Weddings

November 17, 1917: Wedding of Alvira Anness, niece of Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead

Last week, while browsing articles on Fulton History, I came across this one in The Yonkers Statesman (November 19, 1917) describing the wedding of Alvira W. Anness, daughter of Mary Marsh Martin Anness and the (then) late Winfield S. Anness, in the Anness family home at 223 Warburton Avenue in Yonkers, NY. The house still stands! Click here.

Winfield S. Anness (b. 1861, Stamford, CT) was a widower when he married Mary M. Martin. He had a son with his first wife Mamie E. Valentine (b. 1864): Harold W. Anness (b. 1885). Winfield died in November 1899. I don’t know anything about Harold. If he was still alive in 1917, he was not at this wedding.

My Dad always referred to Great Aunt Mary as “Aunt Mame”, and apparently she was quite a pistol. Born in 1863, she was a younger sister of my great-grandmother, Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead (b. 1859).  This wedding was in November; Margaret had lost her husband Andrew Douglas Brodhead six months before, in May. Margaret, Alvira’s aunt, is named in the article as one of the attendees.

Woodruff M. Brodhead, b. 1912, with his mother Fannie Woodruff Brodhead

Giving the bride away was my Dad’s Great Uncle Charlie (Charles Conrad Martin); my Dad’s older brother Woodruff, then age 5 1/2, wore a little sailor suit and carried white baskets filled with yellow asters.

Woodruff’s parents (my grandparents) were also present at the wedding, of course. To the left is a photo of Woodruff (“Woody”) and his mother Fannie Woodruff Brodhead. At that stage, he was their only child. He’s wearing a little sailor suit here, so perhaps this photo was also taken during that period. I’m a bad judge of ages, but I’d say he looks about 5 here?

According to the family tree information of Ancestry user “KrehT,” the newlyweds, Alvira and Walter Douglas Barry, eventually had two children: Alvira Martin Barry (b. 1920) and Walter Douglas Barry (b. 1923). Interestingly, this user shows Alvira’s middle name as “Woodruff,” but did not provide any clues as to where that middle name came from. I’d love to know since my grandmother was a Woodruff, one of the original Elizabeth, NJ, families.

Categories: Anness, Brodhead, Martin, New York, Weddings, Woodruff | 1 Comment

January 28, 1948: “Back from Gypsy Elopement”

Valentine’s Day is almost here so it seems appropriate to share this little snippet I found among the many newspaper articles my grandmother Fannie Woodruff Brodhead clipped and set aside for safekeeping.

The clipping is about her great niece’s elopement at age 16, to William Bull, 20, in Cape Charles, Northampton County, Virginia. I found the marriage record, which shows the lovebirds got hitched on January 28, 1948. They gave their ages as 21 and 22, respectively. A Newark newspaper picked up on the story with its photo “Back from Gypsy Engagement”.

Obviously this fun-loving couple had a wonderful sense of humor:

Back in Newark NJ] after elopement to Cape Charles, Va., are Abby Sommer Bull, 16, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Sommer of 156 Heller parkway, and William Bull, 20, son of Dr. and Mrs. Louis M. Bull of 92 Heller Parkway. Bridegroom still wears earrings which helped them tell gypsy fortunes to finance trip home after they ran out of cash.

Abby and William were neighbors as you can see from the addresses, so perhaps the families knew that something like this was afoot.

Funny enough, when “googling” William’s name, I happened upon a small article in the January 24, 1914, issue of Horticulture reporting the January 13, 1914, elopement of William’s father Louis M. Bull!

Horticulture by Massachusetts Horticultural Society; Horticultural Society of New York; Pennsylvania Horticultural Society magazine, January 24, 1914

Louis and his bride Gertrude Siebrecht, the daughter of a New York florist (which explains the article’s appearance in Horticulture), were the exact same ages as Abby and William at the time of their elopement–16 and 20. So something tells me that “family tradition” may have also been on young William’s mind as he planned his elopement with his young sweetheart.

And good news: Both marriages lasted a very long time!

Happy Valentines Day, all!

PS: A marriage ban was put into place in June 2018 in New Jersey that prohibited previously allowed marriages at age 16 with parental consent. In Virginia, until 2016, no minimum age for marriage had ever been set.

Another PS for family who may be wondering: Abby was a descendant of James and Wealthy Angus:

  • Her parents: Abigail Van Horn and George Sommer
  • Grandparents: Cecelia Russum Woodruff and Robert Osborne Van Horn
  • Great-grandparents: Wealthy Ann Angus and William Earl Woodruff
  • Great-great-grandparents:  Wealthy Ann Jaques and James W. Angus
  • Categories: Bull, New Jersey, Newark, Essex Co., Sommer, Virginia, Weddings | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

    1882 Marriage Certificate for William Trewin and Elizabeth Sargent

    My great-grandfather William Trewin’s first marriage (1868) ended tragically on December 7, 1879, when his wife Edith H. Fry died in childbirth. He remarried and his two sons Bert and Clarence became the beloved sons of my great-grandmother Elizabeth Sargent. I’d never been able to find an exact date of William and Elizabeth’s marriage until earlier this summer when I found an envelope containing the original marriage certificate. The William Sargent listed as a witness was probably Elizabeth’s father rather than her brother who shared the same name. It appears that her brother Samuel, a Methodist minister, performed the ceremony. These new details, as few as they are, combined with images we have of these four, help paint a faint picture of the happenings of July 31, 1882, in the lives of these ancestors and those closest to them.

    Marriage Certificate
    This is to Certify
    That William Trewin of Elizabeth, NJ
    and Elizabeth Sargent of Jersey City, NJ
    were by me joined together in
    Holy Matrimony
    in Jersey City according to the ordinance of God and the Laws
    of the State of New Jersey on the 31st day of July 1882
    Witnesses
    William Sargent
    Samuel Sargent, Minister of the Gospel

    Trewin_Wm_web

    William Trewin (1847-1916)

    Trewin_Eliz_web

    Elizabeth Sargent (born Slaymaker, but name changed to Sargent when emigrated to US after the Civil War) (1854-1926)

    Trewin_Wedding_Certificate_

    Trewin-Sargent Marriage Certificate

    William Sargent Sr. circa 1869/70

    William Sargent Sr. circa 1869/70

    Rev. Samuel Sargent PhD (image courtesy of Frances S. Cowles)

    Rev. Samuel Sargent PhD (image courtesy of Frances S. Cowles)

    Categories: Elizabeth, Union Co., Jersey City, Hudson Co., Methodist, New Jersey, Sargent, Trewin, Weddings | Tags: , | 4 Comments

    Photo circa 1880: Jno. Philip Marthaler, husband of Lavinia P. Angus

    Lavinia Pratt Angus, youngest daughter of James Winans Angus and Wealthy Ann Jaques, was married briefly to John Philip Marthaler, who went by his middle name. They wed in Elizabeth, New Jersey, on 24 May 1879. Lavinia (“Vean”) was twenty years old and Philip was about 28 at the time. I have come upon a labelled photograph of Philip who died sometime before 1885. It was taken at Bogardus’ Souvenir Card, at 872 Broadway in New York City. He was a very handsome fellow with very kind eyes, and I think this solves the mystery for me of who the fellow was in one of my past posts in which I thought perhaps the man shown was a Jaques family member. No, it’s Philip—sans beard! Now I just wish I could find a photo of Aunt Vean

    Marthaler_Phillip

    John Philip Marthaler

    Isaac Jaques

    The past post “mystery photo”

    Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., Marthaler, New Jersey, New York, New York City, Weddings | Tags: , | 2 Comments

    Century-old Brodhead wedding gift list offers family clues

    Fannie Bishop Woodruff (1882-1965)

    Fannie Bishop Woodruff (1882-1965)

    When I first glanced at the list of my grandparents’ wedding gifts (Frank M. Brodhead & Fannie B. Woodruff) a number of years back, most of the names did not ring any bells. Now, six years into delving deeper into my family history, many of these names are familiar to me, and I even almost feel as if I know some of them, as odd as that may sound. Naturally, the list both offers clues and raises questions, but c’est la guerre when you’re peeling the six-ton onion that is your family tree.

    The wedding took place in Hillside (adjacent to Elizabeth), NJ, at the Woodruff family home on Conant Street on 6 June 1908. For the 1900 census, the family was living at “258 Conant Street”, where today there is nothing but an empty field. However, I’d be willing to wager that 100+ years ago, the old Francis Woodruff home (built by Fannie’s grandfather Francis in 1845 and inherited by eldest son William–Fannie’s father—in 1883) was actually 258 Conant Street because it was a working farm until the land surrounding the home was sold for housing developments. So while I could be mistaken, I feel confident the Woodruff family lived in this home on Conant Street, which is still standing. I remember my dad taking us past this house as kids and telling us that that was where his mom (Fannie) and her sisters were born.

    By the way, a brief mention of the Francis Woodruff home can be found in the six-page PDF Eight Colonial Homes, an undated publication put out by the staff of the Hillside National Bank: A third Woodruff house, while appearing to be the same vintage as the others, was erected about 1845. […] …it is frequently the subject of artists’ paint brushes because of its picturesque setting. It was built by Francis Woodruff, a descendant of Enos Woodruff. A letter from Mathias Woodruff in 1843 to his brother, another Enos Woodruff, comments that he is planning to return from Louisiana to help his cousin, Ezra Woodruff, erect a house for Frank. The letter jokingly said in part: “Frank will want him to put up a house next summer. I have advised him to find out from the neighbors what kind of house he wants, sort of architecture, on which side to put the kitchen, dog house, pig pens. If all parties are satisfied, it will save a great deal of talk.” Oddly enough it was constructed sideways to the road, but when the Westminster section was developed by Edward Grassman in the 1930’s, Revere Drive was placed in front of it, so today it faces a street. [On a sad side note, brother Matthias died of yellow fever in St. Francisville, LA, in 1844, and never made it home to help Frank build his house.]

    My grandmother was 17 at the time of the 1900 census and worked as a stenographer. Before she was married eight years later, she was working as a secretary for Mr. Edward D. Duffield, then president of Prudential Insurance Co.

    Wedding gift list, 1st page

    Wedding gift list, 1st page (CLICK to enlarge)

    Unfortunately, we have no photos from the big wedding day, which is disappointing. I feel very wistful when viewing others’ late 19th- and early 20th-century wedding photos—I sure wish we had some.

    Notably absent from the wedding would have been Ophelia Easton Brodhead, grandmother of the groom and wife of Andrew Jackson Brodhead. She died in 1904, just shy of her 82nd birthday, and her husband Andrew’s gift is noted as being given in her memory. Also absent was Calvin Brodhead, Ophelia and Andrew’s son, who passed away in 1907, but two of his children—Alex and Emily—were in attendance. The bride’s grandparents had all passed away by then, one before she was born (James W. Angus) and two when she was just one year’s old (Francis Woodruff & Mary Jane Trowbridge). She would only have had memories of her grandmother Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus who died when Fannie was not quite ten. (Ironically, Fannie is the only grandparent I have any recollection of; all my other grandparents passed away before I was born.)

    The gift list contains 133 items, so I won’t scan in and post all the pages, but I will list some of the gift-givers who stand out to me as well as some I would like to figure out. For example, Aunt Fannie Bishop. Who was she?—I wondered. She must have been someone important since my grandmother was named after her! Upon checking census records, I did indeed discover a Fannie Bishop (b. Feb 1852) living with her husband and children (Samuel, William, and Charles) in that very same neighborhood, so perhaps “Aunt Fannie” was a childhood friend of my grandmother’s mother. In short, there are names to be explored here, and as time goes by, it may be possible to figure out who more of these folks are. The Earls are no doubt all cousins, etc., via William Woodruff’s grandmother Mary Ogden Earl (married John Woodruff in 1817), and I have done nothing yet to research that line, so I am sure once I do get around to it, some of these names will start to pop up. Likewise with the Cranes, a very old Elizabeth, NJ, family.

    A. D. Brodhead (father of the groom)

    A. D. Brodhead (father of the groom)

    Margaret Martin Brodhead (mother of the groom)

    Margaret Martin Brodhead (mother of the groom)

    The parents of the bride and groom were: Andrew Douglas (A. D.) Brodhead and Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead, and William Earl Woodruff and Wealthy Ann Angus Woodruff. The extended Woodruff and Angus families were very large, the former being among the original settlers of what became Union County. Andrew Brodhead, who hailed from Mauch Chunk, PA, and whose immediate and extended family was also very large, met and married Margaret Martin (a descendant of David Wait & Irene Bell) of Perth Amboy, NJ, and, after living for many years in that town, they and their children transitioned to Elizabeth.

    Perhaps, you will find the name(s) of some of your ancestors on this list, and if you do, please feel free to give a ‘shout-out’ in the comment box. It’s fascinating to see so much family coming together for a big event, something that probably happened much more often back then given how enormous families were. Births, weddings, and funerals must have been quite common occasions.

    Brodhead-Woodruff Wedding Announcement (Probably clipped from the Elizabeth Daily Journal) - from our family's private archives

    Brodhead-Woodruff Wedding Announcement – CLICK to enlarge (Probably clipped from the Elizabeth Daily Journal) – from our family’s private archives

    I’m including the wedding announcement, which I posted once previously on the blog, but I think it adds to this post so I am publishing it again. As for the necklace mentioned, I suspect it was sold to a new owner during the Great Depression; I never heard my Dad mention it or its whereabouts.

    Well, here is the list! (As always, comments, corrections, additions, etc., are always welcome.)

    • Mr & Mrs Blakslee [sister and brother-in-law of father of the groom]—1 dozen silver knives
    • Mr. & Mrs. Alex Brodhead [son and daughter-in-law of the late Calvin Brodhead & Laura Leisenring; Calvin was father-of-the-groom’s older brother]—Berry set and silver spoon
    • Mrs. E. B. Earl—Silver tongs
    • Lizzie Earl—Sherbet glasses
    • Grace Earl—Picture
    • The Misses Crane—Doily
    • Miss Emily Easton Brodhead [daughter of the late Calvin Brodhead & Laura Leisenring; Calvin was father-of-the-groom’s older brother]—1/2 dozen orange spoons
    • Annie Earl—Cherry centerpiece
    • Florence Earl—Butter spreader
    • Mr. and Mrs. R. O. Van Horn [sister and brother-in-law of bride]—Old-fashioned chair
    • Mildred W. Woodruff [sister of bride]—Green (?)
    • Andrew J. Brodhead [ brother of the groom]—1/2 dozen sherbet glasses ivy leaf
    • Mr. Richard Brodhead  [brother of father of the groom] & family—cut-glass bowl
    • Mr. & Mrs. A. D. Brodhead [father and mother of groom]—Bread tray, mustard (?), and salt dish & cash
    • Aunt Vean & Elizabeth Booth [mother-of-the-bride’s younger sister Lavinia P. Angus Marthaler & her cousin]—Table center
    • Dr. G. Carlton Brown [future husband of Mildred W. Woodruff, sister of the bride]—Tabourette
    • Cal & Gertrude Brodhead [son and daughter-in-law of Garret Brodhead (father of groom’s brother) & Annie Kocher]—Gas Lamp
    • James E. Brodhead [brother of father of the groom] & family—$60
    • Mr. Charles C. Martin [brother of mother of the groom]—Cut-glass water pitcher
    • Mr. and Mrs. John Davidson [Likely a cousin of Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead, mother of the groom; the two shared a common great grandfather, John Oliver Wait]—cut-glass vase
    Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

    Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

    The bride's parents: Wm Earl Woodruff & Wealthy Ann Angus

    The bride’s parents:
    Wm Earl Woodruff & Wealthy Ann Angus

    • Mr. E. B. Earl—Cream & sugar (silver)
    • Mr. & Mrs. W. A. C. Earl—1/2 dozen spoons
    • Julia Crane —Salad bowl
    • Alice Crane—Glass vase
    • Fanny Crane—Cut-glass berry bowl
    • Mr. & Mrs. Walter H. Knowles [cousin of bride; son of Mary Martha Winans Angus and Austin F. Knowles]—Butter knife
    • Mr. & Mrs. Job W. Angus [mother-of-the-bride’s brother and sister-in-law Jeannette Tillou]—Cut-glass bowl
    • Mr. & Mrs. Morris Budd [parents of wife of Ogden Bonnell Woodruff, cousin of bride’s father]—cut-glass (?)
    • Aunt Fannie Bishop—China centerpiece
    • Aunt Edith & Uncle Walter [Walter Prince Angus and his wife Edith Marshall; Walter was the youngest brother of the bride’s mother]—Cucumber server
    • Celia Belle and Nell—Salt & pepper
    Fannie Bishop Woodruff

    Fannie Bishop Woodruff

    Bertha Woodruff was maid of honor

    Bertha Woodruff was maid of honor

    • Mr. & Mrs. John Woodruff [father-of-the-bride’s cousin, son of Ogden and Phebe Woodruff, and his wife Carrie Conover]—Sugar shaker
    • Aunt Annie Crane—Silver cream ladle
    • Mr. & Mrs. Scott O. Woodruff—Picture
    • Watts Knowles [cousin of bride; son of Mary Martha Winans Angus and Austin F. Knowles]—Silver sugar spoon
    • Mr. & Mrs. A. F. Knowles [Aunt of the bride–Mary Martha Winans Angus—and Austin F. Knowles]—Silver butter spoon
    • Gertrude Knowles [cousin of bride; daughter of Mary Martha Winans Angus and Austin F. Knowles]—Hand-worked towels
    • Lewis Brodhead [brother of the groom]—Knives – 2 dozen – 2 sizes; Carvers – 2 sets – 2 sizes; Pie knife, 1/2 dozen tablespoons, 1 dozen teaspoons
    Categories: Angus, Ayers, Blakslee, Bonnell, Brodhead, Coleman, Crane, Dickinson, Elizabeth, Union Co., Jaques, Marthaler, Martin, Packer, Russum, Wait, Weddings, Woodruff | 2 Comments

    The Pre-1900s Weekday Wedding – Past Wedding Traditions

    Dress, Evening; 1850-1855; silk, cotton; Metropolitan Museum of Art (accession no. 2009.300.921a, b); visit http://www.metmuseum.org

    A while back I read an article on pre-twentieth-century weddings and how the bride would not wear white or have a special dress made, but would appear in her very best dress, whatever color of dress that may have been–black, brown, dark green, and so on. Black would have been handy because it could do double duty as mourning attire. Plaids and florals were also very popular at one time. The idea of purchasing a dress that would only be worn once would have seemed very wasteful, apart from probably being prohibitively expensive (a white dress even more so–imagine trying to clean it without today’s technologies).

    Wedding Ensemble, 1878, American, silk, Metropolitan Museum of Art (accession no. 2009.300.18a, b); visit http://www.metmuseum.org

    It was only when Queen Victoria married Prince Albert in 1840 in a white satin gown specially made for the occasion, that brides began clamoring for white gowns, but a trend did not really come about until the late 1800s when such dresses could be better produced, transported, and marketed to the public, and were more affordable for the everyday woman.

    Weddings often took place in the evening at the home of the bride, often on weekdays, particularly on Thursday evenings. This allowed the work of the day (weekends included), whether on the farm or elsewhere, to be accomplished and livelihoods thus maintained.

    Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

    Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

    A handy day of week calendar allows you to take any date in history and find out what day of the week it was.  I decided to randomly check on some wedding dates I have in my database to see on which days weddings most often fell. As you can see, at least in my little random sample, they fell on all days of the week apart from Friday, with Thursday edging out the other days. And, while June is now the most popular month for weddings, I only found three ceremonies that fell in that month.

    Sunday
    John Woodruff and Mary Ogden Earl, 2/16/1817
    Thomas Trewin and Mary Anne Phillips, 1/27/1839
    James W. Angus and Anna Carpenter, 2/27/1870

    Monday
    John Woodruff and Sarah Cooper, 10/25/1683

    Tuesday
    George Wills and Mary Pitt Capon, 4/14/1812
    Capt. Daniel Brodhead and Hester Wyngart, 9/19/1719
    Calvin Easton Brodhead and Laura Leisenring, 12/6/1870
    James Easton Brodhead and Harriet Boyd, 5/1/1877
    Sampson Wills and Ann Gadsden, 9/22/1789

    Wednesday
    Francis Woodruff and Mary Jane Trowbridge, 11/12/1845
    AJ Brodhead and Ophelia Easton, 12/31/1845
    Austin F. Knowles and Mary M. Angus, 9/4/1867

    Thursday
    Henry Jaques, Sr. and Anna Knight, 10/8/1648
    Henry Jaques, Jr. and Hannah Trueman, 4/10/1670
    Lt. Garret Brodhead and Jane Davis, 3/15/1759
    Garret Brodhead and Cornelia Dingman, 11/25/1813
    William Earl Woodruff and Wealthy Ann Angus, 6/20/1872
    Robert Packer Brodhead and Frances Loveland, 5/23/1889
    Frank Ludey and Metta Ryman, 6/18/1896
    Minnie Ludey and Herbert Duryea Crane, 9/24/1897

    Saturday
    Capt. Richard Brodhead and Magdalena Jansen, 4/19/1692
    Timothy Woodruff and Elizabeth Parsons, 9/25/1739
    James Winans Angus and Wealthy Ann Jaques, 1/26/1839
    Frank Brodhead and Fannie Woodruff, 6/6/1908

    For an interesting article on wedding fashions, visit the Monroe County [PA] Historical Society’s site.

    I’ll close by including some wedding announcements of various family members. Two have appeared in previous posts, but the other two (of the Ludey siblings) are appearing in this blog for the first time. Wish we had some photos!

    Brodhead-Woodruff Wedding Announcement (Probably clipped from the Elizabeth Daily Journal) - from our family's private archives

    Brodhead-Woodruff Wedding Announcement (Probably clipped from the Elizabeth Daily Journal) – from our family’s private archives

    Brodhead-Loveland Marriage Announcement, 1889

    Frank T. Ludey Jr. (1871-1900), age 21  (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

    Frank T. Ludey Jr. (1871-1900), age 21 (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

    Ludey-Ryman Wedding, The New York Times, 6/19/1896

    Mary ("Minnie") Emma Ludey (1873-1938), age 21 (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

    Mary (“Minnie”) Emma Ludey (1873-1938), age 21 (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

    Herbert Duryea Crane  (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

    Herbert Duryea Crane (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

    Ludey-Crane Marriage, Jersey City, The Evening Journal, 9/24/1897

    Ludey-Crane Marriage, Jersey City, The Evening Journal, 9/24/1897

    Categories: Angus, Brodhead, Crane, Dingman, Easton, Jaques, Knowles, Ludey, Phillips, Ryman, Trewin, Trowbridge, Weddings, Woodruff | Leave a comment

    Just Married — Nearly 104 Years Ago!

    Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

    Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

    I went through a box recently and happened upon Fannie Woodruff and Frank Brodhead’s wedding announcement and honeymoon photo, as well as a list of wedding gifts they received and from whom, a wedding guest book, and a small leather-bound guest book that they used when they moved into their new house after their honeymoon.  They were both 26 at the time. Speaking of Frank and Fannie, if you click on enough of the revolving blog headers above, you will come upon them on the right side of a photo taken some forty years later, standing next to their old neighbors, the Boles family.

    Miss Fannie Bishop Woodruff’s Calling Card

    Wedding Announcement

    Judging from the body language in the honeymoon photo, they may have hit a rough patch. But I guess back in those days, smiling was not common in photos. Photographers did not appreciate motion–the chance of a lip or an eyebrow being lowered or raised. The pair probably popped out of this faux carriage as soon as they were finished and had a laugh about how serious they must have looked during what was such a festive occasion in their young lives. At least, I hope so!

    One thing that caught my eye about the newspaper announcement was “The groom’s father AD Brodhead [son of AJ Brodhead and Ophelia Easton] lives at Greenville, Pennsylvania.” Greenville is actually in western Pennsylvania close to the Ohio border. I had no idea that he had lived out that way, but it must have had to do with his work with the railroad. His brother Richard spent time out there, as I recall. It seems strange that the article did not mention Frank’s mother, Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead. Was it common in those days to leave out a parent’s name? Meanwhile sister Bertha was Fannie’s maid of honor, and her sister Wealthy Mildred Woodruff was a bridesmaid. Her other three sisters, Jennie, Flora, and Celia, were not mentioned.  I don’t recognize any of the other names there.

    Frank M. Brodhead’s Calling Card

    If you go to Google Streetview for the honeymooners’ new address of 732 Jersey Avenue in Elizabeth, NJ, you’ll see a pretty unremarkable looking street full of homes that look like they could have been there for 100 years. I wonder if the home they spent their first happiest years together in still stands?

    Footnote: I checked real estate listings and, indeed, these homes were built in the early 1900s, one of these could well have been their then-new home!

    Update: I later discovered that this was indeed the street address of Frank’s parents, A.D. & Margaret Brodhead. Perhaps the parents were living temporarily in Greenville and Frank and Fannie temporarily made their home at #732.

    Categories: Angus, Brodhead, Elizabeth, Union Co., Weddings, Woodruff | Leave a comment

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    Moore Genealogy

    Fun With Genealogy

    Meeting my family

    RESEARCHING MY FAMILY TREE

    Shaking the tree

    musings on the journey towards knowing and sharing my family's stories

    A Hundred Years Ago

    Food and More

    Scots Roots

    Helping you dig up your Scots roots.

    Root To Tip

    Not just a list of names and dates

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