Surnames

November 17, 1917: Wedding of Alvira Anness, niece of Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead

Last week, while browsing articles on Fulton History, I came across this one in The Yonkers Statesman (November 19, 1917) describing the wedding of Alvira W. Anness, daughter of Mary Marsh Martin Anness and the (then) late Winfield S. Anness, in the Anness family home at 223 Warburton Avenue in Yonkers, NY. The house still stands! Click here.

Winfield S. Anness (b. 1861, Stamford, CT) was a widower when he married Mary M. Martin. He had a son with his first wife Mamie E. Valentine (b. 1864): Harold W. Anness (b. 1885). Winfield died in November 1899. I don’t know anything about Harold. If he was still alive in 1917, he was not at this wedding.

My Dad always referred to Great Aunt Mary as “Aunt Mame”, and apparently she was quite a pistol. Born in 1863, she was a younger sister of my great-grandmother, Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead (b. 1859).  This wedding was in November; Margaret had lost her husband Andrew Douglas Brodhead six months before, in May. Margaret, Alvira’s aunt, is named in the article as one of the attendees.

Woodruff M. Brodhead, b. 1912, with his mother Fannie Woodruff Brodhead

Giving the bride away was my Dad’s Great Uncle Charlie (Charles Conrad Martin); my Dad’s older brother Woodruff, then age 5 1/2, wore a little sailor suit and carried white baskets filled with yellow asters.

Woodruff’s parents (my grandparents) were also present at the wedding, of course. To the left is a photo of Woodruff (“Woody”) and his mother Fannie Woodruff Brodhead. At that stage, he was their only child. He’s wearing a little sailor suit here, so perhaps this photo was also taken during that period. I’m a bad judge of ages, but I’d say he looks about 5 here?

According to the family tree information of Ancestry user “KrehT,” the newlyweds, Alvira and Walter Douglas Barry, eventually had two children: Alvira Martin Barry (b. 1920) and Walter Douglas Barry (b. 1923). Interestingly, this user shows Alvira’s middle name as “Woodruff,” but did not provide any clues as to where that middle name came from. I’d love to know since my grandmother was a Woodruff, one of the original Elizabeth, NJ, families.

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Categories: Anness, Brodhead, Martin, New York, Weddings, Woodruff | 1 Comment

Continuation of January 9 post: More Woodruff farm photos from mid-1920s

I forgot I had these two other photos when I did my January 9th post on the Woodruff farm.

My great-grandmother Wealthy Ann Angus Woodruff (5 August 1850 – 27 May 1927) with her grandsons, Charles Brodhead (my Dad) and Richard Angus Brown, outside the barn on the Woodruff farm off Conant Street in Hillside, New Jersey

I have no idea who these ladies and the little girl are, but I’m assuming they worked on the Woodruff farm as this photo was together with the other two.

I offer the below as a comparison; you can see the boys all grown up and ready to go to war. They appear in reverse order in the second photo.

Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., Hillside Union, New Jersey, Woodruff | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

Brodhead Reunion in Kingston, New York, in June 1964

Some of you may remember the post I did several years ago on the 1964 Brodhead family reunion in Kingston, NY, which was held to commemorate the 300th anniversary of Daniel Brodhead and Ann Tye’s arrival in America. Click here to head back to it. Recently I found the below article and photo on Fulton History. I don’t recognize any of these folks, but I thought some of you may. Give a shout out in the comments section if you see one of your family members or want to comment on the reunion in general. Thanks!

Brodhead family reunion in 1964 – just a few of the many Brodheads present for the event

Categories: Anniversaries, Brodhead, Kingston, New York | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Fowler T. Brodhead (1828-1902), famed linguist and foreign language teacher to President Grover Cleveland

New York. Grand ovation to Governor Cleveland in the city of Buffalo, October 2nd. Scene on Main Street / From sketches by C. Upham. 1884. (Credit Library of Congress digital archives http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c07331); Cleveland was 28th Governor of NY (1983-1985) and prior to that had been Mayor of Buffalo in 1882.

While perusing some old papers on Fulton History, I came across several exceedingly sad obituaries for the very gifted and talented Fowler Thayer Brodhead, who at one point in his life had taught foreign languages to a young Grover Cleveland (1837-1908), but in later years seems to have completely withdrawn from society. He died at 75 from what appears to have been a great deal of self-neglect, in spite of having substantial financial means at his disposal. While the articles seize strongly upon what became of Fowler after his mother’s passing in 1885, an event that supposedly sparked his mental and physical decline, his gifts and talents cannot be denied and deserve to be remembered, especially by those of us who share his Brodhead DNA.

From the Illustrated Buffalo Express, February 16, 1902: “Fowler T. Brodhead, famed as a linguist, teacher of Grover Cleveland, later a hermit, was buried in the Brodhead family plot in Forest Lawn last Friday. […] The story of his life is a tale of sadness. His father came to Buffalo from Hudson in 1830, a lawyer and graduate of Williams College, whose wife was Miss Nancy Thayer of Lee, Mass. The first American Brodhead was Captain Daniel Brodhead of the Yorkshire Regiment that came from England in 1664 and wrested New Netherlands from the Dutch. The Brodheads lived at Washington and Huron streets in 1837 and for years thereafter. The father was a law partner of Judge Masten. Fowler Brodhead was born in Hudson in 1828. He attended Fay’s Academy at Washington and Huron streets and then went to Albany to study medicine. He returned to Buffalo without finishing his course and studied French and German. He taught in the high school and gave private lessons. He became known as a proficient linguist, speaking several languages fluently. It, was related of him that be once sat down with a Frenchman, German, Italian and Spaniard and conversed with the four, each in his own language, fluently, and with ease. He wrote poems in several languages and wrote a play, The Burning of Buffalo, for the old Metropolitan Theater.”

I checked the online records for Forest Lawn Cemetery in Buffalo and found Fowler and his parents William W. Brodhead and Nancy Thayer Brodhead. I went ahead and created memorial pages for them on the Find a Grave website. The three are located in Section: BB Lot: 143-N PT Spaces 1, 2, 3.

Volume 4 of The Brodhead Family has William listed on page 303. William Wheeler Brodhead (F-401) was the son of Luke Brodhead (1777-1845); Luke was a son of Daniel Brodhead and Hester Wyngart and a brother of my fifth-great-grandfather Garret Brodhead. William was baptized on 10 September 1797 at Linlithgo RDC, Livingston, Columbia County, NY, and married Nancy Lucretia Thayer on May 25, 1825 in Westfield, MA.  William “lived in Red Hook, NY at the time of his marriage and later lived Buffalo, NY where he was an attorney in 1850 and a private school teacher in 1860.” Fowler is listed as G-1226, but no information is given for him.

The newspaper articles point to Fowler’s withdrawal from society as coinciding with the death of his mother Nancy in 1885; he died with $4,000 to his name which was a substantial sum in 1902 (about $111,000 today). He lived at 82 10th Street in Buffalo; where the house once stood is now a vacant lot.

A notice of sale that appeared in the Buffalo New York Courier on October 24, 1903, offers the names of several Brodheads: two of Fowler’s nieces and a great-nephew. Charlotte Brodhead and Mary Gertude Brodhead (b. 1829 and 1837 respectively) were daughters of James Oliver Brodhead (1803-1841; Brodhead Family F-404) and wife Caroline Wackerhagen. James Oliver Brodhead was the brother of William W. Brodhead. Francis Reynolds Brodhead (b. 1863) was a nephew of the two sisters via their brother Thomas C. Brodhead (1835-1877), son of James Oliver Brodhead.

As sad as Fowler’s end was, clearly his was a life well lived at least up to a certain point. I’m glad I came upon his story. I do not want him to be forgotten especially since he had no wife or children to pass his story down along the line to today’s generations.

Illustrated Buffalo Express – 16 February 1902 (Credit: FultonHistory dot com)

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Buffalo Morning Express, 12 February 1902 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

Buffalo Morning Express, 12 February 1902 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

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Buffalo NY Courier 12 Feb 1902 (Credit: Fulton History)

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Buffalo New York Courier, 24 October 1903

Categories: Brodhead, Cleveland Grover, Death, New York, Obituaries | Tags: , | 2 Comments

1872 obituary for Garret Brodhead, husband of Cornelia Dingman

Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832) – Photo Credit: James & Barbara Brodhead

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851); Photo Credit: James & Barbara Brodhead

I recently came upon this obituary notice for my third-great-grandfather Garret Brodhead (d. January 8, 1872), husband of Cornelia Dingman and father of Albert Gallatin Brodhead, Daniel Dingman Brodhead, Andrew Jackson (A.J.) Brodhead (my second-great-grandfather), and Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead.  Much of what I’d known of Garret is contained in this post.  The obituary offers wonderful details—who wrote it, I have no idea, but it was someone who had been well acquainted with Garret and Pike County men of Garret’s generation.

Reference is made to Garret’s favorite book Modern Chivalry by Breckenridge; we find out he was living with son A.J. and family in Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe) for about a year before his death; we learn where he was during the War of 1812, that he was a Protestant in the Calvin tradition and a Democrat in politics; and we learn he was extremely interested in his Dutch roots.

Coincidentally, I, too, have been thinking lately about my Dutch roots in the sense that I feel like I need to learn much more about them, so it was interesting to me that Garret had a real preoccupation with them rather than his English roots which probably made up a good 50% of his DNA.

In any case, if you are a descendant and have not yet seen this obituary, I hope you will enjoy reading it as much as I did and that you’ll find out a few new things about our shared ancestor.

Port Jervis Evening Gazette – January 1872 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

 

Categories: Brodhead, Death, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Obituaries, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

September 17, 1922, Golden Anniversary: Garret Brodhead & Annie Kocher

PHOTO & LIST OF NAMES: COURTESY OF MICHELLE CAUSTON. Celebratory gathering of Brodhead family members on the occasion of the 50th wedding anniversary of Garret Brodhead and wife Annie Kocher – September 17, 1922. I have cropped the original image which extends upwards into the skyline. 

The guest list – courtesy of Michelle Causton

Thanks to Brodhead descendant Michelle Causton, I am able to publish here today this marvelous, nearly 100-year-old group photo of the many Brodheads who gathered together on September 17, 1922, to celebrate the Golden Anniversary of Garret Brodhead and Annie Kocher.  Garret (1848-1936) was the son of Andrew Jackson (AJ) Brodhead and Ophelia Easton Brodhead, who had 10 children. He married Annie Kocher (b. 1849) on September 17, 1872. Anyone with more details, such as venue, etc., please feel free to comment below. And do please point out any mistakes I make in this post.

Of the ten children of AJ and Ophelia Brodhead, seven were still alive when this photo was taken. Those who had already passed away were:

  • Calvin Easton Brodhead, d. April 29, 1907 (wife 1 and wife 2 predeceased him)
  • Robert Packer Brodhead, d. May 12, 1922
  • Andrew Douglas Brodhead, d. May 6, 1917 – my great-grandfather

Garret’s siblings James Easton Brodhead, Charlotte Elizabeth Brodhead, Jean Struthers Brodhead, Emily Linderman Brodhead, and Richard Henry Brodhead are all present in the photo.

Only one living sibling appears to have been absent: John Romeyn Brodhead.

I found the numbers in the original image hard to read in some cases, so here is a version that is better labelled in that regard.

Updated to display the numbers better

And for better searchability, I am retyping the list here. Garret’s siblings are in bold. Garret’s (#39) and Annie’s (#41) children are in italics. Many of the young children pictured belonged to Garret and Annie Brodhead’s son Calvin (#27) who married Gertrude McNulty (#28) and converted to Catholicism.

1. James I. Blakslee
2. Madeline McCormick
3. Rollin Crellin
4. Mrs. W. H. Fregans
5. Mr. W. H. Fregans
6. Joseph C. Fuller
7. Henry S. Hampson, Sr.
6. Francis Brodhead
9. Alexander Brodhead, Jr.
10. Mr. Everett (Drove JIB)
11. James E. Brodhead, Jr.
12. William Brodhead
13. Mr. Houghton (Rector)
14. Charles D. Brodhead
15. Frank M. Brodhead
16. Fred Moon
17. Emily E. Brodhead
18. Edith L. Brodhead
19. Alex L. Brodhead, Sr.
20. Mrs. Frank M. Brodhead
21. Ophelia Hampson
22. Mrs. Conrad Kocher Brodhead
23. Conrad Kocher Brodhead
24. Ruth Randall (Brodhead) Fuller
25. Garret Brodhead
26. Laura Leisenring Brodhead
27. Calvin Easton Brodhead
28. Mrs Calvin Easton Brodhead (Gertrude McNulty)
29. Mrs. Garret Brodhead, Jr.
30. Mrs. Fred Moon, Jr.
31. Anna L. Brodhead
32. Mrs. Robert P. Brodhead – Fannie Loveland – widow of Robert Packer Brodhead
33. Miss Bessie Loveland (Fannie Loveland Brodhead’s sister Elizabeth Shepard Loveland)
34. Miss Annie Wasser
35. Mr. Charles Ashley Blakslee
36. Mrs. Charles Ashley Blakslee (Jean Struthers Brodhead)

37. Miss Hannah Leisenring
38. Mrs. Alonzo P. Blakslee
39. Mr. Garret Brodhead
40. Garret B. Fuller
41. Mrs. Garret Brodhead (Annie Kocher)
42. Mr. James E. Brodhead
43. Mrs. James E. Brodhead (Hattie Boyd)
44. Mrs. Frank Burk (Charlotte Elizabeth Brodhead Burk)
45. Mrs. Fred Moon, Sr. (Emily Linderman Brodhead Moon)
46. Mrs. Andrew Douglas Brodhead (Margaret Lewis Martin)
47. Mrs. Richard H. Brodhead (Jane V. Smock)
48. Mr. Richard H. Brodhead

49. Anne K. Brodhead
50. Daniel D. Brodhead
51. Edith D. Brodhead
52. Susan W. Brodhead
53. Boyd Brodhead
54. Mrs. Boyd Brodhead
55. Walter Brodhead
56. Edward Brodhead
57. Laura Brodhead, Jr.
58. Katharine Brodhead
59. Jay C. Fuller
60. Mary H. Brodhead
61. Mrs. Fred P. Prosser (Mary B. Brodhead, m. 1926)
62. Louise Moon
63. Henry Hampson, Jr.
64. Mr. Walter Brodhead
65. Cornelia Moon
66. Philip Brodhead
67. “Patches”
68. William Brodhead
69. ???
70. Gertrude Brodhead (Scott)

Although my family tree for Garret and Annie Brodhead is full of holes, I am including what I have here in the event it helps someone connect more dots; of course anyone with updates or errors to comment on, please feel free to do so in the comments box below.

1-Garret Brodhead b. 11 Feb 1848, Mauch Chunk, Carbon Co., PA (Jim Thorpe,
PA), d. 11 Jul 1936, Woodbridge, Middlesex Co., NJ
+Annie Kocher b. 25 Aug 1849, Mauch Chunk, Carbon Co., PA (Jim Thorpe, PA), d.
After 1920
|–2-Conrad Kocher Brodhead b. 19 Jul 1873, d. After 11 Jul 1936
|–2-Andrew Brodhead b. 19 Jul 1873, Pennsylvania, United States, d. 12 Jul
| 1876, Metuchen, Raritan, Middlesex Co., NJ
|–2-Alonzo Blakslee Brodhead b. 26 Dec 1875, d. 5 May 1907, (Mauch Chunk
| Cemetery, Jim Thorpe, Carbon Co., PA)
| +Dent
|–2-Laura Leisenring Brodhead b. 21 Sep 1878, d. After 11 Jul 1936
|–2-Calvin Easton Brodhead b. 21 Sep 1878, Metuchen, NJ, d. 20 Mar 1945, Ohio
| +Gertrude McNulty b. 1881
| |–3-Sister Ann Marie Brodhead d. After Jun 1964
| |–3-William McNulty Brodhead b. Cir 1906, Red Bank, NJ
| | +Unknown
| |–3-Katharine Brodhead
| |–3-Father Phillip Brodhead
| |–3-Mary Halpin Brodhead
| |–3-Laura Leisinring Brodhead
| |–3-Gertrude Brodhead
| |–3-Edward Joseph Brodhead b. 1918
| | +Doris Pettigrew b. Cir 1918
| |–3-Daniel Dingman Brodhead b. 1922
|–2-Brodhead b. 6 Mar 1883, Perth Amboy, Middlesex Co., NJ
|–2-Ruth Randall Brodhead b. 7 Mar 1884, d. After Jun 1964
| +Joseph Cheever Fuller b. , West Newton, MA
| |–3-David Randall Fuller d. After Aug 1964
|–2-Brodhead b. 3 Jan 1887, Perth Amboy, Middlesex Co., NJ
|–2-Garrett Brodhead Jr. b. 3 Feb 1888, d. 13 Apr 1926, Saranac Lake, Franklin
| Co., New York
+Gertrude Pfeiffer b. 15 Dec 1886, d. 10 Oct 1967, Perth Amboy, Middlesex
Co., NJ

This image provides me with a first glimpse of many “AJ/Ophelia” descendants such as Emily Brodhead Moon’s son (#16), daughter-in-law (#30), and their granddaughter Cornelia (#65, behind “Patches”). Also, Walter Brodhead (#55, sitting with the kids), son of James Easton Brodhead and wife Harriet (“Hattie”);

Close up front row – lots of adorable grandchildren and the delightful family dog “Patches”

Middle section with senior family members – #32: Fannie Loveland (widow of Garret’s brother Robert Packer Brodhead); #35 & #36: Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ashley Blakslee – Mrs. Blakslee is Jean Struthers Brodhead, one of Garret’s sisters; #39 and #41: Garret & Annie (Kocher) Brodhead; #44 and #45 are Garret’s sisters Charlotte Elizabeth Brodhead Burk and widow Emily Linderman Brodhead Moon; #42 & #43: Garret’s brother James Easton Brodhead and wife Harriet Locklin Boyd; #46 is my great grandmother Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead, widow of Andrew Douglas Brodhead; #47 and #48 are Garret’s brother and sister-in-law Richard H. Brodhead and wife Jane V. Smock.

Mostly the middle-aged children, nieces and nephews, cousins…

I see my grandfather Frank Brodhead top left, and my grandmother Fannie Woodruff far right. They must have left my Dad (age 1.5) and his brother home (age 10) 😦

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As an aside, after Trudy M. kindly commented (below) that the venue for the anniversary gathering was probably the home of her grandparents Calvin & Gertrude Brodhead in Glenburn, Pennsylvania, I was curious as to where Garret and Annie Brodhead lived at that time. I assumed New Jersey. I found the obituary notice, which stated 180 Green Street in Woodbridge, NJ. The house, built in 1916, still stands and over two dozen photos remain on “Realtor” from a 2016 sale. Anyone who is interested can view the listing here.

Categories: Anniversaries, Brodhead, New Jersey | Tags: , | 4 Comments

January 28, 1948: “Back from Gypsy Elopement”

Valentine’s Day is almost here so it seems appropriate to share this little snippet I found among the many newspaper articles my grandmother Fannie Woodruff Brodhead clipped and set aside for safekeeping.

The clipping is about her great niece’s elopement at age 16, to William Bull, 20, in Cape Charles, Northampton County, Virginia. I found the marriage record, which shows the lovebirds got hitched on January 28, 1948. They gave their ages as 21 and 22, respectively. A Newark newspaper picked up on the story with its photo “Back from Gypsy Engagement”.

Obviously this fun-loving couple had a wonderful sense of humor:

Back in Newark NJ] after elopement to Cape Charles, Va., are Abby Sommer Bull, 16, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Sommer of 156 Heller parkway, and William Bull, 20, son of Dr. and Mrs. Louis M. Bull of 92 Heller Parkway. Bridegroom still wears earrings which helped them tell gypsy fortunes to finance trip home after they ran out of cash.

Abby and William were neighbors as you can see from the addresses, so perhaps the families knew that something like this was afoot.

Funny enough, when “googling” William’s name, I happened upon a small article in the January 24, 1914, issue of Horticulture reporting the January 13, 1914, elopement of William’s father Louis M. Bull!

Horticulture by Massachusetts Horticultural Society; Horticultural Society of New York; Pennsylvania Horticultural Society magazine, January 24, 1914

Louis and his bride Gertrude Siebrecht, the daughter of a New York florist (which explains the article’s appearance in Horticulture), were the exact same ages as Abby and William at the time of their elopement–16 and 20. So something tells me that “family tradition” may have also been on young William’s mind as he planned his elopement with his young sweetheart.

And good news: Both marriages lasted a very long time!

Happy Valentines Day, all!

PS: A marriage ban was put into place in June 2018 in New Jersey that prohibited previously allowed marriages at age 16 with parental consent. In Virginia, until 2016, no minimum age for marriage had ever been set.

Another PS for family who may be wondering: Abby was a descendant of James and Wealthy Angus:

  • Her parents: Abigail Van Horn and George Sommer
  • Grandparents: Cecelia Russum Woodruff and Robert Osborne Van Horn
  • Great-grandparents: Wealthy Ann Angus and William Earl Woodruff
  • Great-great-grandparents:  Wealthy Ann Jaques and James W. Angus
  • Categories: Bull, New Jersey, Newark, Essex Co., Sommer, Virginia, Weddings | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

    Brodhead family’s historic Wheat Plains homestead to be saved and restored by National Park Service

    “Wheat Plains,” the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

    This post is a follow-up to information I shared previously about Wheat Plains, the farmstead located in Pike County, PA, on land whose original Brodhead owners were Revolutionary War veteran Lieutenant Garret Brodhead and his wife Jane Davis. The farmhouse and structures evolved over generations of Brodheads living there.

    The Federal Government-backed Tocks Island Dam project from the 1970s took properties such as this one from their owners, and although the dam project fell through, the US government retained ownership of the properties within the project’s borders. Over time, due to funding issues, the National Park Service was unable to maintain the farmhouse and it fell into disrepair; see my August 2012 post The current sorry state of the Garret Brodhead house.

    Wheat Plains house exterior, 2013, Image copyright: James and Barbara Brodhead

    Fortunately the DePuy / Brodhead Family Association got involved to try to save the structures before they reached the point of no return. See the July 2014 post The Brodhead-Linderman Cemetery: Descendants work on clean up and restoration; the May 2015 post  Garret Brodhead’s Wheat Plains farmhouse – an August clean-up project, and the November 2016 post Garret Brodhead’s Wheat Plains Farm in Pike Co., PA, needs your support.

    The fantastic news, which many of you may have heard, is that last summer at the annual DePuy / Brodhead Family Association reunion, the National Park Service announced its plans to save Wheat Plains. This project will be ongoing and financial contributions* to support it are welcome. Below are excerpts from the recent newsletter I received from the association.

    I want to personally thank the Association’s members for their hard work, dedication, and commitment to preserving the property whose ongoing existence is important not only to our shared family history but also to Pennsylvania’s history and our nation’s history. Thanks to their extraordinary efforts and the NPS’s commitment to the property, Wheat Plains will be enjoyed and celebrated for generations to come.

    *Donations of any size are welcome: DePuy/Brodhead Family Association, 9031 11th Place West, Everett, WA 98204-2694

    The De Puy Brodhead Family Association Newsletter, January 7, 2019

    News reported by Kevin De Puy, President: The biggest news for the Family last year was the announcement from Ranger Kristy Boscheinen, Chief of Special Projects Division of the National Park Service that “Wheat Plains” Revolutionary Homestead of Lt. Garret Brodhead was put on the list for restoration. Wheat Plains is located at mile marker 8 on Route 209 near East Stroudsburg, PA. […] The Family gave a $12,000.00 donation for the restoration process and donations continue to come in, and all donations will be presented this August at this years reunion[**]. The family also did a service project at Wheat Plains joined by Kristy, Ranger Kathleen Hudak two professional young men, one a Marketing Analyst and the other a Historic Building Architect (wish I had their names). We cleared the brush and debris from behind the homestead and up the embankment and cleaned out the water canal in front of the Spring House. The East side of the Homestead was painted and NPS is working on clearing up the mold in the cellar so a major support beam can be replaced. This restoration is going to be several years endeavor and should be the main focus of the Family and I can see our Family having a reunion at Wheat Plains in the Fall when all is said and done. We can mosey around, having fun much like they did back in the day. Again, I would like to remind everyone that the DePuy side has just as much a vested interest in this as do Brodhead. Elizabeth DePuy, daughter of Nicolas DePuy ( Fort DePuy at Shawnee on the Delaware ) was married to General Daniel Brodhead, the brother of Lt. Garret Brodhead, and I imagine the General and Elizabeth may have frequented Wheat Plains quite a few times. This does not mean that we will not support nor take on other endeavors; Wheat Plains should be at the fore front.

    **Reunion scheduled for August 24, 2019, 9 a.m., tentatively at the Bushkill Meeting Center, 6414 Milford Road (route 209), East Stroudsburg, PA 18302. For more information, contact James and Barbara Brodhead at 614 400 9581.

     

    Categories: Brodhead, De Puy (De Pui), Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

    Elizabeth, NJ, circa 1849: Life at the Angus home on Elizabeth Avenue

    Yummy quince preserves from France found at our local Tuesday Morning store

    A few days ago, I made an unexpected discovery at our local Tuesday Morning store: jars and jars of quince preserves, not a common sight here. And that reminded me of a very interesting post I’d planned to do a while back but never got around to.

    Many descendants of the Angus family may already be familiar with the information I am about to disclose, but on the off-chance these details never found their way down your branch of the family tree, I will go ahead and share.

    Lovett’s illustrated catalogue of fruit and ornamental trees and plants for the autumn of 1891. Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection.; J.T. Lovett Company. Credit: www. biodiversitylibrary. org/page/42764492

    A while back, I did a post mentioning the fact that almost every yard in America within the right growing range would have once featured a quince tree; it was a fruit that was essential to the process of canning and preserving food. Well, a letter reveals that in addition to numerous other types of fruit trees, my/our second-great-grandparents Angus had a quince tree on their 927 Elizabeth Avenue, Elizabeth, New Jersey, property. I know this because I came across a copy of a letter that mentions the trees and a few more interesting things about the Angus family’s life in the mid-1800s.

    Thomas F. Russum, son of Thomas and Cecelia (Angus) Russum and one of the many Angus grandsons, copied the letter on February 24, 1934, on his letterhead stationery (address 6 Seneca Avenue, White Plains, New York). The original letter had been written circa 1849 by a roughly nine-year-old Isaac G. de G. Angus to his godmother in Mexico. Thomas copied the letter before passing it on to Isaac’s son Addison Clark Angus, who was then living at 1833 Chestnut Street in Philadelphia.

    I surmise that Thomas must have found the letter among old family papers and decided to send the original letter—which evidently the godparents returned to Wealthy Angus after learning of Isaac’s 1885 death at age 45—to Addison, Isaac’s sole surviving child. (For some background on the Mexico connection, please refer to this past post.)

    Angus family home at 927 Elizabeth Avenue, Elizabeth, New Jersey, from 1848-1871; the house was torn down a long time ago. A law office occupies this land today.

    Isaac’s letter, though brief, is absolutely wonderful. Nowhere else have I ever seen/heard/read anything about the Angus household at that time. So, if you have never seen this letter before, I hope you will enjoy reading it. (I have retained the spelling but have added some punctuation for readability and some bracketed information.)

    My dear Madrina [Godmother],

    My Ma has just written you a letter so I think I will follow her example and write one too. We are all pretty well. We have another little brother. His name is George Welsh. I wish you could see him. He is a very nice little baby and we like him very much. My Pa and Ma wishes very much that you was here. They talk of you and Dona Margarita and Pepa everyday. Jacob [Jacob Baker Angus, 1844-1850] has forgotten all his Spanish and they are afraid that Jimmy [James Winans Angus Jr. 1841-1897] and I will too. Ma hears us read and gives us a lesson almost every day. Won’t you come and live with us. You would like this country. I like it very much. My Pa has got a big house and a very nice garden with apples, pears, plums, quinces and other fruit in it. And he has got a very pretty carriage and horse and some chickens and two little pigs. Give my love to Dona Margarito a Pepa. Tell my Padrino [Godfather] I think he might write me a letter if he ever thinks of me. Give my love to him and all my other friends such as Don Bernardo’s mother. We live in the next house to my Grandpas [Isaac Jaques] and we go there every day. I have no more to write now. You must answer this soon.

    Your affectionate godson
    Isaac Gabriel de Guadalup Angus

    Still Life: Fruit, Bird, and Dwarf Pear Tree by Charles V. Bond, American, 1856

    The letter was written after the birth of George Welsh Angus (13 May 1849) and before the death of Jacob “Jimmy” Baker Angus (8 June 1850 – scarlet fever).

    The family had departed Mexico in early 1849, after a roughly seven-year stay, due to father James’s health issues. It seems likely that young Isaac wrote this letter in summer/fall when the thought of fruit trees would have been top of mind for a child.

    Isaac writes about liking his new country. Even though he was born in Elizabeth, he’d spent the bulk of his life thus far in Mexico City. Returning to daily life in Elizabeth must have been a huge adjustment for him and his siblings. Certainly they must have enjoyed being next door to their grandfather Isaac Jaques and grandmother Wealthy Cushman Jaques who would have been in their mid- to late-50s at that time and, no doubt, delighted to have daughter Wealthy and her growing family back in their midst.

    View Near Elizabethtown, N. J., oil painting by Régis François Gignoux, 1847, Honolulu Museum of Art

    The contrasts between Mexico City (oldest capital city in the Americas, with a population probably somewhere in the neighborhood of 200,000 by 1850) and Elizabeth (1850 population: 5,583) must have made a big impression on the family, as I’m sure did the difference in climate. New Jersey winters are usually cold and bleak. The painting on the left, painted two years before the Anguses returned home, shows just what wintry conditions may have awaited them. For Wealthy and James especially, their Mexico life and their adventures there during the US-Mexico War must have lingered in their minds for a very long time. And, until they’d fully acclimatized themselves, daily life in Elizabeth may have seemed a bit boring. Of course, the city of Manhattan, with its population of ~500,000 was close by, so perhaps they were happy to come home and get caught up on all the changes that had taken place in their absence. This was, after all, HOME.

    I can’t help but wonder what kind of reception the family received from the community when they returned to live in Elizabethtown.  There must have been a lot of curiosity about these somewhat “exotic”” neighbors with their unique international experiences and ability to speak Spanish.

    Bird’s-eye view of Mexico City as seen from convent of San Cosme (1847). Panorámica de la ciudad de México desde el convento de San Cosme (1847). Artist: N. Currier (Wikimedia Commons: In Public Domain in US (70 years) and Mexico (100 years)

    From the letter, we can see that Wealthy was tutoring the children daily, trying to make sure the children would not forget their Spanish; young Isaac does not mention his younger sister Mary Martha who was probably about three at the time. (Another six children would make their appearances between 1850 and 1861, one of them being my great-grandmother Wealthy Ann Angus Woodruff.)

    Photograph of Isaac G. de G. Angus, Princeton 1860 grad, from the collections of the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, Princeton, NJ. Reproduced here in low resolution with their permission. Call number AC-104, Box 117.

    Obviously the family had warmly embraced their Mexican friends and now, with such distance between them, only had letter-writing as a way of remaining in touch. The fact that the godparents returned this letter to mother Wealthy Jaques Angus after Isaac’s death in 1885, some 35 years after they’d left Mexico, indicates that the families remained in contact.

    It would be fabulous to know who these godparents and friends in Mexico were. Unfortunately I have not come across those details yet.

    If anyone out there has more information about anything related to this post, please do share. Thank you.

     

     

     

    Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., Mexico, New Jersey, Russum | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

    Isaac G. de G. Angus (1840-1885) – Part II

    Photograph of Isaac G. de G. Angus, from the collections of the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, Princeton, NJ. Reproduced here in low resolution with their permission. Call number AC-104, Box 117.

    In April 2015, I posted quite an extensive write-up on Isaac G. de G. Angus, which included a fair amount of information about his parents, my second-great-grandparents, James W. Angus and Wealthy Jaques Angus. For that post, please click here. I’m publishing this “Part II” today, not that it is a continuation of that post, but rather simply a bit more information about Isaac, including a photo, and his time at Princeton University, information I found while visiting Princeton University’s digitized online archives.

    Due to ownership/copyright restrictions, it’s best that you go to the site yourself to view these items/request copies for your own files. (See links below.)  I did pay for a high-resolution version of the image, but I am not permitted to publish it here.

    Princeton’s archives include a letter dated September 5, 1859, written by James W. Angus. Isaac must have had some behavioral issues that barred him from returning for his senior year. The letter pleads with Dr. John Maclean to allow Isaac to return, vouching that he (Isaac) much regrets his inappropriate behavior (which appears to have involved alcohol) and seems a changed person who is ready to get back to business at Princeton. If Isaac were to fail again, James promised not to bother Dr. Maclean any further. Obviously Princeton agreed to take him back since he graduated in 1860.

    Also available via Princeton’s archives is a small note with accompanying envelope, both written by Isaac’s wife Susan Robinson on December 9, 1986, advising Princeton that her husband had passed away.

    I hope you enjoyed this little tidbit about the Angus family. Have a great day!

    P.S. I believe this image of Isaac may be on Find a Grave, perhaps in higher res.

    Princeton Links:

    http://findingaids.princeton.edu/collections/AC339/c0008

    http://findingaids.princeton.edu/collections/AC104.02/c4758

    Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., New Jersey | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

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