Pike Co.

1872 obituary for Garret Brodhead, husband of Cornelia Dingman

Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832) – Photo Credit: James & Barbara Brodhead

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851); Photo Credit: James & Barbara Brodhead

I recently came upon this obituary notice for my third-great-grandfather Garret Brodhead (d. January 8, 1872), husband of Cornelia Dingman and father of Albert Gallatin Brodhead, Daniel Dingman Brodhead, Andrew Jackson (A.J.) Brodhead (my second-great-grandfather), and Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead.  Much of what I’d known of Garret is contained in this post.  The obituary offers wonderful details—who wrote it, I have no idea, but it was someone who had been well acquainted with Garret and Pike County men of Garret’s generation.

Reference is made to Garret’s favorite book Modern Chivalry by Breckenridge; we find out he was living with son A.J. and family in Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe) for about a year before his death; we learn where he was during the War of 1812, that he was a Protestant in the Calvin tradition and a Democrat in politics; and we learn he was extremely interested in his Dutch roots.

Coincidentally, I, too, have been thinking lately about my Dutch roots in the sense that I feel like I need to learn much more about them, so it was interesting to me that Garret had a real preoccupation with them rather than his English roots which probably made up a good 50% of his DNA.

In any case, if you are a descendant and have not yet seen this obituary, I hope you will enjoy reading it as much as I did and that you’ll find out a few new things about our shared ancestor.

Port Jervis Evening Gazette – January 1872 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

 

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Categories: Brodhead, Death, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Obituaries, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

Brodhead family’s historic Wheat Plains homestead to be saved and restored by National Park Service

“Wheat Plains,” the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

This post is a follow-up to information I shared previously about Wheat Plains, the farmstead located in Pike County, PA, on land whose original Brodhead owners were Revolutionary War veteran Lieutenant Garret Brodhead and his wife Jane Davis. The farmhouse and structures evolved over generations of Brodheads living there.

The Federal Government-backed Tocks Island Dam project from the 1970s took properties such as this one from their owners, and although the dam project fell through, the US government retained ownership of the properties within the project’s borders. Over time, due to funding issues, the National Park Service was unable to maintain the farmhouse and it fell into disrepair; see my August 2012 post The current sorry state of the Garret Brodhead house.

Wheat Plains house exterior, 2013, Image copyright: James and Barbara Brodhead

Fortunately the DePuy / Brodhead Family Association got involved to try to save the structures before they reached the point of no return. See the July 2014 post The Brodhead-Linderman Cemetery: Descendants work on clean up and restoration; the May 2015 post  Garret Brodhead’s Wheat Plains farmhouse – an August clean-up project, and the November 2016 post Garret Brodhead’s Wheat Plains Farm in Pike Co., PA, needs your support.

The fantastic news, which many of you may have heard, is that last summer at the annual DePuy / Brodhead Family Association reunion, the National Park Service announced its plans to save Wheat Plains. This project will be ongoing and financial contributions* to support it are welcome. Below are excerpts from the recent newsletter I received from the association.

I want to personally thank the Association’s members for their hard work, dedication, and commitment to preserving the property whose ongoing existence is important not only to our shared family history but also to Pennsylvania’s history and our nation’s history. Thanks to their extraordinary efforts and the NPS’s commitment to the property, Wheat Plains will be enjoyed and celebrated for generations to come.

*Donations of any size are welcome: DePuy/Brodhead Family Association, 9031 11th Place West, Everett, WA 98204-2694

The De Puy Brodhead Family Association Newsletter, January 7, 2019

News reported by Kevin De Puy, President: The biggest news for the Family last year was the announcement from Ranger Kristy Boscheinen, Chief of Special Projects Division of the National Park Service that “Wheat Plains” Revolutionary Homestead of Lt. Garret Brodhead was put on the list for restoration. Wheat Plains is located at mile marker 8 on Route 209 near East Stroudsburg, PA. […] The Family gave a $12,000.00 donation for the restoration process and donations continue to come in, and all donations will be presented this August at this years reunion[**]. The family also did a service project at Wheat Plains joined by Kristy, Ranger Kathleen Hudak two professional young men, one a Marketing Analyst and the other a Historic Building Architect (wish I had their names). We cleared the brush and debris from behind the homestead and up the embankment and cleaned out the water canal in front of the Spring House. The East side of the Homestead was painted and NPS is working on clearing up the mold in the cellar so a major support beam can be replaced. This restoration is going to be several years endeavor and should be the main focus of the Family and I can see our Family having a reunion at Wheat Plains in the Fall when all is said and done. We can mosey around, having fun much like they did back in the day. Again, I would like to remind everyone that the DePuy side has just as much a vested interest in this as do Brodhead. Elizabeth DePuy, daughter of Nicolas DePuy ( Fort DePuy at Shawnee on the Delaware ) was married to General Daniel Brodhead, the brother of Lt. Garret Brodhead, and I imagine the General and Elizabeth may have frequented Wheat Plains quite a few times. This does not mean that we will not support nor take on other endeavors; Wheat Plains should be at the fore front.

**Reunion scheduled for August 24, 2019, 9 a.m., tentatively at the Bushkill Meeting Center, 6414 Milford Road (route 209), East Stroudsburg, PA 18302. For more information, contact James and Barbara Brodhead at 614 400 9581.

 

Categories: Brodhead, De Puy (De Pui), Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

Garret Brodhead’s Wheat Plains Farm in Pike Co., PA, needs your support

"Wheat Plains," the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

Circa 1900: “Wheat Plains,” the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

The sad state of the Wheat Plains house

2016: The sad state of the Wheat Plains house – victim of the Tocks Island Dam project

Hello, Brodhead descendants & anyone with an interest in Pennsylvania history! You may not be aware of an important project that could greatly use your support: the restoration of Wheat Plains Farm in Pike County, Pennsylvania, the old Garret Brodhead (1730-1804) family homestead that Brodhead family members were forced to abandon in the 1970s due to the Tocks Island Dam project. Below is a letter just received from James and Barbara Brodhead who are spearheading the DePuy-Brodhead Family Association’s efforts to restore the home (now managed by the National Park Service). So please take a few moments to read the below letter and see if you can lend your support. PS: Next summer’s DePuy-Brodhead Family Association annual reunion is likely to be held there; it would be extremely positive if as many Brodhead descendants as possible made the effort to be there to show the NPS that the home’s fate is of concern to many, not just a few. I hope to be there—a great opportunity to support a great cause and meet cousins of all kinds.

 

Dear Family,

As many of you know, some members of the DePuy/Brodhead Family Association have been working with the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area to preserve the Wheat Plains house. Wheat Plains is the farm started by Garret Brodhead on the land he received as partial payment for his service in the Revolutionary War. From 1790 the farm was owned by the Brodhead family until it was sold to Cornelius Swartout in 1871. Robert Packer Brodhead purchased back the farm in 1896 and his descendants remained there until the 1970’s when the land was acquired by eminent domain as part of the Tocks Island Dam Project. The Army Corp of Engineers headed the project. Later the Army Corp of Engineers determined that the river bed would not support the dam. The land then was transferred to the National Parks Service (NPS) who now manages the property. There are currently about 700 buildings remaining in the park on both sides of the Delaware River. Some have historical significance and most have sentimental value. Many buildings are in poor condition. Wheat Plains is structurally sound and it sits in a prominent place on highway 209.

The Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (DWGNRA) is developing a long range plan to identify which buildings should be restored, maintained, or removed. The NPS has limited funds to do this work. Included in their consideration is the cost of maintenance and what the long term usage of the structure will be. Without a defined usage the preservation efforts will be limited.

Now to get to the purpose of this letter. We have been encouraged to send letters to the Superintendent of the DWGNRA and express our interest and support of preserving Wheat Plains or other structures. Please write a politely worded letter expressing your personal interest in preserving Wheat Plains farmhouse and property. Please include personal memories and historical facts that you have. If you have ideas for the usage for the house, (i.e. museum, vacation rental, etc.) please include that also. These letters need to be sent by the end of the year in order to be included in the evaluation process. The sooner the letters arrive the better. The Association created a good impression when we helped clean the house in 2015. It showed the NPS how much we care and your letter will add to that.

When writing your letter please remember that the NPS had nothing to do with taking the land; they were given the task of maintaining it. Please keep your letter kind and considerate.

Please address your letter to:
John J. Donahue, Superintendent
Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area &
Middle Delaware National Scenic and Recreational River
1978 River Road
Bushkill, PA 18324

Please also send copies of your letter to the following at the address above or email a copy to the addresses
given below:
Judson Kratzer – Judson_Kratzer@NPS.gov
Jennifer Kavanaugh – Jennifer_Kavanaugh@NPS.gov

We are in the initial stages of organizing a “Friends of Wheat Plains” non-profit org. to collect donations to help support the preservation of Wheat Plains. More information coming.

We sincerely thank you,
James and Barbara Brodhead
425-418-4742

Categories: Brodhead, Delaware Water Gap, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

Antique “Dingman’s, Pa.” souvenir

Those out there with Dingman roots may want to weigh in on whose image this is on an old souvenir trinket box. Could it be Judge Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862), or someone farther back in the family tree? His father Andrew Dingman Jr. (1753-1839)? Or grandfather Andrew Dingman Sr. (1711-1796)?

Dingman_souvenir2 Dingman_souvenir

Categories: Dingman, Dingmans Ferry, Memorabilia, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | Tags: | 1 Comment

Blooming Grove Park, Pike Co., PA (Post 3)

Blooming Grove Park

“Blooming Grove Park—The American Fontainebleau” (Image from my personal copy of Harper’s Weekly, December 17, 1870)

This past June I did a post on an 1891 Brodhead hunting expedition in Blooming Grove Park, Pike Co., Pennsylvania (and a subsequent follow-up). I just realized, while leafing through the December 17, 1870, Harper’s Weekly newspaper that contained the great scenes from Blooming Grove, that I failed to include in my post the accompanying article about this private 12,000-plus-acre hunting and fishing club. So, I will include it here now. It’s interesting (and good) to see how even back then, conservation was on people’s minds. You have to wonder what may have happened to all that land had it not fallen under the club’s protection.

As for the article, I had to chuckle when I read that the train took “only” 4.5 hrs to get to Blooming Grove from NYC, a distance of some 87 miles that is described as being one of the Park’s great advantages, which indeed it was at that time—and still is today. While Blooming Grove is still private/members-only, that part of Pennsylvania offers many other areas that are freely accessible to outdoors-lovers. We are still hoping to get up there next summer for some trout fishing and family-history-hunting expeditions.

BloomGrove_article

A clipping of the article on Blooming Grove from my personal copy of Harper’s Weekly, December 17, 1870

Categories: Brodhead, Fishing, Hunting, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | Tags: | 5 Comments

Dingman/Brodhead link to a Dutch “pocket-book” that was 216 years old in 1876

Unknown Master, Dutch (active in the 1620s in Leiden) ; Still-Life with Books (Credit: Wikimedia Commons; uploaded by 'Jarekuploadbot')

Still-Life with Books, Unknown Master, Dutch (active in the 1620s in Leiden); (Credit: Wikimedia Commons; uploaded by ‘Jarekuploadbot’)

From Webster’s Complete Dictionary of the English Language (1886)

From Webster’s Complete Dictionary of the English Language (1886)

The Evening Gazette, Port Jervis, NY, April 29, 1876

The Evening Gazette, Port Jervis, NY, April 29, 1876 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

If it still exists, the little ‘pocket-book’ mentioned in the accompanying newspaper clipping from the Port Jervis (NY) Evening Gazette, dated April 29, 1876, would be 355 years old, which would be pretty remarkable.

The ‘pocket-book’ had long been in the Dingman family until gifted by Andrew Dingman Jr. (1753-1839) to his grandson-son-in-law (my third great-grandfather) Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), who two years before his death gifted the item back to the Dingman family—specifically to ‘A.S. Dingman’. I believe this A. S. Dingman was probably Alfred Stoll Dingman (1839-1907), the elder Dingman’s great-grandson (and Garret’s nephew) who would have been about 31 at the time.

Garret was married to Cornelia Dingman, Judge Daniel Westbrook Dingman‘s daughter. Perhaps the pocket-book was a wedding gift.

Below you will find some background on each of the above as well as Andrew Dingman Sr., father of the aforementioned Andrew Jr.), who was the original Dingman who settled in the Pennsylvania wilderness in 1735 in what is now known as Dingman’s Ferry; and another Andrew Dingman (the Judge’s son and Alfred Stoll Dingman’s father).  (See the tree below.)

If you have access to Ancestry.com, you can view a wonderful photograph of Andrew Dingman Jr. in a group photo with his youngest son Isaac (Alfred’s brother), Isaac’s wife Charlotte, and the couple’s three daughters—Caroline, Melissa, and Helen. Also on Ancestry, you can view a portrait of Judge Daniel Westbrook Dingman who is mentioned in the article, the judge being the son of Andrew Sr. and the father of Andrew Jr. Interestingly one of the below bios mentions the Judge’s ‘corpulent’ size; the portrait on Ancestry of a young Daniel W. Dingman shows a man whose waistline has not yet expanded.

Accompanying images include two photos of waterfalls at the famous Dingmans Falls taken by my grandmother Zillah Trewin (no relation to the Brodheads/Dingmans) during her summer 1907 vacation, and present-day images of the old Dingman stone house (built in 1803-1804) and Dingman’s Ferry bridge (chartered in 1834) that were generously provided by James and Barbara Brodhead following a visit to that area in 2013. I have also included some newspaper clippings found on the Fulton History website; there is one anecdote about Judge Daniel W. Dingman’s handling of one case during which he uses language that would be considered completely inappropriate by today’s standards, and rightly so, of course, but I am including the anecdote here since it is part of history. If you can get beyond the language used, the punishment itself seems fair, if not generous for the crime committed.

So if you are interested in any of these family members, please get a ‘cuppa’ and read on! 🙂 (As always, comments, corrections, and additions are welcome.)

1-Andrew Dingman Sr. b. 11 Feb 1711, Kinderhook Albany Co NY, d. 1796,
Dingmans Ferry Northampton Co PA
+Cornelia Kermer b. 22 May 1720, New York, d. Pennsylvania, United States
|—–2-Andrew Dingman Jr. b. 19 Sep 1753, Northampton Co PA, d. 3 Feb 1839,
| Pike Co PA, bur. Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
+Jane Westbrook b. 9 Apr 1755, NJ, d. 21 Jan 1838, Dingmans Ferry Pike
Co PA, bur. Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
|—–3-Daniel Westbrook Dingman b. 28 Jul 1774, Walpack, Sussex, New
| Jersey, d. 14 Apr 1862, Pike Co PA, bur. Delaware Cemetery,
| Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
| +Mary Westbrook b. 8 Oct 1774, d. 26 Feb 1851, Dingmans Ferry Pike
| Co PA, bur. Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
| |—–4-Andrew Dingman b. 25 Dec 1804, Dingman family homestead, d.
| | 22 Mar 1889, bur. Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike
| | Co., PA
| | +Caroline Eliza Sayre b. 21 Oct 1804, d. 6 May 1885, bur.
| | Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
| | |—–5-Alfred Stoll Dingman (Aug 12, 1837-Jan 28, 1907; married Kate Van Auken; one child Walter)

**************************************************************************

ANDREW DINGMAN SR. (1711-1796; married Cornelia Kermer):

History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania; Delaware Township, Chapter VIII, (Philadelphia: RT Peck & Co., 1886), pp. 908-909: The present township of Delaware is bounded on the north by Dingman township, on the east by the Delaware River and New Jersey, on the south by Lehman township and on the west by Porter. The first settlements on the Delaware River were made on the New Jersey side; but in or about the year 1735, Andreas Dingerman, or Andrew Dingman, as it is now written, crossed the Delaware and chose a place in the wilderness for his home, which he called “Dingman’s Choice,” a name which it still retains in local usage, although the post-office is called Dingman’s Ferry.

What the original ferry looked like (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

What the original ferry looked like; eventually the ferry was replaced by a bridge (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

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Original pulley from 1735 (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

When Andrew Dingman first crossed the river to make his habitation on the Pennsylvania side, he had an opportunity to make a choice, as he was the pioneer settler of Delaware township. If he was not the first, he was among the first, and is the first of whom we have authentic account. He certainly made an excellent choice of location for his future home, judging from present developments, for here the Delaware River flows close to the New Jersey hills and leaves a wide flat of rich bottom land on the Pennsylvania side. Here Dingman Creek bursts through the mountain bluffs after dashing over the rocks at the factory in a fall called the Factory Falls, and lower down is the “Bettie Brooks” or “Fulmer Falls.”

High Falls, Dingman's Falls, PA (CREDIT: Zillah Boles Trewin)

High Falls, Dingman’s Falls, PA, 1907  (CREDIT: Zillah Trewin)

Still farther down are the “Deer Leap” and “High Falls.” […]  Here, then, with a broad expanse of fertile river bottom land under his feet, with a creek that would supply water-power for grist and saw-mills flowing through it, surrounded by mountain bluffs, “rock-ribbed and ancient as the sun,” which environ it on two sides, he feasted his eyes upon the lavish bounty of Nature, in her primeval grandeur and magnificence, and inhaled the pure, health-giving air which floated around these mountains, “yet gorgeous in their primitive beauty, forest-crowned,” and intersected with gushing streams of limpid waters, which burst through the rocks from the highlands above in bold and beautiful waterfalls, where for ages they have been wearing deep and still deeper the steep gorges and rocky glens in her riven sides.

Deer Leap, Child's Park (Credit: Zillah Trewin, 1907)

Deer Leap, Child’s Park (Credit: Zillah Trewin, 1907)

Here, amid so much grandeur and beauty, Andrew Dingman made his choice and cut the first bush, built the first log cabin on the riverbank and put the first ferry-boat on the Delaware at what is now known as Dingman’s Ferry. Andrew Dingman was born at Kinderhook, New York, in the year 1711, and settled at Dingman’s Choice in the year 1735, or about that time. His first log cabin was down by the river-bank. About 1750, or some time previous to the French and Indian War, he built a stone house not far from where the Dingman “Reformed Church “now stands, on the site occupied by the house Fannie Dingman’s farmer occupies.

He had two sons, Isaac and Andrew Dingman, Jr., who was born September 19, 1753, in the old stone house which was destroyed during the French and Indian War, in 1755. Dingman immediately rebuilt another house. Mr. Dingman was endowed with a dauntless spirit and had now a farm, with orchards and barns. He was assisted in his labors by his two sons and four slaves. He established a traffic with the Indians, who often visited him, and from his friendly intercourse and dealing with the natives he derived considerable pecuniary advantage. In 1744 he obtained a warrant for the tract which now comprises a part of the M.W. Dingman estate, and in 1750 one for that lot on which the saw-mill at Dingman’s now stands. He subsequently took up, as it is termed, three other lots of land, the last in 1775. There were twenty-seven log and stone houses in Delaware as it was then, including Lehman and other territory west, contemporaneously with that of Andrew Dingman, Sr.

WEST (FRONT) AND SOUTH ELEVATIONS - Dutch Reformed Church, Dingmans Ferry, Pike County, PA (Credit: Library of Congress)

WEST (FRONT) AND SOUTH ELEVATIONS – Dutch Reformed Church, Dingmans Ferry, Pike County, PA (Credit: Library of Congress)

[…] Andrew Dingman built a flat-boat for ferrying purposes with a hand-axe, and it is probable that he built a grist-mill and saw-mill on Dingman’s Creek. An old grist-mill, with one “run” of native stones, stood near the present grist-mill. Judge Dingman used to tell his children about turning the bolt by hand while the miller ground the grist.*

[…] One of Andrew Dingman’s sons, Isaac, when about nineteen years of age, was riding a horse up the road to the barn and when a little north of the old Dingman Hotel (now Fulmer’s), an Indian, who was secreted in the orchard, shot him and ran away. His mother, who happened to be standing in the door holding the future judge, who was then four years of age, by the hand, exclaimed, “Law me, Isaac is shot!” He was mortally wounded, but they started across the river with him in a flat-boat. While they were going over he asked for a drink of water and shortly after died before they reached the Jersey shore, where there was a fort with one cannon. He was buried on the Jersey side, near the abutment of the old bridge.

ANDREW DINGMAN JR. (1753-1839; married Jane Westbrook )

History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886) – page 213-214: [...] …Andrew resided on the Jersey side of the Delaware, but subsequently removed to Dingman’s Ferry, where his father had made a beginning. He was captain of a company and served in the struggle for the independence of the colonies, and after living to see the country again engaged in a war with England in 1812, he survived many years thereafter, and died in 1839, at the age of eighty-three years.

His wife was Jane Westbrook, who bore him two children, — Daniel W. Dingman and Cornelia, who became the wife of Daniel Van Etten, who resided at Connashaw, where the Van Etten family homestead was.

History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania; Delaware Township, Chapter VIII, pp. 908-909:  Andrew Dingman, Jr., “Foddy Dingman,” as he was called, was born in the old stone house September 19, 1753. He married Jane Westbrook, a daughter of Daniel Westbrook, who lived across the river in New Jersey, and had three daughters, each of whom he gave a farm on the flats in Walpack township. Andrew Dingman took the upper farm, and here Daniel Westbrook Dingman was born April 14, 1775, on the Daniel Smith place, in a house that stood opposite Barney Swartwood’s. Subsequently Andrew Dingman, Jr., sold this property and bought on the Pennsylvania side again, near where John Whitaker lives.

Before the Revolutionary War the nearest justice of the peace was Benjamin Van Campen, who lived twenty-two miles from Dingman’s Choice. The county-seat was at Newtown, near Bristol, and there Andrew Dingman attended court.

Genealogical and Family History of the Wyoming and Lackawanna Valleys, Pennsylvania, Volume 1 by Horace Edwin Hayden, Alfred Hand, John Woolf Jordan (Lewis publishing Company, 1906), page 202: The younger Andrew Dingman served as private, Sussex county, (New Jersey) militia, 1779-83, and was pensioned as such March 4, 1831. He was born at Dingman’s Ferry, Pennsylvania, but lived in New Jersey during the Indian depredations ; enlisted 1779 as private in Captain Peter Westbrook’s company, Third battalion Sussex county (New Jersey) militia, and took part in engagement with the Indians, April 19, 1780.

JUDGE DANIEL WESTBROOK DINGMAN (1774-1862; married Mary Westbrook)

History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886) – page 213-214: Daniel W. Dingman (1775-1862), only son of Andrew, inherited his father’s estate at the “Ferry,” and carried on the lumber business and merchandising there during a large part of his active life. He was a leading and influential man socially and politically, and a Democrat of the Andrew Jackson type.

Judge Daniel W. Dingman's stone house (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

Judge Daniel W. Dingman’s stone house (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

Sign on the Dingman home (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

Sign on the Dingman home (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

He was the first elected sheriff of Wayne County, in 1801, and the second holding the office, and served in the State Legislature from 1808 to 1814, during which time Pike County was taken from Wayne, and he gave the new county its name, from General Pike, a hero of the War of 1812, and he also gave Dingman township its name. He was associate judge of Pike County for twenty-six years in succession, and was chosen one of the electors in the election of President Monroe.

His wife, Mary Westbrook (1777-1852), a daughter of Benjamin Westbrook, of Sussex County, N. J., bore him children as follows: Martin W.; Andrew ; Daniel W., Jr., the first Whig prothonotary of Pike County, appointed by Governor Joseph Ritner ; Cornelia, wife of Garret Brodhead, of Dingman’s Ferry ; Margaret, wife of Abram Coolbaugh, of Shawnee, Monroe County ; and Jane, wife of Franklin Brodhead. Of these children, only Andrew and Margaret survive in 1886, the latter being eighty-five years of age.

History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck & Co. 1886), pp. 910-911: In 1793 Daniel W. Dingman was commissioned as lieutenant of a company of militia by Thomas Mifflin, Governor of Pennsylvania. On the 2d of August, 1800, he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the One Hundred and Third Regiment Pennsylvania Militia by Governor McKean. In 1801 he received a commission as high sheriff of Wayne County, by the same Governor. He was the second sheriff of Wayne County, his term extending from 1801 to 1804. The court was held at Wilsonville from 1799 to 1802, when it was removed to Milford for a short time; consequently he commenced at Wilsonville and closed his term at Milford. [For a list of the elections he ran in over the course of his lifetime, click here.]

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Dingmans Bridge sign (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

At one of these places he lived in a log house, the jail being similar to his dwelling. He had two prisoners in this jail. One morning, on arising, he found both his prisoners and the jail were gone. During the night the jail was torn down and the building reduced to saw-logs, while the prisoners were nowhere to be found. About that time he was visited by some gentlemen from New Jersey on business, and…overheard some very uncomplimentary remarks about such a dwelling for a sheriff to live in, good enough, however, for a county-seat that was liable to be removed any day. He was a member of the Legislature of Pennsylvania from 1808 till 1813, and when Pike County was set off from Wayne and Northampton, he was commissioned associate judge by Governor Simon Snyder, October 10, 1814, and continued in that office twenty-six years, when his term expired by limitation under the new Constitution.

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851)

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851); wife of Garret Brodhead (Image credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

John Coolbaugh sat with him for twenty-two years and until Monroe was erected. They were both large, stoutly-built men, and weighed over two hundred pounds each, while Judge Scott, the presiding judge who sat between them, was a tall, spare, intellectual man of great legal attainments. His associates seldom interfered, unless in relation to something of a political nature. Dingman was once Presidential elector and cast his vote for James Monroe. During Jackson’s campaign he cut a tall hickory pole and floated it to Easton, on a raft, when it was raised on Mount Jefferson. When taken down it was made into canes, one of which was presented to General Jackson and another to Judge Dingman. Solomon Dingman, his grandson, now has the cane. In 1846 he was corresponding secretary of the Pennsylvania Historical Society.

Daniel W. Dingman was an active business man and a successful politician of the old Jacksonian Democratic school. He built a hotel which has since been enlarged by Philip Fulmer, until it will accommodate one hundred guests. He also built the Dingman grist-mill, and being given his choice whether he would have an academy or a county-seat located at Dingman’s Ferry, chose an academy.

The three trusses of the Dingman's Ferry Bridge (Credit: Wikimedia Commons, uploaded by Ando228 on 14 Jun 2008)

The three trusses of the Dingman’s Ferry Bridge (Credit: Wikimedia Commons, uploaded by Ando228 on 14 Jun 2008)

In all public matters relating to Pike County, he was a leading man. While in the Legislature he secured an act making Blooming Grove the county-seat, but the commissioners of Wayne County refused to levy a tax for public buildings and the county-seat was finally fixed at Bethany. He and his friends then had the county of Pike erected.

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The Pennsylvania side of the bridge where the tolls are collected (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

He was also influential in getting State appropriations for roads over the barrens of Pike County. Towards the close of his life he built a house in the wilderness, by Lake Teedyuscung or Nichecronk, where he lived a retired life for a number of years. He finally came back to his old home, and died April 12, 1862, at the advanced age of eighty-seven years, and was buried in the Delaware Cemetery at Dingman’s Ferry. Towards the close of his life he seemed to desire posthumous fame and took pride in the fact that he belonged to the Pennsylvania Historical Society. He was thoroughly identified with the early history of Pike County. Dingman’s Ferry, Dingman Creek and Falls were named in honor of the family, and Dingman township was named in honor of the judge. He was kind to Revolutionary heroes and Indian fighters, and General Seeley, Sam Helm, Mapes and Wagdon found a generous stopping-place with him. His only sister, Cornelia, married John Van Etten, and lived where William Courtright now lives at Dingman’s Ferry. She was eighty-six years of age when she died. Daniel W. Dingman married Mary Westbrook. His children were Cornelia, wife of Garret Brodhead; Jane, wife of Franklin Brodhead; Margaret, wife of Abram Coolbaugh. Daniel Dingman lived on the river road.

Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832)

Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832); husband of Cornelia Dingman, granddaughter of Mr. Andrew Dingman, father of Judge (Daniel Westbrook) Dingman (Image credit: James & Barbara Brodhead)

GARRET BRODHEAD (1793-1872; married Cornelia Dingman in 1813)

Genealogical and Family History of the Wyoming and Lackawanna Valleys, Pennsylvania, Volume 1 by Horace Edwin Hayden, Alfred Hand, John Woolf Jordan (Lewis publishing Company, 1906), page 202:
Garret Brodhead, Jr., eldest son of Richard and Hannah (Drake) Brodhead, born December 2, 1793, died East Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania, January 8, 1872 ; married, November 25, 1813, Cornelia Dingman, born October 3, 1797, died June 18, 1883, daughter of Daniel W. and Mary (Westbrook) Dingman. […] Garret Brodhead, Jr., served as private in Captain Adam Hawks’ Second brigade Pennsylvania militia in the war of 1812-15. He was a farmer in Pike county ; from 1850 until 1858 he held an important position in the civil administration of the United States navy yard at Philadelphia. Garret Brodhead and his wife Cornelia Dingman had children : 1. Albert Gallatin, born August 3, 1815, died January 18, 1891 ; married, July 3, 1838, Sally Ann Tolan. 2. Daniel Dingman, see forward. 3. Andrew Jackson, born May 6, 1822, of whom later. 4. Abram Coolbaugh, born August 6, 1824, died October, 1892; married, January 6, 1863, Cornelia M. Ely.

ANDREW DINGMAN (1804-1889; married Caroline Eliza Sayre)

History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886) – page 214: Andrew, son of Daniel W. Dingman, was born on the homestead, on Christmas day, 1804, where he has followed farming and lumbering most of his active life. He now, at the age of eighty- one years, is hale and hearty, and his correct habits through life, his even temperament and quiet ways, together with his integrity in all the relations of life’s work, have gained the esteem of all who know him.

 His wife, Caroline (1804-85), was a daughter of Jedediah Sayre, a large real estate owner of Deckertown, N. J., and her mother was Elizabeth Reifsnyder, of the same place. Their children are : Mary, wife of John W. Kilsby, a farmer at Dingman’s Ferry ; Susan, wife of John W. Mclnnis, of Columbus, Ohio; E . Sayre, of Scranton ; Jane resides with her brother at Hawley ; Margaret, wife of John Lattimore, of Dingman’s Ferry ; Daniel W., of Flatbrookville, Sussex County, N. J.; Alfred S., of Milford ; William H., of Columbus, Ohio ; Dr. A. C, subject of this sketch ; and Isaac, of Dingman’s Ferry.

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Alfred Stoll Dingman p 214 of History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886)

Alfred Stoll Dingman
p 368 of Commemorative Biographical Record of Northeastern Pennsylvania: Including the Counties of Susquehanna, Wayne, Pike and Monroe (Monroe Co., PA: J. H. Beers & Company, 1900)

ALFRED STOLL DINGMAN (b. 12 August 1837; d. 28 Jan 1907; married Kate Van Auken)
Commemorative Biographical Record of Northeastern Pennsylvania: Including the Counties of Susquehanna, Wayne, Pike and Monroe (Monroe Co., PA: J. H. Beers & Company, 1900), page 369:
Alfred Stoll Dingman was born August 12, 1837, at the homestead at Dingman’s Ferry, where he remained until he reached the age of nineteen, assisting his father with the work of the farm and ferry. He then took a position as clerk in a general store at Dingman’s Ferry, owned by Thomas Cortright, and in 1859 he accepted a similar position with C. McCarty, of the same place. On October 16, 1862, he became a member, at Philadelphia, of Company B, 179th P. V. P, becoming first lieutenant under Capt. John B. Frazier. He went first to Newport News, and later to Yorktown, where he remained until June, 1863, doing guard duty at the Fort, and he then marched up the Peninsula to Whitehouse Landing, Va., participating in an engagement near that place in June, 1863. On July 2, 1863, he was discharged at Harrisburg, on account of expiration of term of service, and after his return home he assisted his father for some time. In the spring of 1864 he entered into mercantile business at Dingman’s Ferry with Evert Hornbeck, and one year later bought his partner’s interest, continuing alone until 1869, when he formed a partnership with Henry P. Beardsley. After two years Mr. Beardsley died, and for one year Jacob B. Westbrook was in partnership with our subject, who then sold out to Mr. Westbrook and retired. In 1880 Mr. Dingman removed to Milford, being employed as a clerk for John F. Pinchot, a merchant, until 1889, when he became a traveling salesman for Thomas E. Grecian, a shoe dealer in New York City.

Mr. Dingman has always taken keen interest in politics, being an ardent Republican, and in 1890 he was elected commissioner of Pike county for the term of three years. In 1893 he was again chosen to the office, and on retiring he engaged, in February, 1896, in his present business. He is an able official, and previous to his election as commissioner he had served three years (1884-1887) as county auditor, and three years as school director in Delaware township. Socially he and his family are prominent, and he is identified with the G. A. R., the I. O. O. F., the Rebekahs, and the F. & A. M. (Blue Lodge No. 344), at Milford.

On May 18, 1889, Mr. Dingman was married, at Port Jervis, N. Y., to Miss Kate Van Auken, and one son, Walter V., born March 14, 1890, brightens their home. Mrs. Dingman was born April 13, 1857, at Dingman’s Ferry, a daughter of the late John B. Van Auken, and is a member of an old and highly-esteemed family of Wallpack, NJ… […]

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OBITUARY

Port Jervis Evening Gazette, January 29, 1907

Alfred S. Dingman obit – part 1, Port Jervis Evening Gazette, January 29, 1907 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Dingman_AS_obit2

Alfred S. Dingman obit – part 2, Port Jervis Evening Gazette, January 29, 1907 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

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OTHER PRESS CLIPPINGS

AdamsNY_JeffersonCoJournal_20Nov1888_1

Adams NY, Jefferson County Journal, 20 Nov 1888 – part 1 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Adams NY, Jefferson County Journal, 20 Nov 1888 - part 1 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Adams NY, Jefferson County Journal, 20 Nov 1888 – part 2 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Adams NY, Jefferson County Journal, 20 Nov 1888 - part 3 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Adams NY, Jefferson County Journal, 20 Nov 1888 – part 3 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

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Wayne County Herald, Honesdale, PA

Excerpt from article in Wayne County Herald, Honesdale, PA

St Regis Adirondack News (dated 1901-1903), Credit: fultonhistory.com

Port Jervis, Evening Gazette, 26 Feb 1889 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Andrew died less than a month later. Port Jervis, Evening Gazette, 26 Feb 1889 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Dingmans Ferry, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | 2 Comments

Brodhead 1891 hunting expedition follow-up: ‘Lafe’, John, & ‘Mose’ Westbrook (Post 2)

This post is a follow-up to the one I did recently about an 1891 Brodhead hunting expedition in Blooming Grove. The participants included some members of the Westbrook family, and I have since discovered traces of them in the book Commemorative Biographical Record of Northeastern Pennsylvania: Including the Counties of Susquehanna, Wayne, Pike and Monroe (Monroe Co., PA: J. H. Beers & Company, 1900), on pages 32-34; and 40-41.

It turns out that John Coolbaugh Westbrook, Moses (‘Mose’) Westbrook, and Lafayette (‘Lafe’) Westbrook were brothers—children of Hannah Coolbaugh (1790-1874) and Solomon Westbrook (1794-1852). The book includes images of John and Lafayette, and while containing scant information on Moses, it goes into detail on the two other brothers. For those who are interested in reading about them, I am including the relevant excerpts from the book here. Some of the information in the below two bios overlaps, but I decided not to edit the overlapping bits out. There is much to wade through, but perhaps you will find clues relevant to your own research. I always especially enjoy reading what these biographers had to say about the character and appearance of their subjects. If you wade through these bios, you will be able to pick some interesting things out about both John and Lafayette.

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Lafayette (‘Lafe’) Westbrook

HON. LAFAYETTE WESTBROOK, of Stroudsburg, is one of Monroe county’s favorite citizens, having been chosen many times to offices of trust and responsibility. As a business man, a soldier and a citizen, he has shown those qualities of character which command respect and admiration, and the story of his successful career will be of lasting interest.

Capt. Westbrook comes of good Colonial stock, members of the family having served with distinction in the Indian wars and in the Revolutionary war, but, unfortunately, the records of the early generations have not been preserved as fully as might be wished. The family is of Anglo-Saxon origin, but religious persecution in England caused their emigration to Holland at an early period. In 1630 the name appeared on the records at Albany, N. Y., among the settlers on the manor of Patroon Van Rensselaer. On October 9, 1665, John Westbrook was at Portsmouth, N. H., and in 1689-90 the names of Job and John appeared on the records. In 1721, Col. Thomas Westbrook, said to have come from Stroudwater, Gloucestershire, England, was a shipbuilder and large landowner in the State of Maine, and the town of Westbrook, Maine, was named in his honor. In that year he commanded the expedition against Norridgewock, which broke up the settlement of the famous Jesuit priest, Father Ralle, and captured his papers. In 1723 he was appointed by Gov. Dunmore as the chief in command of the Eastern frontier.

I. Anthony Westbrook, the first ancestor concerning whom we have any definite information, removed from Guilford, Ulster Co., N. Y., about 1737, and located in Montague township, Sussex Co., N. J., where he became the owner of a large tract of land along the Delaware river and on Minisink Island. He was prominent among the settlers there, holding the office of justice of the peace, and left a record of the earliest marriages contracted in the Minisink Valley. He married Antic Van Etten, and among their children were two sons, Jacob and Johannes.

II. Jacob Westbrook, a son of Anthony, was married. March 24, 1746 to Lydia Westfall, and had six children. Blandina, Johannes, Sofferine, Solomon, Maria and Jane.

III. Solomon Westbrook, the next in the line of descent in which we are now interested, was born in 1762 and died in 1824. He located in Delaware township. Pike Co., Penn., and there owned 700 acres of land upon which he built a stone house that was occupied by the family and for nearly a century, and in times of danger was used as a fort. In 1801 he was assessed with 150 acres of improved land, and at that time he was justice of the peace: Like many of the large agriculturists of his day, he owned slaves, and he was regarded as a wealthy and substantial citizen. He married Margaret DeWitt, and they had the following children: Jacob (1786-1847), who settled upon a portion of the old homestead, and was the father of John I. Westbrook, of Port Jenvis, NY; Col. John, born in 1789, who settled at the homestead, and was a member of Congress from 1841 to 1843; Solomon, our subject’s father; Sofferine; and Margaret, wife of William H. Nyce.

IV . Solomon Westbrook was born in 1794, and died in. 1852. He was a man of hue business ability, and was well known throughout the Delaware valley! In 1819 he sold his farm to his brother Jacob, and purchased another in Middle Smithfield township, Pike county, where he resided until 1829. He then sold his place to John V. Coolbaugh, removed to Philadelphia for a year, and for five years following he conducted a hotel at Dingman’s Ferry owned by Judge Dingman. While there (in 1832) he opened a store, and he also carried on mercantile business at Bushkill in 1830-31, and at Tafton in 1835-36. For some time he was interested in lumbering at Blooming Grove. In 1835 he removed to the old stone house on the homestead, and in 1837 a paralytic stroke nearly incapacitated him for business, depriving him of the power of -speech. In 1842 he’ returned to Blooming Grove, where he and his wife spent their remaining years, his sons taking care of his lumber business. He took much interest in local politics during his active years, and from 1822 to 1825 he served as sheriff of Pike county. He married Hannah Coolbaugh (1790-1874), a daughter of Judge John Coolbaugh, of Middle Smithfield township, Pike county, and they had six children : Margaret (deceased, who married the late John B. Stoll, of Branchville, later a resident of Newark, NJ.; John C, of Pike county; who is mentioned elsewhere; Hiram, late a real-estate dealer of Ridgewood, NJ.; Lafayette, our subject; Moses C, a farmer at the old home in Blooming Grove; and Susan, who married the late Theodore Grandon of Newark, New Jersey.

V. Capt. Lafayette Westbrook was born December 15, 1824, near Dingman’s Ferry, in Pike county, and received an excellent education for that day at Delaware Academy. He became proficient as a surveyor, and in 1850 and 1853 was elected surveyor of Pike county, serving two terms with marked success. I Ie is considered an authority on the location of land in that region, and at one time he assisted in making a map of Dike count)-; throughout his life he has been more or less occupied with surveying.

In 1850, our subject was chosen to represent Pike and Monroe counties in the State Legislature, and so well did he perform his duties that he was re-elected the following year. In 1862 he assisted in raising Company B, 151st P. V. I., and entered the service with the rank of first lieutenant. In March 17, 1863, he was made captain, and this rank he held until honorably discharged, on July 27, 1863, at the expiration of his term. While in the service he was never absent from his command for one moment, and he took part in several important engagements, including the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. On his return home he resumed work as a surveyor, and he also engaged extensively in lumbering in Blooming Grove, where he resided until 1882; in 1874 he was elected county surveyor against his own wishes. In 1866, he was again chosen representative in the State Legislature, his district being changed to Pike and Wayne counties. His ability and experience made his services of so great value to his fellow citizens that, in 1867, he was re-elected without opposition. In 1877 and 1878, under the new constitution, he again represented Pike county in the Legislature – each county being entitled to a member – thus completing six years of service in this capacity. The Captain has been regarded for many years as one of the leading Democrats of this section, and at various conventions, State and National, he has taken an honorable part in the work of the party. At times he has held local offices, including that of justice of the peace, and his interest in educational advancement has been shown by his services as school director. During all these years he has conducted his lumber business in connection with surveying, but in 1882 he removed to Stroudsburg, relinquishing a portion of ‘ his business cares; his investments, however, receive his personal attention, and for some time he has acted as a director and as vice-president of the East Stroudsburg National Bank. The Captain looks much younger than he is, and his active and cultured mind makes him a most agreeable companion. Socially he is much esteemed, and he is identified with the Masonic Fraternity being a Master Mason in the Lodge at Milford, Pike county. During the war he received a certificate from the Grand Lodge: which he still holds In October 1876, Captain Westbrook married Miss Emma Hill, of Newton, NJ; their only child died at an early age.

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John C. Westbrook

John C. Westbrook

JOHN COOLBAUGH WESTBROOK. Few citizens of this section enjoy to as high a degree the confidence of the public as does this well-known resident of Milford, whose popularity is attested by his frequent election to offices of responsibility and trust. For many years he has served ably and acceptably as prothonotary and county auditor, and as recorder of deeds, register of wills, clerk of the Orphans’ Court, Clerk of Court of Assertions, he has also shown characteristic ability, zeal and fidelity.

Mr. Westbrook comes of good old pioneer stock, and traces his descent to an English family, some of whose members went to Holland at an early period to escape religious persecution. The records at Albany, N. Y., show that in 1630 some of that name were settlers on the manor lands of Patroon Van Rensselaer, having come with a Dutch colony. On October 9, 1665, John Westbrook was at Portsmouth, N. H., and in 1689-90 Job and John Westbrook were there. In 1721 Col. Thomas Westbrook, a wealthy land owner and ship builder of Maine, said to have come from Stroudwater, Gloucestershire, England, commanded the expedition against Norridgewock, which broke up the settlement of the famous Jesuit priest Father Ralle, and captured his papers. Two years later he was appointed by Gov. Dunmore as chief in command of the eastern frontier of the Colony of Maine, and he seems to have wielded an important influence in that commonwealth, the town of Westbrook having been named after him. In every generation the love of liberty has been a leading characteristic of the family, and its members have not hesitated to make open resistance to tyranny, several having served in the Revolutionary army. The definite records of our subject’s ancestry began with Anthony Westbrook, who came to Pennsylvania from Guilford, Ulster Co., N. Y., and settled in the Minisink Valley, where he acquired a large tract of land. In 1737 he was a justice of the peace and an elder in the Reformed Dutch Church, while his brother Johannes, who preceded him, was also prominent in the settlement. Anthony Westbrook married Antie Van Etten, and had at least two children, Jacob and Johannes.

Jacob Westbrook became the owner of a large tract of land on the east bank of the Delaware river, about eight miles below Port Jervis, in what is now Montague township, Sussex Co., N. J. His substantial stone house was often used as’ a fort during the troubles with the Indians, as was that of his son Johannes, three miles farther down the Delaware river. Like other pioneer families the Westbrooks kept slaves in the early days. Jacob Westbrook was married March 24, 1746, to Lydia Westfall, and had six children: Blandina, Johannes, Sofferine, Solomon, Maria and Jane.

Solomon Westbrook, our subject’s grandfather, was born October 6, 1762, and died March 30, 1824. In 1792 he located upon a tract of 700 acres of land on the west bank of the Delaware river in Delaware township, Pike county, and his residence, a large stone house, stood on the stage road, two miles below Dingman’s Ferry. In 1801 he was assessed with 150 acres of improved land, and was serving as justice of the peace. On September 24, 1782, he married Margaret De Witt, by whom he had five children: Jacob (1786-1847), who resided on a part of the homestead, and was the father of John I. Westbrook, of Port Jervis; Col. John (1789- 1852), a leading spirit in the State militia, a member of Congress (1841-1843), and one of the ablest men this section ever produced; Solomon, our subject’s father; Sofferine; and Margaret (Mrs. William H. Nyce).

Solomon Westbrook (2), the father of our subject, was born in 1794, and died in 1852. he was a successful business man, and was also active in politics, serving one term as sheriff of Pike county ( 1822-1825). In 1819 he sold his farm to his brother Jacob, and purchased another in Middle Smithfield township, where he remained about ten years; but in 1829 he disposed of the place to John V. Coolbaugh, and removed to Philadelphia. In 1830 be returned and opened a store at Bushkill, which he carried on for a year, while for five years he conducted a hotel at Dingman’s Ferry. In 1832 he opened a store there, and he also carried on mercantile business at Tafton in [835-36. In the meantime he became extensively engaged in lumbering at Blooming Grove, but a paralytic stroke in 1837 deprived him of the power of speech while he was yet in the prime of manhood, lie had removed with his family in 1835 to the old stone house in Delaware township; then in 1842 the family located at Blooming Grove, where his sons carried on the lumber business for many years. His wife was Hannah Coolbaugh, of Middle Smithfield township. Pike comity. Of their children, Margaret, the eldest (deceased) was the wife of John B. Stoll, of Branchville; John C, our subject, is mentioned more fully below; Hiram (deceased) was a real-estate dealer at Ridgewood, NJ, and was twice married, (first) to Eunice A. Horton, and (second) to Jennie M. Maston ; Lafayette, a resident of Stroudsburg, is mentioned elsewhere; Moses C., a farmer on the homestead at Blooming Grove, married Emily Jones; Susan a resident of Milford, married (first) Theodore Grandon, and ( second) William H. Bell, both of whom are now deceased.

Our subject was born May 24. 1820, in Middle Smithfield township, Pike county, then a portion of Delaware township. He began his education in the country schools, afterward studying for some time with Rev. Mr. Allen at Milford. At the age of fifteen he became a clerk in his father’s store at Dingman’s Ferry, and after the latter’s health failed he took charge of the business, assisted by Col. H. S. Mott. Together with his brothers he also managed the lumber business at Blooming Grove, and later he cleared a farm there upon which he built a sawmill and a gristmill. In 1845 he was elected prothonotary of Pike county, on the Democratic ticket, and removed to Milford. After serving two terms he returned to Blooming Grove, and in the fall of 1863 he was again chosen to that office, which he held for six years. In 1870 he removed to Branchville, NJ., and during the following year he secured from various individuals the land for Blooming Grove Park. In 1872 he went to Berks county, Penn., and for three years acted as foreman in the construction of the Boston & South Mountain R. R., running from Harrisburg to Poughkeepsie. In the fall of L875 he returned to Milford, and was elected prothonotary, to which office he has since been continuously re-elected, having held the office in all thirty-five years. Socially Mr. Westbrook and his family are prominent, and he is connected with various orders; he is a Master Mason, having joined the fraternity at Hawley.

On December 31, 1850, Mr. Westbrook was married at Milford to Miss Jane Wells, and four children have blessed the union: Alice B., who resides in Milford, married (first) Dr. Governor Emerson, and after his decease wedded the late Milton B. Mott, formerly editor of the Milford Dispatch, and a representative in the State Legislature. Hannah married John Williamson, of Branchville, N. J., now deceased. Frank Brodhead and Lafayette died unmarried. Mrs. Westbrook was born at Milford, January 24, 1824, only child of Peter and Jane Wells, and, both parent’s dying when she was an infant, she was reared by her grandmother, Jane Wells.

Categories: Brodhead, Coolbaugh, Dingmans Ferry, Pennsylvania, Pike Co., Westbrook | Tags: | Leave a comment

Fishing Pike County, Pennsylvania, in the spring of 1877

Image from p 46 of The Determined Angler and the Brook Trout by Charles Bradford (NY & London: GP Putnam's Sons, 1916)

Image from p 46 of The Determined Angler and the Brook Trout by Charles Bradford (NY & London: GP Putnam’s Sons, 1916)

I don’t know what the fishing is like today in Pike County, PA, but here is an 1877 article from The Country, Vol I & II describing the experiences of one visitor to that area from April 1-4, 1877. During those 4 days, this visitor caught 400 fish weighing 45 pounds and brought back to New York 234 fish that “scaled 33 pounds honest weight.” Roughly 88 of them were between 8 – 13.5 inches in length; the other 150 or so, he said, were small trout, but not “fingerlings” — “fat as butter and excellent eating.”  Obviously these were the days before any limits were introduced! Today he’d be able to walk away with just 5 trout per day, and each would have to be at least 7 inches long.

I love the great outdoors and that includes “escaping mentally” to the great outdoors of yesteryear to imagine what things must have been like in a certain location at a certain point in time. If you’re like me, and you enjoy fishing, perhaps you will find this article of interest too. Present-day fishermen and women in Pike Co., feel free to comment about your experiences fishing in that part of PA.

Happy 4th of July, All!
fishing1fishing2fishing3The Country, weekly journal, Vol 1-2, pub. 1877

Credit: Google Books

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Fishing, Fourth of July, Hobbies and Pastimes, Nature, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | 6 Comments

Some Brodheads on an 1891 hunting expedition in Blooming Grove Park—a playground for all seasons (Post 1)

Blooming grove

“Blooming Grove Park—The American Fontainebleau” (Image from Harper’s Weekly, December 17, 1870 — not long ago, I acquired the issue in which it appeared from ‘Timothy Hughes’ Rare & Early Newspapers’ of Williamsport, PA)

When Daniel Brodhead and his family settled in Pennsylvania’s Minisink Valley in the late 1730s, that area was a vast expanse of wilderness, a true frontier. Hunting and fishing was done for survival. As time went on and villages and towns emerged, stores cropped up where one could buy fresh game and produce, but by and large the common man, and definitely the poor man, fed his family by his own hand—through the use of plow, knife, trap, or gun. But by the 19th century, and especially in the second half of that century, the upper classes, wanting to “re-create pioneer values and to approach nature through wildlife,”1 developed a burgeoning interest in field sports. In answer to this demand, entrepreneurs and others caught up in this trend cobbled together fairly massive parcels of land to establish private hunting and fishing clubs which they hoped would rival the great game parks of Europe that served as private parks for the nobility2, and “by 1878, about 25,000 Americans belonged to 600 of these clubs. Among the leaders was the Blooming Grove Park Association.”3 “Blooming Grove Park,” established in Pike County, Pennsylvania (the county to the north of Monroe County, home of settler Daniel Brodhead’s town of “Dansbury”–a.k.a. East Stroudsburg), in 1870 by the Blooming Grove Park Association, was (and still is) an exclusive hunting and fishing club that has expanded far beyond its initial borders.

Map showing the location of this township within Pike County, Pennsylvania (Credit: Wikimedia Commons - contributed by Rcsprinter123 on Dec 6, 2014)

Map showing the location of Blooming Grove Township within Pike County, Pennsylvania (Credit: Wikimedia Commons – contributed by Rcsprinter123 on Dec 6, 2014)

Initially some 14,000 acres in size, encompassing vast tracts of land, lakes, and trout streams, the members-only Park attracted well-heeled outdoors-people throughout the year—men and women, as the above etching shows. Many were wealthy New Yorkers, searching for supreme experiences in the great outdoors. To cater to their need to keep their fingers on the pulse of the nation’s stock market, the club eventually stretched wire all over the park4 so that interested members could check on their business interests at any time during their nature jaunts. Not surprisingly, the Park was initially very poorly received by locals who had happily hunted these territories for generations before abruptly being shut out by those of wealth and power5.

Junius Brutus Stearns (1810 – 1885)

A Day’s Sport At Blooming Grove Park by Junius Brutus Stearns (1810 – 1885)

When established, the Association was granted the right of ‘self-determination’ by the Pennsylvania General Assembly, whereby it was able to establish and enforce its own game laws as well as propagate fish and game for an improved ‘visitor experience’. The Association later became officially known as the Blooming Grove Hunting and Fishing Club, and it remains to this day a very private and exclusive organization. Over time, the public in general came to appreciate the conservation work done on the Club’s lands much of which had been decimated before 1870 by excessive logging. And today, with development accelerating beyond the Club’s borders, the Club’s lands remain safe and protected with little prospect of that changing. According to the “Blooming Grove Township Comprehensive Plan” produced by Community Planning & Management, LLC, in May 2008, which includes a map of the Club’s lands: “Blooming Grove Township holds less potential for development than many of the other municipalities in Pike County and the Pocono Mountains.” So that’s definitely good news from a conservation standpoint.

Trout Fishing by Junius Brutus Stearns (1810 – 1885)

Trout Fishing by Junius Brutus Stearns (1810 – 1885)

Chapter 13 of The History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania (Mathews, Alfred, Philadelphia, R. T. Peck & Co., 1886), gives some background on Blooming Grove Park, including the following: “The Blooming Grove Park Association was projected by Wm. H. Bell, of Branchville, Sussex County, NJ, and Fayette S. Giles [a gentleman jeweler6] in 1870. [Charles Hallock, future founder of Field and Stream worked with Giles as a promoter7.] John C. Westbrook and Lafayette Westbrook deeded 13,000 acres of land to the association, and they have since purchased 1,000 acres in addition. F.S. Giles was the first president of the association. The stockholders have changed, and most of the stock is now held by New York parties. The lands lie in Blooming Grove, Greene and Porter townships, and include Lakes Beaver, Giles, Scott, Bruce, Westbrook, Laura, Ernest and Belle, according to the names which the association have given them. One square mile of the land is inclosed by a wire fence, as a breeding park, in which they have about 200 deer. The club-house is erected on ground overlooking Giles Lake, or Blooming Grove Pond, as it was formerly called, at a cost of about ten thousand dollars.”

salmon_flies

Salmon and Sea Trout Flies from Fly Fishing (1899), Sir Edward Grey, 1920 edition (Wikimedia – Public domain in US)

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Several months ago, a bit after I finally ‘discovered’ some traces of Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead, my second great grandfather’s brother, and while digging through some search results on the Fulton History website, I came upon an article in the Port Jervis, NY, Evening Gazette, entitled “Home of the Bear and the Deer. What a ‘Gazette’ Man Saw in the Hunting Section of Pike County, PA.” The article is dated November 30, 1891, and it was a fun find because it mentions a hunting party that included both my second great grandfather—Andrew Jackson Brodhead—AND his little brother Abram. Andrew would have been 69 at the time, and Abram 67. And it was even more fun because it described them as “famous sportsmen”: At Blooming Grove, “Moses Westbrook’s”, we found a notable party of hunters, some of whom have followed the hounds in the wilds of Pike for 40 consecutive years. Among them were the famous sportsmen, “Abe” C. Brodhead of Lehighton, Pa., Andrew J. Brodhead and George T. Gray, of Flemington, N.J., W. F. Brodhead of Packerton, Pa., and U. S. Grant Tobias of Mauch Chunk, Pa. They were hourly expecting John C. Westbrook, of Milford, and Captain ” Lafe” Westbrook, of Stroudsburg, the great deer slayers of Pike for the past 40 years, it being a fact that they have to their credit the slaying of over 600 deer during that time. It would be unfair not to mention their brother “Mose” in this connection who, although having no record to exhibit, has without doubt killed nearly as many as his brothers.

Sadly, this may have been one of the last times Abram enjoyed a hunting expedition; a little less than a year later, he fell ill and passed away at his daughter Jennie (Brodhead) Linderman‘s home in Bethlehem, PA. Andrew, meanwhile, was blessed to live another 21 years, dodging the “heart attack alley” that seems to zigzag up the Brodhead family tree, so he probably enjoyed many more such outings before being forced by infirmity to give up such pleasures. Serendipitously to finding the article, I found the above 1870 image in Harper’s Weekly and went so far as to purchase the issue so I could include the image here. Don’t worry, I did not have to rob a bank. 😉

Please don't rely on my data as being 100% accurate. Mistakes happen along the way! ;-)

Please verify my data before you use it. Mistakes happen along the way! 😉

p. 103 of The Runkle Family: Being an Account of the Runkels in Europe, and Their Descendants in America by Ben van Doren Fisher (T.A. Wright, 1899) Other members of the hunting party included “George T. Gray, of Flemington, N.J., W. F. Brodhead of Packerton, Pa., and U. S. Grant Tobias of Mauch Chunk, Pa.” Who were these men? Well, I figured out that W. F. Brodhead referred to Colonel William Franklin Brodhead (1842-1932), a cousin of the Brodhead brothers via the Dingman side of the family. William’s mother Jane Dingman was the younger sister of Andrew and Abram’s mother Cornelia Dingman. Jane and Cornelia both married into the Brodhead family.  (See the greatly condensed family tree inset for a visual.) U.S. Grant Tobias (1868-1940), a clergyman, was William’s son-in-law of just six months.  Grant married William’s daughter Edith on May 5, 1891 at the family’s Packerton, PA, home8.  In November 1891, William would have been 49, and Grant9—23. I think George T. Gray must have been a friend of Andrew Jackson Brodhead’s as both men were visiting from Flemington, NJ. I found George and his wife Rachel Ann Cherry in a Runkle family genealogy book10(see clipping inset and end note below). If I have the correct George (and I think I do), he was 66 at the time of this hunting trip.

At first I thought perhaps they were all members of the Blooming Grove Park Association, but when I discovered it was the exclusive preserve of the wealthy, I decided that was unlikely since as far as I know, my second great grandfather, dad to 10 children, was not a wealthy man. Brother Abram, long-time widower and father of one, had been the superintendent of the Lehigh Stove Foundry, and during the Cleveland administration, had held a lucrative position in the Philadelphia mint. Perhaps, he had the means.

Then I looked into what was meant by “Moses Westbrook’s,” and came upon a mention of this location in The Country, Vol. 1-2 (published in 1877; page 369): “Fishing on the Shohola, the large stream which runs through the territory of the Blooming Grove Park Association, is accessible via Lackawaxen, on the Erie Railway. The headquarters are at Moses Westbrook’s hotel at Blooming Grove, an excellent, cheap, comfortable hostelry…” By 1891, the hotel may have had a makeover, but obviously it was still standing, and providing lodging to this hunting party. Whether they were heading to the Association’s lands or other lands within Pike County, once they met up with John C. Westbrook and Captain ”Lafe” Westbrook, I don’t know. But, given the fact that the former had deeded 13,000 acres for the establishment of Blooming Grove Park, it seems likely that he would have been a member there.

John C. Westbrook (Image from The History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Matthews, p. 895)

John C. Westbrook (Image from The History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Matthews, p. 895)

Speaking of the Westbrooks, there were a number of them who married into the Brodhead family, and vice versa, through the years. For example, Andrew and Abram’s aunt Sarah Brodhead (1792-1879) was married to Colonel John Westbrook (1789-1852), and the brothers’ mom Cornelia Dingman Brodhead was the daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851). I have not sufficiently researched the Westbrook tree to know where “John C. Westbrook” fits (or “Lafe” or “Mose”, for that matter). If anyone out there knows, please feel free to give a shout. [Update: There is a bio of John C. Westbrook in The History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties, (RT Peck & Sons, 1886, pp. 894-896); Lafayette (‘Lafe’) was a brother of John C. Westbrook] [Note: See follow-up post on August 5, 2015]

Well, I will close now and leave you with the Evening Gazette article in the event you want to read it in its entirety. For those “scanners” among you, I have highlighted the names of our Brodheads and their friends. When the reporter left Blooming Grove, [the group was] following five deer. No matter what the day’s results were or where exactly their adventures took place, I hope they all enjoyed their time together in the great outdoors.

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PORT JERVIS EVENING GAZETTE, 30 November 1891

HOME OF THE BEAR AND DEER. WHAT A”GAZETTE” MAN SAW IN THE HUNTING SECTION OF PIKE COUNTY, PA

Many Noted Hunters at Present in That Country Searching for the Big Game. Plenty of Deer but Not Many Captured, as Yet—A Brief Mention of Several of the Many Excellent Hunters Homes.

The hunting season of Pike County, Pa., is now at its best, and in all parts of that vast area of wilderness, barrens and swamps lying between the famous valley road and the Paupack country, the birds the deer and the bears are on the alert to escape the death dealing shots of the wily hunters and the keen scent of their swift footed and well trained dogs. When the law is “on” protecting the game, this vast country is nearly as silent as the grave, and the intense quiet is only broken by the occasional sound of the woodman’s axe.

On a recent drive through this section, the writer found many famous hunters at the various “Hunters Homes.” At Sheriff Hoffman’s hospitable home on Sawkill Lake, five miles out from Milford, on the Milford and Owego turnpike, the Hawes Brothers, of Central Valley, NY, men noted in the Adirondacks and in the Maine forests for their skill as hunters, were in full possession and with the Sheriff and his sons were making it lively for the deer and were capturing many birds. We are informed that they took home with them two four-pronged bucks. Mrs. Hoffman, by the way, we found very ill but the honors of the home were excellently carried out by her daughter. The jolly Sheriff laments the fact that he has not this year his usual number of dogs, by death and other causes his kennel is now reduced to sixteen.

At Shohola Falls a party of gentlemen from Nyack, NY, who had been guests of Garry Hart, the owner of the famous Shohola Falls and the adjacent country, had just left and had taken away with them six deer. These gentlemen were assisted in their hunting by the noted Greening Brothers who know every runway and hiding place for deer in that whole country. In this connection we wish to take the liberty of mentioning that Mr. and Mrs. Hart caught the largest trout that were taken in Pike county this season. They caught in the Rattlesnake creek and in the Shohola, in the “Meadows,” seven trout none of which weighed less than 2 ½ pounds and one weighed a trifle over 6 pounds. Mrs. Hart enjoys the reputation of being one of the most expert anglers of that section.

fishing5

Illustration for index page of The Country, Vol 1 & 2, published 1877; find it on Google Books (free) — the index is extensive and there is good reading to be had here. The 19th-century American passion for the great outdoors is on display!

At Blooming Grove, “Moses Westbrook’s”, we found a notable party of hunters, some of whom have followed the hounds in the wilds of Pike for 40 consecutive years. Among them were the famous sportsmen, “Abe” C. Brodhead of Lehighton, Pa., Andrew J. Brodhead and George T. Gray, of Flemington, N.J., W. F. Brodhead of Packerton, Pa., and U. S. Grant Tobias of Mauch Chunk, Pa. They were hourly expecting John C. Westbrook, of Milford, and Captain “Lafe” Westbrook, of Stroudsburg, the great deer slayers of Pike for the past 40 years, it being a fact that they have to their credit the slaying of over 600 deer during that time. It would be unfair not to mention their brother “Mose” in this connection who, although having no record to exhibit, has without doubt killed nearly as many as his brothers.

When the writer left Blooming Grove the party first mentioned were following five deer and we have no doubt that they captured the greater part of them.

Over on the Paupack there were a number of hunters at “Jack” Kimbles and at Marcus Killam’s and all were having fairly good luck. Marcus Killam, now considerably advanced in years, is another of the famous deer hunters of Pike, having killed over 400 deer in the past 60 years. At Dimon’s, also on the Paupack, a number of hunters were gathered. These gentlemen were under the guidance of the noted local guide and deer hunter Henry Quick, and had already started up several deer but, unfortunately, had not been able to get a shot at them. Among the hunters in the Paupack country was a young divine, Rev. F. T. Angevene, of Sharon, Conn. The young clergyman is an ardent sportsman and an excellent shot; although he did miss two deer when out with “Eph” Kimble, of Kimbles, and we do not doubt that he took away with him more game than any other man of the party. The cause of his missing the deer was a peculiar condition of the atmosphere just at sunset and he was not able to correctly estimate distances.

“Sim” Lord, at Lord’s Valley, has also captured several deer but as he was out following a deer the day that we were in his section we did not see him and consequently are not able to mention the hunters that have been making their headquarters at his very hospitable home. We, however, did see his brother Jury Commissioner, Levi Lord, and he stated that game was comparatively plenty at Lord’s Valley and vicinity and the hunters were having excellent sport. [this part was cut off] …but, for some reason explainable only by those who stood on the runways, none of them were stopped. This home is on the head waters of the Rattlesnake creek in the heart of a famous bear, deer, bird and trout section. The great black bear brought to Port Jervis last February, the skin of which was purchased by Counsellor John W. Lyon, of this village, was shot by Dr. Kelly within three quarters of a mile of his residence. Mrs. Kelly, by the way, is an expert shot and on the day of our visit killed a pheasant, or rather ruffed grouse, that will entitle her to take the first premium this year. The bird weighed a trifle over three pounds and was the largest of his species that we had ever seen.

Space will not allow us at this time to mention the bear hunting in Greene township and at the “Knob” and we will rely on our correspondents to give the interesting bear stories to our readers later on.

We would say to our readers who have a love for the sports of the field that there is no better hunting section than Little Pike to gratify their desires in that direction and, more, that the “Hunters Homes” are comfortable and excellent beyond description. You cannot make a mistake, they all, without exception, are ideal ”Hunters’ Paradises.”

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1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 – Page 51 of Better in the Poconos: The Story of Pennsylvania’s Vacationland by Lawrence Squeri (Penn State Press, 2010)
8 – Carbon Advocate wedding announcement, Volume 19, No. 26, Saturday, May 9, 1891
9 – Carbon Advocate, Volume 20, Number 22, Saturday, April 9, 1892:  In A Few Words. We congratulate our popular young friend Grant Tobias, of the County Seat, over the arrival of a bright little son in his family. We hope the little fellow may have a long life and abundant prosperity, while at the same time we feel like closing digits with granddad Brodhead, at Packerton.
10 – Page 103 of The Runkle Family: Being an Account of the Runkels in Europe, and Their Descendants in America by Ben van Doren Fisher (T. A. Wright, 1899)

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1877_PikCo

The cost of a 2-week trip from NYC to Pike Co. in 1877? No more than $30. (The Country, Vol. 1-2; pub. 1877; page 369)

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Fishing, Hobbies and Pastimes, Hunting, Nature, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | 7 Comments

Garret Brodhead’s “Wheat Plains” farmhouse—an August clean-up project. Come join the fun!

“Wheat Plains,” the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

Hear Ye, Hear Ye! The DePuy/Brodhead Family Association is having its annual reunion in the Dingmans Ferry, PA, area on Saturday, August 15, 2015. The actual location of the meeting place is still to be determined. For details, contact the Association at 6566 Skywae Drive, Columbus, Ohio 43229, and/or join the DePuy/Brodhead Family Association “Facebook” group page where you can keep abreast of all Brodhead (and DePuy) reunion developments!

Wheat Plains farmhouse clean-up opportunity!: On Friday, August 14, those who are interested in volunteering with the Wheat Plains Farmhouse clean-up project are welcome to join in. You may contact James Brodhead at “jbbrodheadfamily at hotmail dot com” to have a volunteer form sent to you. The Parks Department (“Wheat Plains” falls within the National Park Service system) would like to have these forms in hand at least four weeks prior to the work date.

According to Barbara and James Brodhead, who have undertaken the cleanup of the nearby Brodhead-Linderman Cemetery in recent years and are spearheading this year’s “Wheat Plains” clean-up effort: “More specific times and locations will be forthcoming. All efforts are greatly appreciated. Please note that we are organizing a tour of the Farm House on Saturday the 15th for all those who attend the Reunion.”

Come enjoy a fun weekend of connecting with family near and far, and giving Garret Brodhead’s homestead a much-needed makeover!

Categories: Brodhead, Dingmans Ferry, Linderman, Monroe Co., Pennsylvania, Pike Co., Stroudsburg | 10 Comments

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