Monroe Co.

Garret Brodhead’s “Wheat Plains” farmhouse—an August clean-up project. Come join the fun!

“Wheat Plains,” the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

Hear Ye, Hear Ye! The DePuy/Brodhead Family Association is having its annual reunion in the Dingmans Ferry, PA, area on Saturday, August 15, 2015. The actual location of the meeting place is still to be determined. For details, contact the Association at 6566 Skywae Drive, Columbus, Ohio 43229, and/or join the DePuy/Brodhead Family Association “Facebook” group page where you can keep abreast of all Brodhead (and DePuy) reunion developments!

Wheat Plains farmhouse clean-up opportunity!: On Friday, August 14, those who are interested in volunteering with the Wheat Plains Farmhouse clean-up project are welcome to join in. You may contact James Brodhead at “jbbrodheadfamily at hotmail dot com” to have a volunteer form sent to you. The Parks Department (“Wheat Plains” falls within the National Park Service system) would like to have these forms in hand at least four weeks prior to the work date.

According to Barbara and James Brodhead, who have undertaken the cleanup of the nearby Brodhead-Linderman Cemetery in recent years and are spearheading this year’s “Wheat Plains” clean-up effort: “More specific times and locations will be forthcoming. All efforts are greatly appreciated. Please note that we are organizing a tour of the Farm House on Saturday the 15th for all those who attend the Reunion.”

Come enjoy a fun weekend of connecting with family near and far, and giving Garret Brodhead’s homestead a much-needed makeover!

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Categories: Brodhead, Dingmans Ferry, Linderman, Monroe Co., Pennsylvania, Pike Co., Stroudsburg | 10 Comments

Remembering the women: Elizabeth Depui Brodhead

1851 print by Nagel & Weingartner: Depiction of the women of Bryan Station getting water while Native Americans, who are about to besiege the settlement, watch. Famous event in Kentucky during the American Revolutionary War.

1851 print by Nagel & Weingartner: Depiction of the women of Bryan Station getting water while Native Americans, who are about to besiege the settlement, watch. Famous event in Kentucky during the American Revolutionary War (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain in USA)

While, the men who served in the Revolutionary War are remembered with profound gratitude for their heroic sacrifices, it’s easy to forget that behind them stood an army of highly productive and devoted women: wives, sisters, grandmothers and daughters—women who strove to support the War efforts of their beloved, while keeping the home fires burning. How comforted the men must have been by this knowledge.

One such woman was Elizabeth Depui Brodhead, wife of the famous Colonel Daniel Brodhead and sister-in-law to my fifth great-grandfather Garret. A wonderful bit of biographical detail about Elizabeth can be found on pages 22-23 of Some Pennsylvania Women during the War of the Revolution, by William Henry Engle, MD (Harrisburg, PA: Harrisburg Publishing Co., 1898), and I am including it below. While much has been written about the Colonel, this is the first information I’ve found that sheds a tiny bit of light on Elizabeth. If you are aware of other examples, please share in the comment box below.

The Birth of Old Glory, painting by Edward Percy Moran, ca. 1917 (Public Domain - Wikimedia Commons)

The Birth of Old Glory, painting by Edward Percy Moran, ca. 1917 (Public Domain – Wikimedia Commons)

Elizabeth Depui, youngest daughter of Nicholas Depui, was born in 1740* in what is now Monroe county Pa. She was a descendant from Nicholas Depui, a Huguenot who fled from France to Holland in the year 1685 at the time of the revocation of the Edict of Nantes. Little is known of her early childhood. She received a pretty fair education at one of the Dutch schools in New York, but the major portion of her youthful days were spent on the frontiers of civilization, the wily savage ever hovering around the settlements of the Minisink. On more than one occasion she was obliged to flee to either the blockhouses or the more populous settlements for safety.

Shortly after her marriage she accompanied her husband to the town of Reading where she made her home until after the promulgation of peace. During that trying period the care of a young family was hers, and yet among that coterie of bright and heroic women of the Revolution who were in exile in Reading she shone with lustre. Nothing was too great for her to undertake and her patriotic ardor was always aroused for the welfare of the soldier of the Declaration. She administered to the comfort of the sick and wounded who found their way after convalescence to their several homes upon the frontiers. In those days, the women kept many in clothing as well as the necessaries of life. Help was needed everywhere, and as we of the present day minister to our troops from our abundance, the women of the Revolution did the same out of their poverty. It is true they accomplished much more than we at this distance of time can either appreciate or calculate. Theirs was a day of self denial.

Thomas Eakins' Homespun, 1881 (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain)

Thomas Eakins’ Homespun, 1881 (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain)

They delighted in homespun dresses while luxuries were prepared only for the sick and loving who were battling for the rights of mankind and the independence of their country. And yet we must honor the women of all crises in the history of our beloved land who lead in every philanthropic work to alleviate distress. Their forbears during the struggle for independence were animated by that enlarged patriotic spirit which will enshrine their names to the latest posterity. It was so eminently characteristic of them that a British officer, a prisoner of war, remarked that no soldiers whose mothers, wives, and daughters were so devoted to the cause and so self sacrificing could ever be conquered. Mrs. Brodhead died in the city of Philadelphia toward the close of the year 1799*, but exact date with place of burial have not been ascertained.

I’d love to find more such biographical detail on other women relevant to the families covered within this blog. If anyone has other examples to share, please get in touch/leave a comment. Meanwhile, you can check the list below to see whether any of your female Pennsylvania ancestors were also featured in this book.

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*Note: According to p. 74 of The Brodhead Family, Volume I, published by the Brodhead Family Association (Port Ewen, NY: 1986), Elizabeth was born in 1739 and was the daughter of Samuel Depuy and Jane McDowell. Also, per their records, she died sometime before 16 May 1781 at Reading, Berks Co., PA. (Daniel married again–his second wife was Rebecca Edgill Mifflin. She died in Philadelphia and was buried there on 15 February 1788.)

NB: Depui is spelled in many different ways (visit Depuy Surname History for a rundown).

Resources:
Women in the American Revolution
The Roles of Women in the Revolutionary War
The Homespun Movement – interesting PDF

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Other women featured in this book:
Elizabeth Wilkins Allison, 9; Allison, John 9
Rebecca Lyon Armstrong, 11; Armstrong, John 12
Sarah Richardson Atlee, 15; Atlee, Samuel John 15
Mary Quigley Brady, 18; Brady, John 18
Elizabeth Depui Brodhead, 22; Brodhead, Daniel 23
Eleanor Lytle Brown, 26; Brown, Matthew 26
Mary Phillips Bull, 29; Bull, John 29
Sarah Shippen Burd, 33; Burd, James 34
Katharine Hamilton Chambers, 3; Chambers, James 39
Elizabeth Zane Clark, 42; Clark, John 44
Jane Roan Clingan, 45; Clingan, William Jr 46
Martha Crawford Cook, 47; Cook, Edward 47
Sarah Simpson Cooke, 49; Cooke, William 49
Margaret Cochran Corbin, 58; Corbin, John 52
Mary Kelsey Cutter Covenhoven, 55; Covenhoven, Robert 55
Hannah Vance Crawford, 58; Crawford, William 58
Catharine Martin Davidson, 62; Davidson, James 63
Annie Schenck Davies, 65; Davies, Hezekiah 60
Hannah Blair Foster, 67; Foster, William 67
Anne West Gibson, 70; Gibson, George 70
Rachel Marx Graydon, 73; Graydon, Alexander 74
Catharine Ewing Hand, 78; Hand, Edward 79
Margaret Alexander Hamilton, 81; Hamilton, John 81
Katharine Holtzinger Hartley, 83; Hartley, Thomas 83
Mary Ludwig Hays, 85; Hays, John 85
Ann Wood Henry, 87; Henry, William 87
Crecy Covenhoven Hepburn, 90; Hepburn, William 91
Sarah Harris Irvine, 92; Irvine, James 92
Anne Callender Irvine, 94; Irvine, William 95
Jean McDowell Irwin, 98; Irwin, Archibald 98
Alice Erwin Johnston, 100; Johnston, Francis 100
Martha Beatty Johnston, 103; Johnston, Thomas 103
Ann West Alricks Lowrey, 105; Lowrey, Alexander 105
Sarah Nelson McAlister, 108; McAlister, Hugh 108
Sarah Holmes McClean, 110; McClean, Alexander 112
Martha Sanderson McCormick, 113; McCormick, Robert 113
Margaret Lewis McFarland, 115; McFarland, Andrew 115
Martha Hoge McKee, 117; McKee, Thomas 117
Margaret Stout Macpherson, 119; Macpherson, William 120
Marritie Van Brunt Magaw, 122; Magaw, Robert 122
Susanna Miller Mickley, 124; Mickley, John Jacob 124
Sarah Morris Mifflin, 127; Mifflin, Thomas 128
Rachel Rush Boyce Montgomery, 130; Montgomery, Joseph 1
Elizabeth Thompson Moorhead, I34; Moorhead, Fergus 134
Mary White Morris, 137; Morris, Robert 13s
Margaret Mayes Murray, 140; Murray, James 141
Winifred Oldham Neville, I42; Neville, John 143
Mary Carson O’Hara, 14; O’Hara, James 146
Rosina Kucher Orth, I48; Orth, Balzer I48
Sarah McDowell Piper, 150; Piper, William 151
Margaret Lowrey Plumer, 152; Plumer, George I52
Elizabeth Potter Poe, 157; Poe, James 158
Margaret O Brien Pollock, 160; Pollock, Oliver 161
Elizabeth Parker Porter, I64; Porter, Andrew 166
Elizabeth Myer Kelly, 168; Kelly, John 168
Jane Ralston Rosbrugh, 171; Rosbrugh, John 171
Phoebe Bayard St Clair, 171; St Clair, Arthur 174
Margaret Murray Simpson, 178; Simpson, John 178
Maria Thompson Sproat, 180; Sproat, William 180
Martha Espy Stewart, 182; Stewart, Lazarus 182
Hannah Tiffany Swetland, I84; Swetland, Luke 185
Ursula Muller Thomas, 187; Thomas, Martin 187
Catharine Ross Thompson, I89; Thompson, William 190
Hannah Harrison Thomson, 192; Thomson, Charles 193
Elizabeth Grosz Traill, 195; Traill, Robert 19
Lydia Hollingsworth Wallis, 198; Wallis, Samuel 198
Jean Murray Watts, 201; Watts, Frederick 201
Mary Penrose Wayne, 204; Wayne, Anthony 205
Mary Agneta Bechtel Weygandt, 207; Weygandt, Cornelius 207

Categories: Brodhead, Monroe Co., Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Revolutionary War | 6 Comments

Brodhead Creek postcard, pre-1952

Brodhead Creek postcard

Brodhead Creek postcard

I recently acquired another Brodhead Creek postcard on eBay. The year is not visible, but the one-cent stamp on it indicates that it was mailed before 1952 when the rate went up to an ‘outrageous’ two cents. So here’s another image that would have been nice to include in my post Fly Fishing the Brodhead in ages past.

The message on the reverse side is addressed to a Mr. & Mrs. Charles Mahan, Jr. of Baltimore, Maryland: Dear Arelyn & Charlie, What an ideal place for a honeymoon – it is perfect – the cool mountain air, the water close by and such lovely scenery. Thanks again for Sunday – maybe someday we can repay you. See you all soon. Love, Doris & Bill

US Geological Survey image - Public Domain

US Geological Survey image – Public Domain

In my search for the location of Paradise Creek, I came across the awesome US Geological Survey website. The detail it offers is amazing–obviously they are very good at what they do. Turns out that Paradise Creek is a tributary of Brodhead Creek:

Once again, if anyone out there has any other vintage images of the creek they’d like to share, please send them along and I will post them for you for other readers to enjoy. Have a good Sunday, everybody! (We’re having a two-day cool spell here — low 80’s!!!)

Categories: Brodhead, Miscellaneous, Monroe Co., Nature, Stroudsburg | 4 Comments

Brodhead Creek postcard, 1909

I recently acquired this postcard on eBay—it’s an image of Brodhead Creek taken from a hill above. Unfortunately, as luck would have it, I discovered the card after doing the July 8 post Fly Fishing the Brodhead in ages past. So, I will post the card here for you now. The message on the reverse side is addressed to a Mrs. Steve Reinhart, 729 Ann Street, Stroudsburg, Pa.; the postmark is dated August 24, 1909 (Bartonsville).

If anyone out there has any other vintage images of the creek they’d like to share, please send them along and I will post them for you for other readers to enjoy. Have a good day, everybody! Bye for now.

Brodhead Creek

Brodhead Creek Postcard, dated 1909

Categories: Brodhead, Monroe Co., Stroudsburg | 4 Comments

The 1868 murder of Theodore Brodhead of Delaware Water Gap

George Inness (American, 1825-1894). On the Delaware River, 1861-1863. Oil on canvas. Current location: Brooklyn Museum of Art (Wikimedia Commons: Photographed February 2009 by Wikipedia Loves Art participant "shooting_brooklyn"; this file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.)

George Inness (American, 1825-1894). On the Delaware River, 1861-1863. Oil on canvas. Current location: Brooklyn Museum of Art (Wikimedia Commons: Photographed February 2009 by Wikipedia Loves Art participant “shooting_brooklyn”; this file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.)

Some Brodhead descendants may have heard of the murder of Theodore Brodhead which occurred on September 25, 1868, near the Delaware Water Gap hotel owned and managed by his brother Thomas Brodhead.

For those of you who have not, this post will refer you to two articles on this tragic topic.

Theodore was the son of Luke Brodhead (1777-1845) and Elizabeth Wills (1789-1873), and a grandson of Captain Luke Brodhead (1741-1806) of Revolutionary War fame.

Thomas Brodhead - Image from p. 1104 of History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886)

Thomas Brodhead – Image from p. 1104 of History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886)

Captain Luke Brodhead, a good friend of Gen. Lafayette, was one of Daniel Brodhead and Hester Wyngart‘s eight sons. He was the youngest brother of my 5th great grandfather (Garret Brodhead).

The above painting by famous landscape painter George Innes, which I absolutely love, gives a good glimpse of what the Delaware Water Gap area looked like on a glorious summer day in the early 1860s. Wish I could transport myself back there right now—the bucolic setting country is so peaceful-looking (apart from the steam locomotive bounding out of the left side of the canvas!). This is the Delaware Water Gap Theodore and his family members resided in close to the time of Theodore’s death.

Theodore had an older sister Elizabeth and seven brothers (William, Thomas, Lewis, Luke, Horace, Dewitt, and Benjamin Franklin – ‘Frank’)—amazingly, all the brothers grew to be over six feet tall. Their mother Elizabeth once joked that she had 48 feet of sons*! One of the below links will take you to a wonderful group photo of the brothers.

The Monroe County Historical Association of Stroudsburg, PA, posted these two articles on their website several years ago about the murder and its aftermath:

Brodhead Murder, Part I: The Crime

Brodhead Murder, Part II: Trial and Punishment

Due to the nature of this subject matter, I can’t really tell you to ‘enjoy the article’, but I do hope you find it of interest. If you have anything to add or share, please leave a comment below.

Theodore was buried at Delaware Water Gap Cemetery. His grave and those of other family members can be found on Find a Grave.

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How we are related

How my family is related to Theodore’s

CLICK TO ENLARGE –  Philadelphia Inquirer, 12 Aug 1869 (Credit: http://www.fultonhistory.com)
Brodhead_Theo

Brodhead_Theo

Philadelphia Inquirer, 12 Aug 1869 (Credit: www.fultonhistory.com)

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*p. 17 of Eastern Poconos: Delaware Water Gap to Bushkill by Maria J. Summa, Frank D. Summa, and Arthur Garris (Arcadia Publishing, 2005)

Categories: Brodhead, Crime & Punishment, Delaware Water Gap, Monroe Co. | Leave a comment

Fly Fishing “the Brodhead” in ages past

Brodhead Creek Park, Stroud Township, Monroe County, near dusk. 28 March 2007 Source: Nicholas A. Tonelli (Wikimedia Commons:  This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Brodhead Creek Park, Stroud Township, Monroe County, near dusk. 28 March 2007
Source: Nicholas A. Tonelli (Wikimedia Commons: This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Photo of portrait of Capt. Daniel Brodhead (1693-1755), husband of Hester Wyngart, only child of Capt. Richard Brodhead & Magdalena Jansen, and grandson of Capt. Daniel Brodhead & Ann Tye Current location: Senate House, Kingston, NY; www.senatehousekingston.org

IMAGE COPYRIGHT: BARBARA & JAMES BRODHEAD. Used with permission. Photo of portrait of Capt. Daniel Brodhead (1693-1755), husband of Hester Wyngart, only child of Capt. Richard Brodhead & Magdalena Jansen, and grandson of Capt. Daniel Brodhead & Ann Tye Current location: Senate House, Kingston, NY; http://www.senatehousekingston.org. PHOTO CREDIT: Barbara & James Brodhead

Those of us descended from Daniel Brodhead and Hester Wyngart, who uprooted themselves and their children from Esopus, NY (present-day Kingston) to relocate to the wilds of Eastern Pennsylvania’s Minisink Valley in 1738*, can feel fairly confident that they (Daniel — a man of great energy and intrepidity**,  Hester, and “crew”) and their myriad descendants in this picturesque area spent time fishing—whether for the purpose of catching dinner or for the pure enjoyment of the sport.

Numerous creeks, brooks, and rivers are found in fair abundance here, in what is now Monroe County. Daniel’s vast estate (composed of an initial warrant of 600 acres and a later warrant of 150 acres, according to Mrs. Horace G. Walters’ Early History of East Stroudsburg, p. 21-22) was known locally as “Brodhead Manor” and gave birth to the settlement of Dansbury (better known today as the town of East Stroudsburg)**. The 21.9-mile creek that passed through Daniel’s property on its way to the Delaware came to be known as Brodhead Creek.

Having just recently done posts on the Hon. Richard Brodhead and his daughter and son-in-law (Rachael and John Linderman), I can easily imagine them fishing and otherwise enjoying a well-earned day of rest there on ‘the Brodhead.’ And can’t you just see Daniel and Hester’s sons Richard, Charles, Daniel, Garret (my 5th great grandfather), John, and Luke enjoying some friendly, brotherly creek-side competition when they were boys?

From American Fishes by Goode and Gill (1903)

“Brook Trout” from American Fishes by Goode and Gill (1903)

On eBay and other sites that sell and/or display antique and vintage postcards, you can sometimes come across old images of Brodhead Creek (sometimes referred to as “Broadhead’s Creek”). The oldest image I found dates back to 1796. It is an etching by John Scoles from a drawing by Jacob Hoffman. If you’d like to view it, you can do so by clicking here and visiting the Granger Collection website. I would display the image for you here, but their usage rules prohibit that.

I found mention of the Brodhead in the 1906 book The Determined Angler and the Brook Trout: An Anthological Volume of Trout Fishing, Trout Histories, Trout Lore, Trout Resorts, and Trout Tackle by Charles Bradford, and thought I would share a relevant chapter here with you today.

Small section of Brodhead Creek running through East Stroudsburg

Small section of Brodhead Creek running through East Stroudsburg (Image credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

By the way, having now shared “glorious stories” of Brodhead Creek trout fishing with family members, my husband—an avid fisherman—is suddenly keen to get out to eastern Pennsylvania to try his hand at it, which is saying quite a lot since we live a thousand miles away! So, dear reader, just between you and me, I have found a major carrot that will, I hope, someday soon take me back to the geographical setting in which many of my ancestors lived and worked, and where I myself once spent happy childhood moments! The lure of fishing and ‘catching the big one’ has once again cast (no pun intended) its magic spell. 😀

So I hope you will enjoy Chapter IX, “Trout and Trouting” of The Determined Angler and the Brook Trout. Chapter X (“Trouting in Canadensis Valley”) has references to Brodhead Creek as well, so be sure to click on the link to the book above if you’d like to read on.

1942 map of Stroudsburg (Wikipedia: Public Domain)

1942 map of Stroudsburg (Wikipedia: Public Domain)

P. S. I have put the word “Brodhead” in bold in case you don’t have too much time on your hands and want to hone in on those specific passages. Farther down this post you will find links to some good resources. I especially enjoyed the articles by Vic Attardo and Doug Vitale. Enjoy! Perhaps, after reading all this you will want to “Go, Fish!” And if you’ve already had the pleasure of fishing the Brodhead, by all means share your experiences in the Comment box below.

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p 93 of Outing magazine

p 93 of Outing magazine, Vol. XVIII, 1891

Chapter IX: “Trout and Trouting” (written in 1906 by Charles Bradford)

“A day with not too bright a beam;
A warm, but not a scorching, sun.”
—Charles Cotton

Where can I enjoy trout fishing amid good scenery and good cheer without its necessitating a lengthy absence from the city? That is a question which frequently rises in the mind of the toilers in the busy centers of the East, and it is one becoming daily more difficult to answer. Yet there are still nearby trout streams where a creel of from fifteen to fifty, or even more, in favorable weather, might be made. One such locality, which for years local sportsmen have proven, lies within a four hours’ ride of either Philadelphia or New York. All that is necessary is to take the railroad, which conveys you to Cresco, in Monroe County, Pa., and a ride or drive of five miles through the Pocono Mountains will land you in the little village of Canadensis, in the valley of the Brodhead; and within the radius of a few miles on either side fully a dozen other unposted streams ripple along in their natural state, not boarded, bridged, dammed, or fenced by the hand of man, thanks to the naturally uncultivatable condition of the greater part of this paradise for trout fishers. The villagers of Canadensis do their trading and receive their mail at Cresco, and it is an easy matter to obtain excellent food and lodgings for a dollar a day at one of the many farmhouses dotting here and there the valleys, and a seat when needful in one of the several private conveyances running every day between the two villages.

The open season for trout in Pennsylvania is from April 15th until July 15th [present-day regulations call for April-July], and there appears to be no particularly favored period during these three months, for the trout here afford sport equally well at all times, though they greatly vary in their tastes for the fly.

p. 92 Outing Magazine, Vol. XVIII, 1891

p. 92 Outing magazine, Vol. XVIII, 1891

If the angler goes there in the early part of the open season, when the weather is cold, he should engage a room and take his meals at the farmhouse selected; but if the trip is made in the early part of June or any time after that, during the open season, camp life may be enjoyed with great comfort.

Two favorite waters within walking distance from any of the farmhouses in Canadensis are Stony Run and the Buckhill. The great Brodhead, a famous old water in the days of Thaddeus Norris, and noted then and now for its big trout, flows in the valley proper, within a stone’s throw of the farmhouse at which I engaged quarters. Spruce Cabin Run, a mile distant, is a charming stream, but the trout here are not very large beyond the deep pools at the foot of Spruce Falls and in the water flowing through Turner’s fields and woods above the falls.

Any of these streams will afford plenty of sport, but if one wishes to visit a still more wild, romantic, and beautiful trout water, he has only to walk a little farther or take a buckboard wagon and ride to the mighty Bushkill, a stream that must not be confounded with the Buckhill, which lies in an opposite direction from Canadensis.

Trout traits, p. 110

Trout traits, The Determined Angler, p. 110

The Bushkill is the wildest stream in the region, and is fished less than any of the others named, one reason being that there are plenty of trout in the waters of Canadensis which can be fished without the Angler going so far. For those who like to camp, the Bushkill is the proper locality. I spent a day there with friends one season, and we caught in less than two hours, in the liveliest possible manner, all the trout five of us could eat throughout the day, and four dozen extra large ones which we took home to send to friends in the city.

“The trout in the Bushkill,” remarked one of my companions, “are so wild that they’re tame”–an expression based upon the greediness and utter disregard of the enemy with which fontinalis, in his unfamiliarity with man, took the fly. I remember having a number of rises within two feet of my legs as I was taking in my line for a front toss.

I know men who have many times traveled a thousand miles from New York on an angling trip to different famous waters who have not found either the sport or the scenery to be enjoyed on the Bushkill.

The lower Brodhead below the point at which this stream and Spruce Cabin Run come together is very beautiful. It is owned by a farmer who lives on its banks, and who has never been known to refuse Anglers permission to fish there when they asked for the privilege.

Image from p 46 of The Determined Angler and the Brook Trout by Charles Bradford (NY & London: GP Putnam's Sons, 1916)

Image from p 46 of The Determined Angler and the Brook Trout by Charles Bradford (NY & London: GP Putnam’s Sons, 1916)

There are four natural features in the scenery about Canadensis that are especially prized by the countrymen there–the Sand Spring, Buckhill Falls, Spruce Cabin Falls, and the Bushkill Falls.

The Sand Spring is so called because grains of brilliant sand spring up with the water. This sand resembles a mixture of gold and silver dust; it forms in little clouds just under the water’s bubble and then settles down to form and rise again and again. This effect, with the rich colors of wild pink roses, tiny yellow watercups, blue lilies, and three shades of green in the cresses and deer tongue that grow all about, produces a pretty picture. The spring is not over a foot in diameter, but the sand edges and the pool cover several feet. In drinking the water, strange to say, one does not take any sand with it.

Fair and foul angling, p. 119

Fair and foul angling, The Determined Angler, p. 119

Being located at one side of the old road between Cresco and Canadensis every visitor has an opportunity of seeing it without going more than a few feet out of his direct way. Some of the stories told about the old Sand Spring are worth hearing, and no one can tell them better or with more special pleasure than the farmers living thereabout. One man affirms that “more ‘an a hundred b’ar and as many deer have been killed while drinking the crystal water of the spring.”

Each of the falls is a picture of true wild scenery. Though some miles apart they may be here described in the same paragraph.

Great trees have fallen over the water from the banks and lodged on huge projecting moss-covered rocks; they are additional obstacles to the rushing, roaring, down-pouring water, which flows through and over them like melted silver. This against the dark background of the mountain woods, the blue and snow-white of the heavens, the green of the rhododendron-lined banks, and the streams’ bottoms of all-colored stones creates a series of charming and ever-varying views.

Wikimedia Commons (public domain) American brook trout. Lithograph, 1872, Currier & Ives

Wikimedia Commons (public domain) American brook trout. Lithograph, 1872, Currier & Ives

A half dozen trout, weighing from one to two pounds and a half, may always be seen about the huge rock at the point where the lower Brodhead and the Spruce Cabin Run come together, and hundreds may be seen in the stream below the Buckhill Falls. I do not know that fish may be actually seen in any other parts of the waters of Canadensis, but at these points the water is calm and the bottom smooth, and the specimens are plainly in view.

Do not waste time on the “flock” lying about the big rock at Brodhead Point. The trout there will deceive you. I played with them a half day, and before I began work on them I felt certain I would have them in my creel in a half-hour’s time. They are a pack of pampered idlers who do not have to move a fin to feed. All the trout food comes rushing down both streams from behind these big rocks into the silent water and floats right up to the very noses of these gentlemen of leisure. If you have any practicing to do with the rod and fly do it here. These trout are very obliging; they will lie there all day and enjoy your casting all sorts of things at them. This is a good place to prove to yourself whether you are a patient fisherman or not.

Nathan Currier lithograph of Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait's painting "Catching a Trout", 1854 - Depicts fishermen catching a brook trout near South Haven Church, Long Island, NY (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain)

Nathan Currier lithograph of Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait’s painting “Catching a Trout”, 1854 – Depicts fishermen catching a brook trout near South Haven Church, Long Island, NY (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain)

And now a few words about the proper tackle for mountain streams. Most anglers use rods that are too heavy and too long. During my first visit I used a rod of eight feet, four ounces, and I soon found that, while it was a nice weight, it was too long for real convenience, although there were rods used there nine and ten feet long. My rod was the lightest and one of the shortest ever seen in the valley. There are only a few open spots where long casts are necessary, and a long, ordinary-weight trout rod is of very little service compared with one of seven, seven and a half, or eight feet, four or three ounces, that can be handled well along the narrow, bush-lined, tree-branch-covered streams.

The greater part of the fishing is done by sneaking along under cover of the rocks, logs, bushes, and the low-hanging branches, as casts are made in every little pool and eddy. I use a lancewood rod, but of course the higher-priced popular split bamboo is just as good. I shall not claim my rod’s material is the better of the two, as some men do when speaking of their tackle, but I am quite sure I shall never say the split bamboo is more than its equal. I do not advise as to the material; I speak only of the weight and length. Let every man use his choice, but I seriously advise him to avoid the cheap-priced split bamboo rod.

p. 138 of The Determined Angler

p. 138 of The Determined Angler

If split bamboo is the choice, let it be the work of a practical rod-maker. Any ordinary wood rod is better than the four-dollar split bamboo affair.

The leader should be of single gut, but the length should be a trifle more than is commonly used. Twelve feet is my favorite amount. The reel should be the lightest common click reel; the creel, a willow one that sells for a dollar in the stores; and the flies–here’s the rub–must be the smallest and finest in the market. Large, cheap, coarse flies will never do for Eastern waters, and you must not fail to secure your list of the proper kind, as well as all your outfit, before you start on your trip. The only decent thing on sale in the village stores is tobacco.

Wikimedia Commons (public domain): Trout Anglers circa 1820 from Fishing and Shooting-Buxton (1902)

Wikimedia Commons (public domain): “Trout Anglers” circa 1820 from Fishing and Shooting by Sydney Buxton (1902)

When you buy your flies buy lots of them, for, be you a tyro or practical Angler, you will lose them easier on these streams than you imagine. Yes, you must be very careful about the selection of your flies. They must be small and finely made, high-priced goods. I wish I might tell you who to have make them, but I dare not, lest I be charged with advertising a particular house. Regarding the patterns touse, I will say that none are more killing than the general list, if they are the best made and used according to the old rule all are familiar with–dark colors on cold days and bright ones on warm days. The later the season the louder the fly–that is, when the season closes during hot weather, as it does in Canadensis. My favorite time here is from June 15th to July 15th, the closing day, but any time after the first two weeks of the open season is very charming. I avoid the first week or two because the weather is then cold and the trout are more fond of natural bait than the artificial fly. Men take hundreds of fish early in the season with worms and minnows.

I never wear rubber boots to wade in. An old pair of heavy-soled shoes with spikes in their bottoms, and small slits cut in the sides to let the water in and out, and a pair of heavy woolen socks comprise my wading footwear. The slits must not be large enough to let in coarse sand and pebbles, but I find it absolutely necessary to have a slight opening, for if there be no means for the water to run freely in and out, the shoes fill from the tops and become heavy. Rubber boots are too hot for my feet and legs, while the water is never too cold. I have often had wet feet all day, and have never yet experienced any ill effects from it.

Trout by Walter M. Brackett, ca. 1867 (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain)

Trout by Walter M. Brackett, ca. 1867 (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain)

I never use a staff in wading, but I should, for here in some places it is very hard to wade. I have often fallen down in water up to my waist, overbalanced by the heavy current, where the bottoms were rough, with sharp, slimy stones. If you carry a staff, follow the custom of the old Anglers and tie it to your body with a string to keep it out of the way and allow your hands to be as free as possible for a strike. Your landing-net should be a small one, minus any metal, with a foot and a half handle, and a string tied to a front button on your garment should allow it to be slung over your shoulder onto your back when not in use.

Of course, these little points about the use of different things are all familiar to the Angler with but the slightest experience, and will appear to him neither instructive nor interesting, but we must, as gentle Anglers, give a thought or two to the earnest tyro, for we were young once ourselves.

I always carry two fly-books with me; one big fellow with the general fly stock in, which is kept at the farmhouse, and a little one holding two dozen flies and a dozen leaders, which I carry on the stream. A string tied to this, too, will prevent the unpleasantness of having it fall in the water and glide away from you. I even tie a string to my pipe and knife. The outing hat is an important thing to me. Mine is always a soft brown or gray felt, and I use it to sit on in damp and hard places fifty times a day.

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Dressing a Fly

“Dressing a Fly” circa 1817 from Fishing and Shooting by Sydney Buxton (1902), p. 92.

*Some sources say 1737, e.g., The Wyoming and Lackawanna Valleys by Hayden, Hand and Jordan (pub. 1906)

**p. 2 of The Heraldic Journal, Vol. III (Boston: Wiggin & Lunt, Publishers, 1867)

***p. 446 of The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XXVII (Philadelphia: The Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1903)

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Categories: Brodhead, Fishing, Kingston, Monroe Co., Nature, Pennsylvania | 4 Comments

The Brodhead-Linderman Cemetery: Descendants work on clean up and restoration

This post is devoted to Part II of the cemetery restoration efforts undertaken by James & Barbara Brodhead over recent summers; although they live in Washington State–far from their ancestral roots in Pennsylvania–they have made it their mission to see to it that broken and downed stones of Brodhead family ancestors receive the care and respectful restoration they deserve. As you may recall, the first post was devoted to the repair of Cornelia Dingman Brodhead’s gravestone in the Mauch Chunk Cemetery in Jim Thorpe, PA.

This post focuses on their work in the Brodhead & Linderman Cemetery, part of the Brodhead-Courtright Farm Burial Ground, which is very much off the beaten path, within the territory of what once was Wheat Plains farm. The farm was established by Garret and Jane Brodhead after the Revolutionary War, and here in the Brodhead & Linderman Cemetery lie Richard Brodhead (Garret & Jane’s 3rd son) and his wife Hannah Drake. They and their family members resided in the Wheat Plains house for many years. So, once again, without further ado, here is a description of Barbara and James’ efforts in James’ own words (apart from a few spots where I have left clarifying notes in [brackets]; also, please click on images to see enlarged versions–the tile mosaics can be viewed as slideshows):

"Wheat Plains"

“Wheat Plains,” the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

Lt Garret Brodhead served in the Continental Army and as part of his “bounty” for service he was given a land grant along the Delaware River near present-day Dingman’s Ferry. The farm he established in the 1770s was named Wheat Plains. The farm remained in the Brodhead family until 1865 and then it was purchased back by Robert Packer Brodhead in 1894. Robert’s family held the land until the Federal Government took (some say stole) the land under eminent domain in preparation to build the Tocks Island Dam in the 1970s. The dam was supposed to control the occasional floods [One terrible flood occurred in 1955 with the tail end of Hurricane Diane, killing 75 in the Brodhead Valley, alone], but for several reasons the dam was not built. The lands were not returned to the owners. Many of the homes, farms, and hotels were demolished because of squatters (hippies) living in the then empty buildings. When the project was cancelled the land was turned over to the National Park Service.

The sad state of the Wheat Plains house

The sad state of the Wheat Plains house, 2013

The house at Wheat Plains is one of the few remaining homes in the area. Unfortunately the National Park Service is not maintaining the home and it is destined to be destroyed when it is deemed unsafe. Parts of the original log home are integral to the structure. Garret’s son Richard owned and lived in the home for many years.

Wheat Plains house exterior, 2013

Wheat Plains house exterior, 2013

Across the road and on a rise between the fields and the river lies the Brodhead & Linderman Cemetery. The family plot contains the headstones of Richard (d. 1843) and Hannah (d. 1831). Their son Richard (1st of 2 sons named Richard, d. 1809 @ 2½ yrs. old) and his sister Eliza (d. 1814 @ 10 months old) are also buried there. There is a wrought iron fence with a gate surrounding the plot. “Brodhead & Linderman” is cast into the gate. It is unknown who put up the fence and Hannah’s current headstone, but the inscription on the back states “This sacred memorial erected March 2nd 1869”. Richard and Hannah’s daughter Rachael married Dr. John Linderman. It is logical that the Lindermans were the benefactors. [John purchased the Van Gordon property, adjacent to Wheat Farms, after he got his medical license, and built a house on it in 1817 — see past post].

A foot stone, as found

A foot stone, as found

There are several other stones other than the foot stones, but no marking can be discerned. The plot is too small for many more internments so there was probably no plan for the Linderman family to bury others there.  Next to the family plot on the road side of the hill are buried Van Gordens and others. Moses Van Gorden married Charlotte Newman Easton following the death of her husband Calvin Easton. It is not known how this Moses is related to those interned there. The Moses here may be the father of Charlotte’s husband, Moses. Calvin and Charlotte Easton are the parents of Ophelia Easton who married Richard and Hannah’s grandson Andrew Jackson Brodhead.

We have made two trips to the area. The first was in 2011 and then again in 2013.

Summer 2011

In 2011, we met Leroy and Bobby Cron, longtime residents of Dingman’s Ferry and members of the Dingman’s Ferry and Delaware Township Historical Society. We had sent a letter to the Society and asked for family information. Leroy took us down an access road next to a corn field. He pointed into the woods and stated that the cemetery was in there. He was correct, but nothing was visible from that vantage point.

The cemetery in 2011, as found

The cemetery in 2011, as found

The next day we met with a park ranger who helped us find the cemetery, and using his skills as a former surveyor, he looked at the Park Service map and then said “I am going up there.” And he walked off the road and into the brush. A few minutes later he called out “I found it!” The only thing visible through the brush was part of the cast iron fence.   We had to climb over downed trees and push our way through the brush to get there. The ranger stated that even though the National Parks owns the land, the cemetery is still owned by the family.

James dealing with a fallen tree

James dealing with a fallen tree

There was a tree that had been growing inside the plot that died and fell over damaging the fence. Hannah’s headstone was knocked over by the tree and was broken in half. Richard Jr and Eliza’s head stones had been tilted. According to Leroy a local Boy Scout troop, as a service project, cleaned up the cemetery in the late 1990’s, but the bushes rapidly regrew. The fence showed signs of having been painted.

We had about two hours left in our schedule to do what we could do. The ranger station loaned some tools to us. We started calling the sticker bushes “Grab-me-gotchas” because they were long and ‘viney’ and after cutting them, when we tried to throw them outside the fence the Grab-me-gotchas would somehow wrap around our legs and poke us through our pants. We also cut up the tree.

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Summer 2013

In 2013 we returned with the supplies we needed to do some of the repairs. We ordered a headstone repair kit (medium kit 3-6 stones) from Polymer Concrete Inc. (http://www.tombstonerestoration.com) and had it shipped to Myer Country Motel where we stayed. We had to again find the plot because of the rapid re-growth of the brush.

After cutting our way in, we began cleaning up Hannah’s headstone. When the headstone was originally set, the gap between the stone and the base (tongue and groove) should have been filled with molten lead, but it was not done. The first task was then to clean out the dirt and abrade the surfaces to be joined with a wire brush. Masking tape was put around the joint to protect the other surfaces from excess epoxy. The epoxy was mixed and put on the surfaces with a paint brush and extra epoxy used to fill the gap described. The surfaces of the break in the stone were then abraded. Wood stakes were clamped vertically to the lower half of the stone using ratcheting squeeze clamps. The stakes provided a means to align and secure the two halves. The epoxy was applied and the parts fitted together. The upper half of the stone was then clamped to the stakes. Extra epoxy was pushed into the gaps where the stone had chipped when it broke. A couple of days later we returned to remove the clamps and clean up.

We will be returning this year and will give all the stones a good scrubbing, paint more of the fence, and try to slow the growth of the brush. We may also give some attention to the Van Gorden family stones outside the fence, if our time allows. Below is a description of how to find the cemetery.

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If You Go

Along the trail in 2013

Along the trail in 2013

The access road is located north of the Wheat Plains farm on the east side of Hwy 209. Coming south from Milford or Dingman’s Ferry, just past the Briscoe Mountain Rd, is the McDade Trail Access Road. The road sign is hard to read at highway speeds, so look for the Pocono Environmental Education Center sign.

Turn left on the access road and follow it to the end (locked post). From there walk about ½ mile.

McDade Trail marker; red arrow points to the twisted tree.

McDade Trail marker; red arrow points to the twisted tree.

At mile marker 15.5 (left hand side) stop and look to the right and look for the twisted tree. Enter the bushes between the twisted tree and the tree to the left. You are facing the direction of the cemetery. White paint dots were sprayed on the trees on right and left side of the “trail”.   The cemetery is about 100 yards from the road as the crow flies. Be sure to dress in clothes that cover you, and protect yourself from ticks and other insects. Rubber bands or duct tape and a good bug spray around the bottom of your pant legs acts as a good barrier. We did not find any ticks in the five trips to the cemetery.

We are looking forward to our next trip to Dingman’s Ferry to visit the Brodhead/Linderman Cemetery and Wheat Plains Farm. We feel a special connection to our family there.

How to get there

How to get there

Categories: Brodhead, Brodhead-Linderman Cemetery, Cemeteries, Linderman, Monroe Co., Stroudsburg | 5 Comments

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