Ryman

The Pre-1900s Weekday Wedding – Past Wedding Traditions

Dress, Evening; 1850-1855; silk, cotton; Metropolitan Museum of Art (accession no. 2009.300.921a, b); visit http://www.metmuseum.org

A while back I read an article on pre-twentieth-century weddings and how the bride would not wear white or have a special dress made, but would appear in her very best dress, whatever color of dress that may have been–black, brown, dark green, and so on. Black would have been handy because it could do double duty as mourning attire. Plaids and florals were also very popular at one time. The idea of purchasing a dress that would only be worn once would have seemed very wasteful, apart from probably being prohibitively expensive (a white dress even more so–imagine trying to clean it without today’s technologies).

Wedding Ensemble, 1878, American, silk, Metropolitan Museum of Art (accession no. 2009.300.18a, b); visit http://www.metmuseum.org

It was only when Queen Victoria married Prince Albert in 1840 in a white satin gown specially made for the occasion, that brides began clamoring for white gowns, but a trend did not really come about until the late 1800s when such dresses could be better produced, transported, and marketed to the public, and were more affordable for the everyday woman.

Weddings often took place in the evening at the home of the bride, often on weekdays, particularly on Thursday evenings. This allowed the work of the day (weekends included), whether on the farm or elsewhere, to be accomplished and livelihoods thus maintained.

Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

A handy day of week calendar allows you to take any date in history and find out what day of the week it was.  I decided to randomly check on some wedding dates I have in my database to see on which days weddings most often fell. As you can see, at least in my little random sample, they fell on all days of the week apart from Friday, with Thursday edging out the other days. And, while June is now the most popular month for weddings, I only found three ceremonies that fell in that month.

Sunday
John Woodruff and Mary Ogden Earl, 2/16/1817
Thomas Trewin and Mary Anne Phillips, 1/27/1839
James W. Angus and Anna Carpenter, 2/27/1870

Monday
John Woodruff and Sarah Cooper, 10/25/1683

Tuesday
George Wills and Mary Pitt Capon, 4/14/1812
Capt. Daniel Brodhead and Hester Wyngart, 9/19/1719
Calvin Easton Brodhead and Laura Leisenring, 12/6/1870
James Easton Brodhead and Harriet Boyd, 5/1/1877
Sampson Wills and Ann Gadsden, 9/22/1789

Wednesday
Francis Woodruff and Mary Jane Trowbridge, 11/12/1845
AJ Brodhead and Ophelia Easton, 12/31/1845
Austin F. Knowles and Mary M. Angus, 9/4/1867

Thursday
Henry Jaques, Sr. and Anna Knight, 10/8/1648
Henry Jaques, Jr. and Hannah Trueman, 4/10/1670
Lt. Garret Brodhead and Jane Davis, 3/15/1759
Garret Brodhead and Cornelia Dingman, 11/25/1813
William Earl Woodruff and Wealthy Ann Angus, 6/20/1872
Robert Packer Brodhead and Frances Loveland, 5/23/1889
Frank Ludey and Metta Ryman, 6/18/1896
Minnie Ludey and Herbert Duryea Crane, 9/24/1897

Saturday
Capt. Richard Brodhead and Magdalena Jansen, 4/19/1692
Timothy Woodruff and Elizabeth Parsons, 9/25/1739
James Winans Angus and Wealthy Ann Jaques, 1/26/1839
Frank Brodhead and Fannie Woodruff, 6/6/1908

For an interesting article on wedding fashions, visit the Monroe County [PA] Historical Society’s site.

I’ll close by including some wedding announcements of various family members. Two have appeared in previous posts, but the other two (of the Ludey siblings) are appearing in this blog for the first time. Wish we had some photos!

Brodhead-Woodruff Wedding Announcement (Probably clipped from the Elizabeth Daily Journal) - from our family's private archives

Brodhead-Woodruff Wedding Announcement (Probably clipped from the Elizabeth Daily Journal) – from our family’s private archives

Brodhead-Loveland Marriage Announcement, 1889

Frank T. Ludey Jr. (1871-1900), age 21  (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Frank T. Ludey Jr. (1871-1900), age 21 (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Ludey-Ryman Wedding, The New York Times, 6/19/1896

Mary ("Minnie") Emma Ludey (1873-1938), age 21 (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Mary (“Minnie”) Emma Ludey (1873-1938), age 21 (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Herbert Duryea Crane  (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Herbert Duryea Crane (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Ludey-Crane Marriage, Jersey City, The Evening Journal, 9/24/1897

Ludey-Crane Marriage, Jersey City, The Evening Journal, 9/24/1897

Categories: Angus, Brodhead, Crane, Dingman, Easton, Jaques, Knowles, Ludey, Phillips, Ryman, Trewin, Trowbridge, Weddings, Woodruff | Leave a comment

Typhoid Fever Claimed Frank T. Ludey

Frank T. Ludey Jr. (1871-1900), photo taken in 1892 at age 29

Typhoid fever–that was the cause of death of Frank T. Ludey, who died in Summit, NJ, on January 11, 1900, after a sixteen-day illness. The death certificate arrived in the mail on Tuesday from the New Jersey Department of Health Archives and solves the mystery as to what took Frank at such a young age. Sadly he was affected before a vaccine appeared nine years later that, combined with improvements in sanitation, drastically reduced the number of typhoid cases in the US.

Per the CDC website, while there are relatively few cases these days here, in the developing world, over twenty million are affected annually with a 10-30 percent mortality rate. Where Frank may have contracted the bacteria Salmonella enterica, of course, we don’t know. The death certificate lists his occupation as “Commercial Traveler” (a.k.a. salesman); I can’t imagine that his travels took him outside the country but one never knows. According to the CDC, in 1900, “the incidence of typhoid fever was approximately 100 per 100,000 population; by 1920, it had decreased to 33.8…”

This image is a work of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, part of the US Dept.of Health and Human Services. As a work of the US federal government, the image is in the public domain.

“Typhoid Fever And Its Prevention In Town and Country” Virginia Health Bulletin vol. 3, #6, June 1911 (VCU Tompkins-McCaw Special Collections; used with permission under Creative Commons 2.0 Generic license) 

Typhoid can only be transmitted from human to human. According to Wikipedia, “the bacteria which causes typhoid fever may be spread through poor hygiene habits and public sanitation conditions, and sometimes also by flying insects feeding on feces.”

If left to run its course, the illness develops in four stages, each one lasting about a week. That Frank died in just over two, one can only imagine what sort of suffering he must have gone through. How horrible for his family and young wife to have to stand by helplessly as he suffered. It’s so tragic, and though he has been gone for 112 years now (hard to believe!), I can’t help but feel sad for him and his family.

I noticed on Wikipedia that typhoid fever has claimed a number of famous victims including Abigail Adams, wife of President John Adams; William Wallace Lincoln, third son of President Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln; and Wilbur Wright of the famed Wright Brothers. It’s thought that typhoid fever may have wiped out the colony of Jamestown.

Illustration from The New York American, 1909  (Public Domain)

Not everyone who contracted it died, however. Some people were carriers of the disease without being affected themselves–the most notorious arguably being Typhoid Mary, a New York chef, who transmitted the bacteria to fifty-three, resulting in three deaths. Carriers were often institutionalized and many went mad from their confinement. At one point, Mary was released if she promised never again to work as a cook, which she did. Some time later, however, another outbreak occurred and it was traced back to her again (she had been working under a pseudonym). She spent the last 24 years of her life in quarantine on an island before succumbing to pneumonia.

So travelers today to the developing world are wise to get vaccinated beforehand.

Some tips from the CDC website under the heading “Boil it, cook it, peel it, or forget it”:

  • “If you drink water, buy it bottled or bring it to a rolling boil for 1 minute before you drink it. Bottled carbonated water is safer than uncarbonated water.”
  • “Ask for drinks without ice unless the ice is made from bottled or boiled water. Avoid popsicles and flavored ices that may have been made with contaminated water.”
  • “Eat foods that have been thoroughly cooked and that are still hot and steaming.”
  • “Avoid raw vegetables and fruits that cannot be peeled. Vegetables like lettuce are easily contaminated and are very hard to wash well.”
  • “When you eat raw fruit or vegetables that can be peeled, peel them yourself. (Wash your hands with soap first.) Do not eat the peelings.”
  • “Avoid foods and beverages from street vendors. It is difficult for food to be kept clean on the street, and many travelers get sick from food bought from street vendors.”

Oh dear, that last one reminds me of a disastrous few days spent in Paris in 1985. No doubt everyone has one story or another on the subject. Perhaps, it’s best to leave the topic behind.

Back to Frank, I wish we knew more about him and his young wife Metta who survived him by many years (she died in 1952). Perhaps in time, we’ll discover more clues. May they both rest in peace.

Categories: Death Certificates, Ludey, Ryman, Trewin | Leave a comment

Emma Trewin Ludey

The youngest of the three Trewin siblings was Emma. She was born on 4 May 1850 in England.  I found this date of birth in the leaflet distributed to guests at her funeral.

Emma Trewin Ludey funeral leaflet

According to this leaflet, her birthplace was “Cambellwell,” but I believe this was probably meant to be Camberwell as the former does not appear to exist, and the latter is situated in South London to the west of Woolwich Arsenal, which is where Emma’s father, Thomas Trewin, worked until the family emigrated to Canada in 1857.

Distance from Woolwich to Camberwell

Emma would have been 9 years old when her family relocated to Jersey City, NJ, from Toronto, Canada, where they had been living for the two years following their arrival in Quebec from England. On 15 February 1871, Emma, then 20 years of age, married Francis C. Ludey in Elizabeth, NJ. Together they had six children. I know this because the 1900 Census, which lists her incorrectly as “Susan Ludy,” states that there were six children altogether but that only two were living as of the 1900 Census (Mary Emma and Louisa). The couple spent a number of years living in Bayonne, NJ.

William & Elizabeth Trewin and Francis & Emma Ludey on Holiday, Bethlehem, PA, 1915 (Image from my family’s personal collection)

From what I have pieced together, the children were:

Francis T. Ludey, born in 1871. He married Metta S. Ryman on 18 June 1896 in Summit. NJ. Less than four years later, Francis (aka Frank) passed away. NJ Deaths and Burials shows a Frank T. Ludry passing away in Summit, NJ, on 11 January 1899. The occupation listed was “C Traveller.” I have no idea what that meant, unless “C” meant “Sea” in which case, perhaps he worked on ships? I believe this “Ludry” spelling to be a typo as “r” and “e” are neighbors on the keyboard and the birth year listed in the record (1871) fits with census records that estimate the year of birth as 1872. Our old family cemetery records show a Frank Ludey being buried in the family plot in Evergreen Cemetery on 13 January 1900. Perhaps the family had the year mistakenly written down as 1900? I have not checked with the cemetery yet. But in any case, a death on the 11th of the month would make a burial on the 13th plausible. (Update 4/14/12: see later posts on Frank T. Ludey which include cause of death)

Online, I found Metta working as a kindergarten teacher in 1896, as staff librarian at Pratt Institute in 1901, and from 1915-1920 working as the librarian-in-charge at Jarvie Memorial Library in Bloomfield, NJ. The 1920 Census shows her as a widow living with her parents in Essex, NJ. She died on 8 July 1952 and was buried with her parents, Charles S. Ryman and Mary Wells, in Milford Cemetery, Milford, Pike Co., PA. The grave can be found on Find a Grave’s website. I believe Metta lived most of her adult life as a widow since women back then typically gave up employment upon getting married and she obviously developed quite a career as a librarian. And being buried with her parents would also indicate she had lived most of her life as a single person. I would certainly be interested in knowing more about Frank Ludey and how/why he passed away so young. Update (1/3/2012): see photo of Frank in later post; click here.

Mary Emma Ludey (aka “Minnie”), born on 5 February 1873, in Elizabeth. She is also buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Hillside. Minnie was married twice, first to Herbert Duryea Crane (a life insurance salesman per the 1900 census; you must open the original census document to find that out) in Bayonne, NJ, on 23 September 1897 (I just love the NJ Marriage record which has his first name spelled “Herebert” and her surname spelled “Lendey”! See why you have to be creative with your searches?!). They had a daughter named Metta Beryl who was born in 1899. Minnie eventually divorced and was living at 17 West 32nd Street in Bayonne, NJ, when she met and married her second husband Lynn Everett Jennison, a professor of history at Bayonne High School, in April 1916. According to the announcement in the NY Times, Professor Jennison was Minnie’s daughter’s instructor and they became acquainted during a parent-teacher conference to discuss the daughter’s progress. The article refers to the daughter as May. I do not know yet whether this was daughter Metta Beryl’s nickname which she may have gone by in everyday life.  The Professor, who’d been a widower, had two daughters from his first marriage with Hestis Jennison: Eleanor S. Jennison (b. circa 1905) and Amelia W. Jennison (b. circa 1906). The 1920 Census showed the couple living in Bayonne. By 1930 they had relocated to Elizabeth, NJ. Mary Emma Ludey passed away on 20 October 1938 at the age of 65.  Lynne Jennison survived her by almost 30 years. He passed away in Duval, Florida, in June 1967 at the age of  88.

Louise Beryl Ludey was born circa 1875 in Union Co., NJ. She married George Bonney (b. 1873) on 13 January 1894 in Port Richmond, NY. The 1900 Census shows a son Harold L. Bonney (b. 1896) and Dorothy B. Bonney (b. June 1898; married Jonathan Beltz; daughter Elenor, b. 1929). At the time the family was living in Bayonne City, Hudson Co., NJ, and George was working as a boiler maker. In addition, Rhode Island Births and Christening records show a son, Francis George Bonney, born on 24 November 1905. The 1910 Census shows the family still living in Providence, Rhode Island, with George still working as a boiler maker.

William W.F. Ludey was born on 11 July 1877 in Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ. According to cemetery records he was buried that same day. See below.

Another child was born on 16 September 1878 per NJ Births and Christening records. Though no name is given in the record, I believe this was Anna L. Ludey who was buried on 28 December 1878. Our family cemetery records state that William W.F. Ludey and Anna L. Ludey died very young and were buried with their grandparents, one child sharing the plot with grandfather Thomas J. Trewin, and the other child sharing a plot with grandmother Mary Phillips Trewin.

Note: The 1880 Census for “Frank Ludy” and Emma Ludy” shows a daughter Lulu Ludey born in 1876. I suspect that “Lulu” and Louisa may be one in the same person. Or Lulu could have been the sixth child about whom Emma Ludey referred in the 1900 census.

___________________________

Emma lived with her daughter Mary Emma “Minnie” Jennison and Mary’s husband Lynn Jennison after Francis Ludey passed away, in Bayonne, NJ, and then in Elizabeth, NJ. Emma died at age 83 on 9 June 1933 in Elizabeth, NJ. She was buried three days later in Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, alongside her husband Francis C. Ludey. Some more about him in the next post.

Emma Trewin Ludey, obituary notices

Categories: Bayonne, Census Records, Elizabeth, Union Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Jennison, Ludey, Obituaries, Ryman, Trewin, US Federal 1880, US Federal 1900, US Federal 1910, US Federal 1920 | Leave a comment

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