Ludey

Emma Trewin Ludey

The youngest of the three Trewin siblings was Emma. She was born on 4 May 1850 in England.  I found this date of birth in the leaflet distributed to guests at her funeral.

Emma Trewin Ludey funeral leaflet

According to this leaflet, her birthplace was “Cambellwell,” but I believe this was probably meant to be Camberwell as the former does not appear to exist, and the latter is situated in South London to the west of Woolwich Arsenal, which is where Emma’s father, Thomas Trewin, worked until the family emigrated to Canada in 1857.

Distance from Woolwich to Camberwell

Emma would have been 9 years old when her family relocated to Jersey City, NJ, from Toronto, Canada, where they had been living for the two years following their arrival in Quebec from England. On 15 February 1871, Emma, then 20 years of age, married Francis C. Ludey in Elizabeth, NJ. Together they had six children. I know this because the 1900 Census, which lists her incorrectly as “Susan Ludy,” states that there were six children altogether but that only two were living as of the 1900 Census (Mary Emma and Louisa). The couple spent a number of years living in Bayonne, NJ.

William & Elizabeth Trewin and Francis & Emma Ludey on Holiday, Bethlehem, PA, 1915 (Image from my family’s personal collection)

From what I have pieced together, the children were:

Francis T. Ludey, born in 1871. He married Metta S. Ryman on 18 June 1896 in Summit. NJ. Less than four years later, Francis (aka Frank) passed away. NJ Deaths and Burials shows a Frank T. Ludry passing away in Summit, NJ, on 11 January 1899. The occupation listed was “C Traveller.” I have no idea what that meant, unless “C” meant “Sea” in which case, perhaps he worked on ships? I believe this “Ludry” spelling to be a typo as “r” and “e” are neighbors on the keyboard and the birth year listed in the record (1871) fits with census records that estimate the year of birth as 1872. Our old family cemetery records show a Frank Ludey being buried in the family plot in Evergreen Cemetery on 13 January 1900. Perhaps the family had the year mistakenly written down as 1900? I have not checked with the cemetery yet. But in any case, a death on the 11th of the month would make a burial on the 13th plausible. (Update 4/14/12: see later posts on Frank T. Ludey which include cause of death)

Online, I found Metta working as a kindergarten teacher in 1896, as staff librarian at Pratt Institute in 1901, and from 1915-1920 working as the librarian-in-charge at Jarvie Memorial Library in Bloomfield, NJ. The 1920 Census shows her as a widow living with her parents in Essex, NJ. She died on 8 July 1952 and was buried with her parents, Charles S. Ryman and Mary Wells, in Milford Cemetery, Milford, Pike Co., PA. The grave can be found on Find a Grave’s website. I believe Metta lived most of her adult life as a widow since women back then typically gave up employment upon getting married and she obviously developed quite a career as a librarian. And being buried with her parents would also indicate she had lived most of her life as a single person. I would certainly be interested in knowing more about Frank Ludey and how/why he passed away so young. Update (1/3/2012): see photo of Frank in later post; click here.

Mary Emma Ludey (aka “Minnie”), born on 5 February 1873, in Elizabeth. She is also buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Hillside. Minnie was married twice, first to Herbert Duryea Crane (a life insurance salesman per the 1900 census; you must open the original census document to find that out) in Bayonne, NJ, on 23 September 1897 (I just love the NJ Marriage record which has his first name spelled “Herebert” and her surname spelled “Lendey”! See why you have to be creative with your searches?!). They had a daughter named Metta Beryl who was born in 1899. Minnie eventually divorced and was living at 17 West 32nd Street in Bayonne, NJ, when she met and married her second husband Lynn Everett Jennison, a professor of history at Bayonne High School, in April 1916. According to the announcement in the NY Times, Professor Jennison was Minnie’s daughter’s instructor and they became acquainted during a parent-teacher conference to discuss the daughter’s progress. The article refers to the daughter as May. I do not know yet whether this was daughter Metta Beryl’s nickname which she may have gone by in everyday life.  The Professor, who’d been a widower, had two daughters from his first marriage with Hestis Jennison: Eleanor S. Jennison (b. circa 1905) and Amelia W. Jennison (b. circa 1906). The 1920 Census showed the couple living in Bayonne. By 1930 they had relocated to Elizabeth, NJ. Mary Emma Ludey passed away on 20 October 1938 at the age of 65.  Lynne Jennison survived her by almost 30 years. He passed away in Duval, Florida, in June 1967 at the age of  88.

Louise Beryl Ludey was born circa 1875 in Union Co., NJ. She married George Bonney (b. 1873) on 13 January 1894 in Port Richmond, NY. The 1900 Census shows a son Harold L. Bonney (b. 1896) and Dorothy B. Bonney (b. June 1898; married Jonathan Beltz; daughter Elenor, b. 1929). At the time the family was living in Bayonne City, Hudson Co., NJ, and George was working as a boiler maker. In addition, Rhode Island Births and Christening records show a son, Francis George Bonney, born on 24 November 1905. The 1910 Census shows the family still living in Providence, Rhode Island, with George still working as a boiler maker.

William W.F. Ludey was born on 11 July 1877 in Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ. According to cemetery records he was buried that same day. See below.

Another child was born on 16 September 1878 per NJ Births and Christening records. Though no name is given in the record, I believe this was Anna L. Ludey who was buried on 28 December 1878. Our family cemetery records state that William W.F. Ludey and Anna L. Ludey died very young and were buried with their grandparents, one child sharing the plot with grandfather Thomas J. Trewin, and the other child sharing a plot with grandmother Mary Phillips Trewin.

Note: The 1880 Census for “Frank Ludy” and Emma Ludy” shows a daughter Lulu Ludey born in 1876. I suspect that “Lulu” and Louisa may be one in the same person. Or Lulu could have been the sixth child about whom Emma Ludey referred in the 1900 census.

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Emma lived with her daughter Mary Emma “Minnie” Jennison and Mary’s husband Lynn Jennison after Francis Ludey passed away, in Bayonne, NJ, and then in Elizabeth, NJ. Emma died at age 83 on 9 June 1933 in Elizabeth, NJ. She was buried three days later in Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, alongside her husband Francis C. Ludey. Some more about him in the next post.

Emma Trewin Ludey, obituary notices

Categories: Bayonne, Census Records, Elizabeth, Union Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Jennison, Ludey, Obituaries, Ryman, Trewin, US Federal 1880, US Federal 1900, US Federal 1910, US Federal 1920 | Leave a comment

Thomas Trewin Jr. — Bookbinder

Traveling on the ship Ion was also Thomas (12/1839 – 7/1913), son of Thomas Trewin and Mary Anne Phillips. He would have been 18 at the time of the trans-Atlantic crossing and 20 when the family relocated to Jersey City, NJ. His date of birth I found in the 1900 Census. His name was transcribed (incorrectly) as “Thomas ? Frenen.”  His date of death is based on family burial records, showing he was buried in Evergreen Cemetery on 31 July 1913 in the Trewin family plot. He was 73.

I don’t know a lot about Thomas. The 1885 NJ state census shows him living with his sister Emma and her husband Francis C. Ludey in Bayonne, Hudson Co., NJ. According to 1900 and 1910 Census records, he was still residing with Emma and Francis in Bayonne. His status, when listed, was single. He may have lived with is parents until their passing in the late 1870s and then moved in with Emma who had married in 1871. So it could well be that Thomas never married. The 1910 Census lists his occupation as “Bookbinder.”

That unfortunately is about all I know about Thomas. He was active in the religious life of his church as is evidenced by his signature on the below document, a certificate for an auxiliary missionary society of the Methodist Episcopal Church dated 1877. Thomas Trewin served as Secretary and Francis C. Ludey as President. The certificate is for Ludey’s son, Francis T. Ludey. Update: 12/11, please see this follow-up blog post with photos of Thomas!

Auxillary Missionary Society certificate with Trewin signature (Image from my family’s personal collection)

Categories: Bayonne, Census Records, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Ludey, Methodist Episcopal, New Jersey 1885, Trewin, US Federal 1900, US Federal 1910 | Leave a comment

Trewin Family of Woolwich, County of Kent

Not long ago, I discovered a little scrap of paper with a faded handwritten note in pencil tucked away with some old family papers: “Thomas and Mary Trewin and three children sailed from England to Quebec on the ship Ion on July 8, 1857.

The other side of the note provided a bit more information:”Were living in Woolwich, County of Kent at that time. Grandpa age 40, Grandma 38, Uncle Will 10 1/2″ I presumed that William referred to our great grandfather William Trewin.

Intrigued, I decided to dig around for some more information about this line of the family about which little was known.

One discovery was a biography about  William Trewin (1845-1916) which I came across in the Memorial Cyclopedia of New Jersey, Ed. Mary Depue Ogden, Vol. III, (Newark: Memorial History Company, 1917). It can be found at Internet Archives. From this bio I was able to learn not only that he had the amazing privilege of meeting Pres. Abraham Lincoln while serving for the Commissary Dept. during the Civil War, but also was able to confirm the details found in the handwritten note as to where in England he and his parents had come from and how and when they ended up in New Jersey.

As confirmed by the bio, William Trewin’s parents were Thomas J. Trewin and Mary Anne Phillips Trewin of Woolwich, England, which at the time of William’s birth (March 21, 1845) was located in the county of Kent. Today it is part of London. If the handwritten note is accurate, Thomas would have been born circa 1817 and Mary circa 1819. Thomas is described in the bio as “the builder and founder of one of the first Wesleyan Methodist chapels erected in London.” I tried to research that angle online, but have yet to find details connecting him to the construction of a Wesleyan Methodist chapel in London. The bio confirms that Thomas and Mary Anne Trewin moved their family to Canada in 1857. William would have been 12. They lived in Toronto and two years later resettled in New Jersey.

The names of William’s two other siblings I have from a genealogy passed down by family: Thomas and Emma. Emma married Francis C. Ludey. Together they had a daughter Mary Emma (Minnie). I do not have any information yet as to what happened to Thomas. Note: Of the two siblings, only Emma is mentioned in the bio as having survived William at the time of his death in 1916.

William was married first to Edith H. Fry, daughter of Judge Asa Fry of Jersey City. Together they had two sons, William Clarence Trewin and Albert Phillips Trewin. Some time after Edith passed away (1879), William married Miss Elizabeth Sargent, also of Jersey City. Together they had one daughter, Zillah.

More on the Trewins in the next post.

Categories: Jersey City, Hudson Co., Lincoln, President Abraham, Ludey, Quebec City, Quebec, Sargent, The Ion, Trewin, Wesleyan Methodist, Woolwich, Greater London | Leave a comment

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