other indictment.

Resources: Those interested in Brooklyn of that era will enjoy the website Whitman’s Brooklyn: A Virtual Visit Circa 1850.

MAP CREDITS:
David Rumsey Historical Map Collection, Full Title: Map Of The Country Thirty Three Miles Around The City Of New York. Published By J.H. Colton, No. 86 Cedar St. New York, 1853. Drawn by G.W. Colton. Engraved by J.M. Atwood, N.Y.

Full Title: Plan of New York and Brooklyn. (Atlas of New York and vicinity by F.W. Beers published by Beers, Ellis & Soule, New York, 1868)

Currier & Ives image from Eric Homberger: The Historical Atlas of New York City: A Visual Celebration of Nearly 400 Years of New York City’s History. Holt Paperbacks, 1998, page 72 (see Wikimedia Commons link) – ‘This media file is in the public domain’ in the United States. This applies to U.S. works where the copyright has expired, often because its first publication occurred prior to January 1, 1923. See http://copyright.cornell.edu/resources/publicdomain.cfm this page for further explanation. This image might not be in the public domain outside of the United States; this especially applies in the countries and areas that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works, such as Canada, mainland China (not Hong Kong nor Macao), Germany, Mexico, and Switzerland.

Categories: Angus, Brooklyn, Crime & Punishment, Cushman, Elizabeth, Union Co., Jaques, Manhattan, New York City, Newark, Essex Co., Scandal | 2 Comments

Isaac Jaques (b. 1791) and family – more tidbits

Isaac Jaques had been a successful tailor in Lower Manhattan before retiring to Elizabeth, NJ. An article [found on Genealogy Bank] in the Newark Daily Advertiser, published on Thursday, 15 October 1846, mentions some tailor’s shears–an invention of Isaac’s–as being on display at an exhibition, the Fair of the American Institute: … An entire new invention, by which the cloth can be cut without raising it from the counter.

Elizabeth, NJ, 1872 (David Rumsey Map Collection (*credit below)

Elizabeth, NJ, 1872 (David Rumsey Map Collection (*credit below)

Last week I was wondering why more of Isaac’s children had not been mentioned in the few articles written upon his passing in August 1880. Until last week, I’d never known that Wealthy Ann (Jaques) Angus had siblings: Walter, Christopher, and Charles. Well, using Genealogy Bank, I came upon an obituary notice in the New York Tribune that was published on Thursday, 26 August 1880. From it, we know that two children were still living at the time of Isaac’s death, one of them being Wealthy Ann (d. 1892).

Downtown Elizabeth showing location of Jaques St (lower right) and 2nd Presbyterian Church - Rumsfeld Map Collection - credit below*

Downtown Elizabeth showing location of Reid St. and Jaques St (lower right) and 2nd Presbyterian Church (middle, top) – David Rumsey Map Collection – credit below* I believe Isaac Jaques lived on Reid Street.

According to the terms of use of articles found via the Genealogy Bank site, I am not allowed to provide a snippet of the actual obituary notice; I am only allowed to transcribe small bits of it (but not too many bits for fear you won’t want to subscribe to their services).  

Isaac Jaques, the oldest citizen of Elizabeth and Union County, NJ, died at his home…  …having accumulated a large fortune, he retired from active business in 1833, and bought a tract [Ricketts Farm]... …built a house which he occupied up to the time of his death. He… …was a member of Dr. Spring’s Church, [The Brick Church**]… …was active in caring for the poor… …was a sincere friend of sailors… attended the daily Fulton-street prayer meetings [up to two weeks before he died]. In the centennial celebration at Elizabeth in 1876, [he was one of four] of the oldest residents of the county [they rode in a carriage together; the others have since died]… …twice married… …two children still living. A sister… … is now lying at the point of death. [Funeral] …will take place… …the ***Second Presbyterian Church at Elizabeth.

So that chopped the obit considerably. Sorry I cannot include the whole thing!

In any case, Isaac’s immediate family now appears to have included the following:

1-Isaac Jaques b. 8 Aug 1791, Woodbridge Neck, NJ, d. 24 Aug 1880,
Elizabethtown, NJ
+Wealthy Ann Cushman b. possibly 1796, Hartford, CT, d. 13 Apr 1856,
Elizabeth, Union Co, NJ
|—-2-Wealthy Ann Jaques b. 15 Dec 1815, New York City, New York. NY, d. 7 Mar
| 1892, At Home, 25 Reid Street, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ
|—-2-Walter Jaques b. Cir 1826, New York City, New York USA
|—-2-Christopher P. Jaques b. Cir 1832, New York City, New York USA
|—-2-Dr. Charles P. Jaques b. Cir 1834, New York City, New York USA, d. 2 Nov
| 1866, Brooklyn, Kings Co., NY
+Rebecca Robinson b. Cir 1811, CT, d. After 24 Aug 1880

NY Death Newspaper Extracts (1801-1890) show Charles (a doctor) as having passing away in 1866. So who was the other survivor? Walter or Christopher? There was an 11-year gap between first-born Wealthy and second-born Walter. Had there been other children?

*Image courtesy of David Rumsey Map Collection: State atlas of New Jersey based on State Geological Survey and from additional surveys by and under the direction of F.W. Beers. Published by Beers, Comstock & Cline, 36 Vesey Street, New York. 1872. Lithogc. Power Press Printg. of Charles Hart, 36 Vesey St., N.Y. Engraved on stone by Louis E. Neuman, 36 Vesey St., N.Y.

**For more on the history of the Brick Church, click here.

***For an 1880’s-era exterior view of Second Presbyterian Church of Elizabeth, click here.

Categories: Cushman, Elizabeth, Union Co., Jaques, Manhattan, New York City, Obituaries, Presbyterian | Leave a comment

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