Wills

George Wills’ descendants in the US — another update

George Wills, 1793-1856, Image from our private family archives. George Wills’ original portrait was inherited by his daughter Martha according to his will.

Quite a long time ago, I did a number of posts on Wills family descendants in the US, specifically George and Mary Wills’ daughter and son-in-law Mary and William Sargent (original surname = Slaymaker) and their children: my great grandmother Elizabeth Sargent and her siblings Samuel, Sarah (Sadie) and William.  Of all the children, I knew the least about Sadie. From George Wills’ Descendants in America — An Update:

I discovered some census records that revealed that Sarah went by the name Sadie, and that she was married to Richard O. Hemion, a machinist, who was born in 1857 in Rockland County, NY,  to John and Catharine Hemion. In 1880, he was working as a cigar maker in Jersey City, NJ, and living with an older sister, Amelia Curyansen, and her family.  [I saw some message boards stating the surname was actually Auryansen, and was misspelled in that record. Auryansen is a Dutch surname, and evidently the history of the family in America goes way back.] It is in Jersey City that he must have become acquainted with Sadie. According to the 1900 census, they were married in roughly 1882. The pair settled in East Rutherford, NJ, and had four children: Cora, Mabel, Everett, and Edith (see below for dates). By 1920, Sadie is listed as a widow and living with children Cora and Everett, by then in their thirties.

Several months ago I spotted a public tree for the Hemion family on Ancestry. It had the wrong Sarah Sargent, a mistake that was logical given the family changed their name from Slaymaker before emigrating to the US after the Civil War. I was able to reach the tree’s owner to notify them of the error, and then we started sharing information. Turns out he and his brother are great-grandsons of Sadie and Richard, and they’d had scant information passed down to them about Sadie’s roots. I was able to share all the information in this blog with them.

At some point the brothers hope to locate the photo they have of Sadie; a recent move has temporarily displaced it. They did say that their mother Ruth Ramp remembered her grandmother as having very long waist-length snow-white hair and that she had worked as a pastry chef but had never had enough patience at home to teach her children the craft.

We also managed to find a date of death for Sadie and her husband and find their burial places as well as those of some other family members. Most are in Hillside Cemetery, Lyndhurst, New Jersey.

Below is an updated tree:

1-Sarah (Sadie) Sargent b. Jul 1860, St. Sepulchre, Northampton, 
  Northamptonshire, England, d. 12 Jul 1935, East Rutherford, Bergen, New 
  Jersey, Bur. 15 Jul 1935, Hillside Cemetery, Lyndhurst, Bergen Co., NJ
 + Richard Osborn Hemion b. Feb 1857, Rockland Co., New York, d. 15 Jun 1911, 
  Bur. 18 Jun 1911, Hillside Cemetery, Lyndhurst, Bergen Co., NJ
|-----2-Cora S. Hemion b. May 1883, Middletown, New York, d. 4 Feb 1959, Bergen 
|       Pines Hospital, East Rutherford, Bergen, New Jersey, Bur. Hillside 
|       Cemetery, Lyndhurst, Bergen Co., NJ
|-----2-Mabel Hemion b. 1 Aug 1885, New York, d. Dec 1974, New Jersey
|      + Edward N. De Blayker b. 4 May 1878, Passaic, NJ, d. After 1942
|     |-----3-Edward Harold De Blayker b. 25 Dec 1914, New Jersey, d. 23 Jun 
|     |       1980, East Rutherford, Bergen, New Jersey
|     |-----3-Gladys C. De Blayker b. Abt 1917, New Jersey, d. 5 Nov 1974
|     |      + Vincent H. Krieger 
|     |-----3-Sadie De Blayker b. Cir 1920, New Jersey, d. After 5 Nov 1974
|            + Dietrich 
|-----2-Everett Osborn Hemion b. 9 Nov 1887, East Rutherford, New Jersey, d. 7 
|       Nov 1940, Bur. Hillside Cemetery, Rutherford, Bergen Co., NJ
|-----2-Edith Amelia Hemion b. Aug 1889, New Jersey, d. 15 Apr 1948, 
|       Rutherford, Bergen, New Jersey, Bur. 19 Apr 1948, Hillside Cemetery, 
|       Lyndhurst, Bergen Co., NJ
       + Frederick Sampson Ramp b. 30 Jan 1895, New York, d. 9 Apr 1967, East 
        Rutherford, Bergen, New Jersey, USA, Bur. 11 Apr 1967, Hillside 
        Cemetery, Lyndhurst, Bergen Co., NJ
      |-----3-Edith A. Ramp b. 1919, d. 16 Oct 1924, Bur. Hillside Cemetery, 
      |       Lyndhurst, Bergen Co., NJ
      |-----3-Ramp b. 1922, d. 13 Apr 1922, Bur. 20 Apr 1922, Hillside 
      |       Cemetery, Lyndhurst, Bergen Co., NJ
      |-----3-Frederick Ramp III 
      |-----3-Ruth Hemion Ramp b. 4 Sep 1927, East Rutherford, New Jersey, d. 7 
      |       Jul 2017, Low Moor, VA
             + William David Jeffery b. 13 Jul 1922, White Plains, NY, d. 4 Jan 
              1967, Wingdale, Dutchess, NY
             + Rev. Robert Wanstall
Categories: Hemion, Hillside Cemetery Lyndhurst NJ, Lyndhurst, New Jersey, Sargent, Slaymaker, Trewin, Wills | Leave a comment

Family history bits & bobs

Hello, and Happy New Year, family members, near and far.

I disappeared towards the end of 2019, so apologies for that, but my husband and I were in South Korea again to further investigate the situation surrounding his adoption many years ago. I’d hoped to do a post or two in the run up to Christmas, but time slipped away from me. You know how that goes, I’m sure. And now it is already mid-January! Yikes!

Today’s post is for folks following the various family lines covered by this blog, specifically Brodhead;  McGlasson; Wills; Slaymaker (Sargent); Wirsig; Hemion; and Cushman.  I learned a few bits and bobs over the course of last year that I did not manage to share in the blog, so here goes—in no particular order!

Eva Wilder McGlasson Brodhead

Eva Wilder Brodhead (The Book Buyer: A Summary of American and Foreign Literature, Volume XIII, February 1896 – January 1897 (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons) – page 457)

Some of you may remember my post where I wondered whether Eva had indeed married a McGlasson or that that was just a pen name she used. I recently heard from author Michael McGlasson who is doing research on the McGlasson family. He forwarded an email he received from the Kenton County Public Library in Covington, KY: “According to the Hamilton County, Ohio marriage records, Eva Wilder married William F. McGlasson on 29 May 1882.  Apparently the couple lived for some time in Wyoming, Ohio until Eva filed for divorce in October 1891. Neglect and infidelity were given as the reasons for her plea.” So yes, Eva was married to a McGlasson at the age of 12. Michael went on to say: “I also found out that Mr. McGlasson was some sort of salesman and was away from home quite often. Seems that he had a penchant for the ladies. Apparently, Eva and her husband lived in Wyoming, Ohio, which is directly across the border from Covington, Kentucky. It is , as the old say goes, close enough to spit that far. I believe since Eva was only 12 years old (her grave marker in Colorado also states that she was born in 1870), she eloped to Ohio, perhaps because she “had to.” After returning to Covington after her divorce, she met up with Mr. Brodhead and began her literary career.” Many thanks, Michael, for sharing this information.

Sarah (Sadie) Sargent (name change from Slaymaker) Hemion
Eons ago I did a post about the Sargent family, my great-grandmother’s side of the family on my mother’s side. William and Mary (Wills) Sargent emigrated to the US after the Civil War. There were four children: Elizabeth, Samuel, Sadie and William. Sadie married into the Hemion family and lived in East Rutherford, NJ. At the time of that post, and long thereafter, I kept my eye out for Hemions on Ancestry who could be/were linked to Sarah. Over the summer, I spotted the correct tree, however, the incorrect Sarah Sargent had been linked to. I contacted the tree’s owners, Fred and Bruce, who turned out to be great grandsons of Sadie’s via her daughter Edith, and advised them of the correct Sarah. Not knowing the family changed their name from Slaymaker to Sargent prior to leaving England, the wrong Sarah had entered their tree. In the process of our communications, we managed to sort out where Sarah, her husband Richard O. Hemion, and two of their children are buried: Hillside Cemetery in Lyndhurst, NJ – Section A, Lot: 141. Fred and Bruce promised to send a photo of Sadie when they find the one they recall seeing in the past. A recent move had temporarily displaced it. If they find it and give me permission, I will share it here.

Hemion Family in 1900 Census

Wheat Plains, the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

Garret Brodhead’s Wheat Plains farmhouse
For anyone who does not yet know the great news, the Wheat Plains farmhouse is being restored by the National Park Service. A long time ago I lamented its dilapidated state in this post. Fortunately, the Depuy/Brodhead Family Association took the home under its wings and diligently worked with the NPS to see to it that the house got saved before any further deterioration could occur. Members have undertaken a number of volunteer work days at the house during their summer reunion gatherings and are engaged in researching grants and other fundraisers. Renovations now in the works: a new slate roof, re-paneled and glazed windows, and a fresh coat of paint.  Anyone wanting more information or interested in getting involved, email: depuy.brodhead.family.assoc@gmail.com.

Captain Henry D. Wirsig –

Elizabeth Daily Journal, Saturday Evening, March 17, 1945

I was very grateful for a December message on this blog from Sandra Pattelisse, informing me that Henry Wirsig’s grave in Belgium is in good hands: “Hello, I’ve been the “godmother” of Henry’s grave in Henri-Chapelle for about 12 years. As I live not far from the cemetery I regularly bring him flowers. Years ago, I was given the address of members of Henry’s family. I wrote to them but got no answer. I would be very glad to be able to contact some member of his family just to let them know someone here in Belgium takes care of his grave, that he’s not forgotten. Yesterday was the anniversary of his death. It was a sweet sunny day and I brought him white roses. I hope maybe you’ll be able to help me.” I did manage to research and find addresses via the White Pages to give to Sandra and emailed them accordingly. I hope she received them and manages to make contact. Henry, who boarded at my grandparents house prior to the War (see this post), was a very special fellow. It really is wonderful to know there are volunteers like Sandra who are visiting and remembering America’s fallen on foreign lands. Thank you, Sandra!

Life magazine cover from 1904

Eleazar Cushman and the Mayflower Link –
I have yet to officially link my 3rd-great-grandmother Wealthy Cushman (m. Isaac Jaques) to Eleazar although all the circumstantial evidence I’ve come across so far points to him being her father and the son of Seth and Abiah Cushman. That would solve the ongoing Mayflower mystery since Seth Cushman was the great-grandson of Mayflower passenger Mary Allerton. But I managed to make contact with Ruthie Brown of the Connecticut Gravestone Network, who is truly a marvel, and she promised to keep Eleazar on her radar. She also reached out to a Keeney family expert (Eleazer’s widow Mercy married Timothy Keeney). So this topic is now on his radar as well. This was my last post on the subject.

That’s all for today, I think. Have a good weekend. It is expected to be quite blustery here with a cold front heading down to S. Florida on Monday. We may finally have a chance to put on our sweaters!

Categories: Brodhead, Cushman, East Rutherford, Bergen Co., Hemion, Keeney, McGlasson, Sargent, Slaymaker, United States, Wills | 4 Comments

G. S. V. Wills book now available on Archives.org

GSV Wills Family – image from my copy of the Jubilee souvenir book

Just a quick heads-up to let folks know that the book A Jubilee Souvenir: The Work of G. S. V. Wills and the Westminster College of Chemistry and Pharmacy is now available for viewing on Archives.org.

Some may recall that I uploaded all the pages to this blog a number of years ago. I guess I am free to delete those pages now!!!

For past posts on the George Sampson Valentine Wills family, please use the search box or click on “Wills” in the left column under “Surnames.”

 

 

 

Categories: England, London, South Croydon, London, Wills | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Sargent / Wills – quick update

In a recent post, I provided this update:

Sargent / Wills: I have located the final resting places of William Sargent and his first wife (my second great-grandmother Mary Wills Sargent) and his second wife (Mary Bowley Pitt). Their surname was Slaymaker until they changed it to Sargent when moving to the US after the Civil War. I was correct to think that they were in or around Hudson County, New Jersey—they are in what is known today as Bayview-New York Bay Cemetery. I have requested photos on Find a Grave, but that can take time. (For a past post on the family: click here)

Well, I may have been partly wrong about that. Mary Wills Sargent is indeed buried there in Grave no. 953, Row 6, Section O North, in a plot purchased for her by her husband William Sargent upon her death on 6 December 1877, but she is all by herself. The whereabouts of William and his second wife Mary Bowley Pitt are unclear. I suspect they are in that cemetery somewhere, but unfortunately I do not have death dates for either of them, and according to the pleasant lady I spoke with at the cemetery, the only way for them to do look-ups is with a death date. Apparently, a fire destroyed many of the older records, and a name is not enough. So (sigh) I am placing William and Mary II back on my “brick wall.”

I know it may sound strange, but I am a bit bothered by the fact that Mary Wills Sargent is alone in that plot. I’m very curious to learn whether there is a marker, and if so, what it says. If only Google Earth could zoom to that level. Fingers crossed a Find a Grave volunteer checks for me when they have time.

1919 map showing partial view of eastern side of Greenville Section of Jersey City along the Upper New York Bay, CM Hopkins & Co. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

1919 map showing partial view of eastern side of Greenville Section of Jersey City along the Upper New York Bay, CM Hopkins & Co. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

Categories: Jersey City, Hudson Co., Sargent, Wills | Tags: , | 3 Comments

The grave situation

Well, time marches on and I don’t always remember to do updates on previous posts and my ‘brick walls,’ so I will take the time to do this today, at least with regards to ‘grave’ news—no not bad news, just cemetery news!

Sargent / Wills: I have located the final resting places of William Sargent and his first wife (my second great-grandmother Mary Wills Sargent) and his second wife (Mary Bowley Pitt). Their surname was Slaymaker until they changed it to Sargent when moving to the US after the Civil War. I was correct to think that they were in or around Hudson County, New Jersey—they are in what is known today as Bayview-New York Bay Cemetery. I have requested photos on Find a Grave, but that can take time. (For a past post on the family: click here)

Trewin: Also located (no thanks to me) was the grave location for William Clarence Trewin (my grandmother’s step-brother): Locustwood Memorial Park, Cherry Hill, Camden County, New Jersey. According to the descendants who discovered it, the grave is unmarked. (For a past post mentioning William Clarence, click here.)

De La Flechelle: I was delighted that a volunteer found the time to photograph the De La Flechelle graves in the churchyard of the First Presbyterian Church in Woodbridge, NJ. I spent a lot of time researching this family (past post is here), so it’s nice to see them all together and permanently memorialized on Find a Grave.

Still looking for:

  • John Romeyn Brodhead and wife – final resting place – this is the son of Andrew Jackson Brodhead and Ophelia Easton (not the historian John Romeyn Brodhead) – graves are possibly in Buffalo, NY area.
  • Final resting place of Juebb (Jacob) Lewis — husband of Margaret Wait Lewis; father of Sarah Augusta Lewis who married Moses Martin.
Categories: Cemeteries, de la Flechelle, Sargent, Trewin, Wills | Tags: , | 6 Comments

One Sargent (Slaymaker) family mystery solved—thanks to note about a button hook

Wikimedia Commons: Early 20th-century steel button hook with an art nouveau cherub design sterling silver handle. Author Sobebunny; 2009-0118.

Wikimedia Commons: Early 20th-century steel button hook with an art nouveau cherub design sterling silver handle. Author Sobebunny; 2009-0118.

Zillah Trewin, 1907, several years after 'Aunt Jennie' passed away

Zillah Trewin, 1907, several years after ‘Aunt Jennie’ passed away

Don’t you just love those ancestors to pieces who had the presence of mind to sit down and record notes about your family history? How fabulous it is to have those records. Don’t think you have any? Well, maybe not, but if you inherited boxes of papers you have yet to go through, you may just come across some real gems. My advice is to share them and preserve them as fast as you can.

My grandmother Zillah Trewin is one such angel in our family tree. Bless her heart. And yesterday, I came upon a piece of paper in an old file folder. The tides of time and multiple moves over a half century or more had separated it from the other notes she left behind. This paper has resolved one family mystery that emerged for me two years ago. I spoke about it in the post Cemetery Reveals New Mysteries about Sargent Family.

In that post I was left pondering whether my 2nd great grandfather William (Slaymaker) Sargent and his son William (Zillah’s uncle) had married sisters after the elder William’s first wife Mary Wills (Slaymaker) Sargent (my 2nd great grandmother) died of stomach cancer on 6 December 1877—about seven years after the family changed their name from Slaymaker to Sargent and emigrated to New Jersey from Northampton, England. Yes, I know, that’s a lot to digest. I have to re-read genealogy blog entries several times myself to get the whole ‘who’s who’. So feel free to pause here!

So, yesterday I came upon a yellowed piece of paper with pencil writing that confirmed just that and more! I was over the moon.

Zillah Trewin notes

Zillah Trewin notes from our family’s private archives

The note mentioned a button hook (for doing up shoes, which were buttoned in those days) belonging to “Aunt Jennie Sargent” (Sarah Jane Bowley, wife of William the son):

Button hook belonging to Aunt Jennie Sargent, my mother’s youngest brother’s wife. She was born in 1849, died 1904. She lived with us [in Jersey City, Hudson Co.] winters from the time Uncle Will died in 1896 [of ‘debilitation of the heart’] until she died when with us January 6, 1904. Spent summers with her sister at Manchester VT. She had the button hook from my earliest remembrance. Uncle Will was 7 when mother’s mother died and mother brought him up and [they] were very dear to each other. Aunt J. was youngest sister of Grandpa Sargent’s 2nd wife so father & son married sisters—one oldest and one youngest of 5 girls [Mary Bowley Pitt, widow, b. 1839, and Sarah Jane Bowley, b. 1849].

Now, I still don’t know where Wm Sr. and his wives are buried (I am amazed that Zillah and her mom did not pass that info down), but at least I have had my ‘wild’ suspicions confirmed about the father & son marriages to the two sisters. I sure would like to know how all that transpired! Wm Sr. remarried between 1877-1880 and Wm Jr. married in 1890, so I suppose Wm Jr. and Jennie’s romance blossomed over a decade of family gatherings, and although the age gap is a bit eye-opening, I suppose it was not uncommon back then, just as it is not that uncommon today.

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin, Zillah's mother, undated

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin, Zillah’s mother, undated

In any case, it was good to hear how close William was to my great grandmother Elizabeth Sargent Trewin (Zillah’s mom), and that she was critical in overseeing his upbringing after their mother Mary died. And it was wonderful of Elizabeth and her family to take in Jennie after William’s death. Zillah’s timeline is off, however, in that William Jr. could not have been 7 when Mary died. My records indicate that he was about 15 (an age corroborated by his death record); Elizabeth would have been 23 at the time. But perhaps Mary’s illness was a very extended one and Elizabeth took a leading role in his care from a much younger age.

Now, if an old button hook turns up one day, I’ll know who it belongs to!  Keep checking those old files and boxes!

William Trewin, Zillah's father, taken in 1895

William Trewin, Zillah’s father, taken in 1895

William Sargent Sr. circa 1869/70

William Sargent Sr. circa 1869/70

Categories: Death, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Jersey City, Hudson Co., Sargent, Trewin, Wills | Leave a comment

Rebuilding London’s Crystal Palace

Crystal Palace General view from Water Temple, 1854. Author: Philip Henry Delamotte, Negretti and Zambra (Wikimedia Commons: PD-Art, copyright expired 70+ years ago)

Crystal Palace General view from Water Temple, 1854. Author: Philip Henry Delamotte, Negretti and Zambra (Wikimedia Commons: PD-Art, copyright expired 70+ years ago)

I just read in The Telegraph of London’s plans to rebuild the famed Crystal Palace, which was built in Hyde Park for the Great Exhibition of 1851 and later relocated to South London. There in 1936, it was destroyed by a massive fire. To view the October 3rd online article & accompanying video clip, which includes animated schematics of the planned rebuild, click here.

You may recall that this blog mentioned the Crystal Palace once before. It was there that famous chemist George S. V. Wills‘ granddaughter Dorothy Hope Wills (m. Frederick James Warren) played piano with the Palace’s orchestra.

A Chinese investment firm is responsible for the redevelopment which will also include the restoration of the vast grounds and gardens. Work is expected to begin in winter 2015.

Once the reconstruction is complete, I imagine it will be extremely exciting for Dorothy’s descendants to visit and get a sense of the wonderful world in which she adored sharing her enormous musical talent with the visiting public.

Dorothy Hope Wills wedding to Frederick Warren, circa 1920

Dorothy Hope Wills’ wedding to Frederick Warren, circa 1920 (Photo from personal family collection of Colin Newton)

Crystal Palace interior during the Great Exhibition of 1851. (Wikimedia Commons: PD-1923 – published before 1923 and public domain in the US)

Crystal Palace interior during the Great Exhibition of 1851. (Wikimedia Commons: PD-1923 – published before 1923 and public domain in the US)

Plan of Crystal Park Palace in 1857 (Wikimedia Commons: Public domain in US; copyright expired 70+ years ago)

Plan of Crystal Park Palace in 1857 (Wikimedia Commons: Public domain in US; copyright expired 70+ years ago)

Categories: London, Wills | 4 Comments

Traces of Our Slaymakers in Northamptonshire

The Northampton Mercury, 26 January 1861

The Northampton Mercury, 26 January 1861

George Wills died in 1857 and his son-in-law William Slaymaker and daughter Mary removed to Northampton to head a stone masonry business there. With them were their daughter Elizabeth (my great grandmother) who would have been six at the time the above ad appeared; son Samuel who would have been about eight (he went on to be a well-known Methodist minister affiliated with Ocean Grove, NJ); and daughter Sarah (a.k.a. Sadie) who would have been just a baby. Son William appeared in 1861, probably after this ad was placed. I’ve done quite a few posts about them already. When they emigrated to the US in 1870, they changed their last name to ‘Sargent.’ The family settled in Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ. I’ve found a few more traces of their Northamptonshire roots and will share them in future posts.

George Wills, 1793-856, Image from private family archives. George Wills' original portrait was inherited by his daughter Martha according to the will

George Wills, 1793-856, Image from private family archives. George Wills’ original portrait was inherited by his daughter Martha according to the will

William Slaymaker (changed last name to Sargent before moving to the US in 1870)

William Slaymaker (changed last name to Sargent before moving to the US in 1870)

Elizabeth [Slaymaker] Sargent Trewin

Elizabeth [Slaymaker] Sargent Trewin

Rev. Samuel Sargent PhD (image courtesy of Frances S. Cowles)

Rev. Samuel Sargent PhD (image courtesy of Frances S. Cowles)

Categories: Methodist, Northampton, Northamptonshire, Sargent, Slaymaker, Wills | Leave a comment

Sampson Wills’ accidental death in Wolverton, near Stony Stratford

 Commons

All Saints Calverton Church, Wolverton, Buckinghamshire (Attribution: Mr Biz, Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons license)

Holy Trinity Church in Wolverton, Buckinghamshire, England (Attribution: John Salmon, Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons license)

While perusing some old UK newspapers, I came upon a list of coroner’s inquests that included the accidental death of stone mason Sampson Wills, one of my 4th great grandfathers, father of George Wills, and husband of Ann Gadsden.

I’d mentioned Sampson’s tragic accident in a previous post; he had fallen supposedly while attempting to affix the pinnacle of the All Saints Calverton Church in Wolverton (Buckinghamshire, England). His great grandson chemist G.S.V. Wills had documented the accident in his memoirs. G.S.V. gave no exact date, but based on what he’d written, I’d estimated that the death occurred around 1830.

The newspaper article, published in London’s Morning Post* on Wednesday, 18 April 1827, provides more definitive details, thankfully. For one thing, it places Sampson’s death in or before April 1827. I don’t know how long after a death an inquest would take place, but I assume within weeks? Any ideas?

Copyright restrictions prohibit me from including a clipping of the article here, but in a nutshell, it confirms a fall from Calverton Church– specifically from the east pinnacle which had recently been erected. Sampson had been cleaning it when the scaffolding beneath him gave way. The 50-foot fall left him with a serious concussion, and he died two days later.

The article states his age as 63. Unfortunately that throws into question the birth and christening dates I have for him: 26 Dec 1867 and 20 Mar 1768 (at the Holy Trinity Church in Wolverton), respectively; presumed parents: Thomas Wills and Elisabeth Rainbow. As always, just when one question gets answered,  two more appear in its place!

*Note: The results of the coroner’s inquest were also published in the Northampton Mercury and Oxford Journal newspapers at roughly the same time.

Categories: Death, Gadsden, Obituaries, Rainbow, Stony Stratford, Buckinghamshire, Wills, Wolverton, Buckinghamshire | 2 Comments

Martha Nunn Capon – Haploid Group V

Martha Nunn Capon (cir. 1761-1843)

Martha Nunn Capon (cir. 1761-1843)

Well, still looking for the “Pitt connection” mentioned in the last post, but it does seem highly likely that the previously unnamed sitter for this old silhouette was indeed Martha Nunn Capon, my 4th great grandmother and Mary Capon Wills’ mother. I’m pleased because this is the farthest I’ve managed to get back on my maternal line, and this discovery coincides with another one: that genetically, my maternal line is haploid group ‘V’, a subgroup of ‘R0‘. Coincidentally, Benjamin Franklin and Bono are also “Vs”.

According to information provided by http://www.23andme.com, the company through which I had my DNA test, this group “originated in Iberia during the Ice Age. After a last burst of cold conditions roughly 12,000 years ago, migrations carried the haplogroup northward along the Atlantic coast and through central Europe to Scandinavia. Today it is found in a wide variety of populations from the Basques of Spain to the Saami of Finland”.

While I’d always known of my predominantly English, Irish, Dutch, and to a lesser extent German and French ancestry, I could never have imagined that I could have ancestry from Spain or be genetically linked to the Saami.

Haplogroup V - 23andme.com

Haplogroup V – 23andme.com

The amount of information you receive from 23andme on your ancestry is actually quite overwhelming, especially when it comes to deciphering the “lingo” and digesting the list of those genetically related to you. However, none of the 750+ people listed are closer than 3rd-6th cousins. I’m hesitant to start sharing information with people until I have a full grasp of what I am sharing. Hopefully, some day, some closer connections will present themselves. And, by then, I hope I will understand all this a bit better!

I might add that the health information–both the positive and the negative–is also definitely worth having. Definitely take advantage of the $99 offer if you are even mildly interested. You really do find out an extraordinary amount of information. You may even have, as I did, some “a-ha” moments. While reading through some of my genetic traits, I could not help but react with a few “a-ha”s like having a high tolerance of caffeine.

Apparently the V group is relatively rare, found in just about 4% of Europeans, with the biggest concentration in Scandinavia with the Saami (59%).

Mari El Republic in Russia

Mari El Republic in Russia

One other thing that kind of blows my mind as someone who spent a lot of time studying, working, and living in Russia: about 10% of the Mari people of the Volga-Ural region are group V. I actually almost ended up in the vicinity of the Mari who are to the north of the city of Kazan. In the early 1990s, when buying a train ticket to visit friends in Ryazan (3 hours to the southeast of Moscow), the ticket seller thought I said “Kazan” (some 11 hrs to the east). I did not scrutinize my ticket until just before I was leaving. Nor did I scrutinize the price since back then travel was extremely inexpensive by world standards; thankfully I realized the mistake before I boarded the train—an 11 hour train ride would have been quite a rude awakening to say the least.  Now, 20+ years later, I’d actually quite like to go east to visit the home of the Mari. It’s a funny old world, isn’t it?

Categories: Capon, DNA, Franklin, Benjamin, Sargent, Wills | Leave a comment

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Dusty Roots & Forgotten Treasures

Researching, Preserving, and Sharing Genealogical Information For Future Generations

WitzEnd Family History

Adventures in Genealogy of the Witzel and Kroening Families

American in Korea

Everything International

The Genealogist's Craft

My aim is to tell interesting stories of how genealogical information comes to be. Please pull up an armchair ...

omordah.wordpress.com/

Art by Susan M. L. Moore

Lee's Birdwatching Adventures Plus

Birdwatching from a Christian Perspective

Story_Trails

Family history in stories recalled by Edie and Leo. Edith GAYLORD Allen, Leo ALLEN, Jr

Princes, Paupers, Pilgrims & Pioneers

“There are two lasting bequests we can give our children: One is roots, the other is wings.” Teaching children values and giving them the opportunity to excel is essential to good parenting. However, I feel I must also provide my children (and myself) insight into the ones who came before us: our ancestors whose lives and stories have shaped us into who we are. This is my journey; these are their stories…

Myricopia

Exploring the Past to Improve the Future

Buddha Walks Into A Wine Bar ....

Sits down with The Two Doctors and .....

MarileeWein.com

DOUBLE GENEALOGY: the ADOPTION WITNESS

Applegate Genealogy

Helping others discover their roots

allenrizzi

Sempre in Movimento! Published Every Monday and Friday at 12 PM EST

Cooking Without Limits

Food Photography & Recipes

Smart Veg Recipes

Welcome to home made, vegeterian, healthy & kids friendly recipes

ICI & LA NATURE PICTURES

Walk and Bike in France and Europe www.walk-bike-camino.com

The Lives of my Ancestors

Lives, Biographies and Sketches of my Family History

Down the Rabbit Hole with Sir LeprechaunRabbit

Serious about Genealogy? Let this Olde Grey hare show you about

Diggin' Up Graves

Genealogy and family history, dirt and all.

Momoe's Cupboard

Low Budget Meals and Ideas

Generations of Nomads

On the Trail of Family Faces, Places, and Stories Around the World

Your daily Civil War newspaper [est. 1995]

All the Civil War news fit to re-print

Author Adrienne Morris

The Writing Life at Middlemay Farm

Travels with Janet

Just another WordPress.com weblog

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