Scandal

Murder or suicide? Thanksgiving Day 1904 tragedy at Robert Sayre Brodhead home

Strafford train station, Strafford, PA (Wikimedia: Author Lucius Kwok; 17 Apr 2005)

Strafford train station, Strafford, PA (Wikimedia: Author Lucius Kwok; 17 Apr 2005)

It was Thanksgiving Day 1904 in Strafford, Pennsylvania, and just after 10 a.m., 22-year-old Caroline (“Carrie”) Reinholtz, a household servant in the home of Robert Sayre Brodhead and his wife Minnie, delivered a suitcase to the train station for express shipment to Wilkes-Barre. Robert, Minnie and their young children had gone there for a few days to spend the holiday with other Brodhead family members. The station agent later reported her to have been in excellent spirits, laughing and trading a few jokes. She then returned to the Brodhead home at 227 Strafford Avenue, and presumably sat down to write a suicide note.

Hours later the family’s stable boy, Eddie Fitzpatrick, also on duty that day, came into the house at around 6 p.m. to see if there were more chores for him to do, and discovered Carrie dead on the kitchen floor in a pool of blood with seven bullet holes in her chest and her throat slashed by a steel carving knife with such force that the tip of the knife broke off and lodged under her breast bone.

Philadelphia Inquirer, Nov 26, 1904 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Philadelphia Inquirer, Nov 26, 1904 (www.fultonhistory.com)

An inquest was held two days later, and Carrie’s death was ruled a suicide by the coroner—an unbelievable verdict for many, considering the bullet wounds were inflicted in the third story bathroom with a heavy revolver and her throat was slashed downstairs in the kitchen, indicating she would have to have survived the seven self-inflicted gunshot wounds sufficiently to be able to drag herself down two flights of stairs, through a hallway, into the drawing room to get the knife from the sideboard, and into the kitchen, and then still have enough energy and determination to slash her own throat. Add to that that no trail of blood was found between the upstairs bathroom and the kitchen, and that the revolver held but five cartridges, a circumstance that would have required a pause to reload.

The revolver belonged to Robert Brodhead; it was one that was always in the household; the servants knew its location and the location of extra cartridges in the event they were ever home alone facing an intruder.

Suicide note, 26 Nov. 1904, Fredericksburg Daily Star, Google news archives

Suicide note, 26 Nov. 1904, Fredericksburg Daily Star, Google news archives

Carrie’s beau Jerome Newman of Belmar, NJ, who most recently worked as assistant baggage master at Atlantic City, was briefly held by the police, but after witnessing his sincere devastation and earnest wish to cooperate, he was released. Jerome and Carrie had become acquainted in the summer of 1902 when the Brodheads stayed at a cottage in Belmar (a seaside resort town). Jerome wept as he read the suicide note, and confirmed that the handwriting was Caroline’s and that details mentioned in the note would unlikley be known by any outsider.

Jerome had come to Strafford on Thanksgiving Day to spend the holiday with Carrie. He tried to get into the house several times that day, but nobody answered the door, so he waited about nearby. When Eddie Fitzpatrick found the body, he immediately summoned the doctor, and Jerome came into the house with the doctor and confirmed Carrie’s identity. Distraught, Jerome went to the station and traveled home. He returned the next morning, and that was when he was detained by the police.

NY Globe and Commercial Advertiser, Tues, 29 Nov. 1904 (www.fultonhistory.com)

NY Globe and Commercial Advertiser, Tues, 29 Nov. 1904 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Carrie’s family was extremely distraught; her younger sister Ella also worked for the Brodheads and had travelled to Wilkes-Barre with the family. Carrie’s father Christian Reinholtz lived in a Strafford boarding house and had done some gardening work for the Brodheads the previous summer. (His wife, Carrie’s mother, had died 10 years previously and was buried in Virginia.) Mr. Reinholtz had seen Carrie just two days prior to the tragedy and said she had been in excellent spirits and very much looking forward to Jerome’s visit. He rejected any suggestion that Carrie would have killed herself; all Carrie’s family believed that foul play was involved.

There was intense debate in the community and further afield about the suicide verdict. Most locals refused to accept it. Carrie’s brother-in-law Charles Dingle represented the family who wanted to pursue the theory of murder and had their own suspicions about a certain individual whose photo they claimed had gone missing from Carrie’s album, and whose footprints, they alleged, led away from the house through a vegetable patch where torn-up pieces of a letter had been found. This person killed Carrie, they said, shooting her upstairs and then carrying her downstairs to finish her off in the kitchen. They wanted to obtain the album, but it was in police custody.

Robert Brodhead, who returned from Wilkes-Barre at  3 p.m. the day after Thanksgiving, told authorities that he knew of no reason Carrie would go so far as to take her own life. Granted, he said, she had been melancholic over the previous month and had been disappointed on several occasions when Jerome failed to show as promised. But overall, he said, Carrie seemed to be a happy young lady. He did agree that the handwriting in the suicide note appeared to be Carrie’s, but could not accept the idea that she was so despondent as to kill herself.

NY Globe and Commercial Advertiser, Tues, 29 Nov. 1904 (www.fultonhistory.com)

NY Globe and Commercial Advertiser, Tues, 29 Nov. 1904 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Those in support of the suicide theory primarily had the note to point to. As for the contradictions of the case, they could explain some of them.  The cartridges in the revolver were six years old and the powder in them perhaps insufficient so as to cause fatal damage. Carrie’s dress caught fire, and it was suggested that she used the skirt of her dress to cover up the flames, which would have eliminated a trail of blood as she made her way downstairs to the kitchen.

An autopsy was performed on November 26. Seven entrance wounds and five exit wounds were found, all were determined to be not necessarily fatal in an immediate sense. The coroner and the jury found the suicide note to be the most influential piece of evidence, and on its basis, rendered a verdict of suicide. The fact that there were seven bullet wounds and the revolver only held five cartridges was explained by the theory that Carrie either went to Mr. Brodhead’s bedroom closet (on the 2nd floor) to retrieve more cartridges after she emptied the five into herself, or she kept additional cartridges with her to begin with. The motive for suicide was that Carrie did not receive a promised letter from Jerome from Belmar, saying he was coming that day, and that after several disappointments over unkept promised meetings, she felt despondent enough to kill herself.

Those refuting the cartridge theory pointed out that the the box with additional cartridges was found to be all tied-up, so Carrie could not have retrieved more cartridges after the five were spent. These people introduced the idea that a second revolver would have to have been involved. Furthermore, Jerome was convinced Carrie would have given him more time to get to the home; he had only arrived an hour later than anticipated. (Note: Carrie had apparently asked her sister about the revolver’s location before the family left for Wilkes-Barre, but this was normal, the Brodhead family and servants said; whenever anyone was going to be left alone in the house, the revolver’s location was always pointed out.)

Philadelphia Inquirer, November 29, 1904 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Philadelphia Inquirer, November 29, 1904 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Unfortunately, what may have been critical evidence was destroyed. Four bloodstained finger prints were discovered on the bathtub when the doctor initially came to the residence. These were wiped away inadvertently, so no comparison with Carrie’s prints could be made.

St Mary's Episcopal Church in Wayne Pennsylvania at Louella and Lancaster in Downtown Wayne Historic District. (Wikimedia Commons, contributed by 'smallbones' on December 8, 2012)

St Mary’s Episcopal Church in Wayne Pennsylvania at Louella and Lancaster in Downtown Wayne Historic District. (Wikimedia Commons, contributed by ‘smallbones’ on December 8, 2012)

Carrie’s funeral took place on November 28, 2904, at St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Wayne, PA, and she was buried in the Great Valley Baptist Cemetery in Devon, Pennsylvania. Carrie’s family and Mr. & Mrs. Brodhead were present as was Jerome. To fulfill Carrie’s dying wish that she be buried next to her mother, her mother was to be disinterred from her Virginia grave and relocated to be near Carrie.

The district attorney’s office declared the matter closed on November 30; the family insisted it would pursue its own investigation to prove Carrie was murdered. They said the suicide note could have just been Carrie’s way of hurrying Jerome along with a marriage proposal. The community of Strafford and nearby Wayne was united in its support of the family’s pursuit of the murder theory, believing Carrie deserved not to go down in history as the victim of yet another unsolved mystery.

Unfortunately, I have not yet learned what the outcome was to the family’s private investigations. Perhaps, I will come across those details some day or someone reading this will offer some clues. Hopefully there were some conclusive outcomes so that the matter could be laid to rest once and for all and so that Carrie —and her family— could rest in peace.

A bit of Brodhead biography

Robert Sayre Brodhead was my great grandfather Andrew Douglas Brodhead‘s cousin. Robert was the sixth child of Daniel Dingman Brodhead Sr. and Mary Ann Brodrick. (For those who have been following this blog, Robert is the younger brother of William Hall Brodhead who eloped in secret with the much younger Miss Van Tassel, and he was an uncle of Charles Reginald Brodhead who died of lockjaw in 1899. He was a nephew of my 2nd great grandfather Andrew Jackson Brodhead.)

Robert was married twice. First on 7 January 1885 to Susan Amelia Shoemaker (b. 1860) who passed away; as far as I know no children came from that marriage. His second marriage was to Sarah Claire (“Minnie”) Stafford of Rome, Georgia, sometime around 1894/5. They had two children: a daughter Frances Clyde Montgomery Brodhead (b. 24 Sept 1895) and a son Robert Stafford Brodhead (b. 14 April 1899).

Robert was vice president of an incorporated company that owned various Brodhead coal-producing properties in Colorado (more about that in an upcoming post). The business was a family affair: oldest brother Harry was president and younger brother Albert was secretary and general manager.

In the 1900 census, Robert and Minnie’s household at 132 Park Avenue in Wilkes-Barre, PA, included son Robert (1) and daughter Frances (3); domestic servants Eliza Reinholt (Michigan-born, 21- in spite of the difference in spelling, I think she may have been Carrie’s older sister who married Charles Dingle), Annie Jennison (Danish, 19), and Delia McCarder (Alabama-born, 60);  Harry Brodhead (52, Robert’s oldest brother), and parents Daniel D. Brodhead (83) and Mary Brodrick (73). Robert’s occupation was listed as a coal operator; brother Harry — a mining engineer; and father Daniel as a ‘capitalist’.

Fuel Magazine, The Coal Operators National Weekly, Volume 14, 1909

Fuel Magazine, The Coal Operators National Weekly, Volume 14, p. 267, 1909

On 7 December 1909, just over five years after the Reinholtz murder, Robert died at home from endocarditis at the relatively young age of 48. He was preceded in death by his father Daniel Dingman Brodhead (d. 3 Jun 1905) and mother Mary Ann Brodrick Brodhead (d. 5 May 1909), and four of his siblings: James (1850-1863), Elizabeth (1853-1853), Alice (1864-1869) and William H. (1857-1895). He was survived by brothers Henry, Daniel, Albert, and sister Emily.

Robert’s wife Minnie was left a rather wealthy widow, and —from what I’ve gleaned from newspaper clippings— spent her time engaged in raising the children; undertaking charitable activities; visiting family members; overseeing her daughter’s societal debut and subsequent betrothal to Mark A. Cooper of Rome, Georgia; and enjoying trips further afield to places like Toronto, her home state of Georgia, etc. Daughter Montgomery’s marriage to Cooper, planned for October 1919, never took place, however. She ended up marrying a Mr. Barker  and having a son named Peter. Further down the road there was a second marriage for Montgomery–to one Frederick Harris Warner Jr.  I’ve seen no indications thus far that Minnie’s son Robert ever married.

Note: For details on the Stafford family’s history, visit pp. 505-506 of Our Family Circle, compiled by Annie Elizabeth Miller, Macon, GA: JW Burke 1931, available for viewing on the HathiTrust website. Click here.

(NB: Robert may have been named in honor of Robert H. Sayre, who held top positions with the Lehigh Valley Railroad and Bethlehem Iron Works, which became Bethlehem Steel.)

Resources:
Fredericksburg, Virginia Daily Star, 26 Nov 1904
Woodbury NJ Daily Times, 28 Nov 1904
Troy NY Daily Times, 25 Nov 1904
Pawtucket Times, 25 Nov 1904
Philadelphia Inquirer, 25, 26, 27, 29 Nov and 1 Dec 1904
NY Globe and Commercial Advertiser, 29 Nov 1904

P.S. A Victorian house dating back to that era still stands on that street — at No. 211. Built in 1890, it is now a bed and breakfast, and their website has many interior photos posted. Because the house strongly resembles the one whose photograph appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer (26 November 1904, inset), you can easily get an idea of the possible layout of the Brodhead house. Visit www dot bnbinn dot com. BTW, Wayne, PA, is now the official location of this address, not “Strafford.”

Note: This post was pieced together from many press clippings of that time. Initial articles, in particular, seemed to contradict each other somewhat concerning certain details, most notably the number of gunshot wounds. For that, I went with the number uncovered during the autopsy. I suggest reading the articles yourself, if interested, to get a sense of what variations occurred in the press reports and to view the accompanying images. Please let me know if you notice any errors in this piece or have additional information. Thank you.

Categories: Brodhead, Brodrick, Death, Great Valley Baptist - Devon PA, Pennsylvania, Scandal, Strafford, Thanksgiving, US Federal 1900 | 6 Comments

Another Brodhead elopes, this time in 1911 at NYC’s ‘Little Church Around the Corner’

Credit: Aukirk, 22 Oct. 2012. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Credit: Aukirk, 22 Oct. 2012. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Completely by chance, I came across a grainy 1911 photo of a “Mrs. L. D. Brodhead,” under the headline: “Lutherville Girl Who Eloped.” The photo was from the Baltimore Sun whose old issues can be found on Genealogy Bank. I certainly did not recognize her nor did I expect to. However, having just published the story about William Hall Brodhead and Mary Van Tassel’s elopement, I couldn’t help but be intrigued by news of yet another Brodhead elopement. So, I found the accompanying article, expecting I’d come upon some “new” Brodheads down there in Maryland (“my Brodheads” were mostly from the NJ/NY/PA area), probably some distant relations… But, life changed in an instant–half way into paragraph No. 2, my jaw dropped and all I could think was “Holy cow!” The Brits have the greatest word: “gobsmacked”– and that’s exactly what I was. The groom’s name? “Lewis D. Brodhead of Elizabeth, New Jersey.”

1904 Stereoview card:

1904 Stereoview card: “The Elopement: A Hasty Descent” (Wikimedia; source: Library of Congress – public domain)

“Uncle Lewie,” as my dad used to call him, died of a heart attack on 8 December 1933 at age 49, when my Dad was just 12. At the time of his death, which took place in his office, Lewis was on the board of the American Swiss File and Tool Company. The December 10 obituary notice in the New York Times mentions only his mother and two brothers as surviving him.

All my Dad remembered about Uncle Lewie was that he was a bit too fond of his drink, had a reputation for being quite a character, and had never married or had children. And there I was–almost 80 years after Lewie’s death–suddenly confronted with proof that he’d been married—to one Mildred Elizabeth Hancock on 23 June 1911. How bizarre. It was shocking. Even my 90-year-old mother was shocked, and it takes a lot to shock her these days. My late father would have been completely flummoxed by this. How could it be that neither of his parents ever mentioned Uncle Lewie has having been married?! It’s extremely odd, and all I could immediately surmise was that the marriage was either a very brief one or a very troubled one that ended in divorce and was swept under the rug permanently. But it still seemed a bit nuts that my dad would not have heard anything about it.

Top: Uncle Lewie's mom and dad: Andrew Douglas Brodhead and Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead. Their three sons: Frank Martin (seated left), Lewis Dingman (right), and Andrew Jackson (standing in rear) (PHOTO of the three brothers courtesy of James E. Brodhead)

Top: Uncle Lewie’s mom and dad: Andrew Douglas Brodhead and Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead. Their three sons: Frank Martin (seated left), Lewis Dingman (right), and Andrew Jackson (standing in rear) (PHOTO of the three brothers courtesy of James E. Brodhead)

Lewis (b. 5 October 1884) was the second of three sons of Andrew Douglas Brodhead (son of Andrew Jackson Brodhead) and Margaret Lewis Martin (a daughter Edith died in early childhood); I cannot help but wonder what their and the rest of the family’s reaction was to this elopement. My grandfather (Uncle Lewie’s older brother) Frank M. Brodhead (b. 5 Feb. 1882) and wife Fannie Woodruff, who lived in Elizabeth, would have been entering their third year of marriage at that time. Youngest brother Andrew (b. 3 October 1886) was still living at home in 1905 but was gone by 1910, so I don’t know where he was at the time of Lewis’s 1911 elopement (Andrew married in 1916).

The elopement of Mildred Hancock, daughter of Laura and Josias A. Hancock, caused a great deal of buzz in the local Maryland press. Mildred was described as “one of the most attractive belles of the [Lutherville, MD] community” This was the second Hancock to elope in the space of three months, and Mildred broke the news to her parents via telegram. Mildred, 18 years of age, had been employed for five months in a touring theatrical troupe, partially against the wishes of her parents. Sometime during her brief stage career, she met Lewis, who became a regular member of the audience. She left the troupe and returned to Baltimore. Apparently Lewis was a traveling hardware salesman, and he soon found reason to visit Maryland regularly on business. He met Mildred’s mother on several occasions, but never met Mr. Hancock. In June 1911, Lewis was in NYC on business and Mildred insisted on making a trip to NYC at that time, not telling her parents the trip involved Lewis.

Published before 1920 by The American Art Publishing Co., New York City; H. Finkelstein & Son (Wikimedia Commons: Public domain)

Published before 1920 by The American Art Publishing Co., New York City; H. Finkelstein & Son (Wikimedia Commons: Public domain)

Library of Congress image, 1904 (Wikimedia commons: Public domain)

Library of Congress image, 1904 (Wikimedia commons: Public domain)

They eloped, marrying at the Church of the Transfiguration on 29th Street (a.k.a. The Little Church Around the Corner; Episcopalian). Afterwards they “made merry” in Atlantic City and elsewhere on the Jersey shore. The Hancocks eventually telegraphed their blessing (no indication given that a blessing arrived from M/M A.D. Brodhead). Lewis then made his way to Canada on a business trip and Mildred returned home to her parents where all awaited Lewis’s August 26 visit to finally meet Mr. Hancock. Then, according to Mildred, Lewis and she would be leaving for a honeymoon although she had no idea where, just that it was going to be an “awfully long distance” away and that she wanted to go to Europe soon as well. The article contained a number of comments made by Mildred that made her come across as immature and a bit ditzy. It closed by saying Mr. & Mrs. L. D. Brodhead planned to make their home in Springfield, MA (And they did end up going there).

So, the big question for me was: Did the marriage last? Well, the answer is “yes”–at least for 11 years. I found Lewis’s 12 September 1918 registration card for WWI. His home address was listed as 132 Bushkill Street, Easton North, Pennsylvania. He stated his place of employment as manager at Crew Levick Co. (an oil company) in Easton, and lists wife Mildred as sharing his Bushkill St. home address. He described himself as “tall” and “slender”, and as having brown eyes and black hair.

'A portion of the Yuengling Brewery at night, as visible from Mahantango Street, Pottsville. Artwork now adorns the entrances on the front of the building' (Wikimedia: Author Mredden, 13 Mar 2007)

‘A portion of the Yuengling Brewery at night, as visible from Mahantango Street, Pottsville. Artwork now adorns the entrances on the front of the building’ (Wikimedia: Author Mredden, 13 Mar 2007)

Lobby Card c. 1921 featuring the first appearance on film by Laurel and Hardy, in Lucky Dog produced in 1919 and released in 1921. Published 1921; photo may have been taken as early as 1919. Author unknown (Wikimedia: Public domain in USA)

Lobby Card c. 1921 featuring the first appearance on film by Laurel and Hardy, in Lucky Dog produced in 1919 and released in 1921. Published 1921; photo may have been taken as early as 1919. Author unknown (Wikimedia: Public domain in USA)

I found the next trace of Lewis and Mildred in a 1922 Pottsville, PA, directory. They were living at 109 S. Centre Street. Why Pottsville, home of the famous Yuengling Brewery, (America’s oldest; est. 1829)? I don’t know, but it wasn’t for the beer as prohibition had gone into effect in 1920. Perhaps a clue comes from the Wikipedia entry for the town: Until the middle of the 20th century, Pottsville was a popular destination for many traveling acts and vaudeville performers. The 1929 film Berth Marks stars the comedy legends Laurel and Hardy as they attempt to reach Pottsville by train for one of their booked performances. Pearl Bailey had once resided in Pottsville during the early part of her entertaining career. Soldiers in training at nearby Fort Indiantown Gap were prohibited from visiting Pottsville during most of World War II due to the large amounts of illicit venues and activities present during the time. Maybe Mildred was involved with the theatre there, or maybe the couple just liked the city’s “vibe”. It was, after all, the roaring ’20s.

So sometime between 1922 and Lewis’s death in 1933, Mildred died or the pair split up. She is not mentioned in his obituary. I’ve searched high and low for further clues, but have so far come up empty-handed. A trip to Pottsville to look at old court records and library archives will probably be required to figure this one out! If anyone reading this has any clues, please share!

Update 9/17/13:  I found an Elizabeth city directory for 1931 showing Lewis (salesman) living with his widowed mother Margaret Lewis Brodhead at 11 Elmwood Place. No mention of Mildred. Also, I forgot to mention that Lewis was buried in the family plot at Evergreen Cemetery in Hillside, NJ.

Follow-up Posts:
Lewis Dingman Brodhead – death
Mildred Elizabeth Hancock Brodhead – remarriage

Resources: YouTube Videos: To Live in the 1920s ; Flappers: The Roaring 1920s

Categories: Brodhead, Hancock, Lutherville, Maryland, New Jersey 1905, Pottsville Schuylkill Co, Providence, Rhode Island, Scandal, US Federal 1910 | 8 Comments

Cupid’s Arrow —> William H. Brodhead

Cupid in a Wine Glass, oil painting by Abraham Woodside, 1840s, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (Wikimedia - expired copyright - in public domain)

Cupid in a Wine Glass, oil painting by Abraham Woodside, 1840s, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (Wikimedia: in public domain due to exp. copyright)

In early 1893, William Hall Brodhead, 35, was a very busy guy who may have already resigned himself to a life of bachelorhood, whether by default or by design. He was living and working in Wilkes-Barre (Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania) and was one of the most well-known and established coal operators in the area. William was from a very prominent Pennsylvania family–Daniel Dingman Brodhead (brother of my 2nd great grandfather Andrew Jackson Brodhead) and Mary Ann Brodrick were his parents; Garret Brodhead and Cornelia Dingman, and Irish immigrants James Brodrick and Elizabeth Dogherty — his grandparents. (All the Brodheads mentioned in this post were descendants of Daniel Brodhead and Hester Wyngart, original Pennsylvania Minisink Valley settlers.)

Portraits of the Heads of State Departments and Portraits and Sketches of Members of the Legislature of Pennsylvania, 1893-1894 compiled by Wm Rodearmel (Harrisburg, PA: E.K. Meyers Printing House, 1893)

Major William Hall Brodhead. Credit: “Portraits of the Heads of State Departments and Portraits and Sketches of Members of the Legislature of Pennsylvania, 1893-1894” compiled by Wm Rodearmel (Harrisburg, PA: E.K. Meyers Printing House, 1893); expired copyright

Daniel D. and Mary Brodhead had nine children between 1848 and 1870, and William was child no. 5. Two of his older siblings (James and Elizabeth) and one of his younger siblings (Alice) died young. Oldest brother Henry and younger brother Albert were still bachelors, at 45 and 25, respectively. Baby of the family Emily was 22 and also yet unmarried. Robert, age 32, may have been between marriages. His first wife Susan Amelia Shoemaker, a descendant of Elijah Shoemaker, died shortly after their marriage. He remarried Minnie Stafford of Rome, Georgia, and they started having children in 1896. So, at this point — early 1893 — the only one who had splashed out into post-marriage parenthood was fourth-born, 37-yr-old Daniel Dingman Brodhead, Jr. It looks like he and wife Leonora Hubbard had two of their five children by then: Clement P. and Charles R.. Baby Maude H. (b. 1893) may also have put in her appearance by then.

Any thoughts of competition between the Andrew Jackson (A. J.) Brodhead family and Daniel Dingman (D. D.) Brodhead families with regards to producing grandchildren must have vanished quickly. The two families were very large — A. J. and wife Ophelia had 10 kids between 1843 and 1864. By early 1893, A. J.’s & Ophelia’s kids had produced roughly 30 grandchildren for them, a ten-fold advantage over D. D. and wife Mary’s offspring.

But, back now to William Hall Brodhead. He was a busy guy professionally at this stage as evidenced by his biography published in Portraits of the Heads of State Departments and Portraits and Sketches of Members of the Legislature of Pennsylvania, 1893-1894 by E. K. Meyers Printing House of Harrisburg (p. 208; I have highlighted the most relevant details in bold):

WILLIAM HALL BRODHEAD was born in the Seventh ward of Philadelphia in 1857. In 1873 removed with his family to Mauch Chunk and from that place into the Wyoming Valley region. Since that time has been engaged about the mines in various capacities. He is a direct descendant of Captain Daniel Brodhead, of the British army, who came to this country in 1664 for the purpose of protecting British interests in the Dutch settlement, and settled on the Hudson river. Two of the Captain’s grandsons came over into Pennsylvania, and Pennsylvania, and one of them, Daniel Brodhead, who died in 1754, is now buried in the Moravian cemetery at Bethlehem. His son, Daniel Brodhead, was on Washington’s staff, and the first surveyor general of Pennsylvania. So it will be seen that the subject of this sketch comes from good old revolutionary ancestry. He received his education in the public schools of Philadelphia. Had never held any political office before moving to Wilkes-Barre in 1890, though had taken a lively interest in politics. Six month after moving to the above mentioned city he was delegate to the Luzerne County convention. In 1892 he was elected to the Legislature on the Democratic ticket and ran 350 votes ahead of President Cleveland in his district. He was put on the Committee on Military Affairs, Corporations, Judiciary, Local and Retrenchment and Reform. He introduced a bill creating a Mining institution for the purpose of educating young men in the several branches of mining, to better fit them to become foremen and fire bosses ; also a bill for the purification and improvement of the water supply in the Wyoming Valley ; also a bill providing for the repeal of an act which requires the tax collector of Wilkes-Barre to be appointed, and providing that the office shall become an elective one, to be filled by the votes of the people and bill providing that the funeral expenses of paupers shall be paid by the county, instead as now by the poor district in which such indigent person had a residence. Mr. Brodhead takes a very active interest in the National guard and is now the senior captain of the Ninth regiment. He and his boys did service at Homestead last fall for five weeks. As will be seen by the number and character of the bills he has presented, he takes a lively interest in affairs affecting his constituents, and attends well to the duties devolving upon him as a member.

William was an officer in Pennsylvania’s Ninth Regiment, National Guard, and during the summer of 1893, he attended the regiment’s annual camp. That year it was held in the town of Berwick (Columbia Co.), and ‘lo and behold, during the course of his stay there, he was introduced to Mary Jackson Van Tassel, a young lady of about 19-20 who came from a very prominent Pennsylvania family. The two developed a bit of a friendship that would blossom into something much greater weeks later when William was on a hunting expedition near Berwick and fell very ill. His prognosis was dire, and when Miss Van Tassel learned of William’s illness she went to care for him, watching over him day and night. Cupid’s arrow hit its mark and, thankfully, against all odds, William made a full recovery. Love has a habit of doing that, eh?!

William was totally smitten, and the parents on both sides, no doubt totally mortified by the age difference, worked behind the scenes to sabotage the couple’s young love. This went on for over a year until William and Mary quite obviously had enough and went behind everyone’s backs to be married in secret on December 5, 1894.

Wm Hall Brodhead, image from Wyoming Valley in the 19th Century. Art Edition by SR Smith, Vol I, Wilkes-Barre Leader Print, 1894

Wm Hall Brodhead, image from Wyoming Valley in the 19th Century. Art Edition by SR Smith, Vol I, Wilkes-Barre Leader Print, 1894


Even that day, they had been under heavy scrutiny by Mary’s mother who was completely bamboozled by Mary’s race out a back door to a taxi that whisked her away to waiting William. They fled to the Columbia County Court House for a marriage license and then sped to a Methodist parsonage where a Rev. Ferguson proclaimed them man and wife. No doubt because of William’s prominent position in Wilkes-Barre and the two families’ prominence in eastern Pennsylvania society, the marriage made it into a number of papers, including The New York Herald (you can read the article below). Amazingly, another wedding took place that day — that of William’s oldest brother Henry Conrad Brodhead. That wedding provided the perfect camouflage for William to work his plan on his side of the family. With all the Brodheads probably gone to NYC for Henry’s wedding, William was able to jump into action with no possibility of any of his detractors interfering.

After the wedding, William and Mary returned to Wilkes-Barre to await their families’ forgiveness; then they planned to head off to California for the winter.

Tragically, there was to be no happy ending for William and Mary. Whatever it was that ailed him on his hunting trip may have returned in the spring of 1895 for he passed away at home in Wilkes-Barre on 7 June 1895, just three days after his younger sister Emily’s wedding to Robert Honeyman.

But William’s legacy lived on in the form of William Hall Brodhead, Jr. who was born later that year — on 1 December 1895. And, if I’m correct, that child lived to the ripe age of 77. Major William H. Brodhead Sr. was buried in Wilkes-Barre’s Hollenback Cemetery — no doubt a very sad day for all, especially his young wife after just six months of marriage.

New York Herald, part 1 (credit: fultonhistory.com)

New York Herald, part 1 (credit: fultonhistory.com)

New York Herald, 9 June 1895 (www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Herald, 9 June 1895 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Categories: Brodhead, Brodrick, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Mauch Chunk Cemetery Jim Thorpe PA, Methodist, Obituaries, Philadelphia, Scandal, Van Tassel, Wilkes-Barre Luzerne Co | 6 Comments

John B. Jaques – Part IV – The Final Years

When we left off with the story of John B. Jaques (see Part III), it was 1870 and he was living in Newark with his wife Mary and sons Walter and John (Civil War veteran, former drummer boy highlighted in a recent post). John Sr. was still estranged from his father at this point, and had yet to seek help with his rehabilitation from a serious addiction to alcohol that had driven him to a life of petty crime and at least one stint in state prison.

In March of 1872, John was arrested for stealing some coats, as reported in the New York Tribune on the 28th of that month. Somewhere between then and his 1879 reunion with his father (documented in the past post, Wayward Jaques son returns home), he sought and found help to get sober and straighten out his life. He was in his late 50s by then.

New York Herald, 28 Mar 1872 (www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Herald, 28 Mar 1872 (www.fultonhistory.com)

After I read in the Oswego paper about the father-son reunion, my first thought was about whether John Jr. managed from then on to live in a permanent state of sobriety. His father died the following year; with dad gone, did John Jr. have the will and courage to continue coping with the numerous temptations that would naturally have come his way in normal, everyday life?

1880 Census Record, 12 Jun 1880

1880 Census Record, 12 Jun 1880

On 12 Jun 1880 (two months before his father Isaac’s death), John and Mary were living together alone on Court Street in Newark; the children were out of the nest, settled down, and married, and having children of their own. John reported his profession as “Tailor” but had experienced some unemployment that year as evidenced by the tick in box 14 of the record. At some point in the next six-plus years, Mary passed away (or divorced him, but I think the former is more likely). I found a marriage record showing John’s remarriage to someone named Margaret A. Wambeld, a lady some 26 years younger than he. The marriage took place in Newark on 14 September 1886. Did she help keep John on the straight and narrow, or did she serve as an enabler of his bad habits? (Or, was she into all those bad habits herself?)

Wealthy Ann (Jaques) Angus, widow of James W. Angus, probably circa 1890

Wealthy Ann (Jaques) Angus, widow of James W. Angus, probably circa 1890

One answer to that question came from a New York Times article published on 3 September 1892, about an Elizabeth, NJ, robbery of the Walter P. Angus home at 25 Reid Street, and I thank blog reader Mary Keenan for pointing the article out to me. John’s first name is never given, but it is crystal clear from the contents that it was he who perpetrated the crime. Walter P. Angus was one of John’s nephews, a child of John’s late sister Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus. This was the home Wealthy lived in until she died some six months earlier, so with “big sis” permanently out of the picture, little brother with the alcohol problem seized a moment when the family was on holiday in Ocean Grove (NJ) and Walter was at work in NYC to break in and rummage through the household. John walked off with roughly $200 worth of clothing and jewelry. The police were called and after a bit of discussion and investigation, it was determined that an old man named Jacques, a relative of the Angus family, who had been boarding in this city perpetrated the crime. The article went on to mention that John was wanted for a charge of forgery, having paid his latest board bill with a forged and worthless check. The search for John had thus far proven to be fruitless: They have been unable to find any trace of him, and he is supposed to have left the city. Jacques’s father many years ago was one of the largest real estate owners in the central part of the city, and one of the streets there is called after him. Jacques is supposed to be somewhere in New-York City.

So, no, sadly it appears that John fell off the wagon at some point and was engaging in the classic activities of an addict– either drinking or looking for a way to finance his next drink.

Newark Alms House on the Elizabeth/Newark line.

Newark Alms House on the Elizabeth/Newark line.

St. Michael's Hospital, 1900

St. Michael’s Hospital, 1900

Final confirmation of John’s sad demise came in the form of his death record, which I received in the mail some two months ago:  John died of stomach cancer on 19 Dec 1895, at the age of 73 (it’s rather amazing he lived that long, given his lifestyle). The death occurred at St. Michael’s Hospital in Newark, and prior to that, John had been living at the Newark Alms House (aka the poor house). According to the website The Poor House Story, Poorhouses were tax-supported residential institutions to which people were required to go if they could not support themselves. They were started as a method of providing a less expensive (to the taxpayers) alternative to what we would now days call “welfare” – what was called “outdoor relief” in those days. Evidently, Newark’s first alms house was a godforsaken place where the down-and-out and society’s deviants were dumped. The Old Newark website provides a description (click here). A glimpse of the situation for one poor soul who met his maker there in 1867 was described in this NY times article. Whether a new alms house was in existence by the mid-1890s, I don’t know. The census of 1880 gives an idea of the types of people who ended up here (visit the Newark Research website). Margaret may well have been residing there with John. I found a death record for a ‘Margaret Jaques’ for 31 December 1896 (just over a year after John’s death), and this may have been her; had she been an alcoholic, too, a death at 50 would have come as no surprise.

John B. Jaques was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ. If he was buried in his father’s plot, he is in an unmarked grave as no marker appears for him in that vicinity.

That is the extent of what I know about John B. Jaques Jr. He has numerous descendants “out there,” and I have managed to track down a few lines into the early part of last century. It still amazes me to think that John’s existence had been hidden from us until quite recently, and it took the Fulton History newspaper archives website to reveal him to me. I can now attest to the veracity of that site’s tagline: Finding the Angels & the Devils in the Family Tree since 2003!

1-John Barron Jaques b. Mar 1822, New York or New Jersey, USA, d. 19 Dec 
  1895, St. Michael's Hospital, Newark, Essex Co., NJ, bur. Evergreen Cemetery, 
  Hillside, Union, NJ
 +Mary F. Briggs b. Cir 1827, New Jersey, d. Bef 1886
|----2-Wealthy Ann Jaques b. Cir 1845, Pennsylvania, United States, d. Bef 8 
|      Mar 1918
|     +John Seaman b. Cir 1842
|    |----3-Mary Seaman 
|----2-Mary Jaques b. 1847, New Jersey
|----2-John B. Jaques Jr. b. 15 Oct 1848, Elizabeth, Twp, Essex Co., New 
|      Jersey, d. 13 Jun 1911, Newark, Essex Co., New Jersey
|     +Katherine Griffith b. Nov 1849, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|    |----3-Mary F. B. Jaques b. Sep 1871, New Jersey, d. After 1920
|    |     +Horace E. Apperson b. 1869, New Jersey, d. After 1930
|    |    |----4-Charlotte Apperson b. Jun 1894, New Jersey, d. After 1920
|    |    |----4-Apperson b. 6 Jun 1894, Newark, Essex, New Jersey
|    |----3-Isaac Jaques b. Jan 1872, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|    |     +Ida E. b. Jun 1875, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|    |    |----4-William C. Jaques b. Mar 1894, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|    |    |----4-Russell Jaques b. 13 Jul 1894, New Jersey, d. After 1920
|    |          +Edna b. Est 1899, New York
|    |         |----5-Joseph R. Jaques b. 13 May 1916, New York
|    |----3-William S. Jaques b. Aug 1874, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|    |     +Ann 
|    |----3-Ida Jaques b. Cir 1877, New Jersey, d. Bef 1900
|----2-Margaretta Jaques b. 10 Jul 1851, Newark, Essex, New Jersey
|     +Sylvanus Stansbury b. 1854, New Jersey
|    |----3-Ella May Stansbury b. 1880
|----2-Walter M. S. Jaques b. 4 Nov 1853, Newark, Essex, New Jersey
      +Anna Corigan b. Cir 1856, New Jersey, d. Bef 1900
     |----3-Jaques b. 7 Apr 1876, Newark, Essex Co., New Jersey
     |----3-Lillie B. Jaques b. Cir 1878, New Jersey, d. After 1900
     |----3-Josephine Jaques b. Jan 1880, Rhode Island
     |----3-Catherine Jaques b. 4 Sep 1885, Newark, Essex Co., New Jersey
 +Margaret A. Wambeld b. cir. 1848, d. Poss 31 December 1896
Categories: Angus, Crime & Punishment, Death Certificates, Elizabeth, Union Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Jaques, Newark, Essex Co., Scandal, US Federal 1880 | Leave a comment

John B. Jaques – Part II – The ‘Infamous’ Brooklyn Case

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1856 — New York City and Environs, showing Newark, NJ, on the left & Brooklyn, NY, on the right (Map Credit: David Rumsey Historical Map Collection – details and link to full map below)

Just after the New Year in 1858, John Jaques resurfaced in the newspapers in a story that one paper referred to as ‘one of the most infamous cases ever placed on record.’ He was 34 years old, his wife Mary — in her early 30s, and their eldest child Wealthy Ann — about 13 years of age. Walter, their youngest, was about five. John’s dad, the respected Isaac Jaques of Elizabeth, NJ, was about 67 and long retired after a successful career as a Manhattan tailor and an Elizabeth, NJ, real estate investor. John’s mom (also named Wealthy Ann) had died of consumption some two years prior, in April 1856. Sometime between Wealthy’s death and the 1860 census, Isaac remarried — to Rebecca Robinson, so he could have already been married to Rebecca at the time this ‘infamous’ Brooklyn case was the talk of the town, state, and tri-state area (the story even made it into the Boston Herald and the Philadelphia Press).

As far as John’s siblings go, Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus (my 2nd great grandmother) was married to carriage maker and respected Elizabethtown businessman James Angus, Walter was a dentist, and Charles was in the process of becoming a doctor. I’m not sure about Jane, Christopher, and Isaac Jr., but (provided they were still around–and I know at least Isaac Jr. was) I suspect they were busy living respectable lives. So, John’s propensity for alcohol must have been a source of disruption and great worry for his friends and family, and the third article included in this post states just that. At some point down the road, they may well have washed their hands of him, but it appears that at this point at least some of his friends and family were standing by him. And he had not yet trashed his reputation with the community; one paper described him as ‘a man of respectable standing, except that occasionally he drinks too much.’

Brooklyn, NY, in 1868, showing location of the IX Ward (Map Credit: David Rumsey Maps -- full credit and link below)

Brooklyn, NY, in 1868, showing location of the IX Ward (Map Credit: David Rumsey Maps — full credit and link below)

But, on with the story of what happened. On the cold winter’s night of January 4, 1858, John was discovered lying unconscious and near death in a pond in Brooklyn’s 9th Ward. The incessant barking of a dog, whose master eventually came outside to see what the fuss was all about, is the only thing that saved him. Allegedly he was severely beaten and left there to die by two shady characters who were trying to prevent him from testifying at a trial taking place the next day in New Jersey. I’ll let you do your own reading of the tale as it unfolds. Suffice it to say, you’re going to get some background on John (residing in Newark, NJ, at this time) and his own recounting of the events, and you’re going to ‘hear’ courtroom testimony from John’s long-suffering wife Mary F. (Briggs) Jaques and his daughter Wealthy Ann. There are twists and turns, and things are not always what they seem. Is he a victim, or is there more to the story? The last clipping included contains the verdict which came in mid-February 1858; this clipping is a bit hard to read, so I am including a transcription of the most illegible section below it.  (As an aside, those interested in Brooklyn of that era will enjoy the website Whitman’s Brooklyn: A Virtual Visit Circa 1850) There are some views of old Brooklyn from about this period which help set the scene for this story. Worth a look, if you have time.)

Currier & Ives, View of Brooklyn, 1879 (In public domain in US - credit below)

Currier & Ives, View of Brooklyn, 1879 (In public domain in US – credit below)

Thanks to the generosity of the Fulton History website’s lack of copyright restrictions, I can post the articles here. And that’s a great thing because, just like the previous post’s article about John (the ‘Prodigal Son’ returns), these articles are (naturally) written in a way that reflects the tone of that era, something I’d find impossible to convey should I be forced to paraphrase or re-word. So enjoy the read. This post will be followed by 1-2 more as we are still in the 1850s, and John lived another 37 years. As always, comments, thoughts, corrections, and additions welcome.

Jamaica, NY, Long Island Farmer, January 7, 1858

Jamaica, NY, Long Island Farmer, January 7, 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com).

Jamaica, NY, Long Island Farmer, January 7, 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com).


The New York Evening Express, 7 Jan 1858

crime

The New York Evening Express, 7 Jan 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Times, 7 January 1858

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Herald, 8 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Herald, 8 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, Friday evening, 8 January 1858

Crime

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, Friday evening, 8 January 1858

Trenton State Gazette (8 January 1858): Mr. John B. Jaques, of Newark, New Jersey, was found insensible in a pond in the Ninth Ward of Brooklyn, on Wednesday morning. It appears that he had been inveigled from New York by a man named Smith, the keeper of a saloon, and against whom a charge was pending for selling liquor without license, and Jaques was the principal witness for the prosecution. Arrived in Brooklyn, Smith was joined by one Myers, the keeper of a saloon on Fulton Avenue, when they robbed and threw Jaques into the pond where he was found.

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, 9 January 1858

Crime

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, 9 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, Monday evening, 11 January 1858

Crime

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, Monday evening, 11 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Times, Friday, 15 January 1858

Crime

The New York Times, Friday, 15 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Crime

The New York Times, Friday, 15 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Crime

The New York Times, Friday, 15 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Herald, 18 January 1858

Crime

The New York Herald, 18 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Herald, 19 February 1858

New York Herald, 19 February 1858

New York Herald, 19 February 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Herald, 19 February 1858: …the defendants were arrested and had a partial examination before Justice Morehouse, when they waived further examination, and were committed to await the action of the Grand Jury. That body indicted  Myres and Smith for assault and battery with intent to kill, and also for highway robbery. The present trial was for assault and battery with intent to kill. The evidence of Jaques was substantially as above; that of Dr. Ball went to show the extent of the injuries which were at the time thought to be of a serious nature, although Jaques had subsequently entirely recovered from them. The witnesses for the defence went to show that Jaques could not be believed under oath, and that he had been arrested for various offences in New Jersey, and that indictments were there pending against him. They sought to prove that Myres and Smith separated from Jaques on the night of the affair, and that the injuries were the result of his falling while intoxicated. The trial was concluded yesterday  afternoon and the case given to the jury, who, after a long absence, returned a verdict of “not guilty.” The defendants were then discharged, their own recognizances being taken to appear and answer the other indictment.

Resources: Those interested in Brooklyn of that era will enjoy the website Whitman’s Brooklyn: A Virtual Visit Circa 1850.

MAP CREDITS:
David Rumsey Historical Map Collection, Full Title: Map Of The Country Thirty Three Miles Around The City Of New York. Published By J.H. Colton, No. 86 Cedar St. New York, 1853. Drawn by G.W. Colton. Engraved by J.M. Atwood, N.Y.

Full Title: Plan of New York and Brooklyn. (Atlas of New York and vicinity by F.W. Beers published by Beers, Ellis & Soule, New York, 1868)

Currier & Ives image from Eric Homberger: The Historical Atlas of New York City: A Visual Celebration of Nearly 400 Years of New York City’s History. Holt Paperbacks, 1998, page 72 (see Wikimedia Commons link) – ‘This media file is in the public domain’ in the United States. This applies to U.S. works where the copyright has expired, often because its first publication occurred prior to January 1, 1923. See http://copyright.cornell.edu/resources/publicdomain.cfm this page for further explanation. This image might not be in the public domain outside of the United States; this especially applies in the countries and areas that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works, such as Canada, mainland China (not Hong Kong nor Macao), Germany, Mexico, and Switzerland.

Categories: Angus, Brooklyn, Crime & Punishment, Cushman, Elizabeth, Union Co., Jaques, Manhattan, New York City, Newark, Essex Co., Scandal | 2 Comments

Wayward Jaques son returns home in 1879

River front, Oswego, N.Y., c1909. (Wikimedia Commons - photo in public domain in USA)

River front, Oswego, N.Y., cir. 1909 (Wikimedia Commons – photo in public domain in USA)

In a million years, I never would have expected to find clues about my Elizabeth, NJ, ancestors in an Oswego, NY, newspaper. Oswego, which is perched on the northeast border of Lake Ontario, is roughly 300 miles away from Elizabeth, NJ — a city very close to Manhattan. On a total lark, about eight weeks ago, I did a search for Isaac Jaques on the Fulton History website, which features old newspapers from NY state, and up popped a headline for the ‘Temperance Column’ in the Oswego Daily Times for 24 January 1879, about 18 months before Isaac passed away at age 89. (Just goes to show, that when searching old newspapers, it may be worth not restricting your search to a particular city, county, or state.)

Oswego Daily Times, Saturday Evening, 24 January 1879 (Credit: www.fultonhistory.com)

Oswego Daily Times, Saturday Evening, 24 January 1879 (Credit: http://www.fultonhistory.com)

Temperance Lecture, oil painting by Edward Edmondson, Jr., Dayton Art Institute collection, (Wikimedia Commons: Public domain due to expired copyright)

‘Temperance Lecture,’ oil on canvas, by Edward Edmondson, Jr. (1861), Dayton Art Institute collection (Wikimedia Commons: Public domain due to expired copyright)

This all happened prior to my discovering that Isaac had children other than my 2nd great grandmother Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus. You may recall from a previous post that I’d mentioned even Roger & Patricia Jaques’ Jaques Family Genealogy book, a massive tome, contains no reference to children other than Wealthy Ann.

I couldn’t imagine what could possibly have linked Isaac, an upstanding citizen of Elizabeth, NJ, to the issue of temperance. So, after opening the link and pulling up the page, I was shocked to scroll down to read about Isaac’s reunion with a once very wayward son named John, who had been Isaac’s ‘secret sorrow’ for several decades prior. Thankfully the Fulton History site permits its articles to be shared, so I don’t have to try to paraphrase or summarize. I think the writing of that era is so much more descriptive anyway. So I hope you’ll enjoy reading it as much as I did.

John must have been quite a character. Let’s be honest, throughout the ages, it’s the rare family that does not have at least one individual in it who occasionally (or more than occasionally) brings inharmonious moments to that family’s life. Back then, however, I suspect this all would have been much more scandalous. So it’s no wonder John got erased from the family record books; and perhaps that’s why this ‘Temperance Column’ appeared in a distant city rather than Isaac’s home town, although I can’t be certain of that since the now-out-of-print Elizabeth Daily Journal may have carried it. However, that newspaper does not appear to be available through any online sites (If I’m wrong about that, please let me know).

I’ll close this post by saying that I’ve since done tons of digging on John, on his life, both pre- and post-‘Temperance column,’ and I have much more to share. Suffice it to say that he took me on quite a roller coaster ride; just when I thought I’d found the last trace of his bad behavior, I’d stumble on something else. There were a sufficient number of cringe-worthy moments, and I will share them as well as some other interesting details, in the next 1-2 posts.

P.S. In some ways, I feel rather uncomfortable sharing scandal that’s been locked away in the family cupboards for 130+ years. What do you think? — Would it be better to let sleeping dogs lie?

Part 2

Part 2/3

Part 3/3

Part 3/3

Links:
Dayton Art Institute
Wikimedia

Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., Jaques, Oswego, Scandal | 16 Comments

Daniel Brodhead Jr.: A Timeline of Life Events

Philadelphia's Ancient Town Hall, Second and Market Streets, 1829.

Philadelphia’s Ancient Town Hall, Second and Market Streets, 1829, from America’s Most Historic Highway: Market Street Philadelphia.

One little sentence can open up a whole can of worms, and I’ve found myself wallowing in a can of big, fat, juicy ones this past week. And all because of two little words: “William Baker”.

Following Daniel Brodhead Jr.’s death on the February 2, 1831, at age 75, a little funeral announcement appeared the next day in The Philadelphia Inquirer:

DIED: On Wednesday morning, the 2nd inst. Mr. Daniel Brodhead, in the 76th year of his age, who served as a Lieutenant in the revolutionary war.

His friends and acquaintances are particularly invited to attend his funeral, from the residence of his son-in-law, William Baker, in Buttonwood Street, above Tenth, tomorrow afternoon, at 2 o’clock.

That name (William Baker) was new to me. Daniel had five daughters, and I only knew the name of two of the daughters’ spouses, so I set out to try to figure out which of the remaining three daughters had been married to ‘William Baker’. This took some doing; in fact, it was only after I figured out some of the other spouses that I finally had a feeling about William Baker. And along the way, I unearthed all sorts of other things about Daniel. Isn’t that always the way? That’s what I meant about the can of worms. But, as exhausting as it was, now I have a decent tree fleshed out for Daniel Jr.’s line and have unearthed a bit more about him. So below is a timeline that offers a possible glimpse into some of his activities; I say “possible” because there is no way to know with 100% certainty, without doing much more research, that ALL references to Daniel Jr. herein actually refer to Colonel Brodhead’s son and not some other Daniel.

Robert Morris, painted by Robert Edge Pine, ca. 1785

Robert Morris, painted by Robert Edge Pine, ca. 1785 (Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license)

1776 (age 20): Rank of 1st Lieutenant attained on January 6. Unit: 3rd Pennsylvania Battalion. Captured at the surrender of Fort Washington on November 16.

1777 (age 21): POW throughout the year. Rank of Captain attained on Sept. 1.

1778 (age 22): Exchanged on August 26. Worked as a supernumerary officer.

Gen. Daniel Brodhead Portrait

Gen. Daniel Brodhead Portrait

1779 (age 23): Daniel Brodhead Jr. is mentioned in a letter (Fitzpatrick, pp. 480-481) from General George Washington to Colonel Daniel Brodhead (Sr.) in response to the latter’s attempt to secure a military post for Daniel Jr. (at Daniel Jr.’s request according to one of Fitzpatrick’s footnotes): ...It has been the misfortune of Many Officers in captivity to have been overlooked by their States, who had the power of all regimental appointments, which seems to have been the case with respect to Mr. Broadhead. Had he been appointed in the line, after so long an absence from you, I should not have refused him the opportunity of paying you a visit but as he has not, there cannot be a possibility of objection on my part.

From the book History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties (p. 935): [Col. Daniel Brodhead] …had only one son, also named Daniel (by his first wife, Elizabeth De Pue), who was also an officer during the Revolution. He was sent to Virginia in 1779, in charge of the prisoners of General Burgoyne’s army. If this is true, he could not have been in Virginia for long in that capacity as he retired from the military that year.

1781 (age 25): From the diary of Robert Morris, US Superintendent of Finance, on August 28: Mr. Danl. Brodhead entered in this Office as one of my Clerks (Morris, Aug-Sept 1781, p. 119, 121).

1782 (age 26): On May 29, Daniel Jr. was fired from his position by Robert Morris (Morris, April 16 – June 20, 1782, p. 280) – note: the spelling is Morris’s: …The Pennsylvania Commissioners for fitting out the Ships to defend the Bay and River Delaware called and executed the Contract for the Ship Washington Capt Barney. These gentleman informed me that Mr. Daniel Brodhead, one of the Clerks in this Office, had mentioned the Destination of that Ship, whereupon I sent for him and told him before them what was said. He very candidly acknowledged the Fact, alledging in excuse that he had heard it mentioned by other Persons before and therefore conceiving the thing to be known he had inadvertantly mentioned the matter in a Company, that it is the only time and the only thing he ever did mention out of this Office. Mr. Brodhead being a modest, well disposed young Man I am perswaded that this was an act of meer inadvertency, but the Consequences of imprudence or indiscretion in things of this nature may be as pernicious as if they proceeded from bad designs, therefore I dismissed him instantly from this office — sorry however for the Necessity he has laid me under to do so.

Also in 1782: Possibly living at his father’s home in Reading, PA, Daniel described the July 12, 1782, suicide that took place there of Captain Charles Craig, an intelligence officer during the Revolutionary War, who had a major disagreement with his father-in-law that turned ugly. In a letter written to a Walter Stone in Maryland, Daniel wrote: After taking such precautions as were requisite to prevent detection, he laid himself on the bed, raising his head, with several pillows, to a convenient height; He placed a muzzle of the pistol under one ear, and discharged its contents, which went thro’ his head. The report of the pistol brought up his brother Colonel Thomas Craig, who immediately burst open the door (he having had the precaution to bolt it on the inner side) But the unfortunate Charles was already quite dead.——-I ought here to take notice, that, least (sic) the pistol should by any means have proved ineffectual, he had provided his sword, which lay across his breast when his brother entered the room. So determined was he, on the preparation of this shocking deed. (Rubicam, Milton)

Land claims, 1783 (credit: Florida Center for Instructional Technology at the University of South Florida-website below)

Land claims, 1783 (credit: Florida Center for Instructional Technology at the University of South Florida-website below)

1783 (age 27): Daniel was the first merchant to arrive in the new frontier town of Louisville, Kentucky. At that time, there was no state of Kentucky. Virginia extended westward as the map of land claims indicates. I found mention of Daniel Jr. in a number of books, including one on the life of Daniel Boone: In 1783 Daniel Brodhead astonished the settlers by offering for sale goods from Philadelphia, having succeeded in freighting them from thence to Pittsburgh in wagons, and down the river in flat-boats. Even upon those days of simplicity arose the radiance of gaudy calico and overshadowing wool hats. It was a time of serious innovation. (Bogart, p. 305).

George Rogers Clark (Public Domain, expired copyright*)

George Rogers Clark, painted by Matthew Harris Jouett in 1825 (Public Domain, expired copyright*)

In a book on Chesapeake politics (Risjord, p. 236), I found the following on Daniel: Merchants who established themselves in Kentucky at the end of the war augmented the ranks of the court party, though few of them could claim Virginia ancestry. The first merchant in the newly erected town of Louisville at the falls of Ohio was Daniel Brodhead, Jr., son of the Pennsylvania colonel who had commanded at Pittsburgh in the last years of the war. Arriving in 1783, Brodhead established a commercial contact with George Rogers Clark and his cousin William, who were then surveying the Virginia military district across the river. These men, in turn, had interests in the down-river trade with New Orleans, and they had contacts with New Orleans merchants as a result of Clark’s military expeditions. Before long, Brodhead too had mercantile acquaintances in Spanish Louisiana.

On the Kentucky Educational Television site under the topic of Louisville Life, I found the following: According to “The Encyclopedia of Louisville”, the first dry goods store opened in Louisville in 1783. It was basically a double-sized log cabin with glass pane windows, featuring merchandise from Pittsburgh and Philadelphia. The store was located on the north side of Main St. between Fifth and Sixth Streets and was owned by Daniel Brodhead. This mercantile outlet was the precursor to department stores.

Another reference to Daniel’s store is contained in the book, A History of Ohio Falls Cities and Their Counties (p. 189): Another notable commercial event occurred after navigation opened this year — the opening of the first general store in Louisville, and the second in what is now the State of Kentucky, the first having been started at Boonesborough in April, 1775, by Messrs. Henderson & Co., the would-be founders of “the Province of Transylvania.” Mr. Daniel Brodhead was the happy man to expose, first amid the wildness of the Louisville plateau, the beautiful fabrics of the East to the linsey-clad dames and belles of the Falls city. Mr. Butler, in his History of Kentucky, says “it is believed that Mr. Broadhead’s was the first store in the State for the sale of foreign merchandise.” He transported his moderate stock in wagons from Philadelphia to Pittsburg, and thence on flat-boats they were floated down to Louisville. Mr. Collins says : ” The belles of our forest land’ then began to shine in all the magnificence of calico, and the beaux in the luxury of wool hats.” We add the following from Casseday’s History: The young ladies could now throw aside all the homely products of their own looms, take the wooden skewers from their ill-bound tresses, and on festive occasions shine in all the glories of flowered calico and real horn-combs.

It is not known whether it was this worthy Mr. Brodhead who was the first to introduce the luxury of glass window-lights, but it is certain that previous to this time such an extravagance was unknown, and there is an incident connected with the first window-pane which deserves a place here, and which is recorded in the words of an author who is not more celebrated for his many public virtues, than for his unceasing and incurable exercise of the private vice of punning. After referring to the introduction of this innovation, this gentleman says : “A young urchin who had seen glass spectacles on the noses of his elders, saw this spectacle with astonishment, and running home to his mother exclaimed, ‘O, Ma! there’s a house down here with specs on!”…

1784 (age 28): Daniel was still active in Louisville as is evidenced by the insurance he took out for some of his freighted goods (see article inset, The Baltimore Underwriter, p. 344).

Daniel Brodhead, Jr. insurance policy, 1784

Daniel Brodhead, Jr. insurance policy, 1784

1785 (age 29): From the History of Ohio Falls Cities and Their Counties (p. 183-184), came more information on Daniel Jr. On October 6th of that year James Sullivan and James Patton were appointed to superintend the sales of lots. Captain Daniel Brodhead was subsequently appointed in place of Patton. The superintendents of sales were authorized to bid on lots “as far as they may think necessary, or nearly their value, which purchases are to be considered as subject to the further direction of the trustees.” December 9, 1785, it was resolved “that all the land from Preston’s line to the mouth of Beargrass [Daniel Jr. owned the “point over Beargrass” according to p. 149 of this book] and up said creek to said line be sold to the highest bidder, and also all the land that remains on this side of said creek at the mouth, thereof, exclusive of the thirty feet allowed for a road between the Bottom squares and the Ohio.” All the remaining land of the one thousand acre tract, formerly Connolly’s, was ordered sold the next February to “the highest bidder for ready cash.”

1788 (age 32): Daniel sold all of his Jefferson Co., Kentucky, goods (Early Kentucky Settlers, p. 374): Daniel Brodhead, Jr. of Jefferson Co. sold to Richard Jones Waters of said county his goods, chattels, and all his personal property, farm implements, cattle, sheep, a negro woman, also horses, including young stallion purchased from John Severns, his interest in a stud horse late the property of Samuel Boon purchased at Sheriff’s sale by Brodhead in partnership with Samuel Wells, 4 wagons, gears for 16 horses, etc., log chains and trace chains, stock of all kinds, timbers belonging to Brodhead, in Louisville or elsewhere, his furniture, rifle-gun, rugs, cherry cupboard, one chocolate pot, pewter ware, etc. August 4, 1788. Recorded September 2, 1788.

Also in 1788: (Early Kentucky Settlers, p. 375) Daniel Brodhead [the father] of the Burrough of Reading, Berks Co., Pa. appoints his son Daniel Brodhead Jr., his lawful attorney to collect from James Francis Moore and James Sullivan of Kentucky, his former agents, all money and all such other matters as they had in trust for him. March 1, 1787. Witnesses: Charles Jno. Biddle, John Christian Hondebier. Recorded September 2, 1788. Father and son, evidently, still in good rapport.

1790 (age 34): (Early Kentucky Settlers, p. 383) Elijah Logan Hall [Hale?] of Louisville, now intending a journey to Fauquier Co., in the Old Settlement, appoints his friend Benjamin Johnston, his lawful attorney, to represent him in all matters of business. Revokes all other powers of attorney, especially the one to Daniel Brodhead Jr. to transact business with Colo Harry Lee of Virginia. August 24, 1790.  The emphatic “especially” is particularly intriguing.

1790-1797 (age 34-41): After Daniel Jr. left Kentucky, he spent time living in Richmond, Virginia (Goodwill & Smith, p. 136). So he must have spent at least some of these years there.

1798 (age 42): Daniel is listed on p. 59 of the book Centennial anniversary of the Pennsylvania Society, for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage: And for Improving the Condition of the African Race published by the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery. Philadelphia is given as his place of residence. C.W. Stafford’s Philadelphia Directory lists his place of residence as: 214 High Street (later known as Market Street; current location of Campo’s Philadelphia Deli). His father lived steps away at 226 High Street, current home of Mac’s Tavern.

PA Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery

PA Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery

1799: Stafford’s City Directory still shows the father and son living at their respective residences on High (Market) Street.

1800 (age 44): Daniel’s father, former General Daniel Brodhead who served as Surveyor-General from 1789-1800, retired to Milford, Pennsylvania, after spending the previous decade in Philadelphia. In 1795 he is known to have lived next to the southeast corner of Seventh and Market Streets (Jackson, p. 194). It was on the southwest corner of that intersection that Thomas Jefferson had written the Declaration of Independence between June 11-28, 1776.

SW corner of Seventh and Market Streets in Philadelphia. General Brodhead lived nearby in 1795. Photo from 1858.

SW corner of Seventh and Market Streets in Philadelphia where the Declaration of Independence was written. General Brodhead lived steps away in 1795. Photo from 1858. America’s Most Historic Highway: Market Street Philadelphia.

Stafford’s 1800 city directory still shows the pair at their respective residences, the only change is that Daniel Jr.’s occupation (not listed in the previous two year’s editions) is “tanner” (Merriam-Webster’s definition #1: “one who tans hides” as opposed to definition #2: “one who acquires or seeks to acquire a suntan” – injecting some levity here!).

Once Daniel Jr. relocated to Philadelphia in cir. 1898 (when he surfaces in the city directory listings), were father and son on good terms? I would think so given that they lived in such close proximity to each other. But something must have happened between then in the course of the next few years because the fallout was certain in August of 1803 when the General set his hand to his last will and testament and omitted Daniel Jr.

1800-1802: The son appears to have finally taken a stab at married life, and he did it in a pretty big way. Some family trees I’ve seen have listed Daniel Jr.’s wife as “Christian Abel”; that may well have been her name, but I have yet to see any proof of that. In any case, I must say that I feel slightly suspicious that “Christian” may have been a second wife since Daniel Jr. would have been between the ages of 47-58 when his six known children were born: Ellen (1803), Juliana (1805), Amanda (b. Phila., cir 1807), Evelina (1809), Mira (1812), and Daniel (1814) .

1801-1808: Daniel Jr. is absent from the Philadelphia City Directory. Was he no longer in the city or just living in someone else’s household?

1808 (age 52): The Tickler article of October 5 alluded to Daniel Jr. as having married a woman in Virginia and abandoning her and their small children. Had that been a first wife? Or is that a reference to ‘Christian Abel’ and her first 3 children born between 1803 and 1807? (The problem with that is that all of ‘Christian’ and Daniel’s children were born in Pennsylvania, not Virginia.) The article also alleges Daniel Jr. to have been Daniel Sr’s illegitimate son. Was that the public’s assumption regarding Daniel Jr. after he was omitted from his father’s will? That said, the General did not die until November 15, 1809; would the will have been made public prior to that for people to have been able to draw such a conclusion? Or was this gossip that had been tossed about for a long time?

Another Tickler article appeared a month later on November 9: A fellow called major Brodhead, who frequently boasted since the governor’s election, that he was one who had assisted in naturalizing the 500 aliens, recently solicited alms, in a certain billiard room, for one of the new made citizens, under the plea that he was a seafaring man thrown out of employ by the embargo. Now, although we do not know by what right Brodhead claims the title of major, we wish major Wash-tub to inform the public, whether the man for whom he solicited alms, is a seaman ; or whether he does not keep a sailor’s boarding house in Southwark. Further — major Wash-tub is requested to state, whether he ever received favors, similar to those he solicited for his protegee?

1809 (age 53): Daniel Sr. dies in Milford, Pike Co., PA, on November 15, and is buried in the Milford Cemetery. Daniel Jr. is listed in Robinson’s Philadelphia Directory: Broadhead, Danl., accomptant, N. Broad.

1810 (age 54): Daniel Jr. is again listed in Robinson’s Philadelphia Directory: Broadhead, Daniel, accomptant, North Broad. The 1810 Census shows the family living in South Mulberry Ward, Philadelphia. The household included 1 male under 10, 1 male aged 10-16, and 1 male aged 45 and older (Daniel Sr.). I don’t know who the 2 male children could have been because presumably son Daniel was not born until 1814. There were 5 girls under the age of 10,  1 between the age of 10-16, and 1 aged 26-44 (‘Christian Abel’). I don’t know who the 5th girl under the age of 10 could have been since Mira was born in 1812, nor do I know who the girl aged 10-16 could have been.

1813 (age 57): Daniel Brodhead Jr. is listed among numerous insolvent debtors in a newspaper notice that appeared in Daniel Poulson’s American Daily Advertiser (Philadelphia) on Wednesday, March 3, 1813. His profession is listed as “Accomptant” (an accountant). His creditors are listed as M. Randall, Henry Sparks, and Benjamin Noner.  Kite’s Philadelphia Directory for 1814 lists Daniel: Brodhead Daniel, accomptant north Broad and 24 Strawberry.

1814 (age 58): Kite’s Philadelphia Directory carries the same listing: Brodhead Daniel, accomptant north Broad and 24 Strawberry.

1816 (age 60): Robinson’s Philadelphia Directory lists Daniel Jr.: Broadhead, Daniel, accomptant, North Broad. Daniel offers bail for Jane Baker, mother of the notorious Ann Carson. Mrs. Baker had been implicated in her daughter’s attempted kidnapping of Governor Simon Snyder. See New York Evening Post article – October 31, 1816. Was Jane Baker, perhaps, related to Daniel’s aforementioned son-in-law William Baker? This was a huge scandal worthy of its own blog post, but for a quick synopsis, click here. For the whole story, click here. Update 6/13/13: Daniel’s role was that of professional bail bondsman. (Branson, p. 62)

New York Evening Post, 1816 (Credit: www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Evening Post, 1816 (Credit: http://www.fultonhistory.com)

Pennsylvania Governor Simon Snyder, ca. 1815 (Wikimedia Commons - image in public domain)

Pennsylvania Governor Simon Snyder, ca. 1815 (Wikimedia Commons – image in public domain)

1817 (age 61): Per Robinson’s Philadelphia Directory he is still at the same location: Broadhead, Daniel, accomptant, North Broad.

1818 (age 62): On March 27, Daniel Jr. appeared in District Court in Philadelphia to confirm his identity as a veteran of the Revolutionary War and to request a pension due to his “reduced circumstances in life”. (Goodwill and Smith, p. 136) Paxton’s Philadelphia Directory shows a change of address: Brodhead, Daniel, accomptant, 17 Arch.

1819 (age 63): According to Paxton’s Philadelphia Directory, Daniel is now several doors away: Brodhead, Daniel, accountant, 12 Arch.

1820 (age 64): On August 11, Daniel appeared in Court again to affirm his identity and to demand Bounty Land promised to him by the US for having served as an officer in the War. (Goodwill and Smith, pp. 137-138)

The 1820 Census shows the family living in Philadelphia’s High Street Ward. But now there are only 7 in the household: 1 male over 45 (Daniel Jr), 1 female under 10 (must be Mira), 3 females aged 10-16 (presumably Juliana, Amanda, and Evelina), and 2 females aged 16-26 (one was probably Ellen, but who was the 2nd?). It appears that ‘Christian Abel’ and young son Daniel may have passed away by then, but I have not yet found proof of that. Whitely’s Philadelphia Directory shows an additional occupation (scrivener – a.k.a. notary): Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener and accountant, 12 Arch.

First Presbyterian Church, Market Street, East of Third, in 1800

First Presbyterian Church, Market Street, East of Third, in 1800

1821 (age 65): M’Carty Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener and accountant, 12 Arch.

1822 (age 66): M’Carty Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener and accountant, 12 Arch.

1823 (age 67): Desilver’s Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener and accountant, 12 Arch.

1824 (age 68): Desilver’s Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, accountant, 12 Arch.

1825 (age 69): Wilson’s Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, conveyancer and accountant, 12 Mulberry.

1828 (age 72): Desilver’s Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener, 12 Mulberry.

1829 (age 73): Desilver’s Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener, 12 Mulberry.

1830 (age 74): I could not find the family in the 1830 Census, but Desilver’s Philadelphia Directory carried this listing: Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener, 12 Mulberry.

1831 (age 75): Dies on February 2 in Philadelphia. Funeral procession departing from son-in-law William Baker’s home on Buttonwood Street. Burial place not stated.

1835: His estate is appraised on January 8. It consists of acreage in Henderson Co., Kentucky, transferred to him by “Military Warrant No. 3490”: …2666-2/3 acres — 766-2/3 ares of which remain unallocated and which we value at ——— $600. (Goodwill and Smith, p. 139).

So all of that research was triggered by those two little words “William Baker”– so whose husband was he? Juliana’s.

If you’ve made it this far, thanks for reading, and as always, your comments, corrections, and suggestions are welcome!

******************************************************************************************************

Update 4/28/14: From the book History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties, p. 935:

[Col. Daniel Brodhead] …had only one son, also named Daniel (by his first wife, Elizabeth De Pue), who was also an officer during the Revolution. He was sent to Virginia in 1779, in charge of the prisoners of General Burgoyne’s army. He subsequently settled in Virgina and raised a family. Colonel James O. Brodhead, of St. Louis, MO, who has achieved a national reputation, is a grandson of his.

This obviously raises more questions that need to be looked into. Daniel Jr. supposedly retired in 1779, so if in fact he was sent to Va., he must not have been there that long. On the surface, this does seem to corroborate other sources alleging that a wife existed in KY/VA, at a time prior to when Daniel Jr. established a family in Philadelphia ca 1800-1802.

Note: It would seem that History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties is incorrect about James O. Brodhead being one of Daniel Jr.’s grandsons, unless there is another James O. Brodhead that was born in St. Louis. This is the only one I have found: James Overton Broadhead; born in Charlottesville, VA, 29 May 1819; died 7 Aug 1898 in St. Louis. The article ‘Ardent Unionist, Unrepentant Slaveholder’ contains a wealth of information about this James including that he was the son of Achilles Brodhead, who was ‘commissioned by Thomas Jefferson to survey the grounds that became the University of Virginia.’ After a bit of digging, I learned that Achilles’ father was a Jonathan Broadhead (from A History of the City of St. Louis and Vicinity, The Pioneers and Their Successors compiled and published by John Devoy, St. Louis, 1898: “Mr. Broadhead’s grandfather, Jonathan Broadhead, came to this country from Yorkshire, England, during the Revolutionary War and settled in Albemarle County”).

*******************************************************************************************************

References:

  • The Baltimore Underwriter: A Weekly Journal Devoted to the Interests of Insurance in All Its Branches, Vol. XIII, January – June 1875 (Baltimore: Bombaugh & Ransom Publishers and Proprietors).
  • Bogart, William Henry. Daniel Boone And The Hunters Of Kentucky (New York and Auburn: Miller, Orton & Mulligan, 1856).
  • Susan Branson. Dangerous to Know: Women, Crime, and Notoriety in the Early Republic. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008).
  • Early Kentucky Settlers: The Records of Jefferson County, Kentucky from the Filson Club History Quarterly (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. for Clearfield Co., 2007).
  • Fitzpatrick, John C., editor.The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799, Volume 14 (January 12, 1779 – May 5, 1779) by George Washington, John Clement Fitzpatrick, David Maydole Matteson. United States George Washington Bicentennial Commission.
  • Goodwill, Anne, and Jean Smith. The Brodhead Family: The Story of Captain Daniel Brodhead, His Wife Ann Tye, and Their Descendants, Vol. II (Port Ewen, NY: Brodhead Family Association, 1988).
  • The History of Ohio Falls Cities and Their Counties: Illustrations and Biographical Sketches, Vol. I (Cleveland: L.A. Williams and Co., 1882).
  • Jackson, Joseph. America’s Most Historic Highway: Market Street Philadelphia (Philadelphia & NY: Wannamaker, 1926).
  • Mathews, Alfred. History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania (Philadelphia: R. T. Peck and Co., 1886).
  • Morris, Robert. The Papers of Robert Morris, 1781-1784: August-September 1781 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1975).
  • Morris, Robert. The Papers of Robert Morris, 1781-1784: April 16-July 20, 1782 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1980).
  • Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery. Centennial anniversary of the Pennsylvania Society, for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage: And for Improving the Condition of the African Race (Philadelphia: Grant, Faires & Rodgers, Printers, 1875).
  • Risjord, Norman K. Chesapeake Politics: 1781-1800 (New York: Columbia University Press, 1978).
  • Rubicam, Milton. Evidence: An Exemplary Study, A Craig Family Case History. Special Publication No. 49. (Washington DC: National Genealogical Society, 1981).

Philadelphia Directory Listings:

Philadelphia city directories

Philadelphia city directories

Resources on Ann Carson:

  • The trials of Richard Smith, late lieutenant in the 23d Regiment U. States infantry, as principal, and Ann Carson, alias Ann Smith, as accessory, for the murder of Captain John Carson, on the 20th day of January 1816. Ebook on  openlibrary.org
  • Susan Branson. Dangerous to Know: Women, Crime, and Notoriety in the Early Republic. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008. ISBN 978-0-8122-4088-7
  • Essay: Crime, Class Consciousness and Narrative in the Early Republic

Map Credit: Florida Center for Instructional Technology at University of South Florida: http://etc.usf.edu/maps.

G. R. Clark image: This media file is in the public domain in the United States. This applies to U.S. works where the copyright has expired, often because its first publication occurred prior to January 1, 1923. See [http://copyright.cornell.edu/resources/publicdomain.cfm this page] for further explanation. This image might not be in the public domain outside of the United States; this especially applies in the countries and areas that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works, such as Canada, mainland China (not Hong Kong nor Macao), Germany, Mexico, and Switzerland.

Categories: Abel, Baker, Brodhead, Kentucky, Milford Cemetery Milford PA, Obituaries, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Scandal, US Federal 1810, US Federal 1820, Virginia, Washington, President George | 2 Comments

The curious case of Daniel Brodhead Jr. (1756 – 2 Feb 1831)

Brig. Gen. Daniel Brodhead Portrait

Brig. Gen. Daniel Brodhead Portrait

I’d written once before about Daniel Brodhead Jr., a child of Elizabeth DePuy and Brigadier General Daniel Brodhead of Revolutionary War fame. (The previous blog post on Daniel Jr. can be found here.) Different accounts of Daniel Jr.’s fate had been bandied about over the years. I’d always believed he’d died as an infant, as that is what our family tree had recorded. Then I found an account that he had been killed in the War. Later I found an account stating he settled in Philadelphia and started a business there. Thankfully, his fate was finally confirmed to me by the Brodhead Family Association which had positively identified him through Revolutionary War pension records. So, in short, I was pretty surprised to discover that Daniel Jr. had made it to retirement. (Surprised, too, to learn that he had a wife and six children.)

Daniel Jr. had two siblings: Ann Garton Brodhead (1758) and Phebe Brodhead (c. 1759), and had been excluded from inheriting any of the substantial holdings listed in his father’s will. Family bad boy was the first thought that came to my mind; why else would his father cut him off?

Well, coincidentally, a few days ago, I was looking through some articles on Genealogy Bank, and up popped the following little article from the Tickler, a satirical publication out of Philadelphia (1807-1813) whose writings attacked politicians and government. The article is dated Wednesday, 5 October 1808. It paints a terribly unflattering picture of the General’s son and makes some pretty damning allegations.

Genealogy Bank terms of use prohibit me from posting a snippet of the article here. I am allowed to transcribe small bits of it, but not too many bits (I am not supposed to do anything that will keep you from wanting to subscribe to their services). So here is a heavily chopped version:

Skeleton fresh from the closet

Skeleton in the Brodhead family closet?

There is a… fellow named Dan Brodhead, an illegitimate son of old general Brodhead, who cuts a very busy figure among the Snyderites. …procured goods to a vast amount, on his father’s credit… …married an amiable woman in Virginia, whose property he lavished on prostitutes… deserted by husband… …several small children to support. Does Dan know the same son, whose father called him one of the most infamous wretches, that had ever disgraced society….

Six children were born to Daniel Jr. and his wife between 1803-1814. Three of them (Ellen, Juliana, and Amanda) would have been alive at the time of this publication. (Note: Daniel Jr.’s wife’s name may have been Christian Abel, but I have yet to see verification of that.)

Something must have prompted the authors of the article to hurl such horrible accusations. Illegitimate son? That’s an interesting one. The General was still alive at the time of publication (he passed away on November 15, 1809), suggesting (to me, anyway) that the authors felt they had some facts to back their statements and weren’t particularly concerned about being accused of libel.

Interesting!

Update 6/20/13: There are more recent posts on this topic. Visit:
Daniel Brodhead Jr.: A Timeline of Life Events
Daniel Brodhead Jr.’s daughter, Ellen
 

Categories: Brodhead, Philadelphia, Scandal | Leave a comment

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