Woodruff

112-year-old Brodhead family guestbook — post XI

So these are the last pages of the guest book, which entered into use in June 1908 and, as you’ll see, came to a close on May 31,1913.  At that point, my grandparents were both 31, and that was right about when my grandmother gave birth to her second son Frank Martin Brodhead Jr., so now with two babies to tend to who were just a year apart, using the guestbook must have drifted far into the background.

Robert Packer Brodhead

Infant Frank died 11 months later, and the jolliness of the couple’s early years of entertaining vanished as they descended into a deep chasm of grief. A condolence letter from my grandfather’s Uncle Robert Packer Brodhead (shown here) bears witness to the shock waves felt across the family. Robert, too, had lost his namesake—his first-born child Robert Jr. who died of diptheria at 10. The letter of May 24, 1914:

Dear Frank and Fannie: Doug’s message [Andrew Douglas Brodhead, Frank’s father] came, last night after we had gone upstairs, we thot best not to disturb the family and wait until this morning. Well, I can’t tell you how we all with one accord wished we could comfort you, and our hearts went out to each of you as only hearts that have experienced a loss can go— This morning Mr. Haynes preached about the Angels of Heaven, what they did, and said, among other comforting things, that surely the littlest ones who come into the world had an angel assigned them by God. And how comforting it is to think that your little one was just picked up from this old world and wafted up and up and up into the very presence of God where there is no more sighing or crying or aches or pain. Don’t look into the grave, just look up, and let the grace of God which passeth all understanding guide, comfort, and keep you. We all send our tenderest love. Affectionately, Uncle Bob

In October 1917, my grandparents lost their next child, at birth—a little girl who was never given a name. I can’t begin to imagine what impact that must have had on them.  When my Dad appeared in 1921, alive and well, albeit a bit small since he was a bit early, my grandparents must have walked on eggshells with worry for a long time. But, as the initial birthdays passed, the worry must have given way to relief. My Dad was one who lived life to the full, joining the Marines in WWII and learning to fly small planes; his zest for life and adventurous pursuits must have given them pause at times. They definitely nixed his desire to be a commercial pilot, and that was his big regret later in life. He absolutely would have loved that profession.

But, back to these last two pages. Now, it was very interesting to see the name Mrs. Isaac J. Ayers (October 26, 1909) because this was my grandmother’s Aunt Phoebe, the younger sister of William Earl Woodruff, and I have never seen her mentioned anywhere else in all the materials I have—no photos, letters, etc. I have written about the Ayers family previously so click here if you are interested in going to that post.

The remaining five people on the page and the two on the last page:

  • Erwin D. Grace (sp.?) – Jan. 30, 1910 – 587 Westfield Ave. – “With Miller.”
  • Manley Miller – Jan. 30, 1910 – 591 Westfield Ave. – “Nuf Sed”
  • Netta Miller – May 30, 1913 – 591 Westfield Ave. – “I can’t wait to have this again”
  • Mrs. Thomas F. Russum – Jan. 1st 1910 – 806 Colfax St. Evanston, Ill.
  • Mabel T. Dickinson – Nov. 11, 1911
  • Miss Mary Knowles – May 31st 1913
  • Miss Gertrude Knowles – May 31st 1913

I don’t know who Mr. Grace or the Millers were, but Mrs. Thomas F. Russum was the daughter-in-law of Cecelia Bensley Angus Russum, my grandmother’s aunt. You’ve heard me talk about her before.

Mabel T. Dickinson (1880-1967, third child of Dr. John W. Dickinson and Mary Emma Woodruff) was my grandmother’s first cousin and older sister of past visitor Anna Dickinson Lorentz (b. 1886). Mabel never married.

The Knowles house in Elizabeth, NJ

And the last two visitors were the Knowles girls; these must have been granddaughters of Mary Martha Angus Knowles and Austin Fellows Knowles—the folks who lived in that beautiful old house on Elizabeth Avenue. Mary and Austin had six sons. I’ll have to research the names of their children when I have time for that.

So that’s the guestbook! I hope those of you who have followed along have enjoyed seeing all the pages. And, I think it’s good that they are here for future visitors to come across and perhaps stumble into an ancestor or two.

Adieu for now!

Categories: Brodhead, Dickinson, Knowles, Russum, Woodruff | Tags: , | 2 Comments

112-year-old Brodhead family guestbook — post X

We are nearing the end of the guestbook. Here are two of the last four pages.

On the first page shown below, only the name Anna Dickenson Lorentz stands out to me. This was my grandmother’s first cousin on the Woodruff side of the family. Mary Emma Woodruff (1846-1923) was my great-grandfather William Earl Woodruff’s older sister. She married John W. Dickinson (b. 1843), a dentist, in 1874. They had four children: John (b. 1875), Mary (b. 1877), Madel (b. 1880) and Anna (b. 1886). Anna, who was four years younger than my grandmother, married Douglas C. Lorentz sometime after my grandmother’s own wedding on June 8, 1908, as she appears in my grandmother’s list of wedding gifts under her maiden name.

  • Florence A. Thompson – March 7, 1909 – Goshen, NY
  • Mrs. Isabelle S. Van Riper – March 8, 1909 – 210 Park Ave., Paterson, NJ – “Just Jamie and I for a call”
  • Anna Dickenson Lorentz – March 10, 1909 – 60 Ward St., Orange, ?
  • Hazel M. Knott – March 13, 1909 – 256 South Clinton St, East Orange, NJ
  • Harriet N. Ackerman – March 13, 1909 – 154 Rahway Ave., Elizabeth, NJ
  • Nellie E. Baldwin – 931 South St., Elizabeth, NJ

Elizabeth Daily Journal, Dec. 23, 1898

Mrs. Thomas B. Russum was my grandmother’s aunt Cecelia Bensley (Angus) Russum. Both she and Thomas Bayley Russum have been mentioned in this blog before.

As for Marietta B. Earl, I learned that she was a granddaughter of Marietta (Crane) Earl and Edward B. Earl, who were married on 19 Jan 1859 and subsequently had a large number of children: The 1880 census registered Elizabeth (20), Annie (15), Marietta (10), Grace (1), and Florence (6 mo.), Edward Jr. (16), William (12), Fannie (7), and Alice (4). Daughter Marietta died of consumption in Tucson, Arizona, on 21 December 1898 (see clipping); she’d have been about 28.  The 1900 census, in addition to the above and minus Marietta, showed a brother George (18) and a granddaughter Marietta B. (6). So, evidently one of the siblings named a daughter after Marietta.

The Hillside Times, January 11, 1945

The 1920 census recorded Edward (then 83) and Marietta (then 82) residing with never-married daughters Elizabeth (age 52), Annie (50, dressmaker), Grace (40, nurse), and Florence (39, teacher).

So going back to the guestbook, Florence A. Earl was Marietta B. Earl’s aunt, and Marietta B. was about 15 when she paid my grandparents a visit. As I’ve said before regarding the Earls, there may have been some familial connection (my great-grandfather was William Earl Woodruff, after all), but how far back it goes, I have no idea. Meanwhile I do know that all of these folks went to First Presbyterian Church in Elizabeth, so that may explain the close friendships.

For this family’s Evergreen Cemetery plot, visit their Find a Grave entry. It includes:  Elizabeth Littell Earl,18601944 /// Anna May Earl,18651938 /// William Alexander Earl,18671925 /// Marietta Benton Earl,1870–1898  /// Fannie Crane Earl,18731882 /// Alice Maxwell Earl Crane,18761951 /// Sarah Margaret Earl,18771879 /// Grace Earl,1878–1936  /// Florence Adelaide Earl,18801972 /// George M Earl, 18821963

Categories: Dickinson, Earl, Elizabeth, Union Co., Heirlooms, New Jersey, Russum, Woodruff | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Who’s in that old tennis court photo

It dawned on me today, just after I posted the tennis court photo, that I may have an idea of who the lady and little girl are. I suspect that this is Cecelia Russum (Woodruff) Van Horn (b. 1878) and her little girl Abigail. Abigail was born in 1904, and here she looks to be about 6 (?), so if that’s them, this must be about 1910.

The Van Horn Children: Abigail Van Horn, Frances Van Horn, and Robert Osborn Van Horn

Is this Abigail with her mom Cecelia (Woodruff) Van Horn?

Cecelia (Woodruff) Van Horn (b. 1878)

Elizabeth, NJ, tennis court – photo was among those belonging to Jennie B. (Woodruff) Coleman

Categories: Elizabeth, Union Co., New Jersey, Van Horn, Woodruff | Tags: , | 4 Comments

112-year-old Brodhead family guestbook — Post VI

Mr. & Mrs. Frank M. Brodhead Guest Book, 1908

Flora May Woodruff Baker, circa 1910

The next page from the guestbook! On August 18, 1908, Flora M. Baker and son, residing at Cranbury & Conant Street, visited for lunch. This was my grandmother’s older sister Flora May Woodruff (1877-1962) and her infant son Norment Woodruff Baker (1908-1979). Flora was married to Claiborne Barksdale Baker (b. 1870). He passed away in 1916, and she eventually was remarried to a gentleman named John Jacob Ulrich (b. 1884) and moved to California.

Evelyn Angus visited on September 4. I believe this was Evelyn L. Angus (1894-1981), the daughter of Charles Dujah Angus (1852-1938) and Harriet Hartnett (1858-1951). Charles was child #7 of James W. and Wealthy (Jaques) Angus. If this is the correct Evelyn, she was also the one who tended to my grandmother Fannie Woodruff Brodhead, in the weeks leading up to her death from pneumonia in 1965. Evelyn was one of my grandmother’s many 1st cousins.

Image credit: Michelle Causton. Original group photo cropped to show: Circled (left to right): Laura L. Brodhead, Calvin E. Brodhead, Gertrude M. Brodhead, and William McNulty Brodhead (on the occasion of the Golden Wedding Anniversary of Garret and Annie Brodhead (parents of Calvin, Laura, and siblings)).

September 8th saw the arrival of another Woodruff cousin—Lucetta Crane Woodruff (1867-1956), one of the never-married daughters of Ogden Woodruff and Phebe Asenath Bonnell, who had 12 children in all.

The next guests, on September 20, were on my grandfather’s side of the family—first cousin Calvin Easton Brodhead (1878-1945) with wife Gertrude Brodhead (1881-1961) and baby son William McNulty Brodhead (1906-1976). Eventually this family, which grew to have many more children, moved to Ohio.

The Central New Jersey Home News, New Brunswick, NJ, March 22, 1945

The last name on the page is Laura Leisenring Brodhead (1878-1949), Calvin’s twin sister, who resided in Perth Amboy. I don’t believe she ever married, but feel free to correct me on that. Shown here is a cropped image of the September 21, 1922, Brodhead family gathering on the occasion of Calvin and Laura’s parents’ 50th wedding anniversary. I have circled and noted who’s who.

Laura remarked in the guest book: “Tennis is great”. Perhaps she and my grandparents played a game of tennis earlier that day?  Sounds like it! I published a tennis-related photo once before (below). Perhaps, this was the court they played on. The time period looks about right.

Have a good and safe Sunday everyone. And, remember, “this too shall pass,” and we will be the stronger for it.

Elizabeth, NJ, tennis court

Categories: Baker, Brodhead, Heirlooms, Memorabilia, Woodruff | Tags: , | Leave a comment

112-year-old Brodhead family guestbook — Post V

Untitled (Cracked watermelon) By Charles Ethan Porter – ca. 1890; Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Another page from the guest book my grandparents started using right after they were married. And here we see my grandmother’s parents came to pay the newlyweds a visit: William Earl Woodruff (1848-1928) and Wealthy Ann Woodruff (1850-1927). The date was August 9, 1908. They resided at their farm on Conant Street and commented “Our first time to dinner to help eat watermelon.”

Wm Earl Woodruff & Wealthy Ann Angus

The following day, three visitors arrived: Mary Earl Woodruff of 854 Salem Road — “My first call”; Carrie E. Woodruff of 902 Salem Road — “Spent a pleasant evening”; and Mr. and Mrs. George Maxwell Earl of 637 Jefferson Avenue, Elizabeth — “Here for dinner.”

Mary Earl Woodruff (1880-1957) and Carrie Elizabeth Woodruff (1875-1967) were daughters of Ogden Woodruff and Phoebe Bonnell. Neither of the sisters ever married. They were my grandmother’s aunts even though the age difference between them and my grandmother was only 2 and 7 years, respectively.

Bertha Winans Woodruff (1888 – 1973)

Mr. George Maxwell Earl (1882-1978) was born in Elizabeth and baptized at the First Presbyterian Church there. He and my grandfather may have gone to school together or, perhaps, met through the church. George’s wife was Edith Willis (1881-1978; b. Pennsylvania). The couple appeared in a different blog post I did about my grandparents’ wedding and the list of gifts they received.

I do not know who Jessie A. Pierson was, but below her name in pencil is “Sister Bertha”—the same Bertha who visited previously.

Some August guests

Categories: Brodhead, Earl, Elizabeth, Union Co., Memorabilia, New Jersey, Woodruff | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

Memories of a Madame de Ryther recipe lead to a fun eBay discovery

John George Brown (American, 1831-1913) Claiming the Shot – After the Hunt in the Adirondacks

A long time ago, I did a post about 19th-century food writer Madame Jules de Ryther‘s recommendations on how to prepare “roast saddle of venison” from deer killed during hunting expeditions in New York’s Adirondack Mountains. Perhaps you remember that post.

Well, I was scrolling through some antique postcards on eBay last week, and one in particular caught my eye–it was of two men in a canoe arriving at the side of a lake with at least a couple of dead deer in their vessel. The title was: “Adirondack Mountains. Bringing in the spoils.”

That Madame de Ryther post came to mind, so I paused to take a closer look at the scene. On the front right side was a small note written by the sender, someone named Ripley Watson: “Am up at Lake George, having a fine time. Remember me to your brothers, please. Ripley Watson.”

Adirondack Mountains. Bringing in the spoils

Then I turned the postcard over and was absolutely shocked to discover that the recipient was someone I knew from my family history research and had actually met over a half century ago when visiting my late grandmother in Plainfield, NJ. I was only a few years old at the time and don’t remember the visit, but I do have a photo to prove that I was there!

How amazing! I am still pinching myself. Life is full of strange little surprises. I felt compelled to buy the postcard, and it arrived the day before yesterday from Pennsylvania.

Postcard addressed to Miss Cecelia Russum, postmarked 10 July 1906

Miss Cecelia Bell Russum (1090 East Jersey Street, Elizabeth, NJ) was the postcard recipient, and she would have been 18 at the time. Some of you may know who Cecelia was. For those who do not: she was the only daughter of Cecelia Bensley Angus (1855-1933) and Thomas Bayley Russum (cir. 1850-1938) of Elizabeth, New Jersey, who also had four sons (Thomas; Charles, who died before Cecelia was born; Frank; and William).

Cecelia Bensley Angus was a daughter of James Angus & Wealthy Ann Jaques and one of my great-grandmother Wealthy Angus Woodruff’s younger sisters.

These two Angus sisters were five years apart, but each gave birth to a daughter in 1888: Cecelia Bell Russum was born in June, and Wealthy’s daughter Bertha Woodruff in October. They all appear in the below group photo taken, I believe, in 1892 on the occasion of the funeral gathering for Wealthy Ann (Jaques) Angus. (Note: I have posted this group photo before. I think I have the Russum kids shown incorrectly apart from William and Cecelia, but plan to fix that label soon.)

William and Wealthy Woodruff with extended family, Elizabeth, NJ, circa 1893 (Photo from my family’s personal archives)

I took a quick look to see who Ripley Watson may have been. Cecelia’s brothers all went to Rutgers College (classes of 1895, 1902, and 1910), and I found a Ripley Watson who was in the class of 1908. A few tidbits I found about him indicated that he was gifted academically and played varsity football (6′ tall, 186 pounds). Published almost a decade after his graduation, The Catalogue of the Officers and Alumni of Rutgers College… 1766 to 1916, published by Rutgers, gives the following information about Ripley: Born at Jersey City, NJ, Mch. 15, 1886. Lawyer. L.L.B. (N.K. Law School,1910). A.M. (Rutgers, 1911).

So here was Ripley in July of 1906 sending Cecelia a postcard from the Adirondacks. Perhaps, he had romantic intentions? If he did, nothing came of it. Cecelia remained single, living at home with her parents, into her early forties, when she met and married the much older Reverend George Rutger Brauer (b. 1871) in 1931. Unfortunately the marriage was short lived as George died in 1935 of a cerebral hemorrhage. His Find a Grave memorial has some photos of him as well as a long obituary that appeared in the New York Times. Click here if you are interested in seeing that memorial page (and here if you want to see the page for his first wife Eugenia Lathrop Brauer, who died in 1929).

Back to Cecelia. She died in Los Angeles in 1981 at the age of 93, outliving her cousin Bertha by almost a decade. Remarkably, we have the photo showing the two as young children and another showing them some seven decades later, sitting on the front porch at my grandmother’s house—with me and my sister the young children this time around. The ladies had remained good friends. I don’t know what happened to Cecelia after this or why she moved to California. But, how amazing is it that 114 years after that postcard was sent to Cecelia, it’s ended up here with me!

Circa 1964: Bertha Woodruff (left) and Cecelia Russum Brauer (right) with two little mischief-makers in between

Cecelia Bell Russum and her cousin Bertha Winans Woodruff back in their mischief-making days

Categories: Adirondacks, Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., New Jersey, New York, Russum, Woodruff | Tags: , , | 4 Comments

112-year-old Brodhead family guestbook — Post II

Today, I’m posting three more pages from my grandparents’ guest book, which went into service in June 1908. I have not had time to research the names I don’t know but figured I would go ahead and post the pages anyway since some of these unknowns may be known to you!

I love the entry made by my great-grandfather Andrew Douglas Brodhead, who clearly had a great sense of humor, and the “namesake” remark in the entry made by Mrs. F. C. Bishop, which confirms my grandmother was indeed named after her. Other visitors included my grandmother’s oldest and youngest sisters—Jennie and Bertha. I think Bertha in particular must have been a lot of fun. She was a very clever and artistic young woman and probably in art school in NYC at that time.

1910: Miss M. E. Woodruff’s “Button,” 902 Salem Rd., Elizabeth, NJ – I remembered this photo and now I am wondering: Is this the Mary E. Woodruff who visited on July 9? The address is Jennie Woodruff Coleman’s — did Mary move out of 854 and in with Jennie and her husband at 902? 

Another visitor was Mary E. Woodruff (Aunt Mary) and I believe this was probably Mary Elizabeth Woodruff (1835-1924), a younger sister of my grandmother’s grandfather Francis Woodruff and the younger sister of Ogden Woodruff (father of guest Fannie Woodruff Townley who appears as a guest here and in the previous post’s pages as well).

This Mary E. Woodruff’s address was 854 Salem Avenue, which is in present-day Hillside, NJ. If you Google this address, you will find a very grand 6,000+ square-foot home built in 1874. Incidentally, it is just two doors down from another home I have mentioned in this blog—the old Woodruff homestead at 866 Salem Avenue! Anyway, if Mary lived at 854, her comment in the guest book “A lovely little home” may have had her mentally emphasizing the word “little” as she wrote that. 😉

The most distant visitor was M. Margaret Fritz of Wilkes-Barre, PA.  I know some Brodheads lived in Wilkes-Barre back in those days, and, perhaps, she was somehow related to them. In any case, I will leave you to enjoy these few pages and if you have any info to add, please do leave a comment!

Jennie Belle Woodruff Coleman (1873 – 1955)

Bertha Winans Woodruff (1888 – 1973)

A. D. Brodhead (1853-1917)

  • Jennie Belle Coleman – 902 Salem Road, Elizabeth, NJ – “Our fourth anniversary”
  • William J. James and Harriet Eadie James – 920 1/2 Grove Street, Elizabeth, NJ
  • Elizabeth A. Terrill – 1074 Lafayette St, Elizabeth, NJ – “We did not ride in a coach”
  • Alice F. Rath – 141 Jefferson Ave, Elizabeth, NJ – “ditto”
  • Homer L. Wandling – 518 Walnut St., Elizabeth, NJ – “ditto”
  • William T. Rath – 141 Jefferson Ave., Elizabeth, NJ – “Good Luck”
  • Gertrude L. Younglove – 407 Jefferson Ave. – Elizabeth – SS Teacher”
  • Bertha W. WoodruffConant St, Elizabeth, NJ – “A diner for dinner”
  • Vera A. Stinson – 157 5th Ave., Roselle, NJ – “A diner for supper”
  • Adelaide H. Russ – 458 N. Broad St., Elizabeth
  • M. Margaret Fritz – 820 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA – “On again, off again”
  • Alice F. Rath – Elizabeth, NJ – “Here for lunch”
  • Elizabeth A. Terrill – Elizabeth, NJ – ditto
  • Fannie W. Townley – Elizabeth, NJ – “Here for tea”
  • William E. Townley – ditto – “Baby with us”
  • A.D. Brodhead – a wanderer – “Just for a shave”
  • Mrs. F.C. Bishop – 920 Salem Ave, Elizabeth, NJ – “Namesake”
  • Mary E. Woodruff (Aunt Mary) – 854 Salem Ave, Eliz, NJ – “A lovely little home”
  • Anna Bowles Hesse – 154 Elm St., Eliz., NJ – “Everything fine”
  • Louise Hesse – ditto – “Dinner a big success”

Categories: Brodhead, Elizabeth, Union Co., New Jersey, Townley, Woodruff | Tags: , | 7 Comments

112-year-old Brodhead family guestbook — Post I

Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

In the coming weeks, I’m going to be publishing the pages of a guest book that was given to my grandparents when they moved into their new home at 736 Jersey Avenue in Elizabeth, Union Co., New Jersey, in June 1908.  Their minister Rev. William Force Whitaker of the First Presbyterian Church of Elizabeth was the first guest who signed in, and his handwriting matches the handwriting you see here, so the book evidently was a gift from him. About 18 months’ worth of guests is recorded. Many of you will recognize the names of those who stopped by. I’m not publishing all the pages at once since I will have comments to make about certain names and want to research some others.

I am going to assume that the house number 736 is correct, however, a previous post I did on my grandparents’ wedding contained a newspaper announcement that gave the house number as 732.  It could be that parents (Andrew D. and Margaret Brodhead) lived at 732, since I have seen that as their address, and my grandparents at 736.  A visit to Google street view indicates that both those homes have been replaced (quite recently it appears) by a townhouse-looking structure, so, alas, the number discrepancy is neither here nor there—there shall never be real estate listings showing the inside of those two dwellings.

The pages below show a child’s scribbles, revealing that my Dad or his brother must have gotten his hands on the guest book at some point. Or perhaps the scribbles were made by the children of some visitors…

The first page shows the following guests — after the Reverend (who resided at 142 Stiles Street, Elizabeth, NJ):

The Van Horn Children: Abigail Van Horn, Frances Van Horn, and Robert Osborn Van Horn

In any case, I will welcome your comments as you see names you recognize. Please feel free to share any information you may know about the people behind them for the benefit of other family members who follow this blog. Thank you!


Categories: Baker, Barksdale, Brodhead, Coleman, Elizabeth, Union Co., Family Homes, Heirlooms, New Jersey, Presbyterian, Townley, Woodruff | Tags: , , | 10 Comments

1869 – James W. Angus Estate Map – Elizabeth, New Jersey

The Knowles house at 924 Elizabeth Ave

Below is a map showing the estate of my second-great-grandfather James W. Angus, who died in December 1862 at the age of 52, leaving behind his wife Wealthy and 10 children, aged 11 months to 22 years. The map was drafted in 1869 as Wealthy sold off bits and pieces of the land to help make ends meet.

If you enlarge the map, you will see that daughter Mary Martha Angus and her husband Austin F. Knowles had two lots/homes on Elizabeth Avenue (924 is pictured on the left); daughter Lavinia Angus Marthaler had four; daughter Wealthy Angus Woodruff had one; and son Walter P. Angus had one.

I’m not sure who the Woodruff was at 928. Could have been Wealthy Angus Woodruff, I suppose. The other names I don’t recognize.

Angus family home

Written in red ink, the names must have been added later since Lavinia, the youngest daughter, did not marry until 1879, and her married name is included here.

The Angus family home from 1848-1871 was at 927 Elizabeth Avenue, across the street from the Knowles’ property.

Estate of James W. Angus, 1869

Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., Family Homes, Knowles, Last Wills and Testaments, New Jersey, Woodruff | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Old Woodruff home on Salem Ave in Hillside, NJ — built in 1743

The Woodruff House at 866 Salem Avenue – present day

Quite a while ago, I did a post about the Woodruff home at 866 Salem Avenue in Hillside NJ: “Old Woodruff Family Homestead: Witnesss to American History.”

Today, I happened to notice some photos left behind on a 2013 Zillow listing, showing a few interior and exterior views. Here’s the link in case you’d like to take a peek. 

Categories: Hillside Union, New Jersey, Woodruff | Tags: , , | 4 Comments

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