Woodruff

Obit for Mary Jane Woodruff (1833-1916)

Grave of Mary Jane Woodruff (and her younger brother William Henry) in First Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ; Creative commons attribution license cc-by-2.5, attribution ‘R.E.H.’.

Grave of Mary Jane Woodruff (and her younger brother William Henry) in First Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ; Creative commons attribution license cc-by-2.5, attribution ‘R.E.H.’.

Just a brief post today: the nearly 100-year-old obituary notice for Mary Jane Woodruff, daughter of Henry King Woodruff and Abby Winans Angus Woodruff, which was saved along with a bunch of other clippings by my grandmother.

Mary Jane (single, never married) died on November 30, 1916, at age 84, at the home of her cousin Mary Martha Angus Knowles (1846-1922) and Mary Martha’s husband Austin Fellows Knowles (d. 1924). (Their beautiful house located at 924 Elizabeth Avenue, Elizabeth, NJ, was featured in a previous post.)

Below is a tree showing how they were related. My great-grandmother Wealthy Angus Woodruff, one of Mary Martha’s sisters, was a cousin as well. She lived a little less than 3 miles away on the Woodruff family farmhouse located on Conant Street and was probably a frequent guest in the Knowles’ home.

Mary Jane was buried in the First Presbyterian Churchyard. She shares a gravestone with her younger brother William Henry Woodruff (1836-1913).

I have another Woodruff obit to share, but will do so in a separate post. Have a great day, all.

1-Jacob Baker Angus b. possibly 13 Oct 1786, c. 26 Nov 1786, First 
  Presbyterian Church, Albany, NY, d. 27 Mar 1828, Hester Street, New York 
  City, New York USA, bur. Methodist Society Cemetery, New York, NY
 +Mary Winans b. 1784, Elizabethtown, NJ, d. 27 Nov 1824, New York City, Kings 
  County, NY, bur. Stone #1249, First Presbyterian Church yard, Elizabeth, 
  Union Co., NJ
|--2-James Winans Angus b. 10 May 1810, New York City, New York USA, d. 23 
|    Dec 1862, Elizabeth, Union Co, NJ, bur. First Presbyterian Church yard of 
|    Elizabeth, NJ
|   +Wealthy Ann Jaques b. 15 Dec 1815, New York City, New York. NY, d. 7 Mar 
|    1892, At Home, 25 Reid Street, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. First 
|    Presbyterian Church yard of Elizabeth, NJ
|  |--3-Mary Martha Winans Angus b. 20 Aug 1846, Mexico City, Mexico, d. 16 Jan 
|  |    1922, Elizabeth, Union Co, NJ
|  |   +Austin Fellows Knowles b. Mauch Chunk, Carbon Co., PA (Jim Thorpe, PA), 
|  |    d. 20 Aug 1924
|--2-Abigail Winans Angus b. 16 Jul 1812, Albany, New York, USA, d. 16 Mar 
|    1905, 1177 S. Chestnut St., Elizabeth, Union Co, NJ, bur. First 
|    Presbyterian Church yard of Elizabeth, NJ
|   +Henry King Woodruff b. 1806, New York, USA, d. 1852, Elizabeth, New 
|    Jersey, USA
|  |--3-Mary Jane Woodruff b. 1833, New York, NY, d. 30 Nov 1916, Home of Mrs. 
|  |    AF Knowles, 924 Elizabeth Ave, Elizabeth, Union, NJ, bur. First Pres. 
|  |    Church of Elizabeth, Union, NJ

Angus_MaryJaneWoodruff_obit
Knowles_house_924ElizAve


			
Categories: Angus, Death, Elizabeth, Union Co., Knowles, Obituaries, Presbyterian, Woodruff | Tags: , | 4 Comments

Image circa late 1890s – Elizabeth, NJ – One Coleman, several unknowns

Here is an image of a few unknowns. I love the photographer! I’m quite certain that’s C. Clarence Coleman on the right. He was born in 1877 and he looks to be about 20 here, maybe younger. I’m not very good with ages. The young fellow to his left looks very familiar but I can’t place him. For some reason this photo was mixed in with some Brodhead family photos which initially struck me as odd given young Coleman is in the photo, but my Grandmother Brodhead was a Woodruff and her older sister Jennie ended up as Clarence’s bride in 1904, so perhaps those connections were all in the process of being established or in place when this photo was taken. Everything would be clearer if I knew who these other folks were. If anyone can identify them, please let me know. The woman on the left looks a bit like Clarence—perhaps, a sister?
Have a great day, All!
PS: The fence is the exact same type my dad built around our swimming pool in the early 1970s. I wonder if the inspiration came from this very spot, provided the fence here lasted another 30-40 years!
Unknown_image_photographer

Categories: Angus, Coleman, Elizabeth, Union Co., Miscellaneous, Woodruff | Tags: , | 7 Comments

Last of the Coleman family photos – two unknowns – 1917 & 1918

Here are two more photos that belonged to the Coleman family. They are unlabelled, and I have no idea who these folks are. Perhaps they are Coleman or Woodruff family members. If anyone reading this has any thoughts, please leave a comment. Thanks!

unknown_coleman1a

Unknown woman; photographer Newman (?), dated 1918

unknown_coleman2a

Unknown child; photographer Newman (?), dated 1917

Categories: Coleman, Woodruff | Tags: | Leave a comment

Circa 1900? – Unidentified lady with cat & little girl at tennis court

Here’s and interesting photo that was in the Colemans‘ possession. It is unlabelled. As far as a date goes, I am thinking 1890s/early 1900s? Thoughts, anyone? It’s highly possible these are Coleman / Angus / Woodruff family members, but so far I can’t make any best guesses. I’m assuming the photo was taken somewhere in Elizabeth, New Jersey, given that’s where they were all based at the time, with a few exceptions. If anyone recognizes this lady and little girl, please let me know. Thank you!

coleman_woodruff_tennis

Elizabeth, New Jersey, tennis court – unidentified woman with cat and young girl

Categories: Angus, Coleman, Elizabeth, Union Co., Tennis, Woodruff | Leave a comment

Jennie Belle Woodruff (1873-1955) & Charles Clarence Coleman (1877-1953)

As promised in my July 25 post, I am adding some more Coleman family photos to this blog. Jennie Belle Woodruff Coleman was the daughter of William Earl Woodruff & Wealthy Ann Angus. Jennie was the oldest of six children, all daughters. I have posted photos of the sisters previously. For those images, click here, and here.

Woodruff doctor's bill

Doctor’s bill for delivering Jennie Belle Woodruff (from our family archives)

Coleman

Baby Jennie Belle Woodruff, eldest of six daughters of William Earl Woodruff and Wealthy Ann Angus Woodruff; born 24 November 1873 in Elizabeth, NJ.

Coleman1

Jennie Belle Woodruff, undated, but probably ca 1875/6; love her ‘Glum Plum’ expression; perhaps, it was nap time and crankiness was setting in

Coleman2

Jennie Belle Woodruff holding tulips, undated, on occasion of graduation, ca. 1891? Or engagement? In the case of the latter she would have been approx. 31 here (she married on 16 June 1904)

CC_Coleman copy

I found what I believe is an image of Clarence as a young man (left); I’ve compared it to a photo of him in his early 40s, and I think there is a strong likeness.

Coleman3

Jennie Belle Woodruff Coleman with daughter Jennie Belle (b. Oct 1914)

Coleman6

Daughter Jennie Belle, ca. 1917

Coleman4

Daughter Jennie Belle, circa 1919; she endured a lifelong struggle with distonia, a neurological movement disorder.

Coleman5

The Coleman Family (Charles Clarence (‘C.C’) with wife Jennie Belle Woodruff and daughter Jennie Belle) – ca. 1922

Coleman_Jennie_Belle_portrait

Daughter Jennie Belle Coleman, circa 1930; HS graduation?

Daughter Jennie Belle Coleman

Daughter Jennie Belle Coleman; college graduation photo?; graduated with a degree in teaching; was a member of the DAR (her patriot was Hezekiah Hand, her paternal grandmother’s great-grandfather)

Coleman_1938

Two articles: House burglary in 1914 and Clarence’s 1937 appointment to Commissioner

Coleman7

Jennie Belle Woodruff Coleman, undated

Coleman8

Jennie Belle Woodruff Coleman with Charles Clarence Coleman, undated (late 1940s/early 1950s?)

Coleman9

Daughter Jennie Belle Coleman (left) – 1970s

Categories: Coleman, Elizabeth, Union Co., Woodruff | Tags: , | 2 Comments

Elizabeth, NJ: Coleman house interior

Coleman_house_interior This is the northeast corner of Clarence and Jennie (Woodruff) Coleman‘s living room in the house they built at 17 Wilder Street in Elizabeth, NJ, in 1912, I believe. The living room was on the left when you walked through the front door. The photograph was taken professionally, by ‘John L. Soltis’ of Elizabeth, and is undated. The house was torn down in the 1970s and replaced with an apartment building.

The C. Clarence Coleman family home at 17 Wilder Street, late 1930s/early 1940s (Standing, third from the left, is Jennie Woodruff Coleman; Clarence is the gentleman in the hat to her left. Their daughter is to Jennie's right. My dad, a nephew of Clarence and Jennie is standing by the door to the truck)

The C. Clarence Coleman family home at 17 Wilder Street, late 1930s/early 1940s (Standing, third from the left, is Jennie Woodruff Coleman; Clarence is the gentleman in the hat to her left. Their daughter is to Jennie’s right. My dad, a nephew of Clarence and Jennie is standing by the door to the truck)

How did we end up with this photo, you may be asking? After the Coleman’s daughter Jennie (only child; never married) died in the 1990s, we were contacted by a cousin of hers who lived in a NJ seaside town. At the time, my mom was in Florida (dad had passed away five years earlier), and I was living in London. The cousin told us that there were “a lot of family papers and other items that you should have, but it’s a lot and we can’t possibly ship it.” I had some vacation time and mom was retired so we met in Newark and drove down to get all of this stuff. When we arrived we were shown a couple of regular-size boxes, nothing that could not have been shipped… Needless to say we were ever so slightly annoyed, but on the other hand, got to converse with this cousin of Jennie’s and her spouse, both in their 70s by then, on family & family history matters.

Coleman_Charles_Clarence_family

Clarence and Jennie (Woodruff) Coleman with daughter Jennie, circa 1920

These boxes, containing some photos, newspaper clippings, year books and other memorabilia, were all that was left of the Coleman estate, at least as far as family members were concerned. The rest of the estate, which was quite substantial in both money and antiques, was all taken by the executor who moved out of state. A lawsuit was filed (all public record), and eventually this individual was removed from the executorship of the estate by court order. But, by the time that happened, there was nothing… he’d supposedly spent it all—all the fruits of Clarence Coleman’s labor.

I remember sitting on that beautiful, antique sofa many times. It was unlike anything we’d seen elsewhere as kids in the 1960s, and the picture on the wall above it always captivated me. The books and things in the corner were off-limits to us little kids, of course. I have vague memories of the rest of the room. I believe there was a fireplace on the west side of the room, as well as doors leading out to the covered porch.

I will probably publish another one or two posts containing the rest of the materials we have from this family. There are no descendants, so I think it’s important that their lives be remembered in this blog, especially since (I think) that is unlikely to happen anywhere else, now or in the future.

Coleman_Clarence

Categories: Coleman, Elizabeth, Union Co., Woodruff | Tags: , | 8 Comments

1902: A milestone year for Abigail Winans Angus Woodruff, sister of James Winans Angus

Angus_AbbyAngusWoodruff

Abigail Winans Angus Woodruff’s 90th birthday. Newspaper probably Elizabeth Daily Journal

On the morning of 16 July 1902, Abigail Winans (Angus) Woodruff (1812-1905) awoke in her home at 1177 South Chestnut Street in Elizabeth, NJ, to begin celebrating her 90th birthday. Abigail made it into the newspaper that day on the occasion of her newly acquired nonagenarian status, and thanks to my grandmother who saved the clipping, I can share it with you today. Many came to meet and greet Abigail, who was “in the possession of health and strength, and received her guests in a most affable manner.” (On a side note, not surprisingly the house on Chestnut Street no longer exists, which is a shame; I’d love to see what it was like.)

Abigail’s older brother James, my 2nd-great-grandfather, died in 1862 at just 52 years of age, and because of that I always think of him as being someone from the fairly distant past. But the fact that his sister, and brother Job (1821-1909) for that matter, made it into the 20th century just goes to show that there were indeed some very good genes in the family, and were it not for an unfortunate twist of fate (an unpleasant bacterial skin illness), James may have made it into the 20th century as well.

Abigail was married to Henry King Woodruff (1806-1853), who’d died nearly a half century before this 1902 celebration. They’d had three children together: Mary Jane (1832-1916), Jacob (1840-1847), and William (1842-1913). So two of the three children were present for their mother’s milestone festivities.

Unfortunately, another clipping from 1905 reports the sad news of Abigail’s demise on the 16th of March of that year, but it’s obvious from reading the clipping that hers was a life very well lived, and that she enjoyed the support of the community and a great many family members. The clipping offers us a little snapshot in time of the funeral, and because it names names, we know with certainty where some of our ancestors were on that day in history. I learned, for example, that my great-grandfather William Earl Woodruff was a pallbearer (he was married to Abigail’s niece Wealthy Ann Angus Woodruff, James & Wealthy Angus’s daughter) at the funeral. Other pallbearers included nephews Charles Dujah Angus, Job Winans Angus (Jr.), and George Welsh Angus—all sons of my 2nd-great-grandparents James and Wealthy Angus; and two sons of Mary Martha Winans Angus Knowles (another daughter of James & Wealthy). Abigail was buried in the historic First Presbyterian Churchyard.

Angus_AbbyAngusWoodruff_obit

Abigail Winans Angus Woodruff’s 1905 funeral. Newspaper probably Elizabeth Daily Journal

Creative commons attribution license cc-by-2.5, attribution 'R.E.H.'.

Grave of Abigail Winans Angus Woodruff in First Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ; Creative commons attribution license cc-by-2.5, attribution ‘R.E.H.’.

Categories: Angus, Death, Elizabeth, Union Co., New Jersey, Obituaries, Woodruff | Tags: , | 4 Comments

Hillside, New Jersey, 1922: Woodruff golden wedding anniversary

Woodruff_Wm_anniversary_1922

From our family archives: News clipping from the Elizabeth Daily Journal, Monday 19 June 1922

Here’s a clipping about my great-grandparents’ 50th wedding anniversary celebration (William Earl Woodruff & Wealthy Ann Angus), which took place on Saturday, 17 June 1922, at their home in Hillside, Union Co., NJ. The clipping, saved by my grandmother, is from the June 19, 1922, issue of the Elizabeth Daily Journal.

Woodruff_Wm_and_Wealthy_anniv_1922

A photo from our family archives: Wealthy Ann Angus & William Earl Woodruff, 17 June 1922

The accompanying photograph, one of our family history treasures, brings to life the article’s description of my great-grandmother’s outfit and all the various flowers on display. Lots of roses, of course!

Conant Street farmhouse

Conant Street farmhouse

Such articles usually offer new little clues and facts, and this one does not disappoint. For example, the Who’s Who of who was present, the name of the minister who married them, and the celebratory trip to Niagara Falls were news to me.  According to the article, they left for the Falls the next day, Sunday, 18 June. Since their actual anniversary was June 20, Tuesday, they marked the date there.

I visited Niagara Falls for the first time about 10 years ago, but had no idea that this connection with the Falls existed in my family tree. I suppose if I’d known about it at the time, it would have impacted my experience in some small way. I definitely would have paid attention to historical images from that period.

Dorothy Perkins roses (Credit: Wikipedia)

‘Dorothy Perkins’ rose, introduced in 1901 (Credit: Wikipedia)

"The Conard Star Roses," 1924 (Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons - uploaded to Flickr by Biodiversity Heritage Library)

No. 2 – Ophelia in “The Conard Star Roses,” 1924 (Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons – uploaded to Flickr by Biodiversity Heritage Library)

William and Wealthy made the trip at ages 73 and 71, respectively. It must have been a tremendously exciting and memorable moment for them, one that they could look back on happily during their remaining five years together.

Coreopsis_grandiflora_002

Coreopsis (Credit: Wikipedia)

Niagara Falls stamp, 1922 (Credit: Wikipedia - By U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing; Designed by Clair Aubrey Houston - U.S. Post Office Smithsonian National Postal Museum; Photo image obtained/rendered by Gwillhickers, Public Domain)

Niagara Falls stamp, 1922 (Credit: Wikipedia – By U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing; Designed by Clair Aubrey Houston – U.S. Post Office Smithsonian National Postal Museum; Photo image obtained/rendered by Gwillhickers, Public Domain)

Wealthy passed away on 27 May 1927. My dad, who was six at the time, distinctly remembered the emotional tumult the family experienced upon losing Wealthy and the sadness that accompanied William’s passing the following year (18 October 1928). My dad’s parents, who lived in neighboring Elizabeth, took in William and Wealthy’s dog, but the dog kept running away back to the house in Hillside, and eventually got hit my a car. My dad was heartbroken; as he described it, the last link with his Woodruff grandparents was gone.

(Sorry to end the post on such a down note, but I think all these pieces help convey how beloved William and Wealthy were to their children and grandchildren.)

Wealthy Ann Angus Woodruff_Wm_engagement_photo_w_tag

Categories: Angus, Anniversaries, Elizabeth, Union Co., Hillside Union, New Jersey, Woodruff | Tags: | 3 Comments

Elizabeth, New Jersey, 1955: Youngest Woodruff daughter was “foremost quilt designer in the United States”

A young 20-something Bertha

Bertha Woodruff circa 1920

I wrote a post several years ago (my, how time flies!) about my great aunt Bertha (1888-1973), but after coming across this old newspaper clipping about her lifelong career as a quilt designer, I thought a follow-up post would be in order. Bertha was the youngest of the six Woodruff sisters. She appeared in that wonderful series of photos the sisters took at different moments in their lives. I wish I’d known her in her younger years; she was very fond of my father and he of her. Unfortunately, I caught her at the tail end of her life when old age and health problems deprived her of the joie de vivre she had once been so famous for.

By all accounts, including the one in the article, she lived a very interesting and creative life, and she certainly had a sea of admirers. For a look at her ‘Tree of Life’ quilt, click here.

The article mentions the Grand Tour of Europe my father took Bertha and his mother on in 1955. Bless his heart. He was a good son and a good nephew.

cropped-europe.jpg

The gondola ride in Venice during the 1955 European Grand Tour. Bertha and my grandmother are in the rear. My dad is in the light blue suit in the rear.

Elizabeth Daily Journal clipping, Tuesday evening, 2 August 1955

Elizabeth Daily Journal clipping in my family’s possession, Tuesday evening, 2 August 1955

Categories: Brodhead, Elizabeth, Union Co., Woodruff | Tags: , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Thanksgiving—a century ago: Teddy Roosevelt, turkey, football, ragamuffin parades, and ‘Black Friday’

Thanksgiving postcard circa 1900 (Credit: Wikipedia)

Thanksgiving postcard circa 1900 (Credit: Wikipedia)

Life magazine cover, 1904

Life magazine cover, 1904

Thanksgiving is just a week away, and I enjoy thinking about how our ancestors may have gone about their own Thanksgiving Day preparations and celebrations.

I came across some ads and articles from 1904. What would have been going on back then? Grandma (not yet married) and her five sisters were likely cooking up a storm in the Woodruff family home in Hillside, NJ. The Andrew Jackson Brodhead family was marking its first Thanksgiving without family matriarch Ophelia. Did they spend the day at son James Easton Brodhead’s gloriously big home in Flemington, NJ? Did my great-grandfather Andrew Douglas Brodhead (James’ brother) and family of Perth Amboy, NJ, join them? And, on my mom’s side, the Trewin family was celebrating in Elizabeth, NJ. Did they get together with other family in nearby Bayonne or Jersey City, or have a quiet day at home? Did ‘Thanksgiving maskers’ come by to beg for pennies? (A tradition described very well in this Huffington Post article “A Forgotten Thanksgiving Custom: Masks, Mischief and Cross-dressing” – pub. 11/20/2012.)

Finding a Thanksgiving Turkey (Credit: Library of Congress*)

Finding a Thanksgiving Turkey (Credit: Library of Congress*)

Perry NY Record, 24 Nov 1904 advertisement

Perry NY Record, 24 Nov 1904 advertisement

In the early 20th century, the household radio had yet to exist, not to mention all the other devices available to us today—devices that, dare I say it, often distract us from interacting with the very family members in our midst? I imagine that back then, our ancestors enjoyed listening to the phonograph, dancing, playing games, and exchanging news and views on all sorts of topics. There’d certainly have been no TV football games to watch or fall in sleep in front of! But apparently high school Thanksgiving football games had become popular by then; so perhaps, our ancestors enjoyed watching a game or two in the crisp November air…or ventured into the Big Apple to watch a ‘ragamuffin parade‘—popular back then (see the below article “Turkey Feasts for Everyone”) and still a feature of many autumn festivals today.

Thanksgiving Maskers scrambling for pennies (Courtesy of Library of Congress)

Thanksgiving Maskers scrambling for pennies (Courtesy of Library of Congress)

Thanksgiving Maskers (Courtesy of Library of Congress)

Thanksgiving Maskers (Courtesy of Library of Congress)

It would seem safe to say that many of my ancestors would likely have read the text of the inspiring and patriotic Thanksgiving Day Proclamation (below) by President Theodore Roosevelt (Rep-NY) who had won reelection by a landslide that year. The ladies in the respective families may have poured over Jule De Ryther’s cooking tips. De Ryther, celebrated soprano turned food maven, provided instructions in the newspaper for the ‘little woman’ on how to make a ‘Yankee Thanksgiving Dinner’ (see below). And, yes, it seems likely that our ancestors had some shopping on their mind. I found one full-page ‘Black Friday’ ad (shown below) with a headline screaming “Give Thanks Today For These Bargains Tomorrow.” It would seem that not much has changed after all these years, except for the items on sale and, of course, the prices!

Anyway, back to 2014. Best wishes to all of you for a wonderful Thanksgiving. I’m still debating a couple of turkey recipes (Tyler Florence’s ‘Buried Turkey with Gravy‘ or Sandra Lee’s ‘Roasted Butter Herb Turkey‘). Both are excellent recipes. Tried Sandra’s last year and Tyler’s the year before. His is very handy if you want to get the bird cooked fast. It’s quick and easy and the meat comes out wonderfully moist and flavorful. Stuffing must be cooked separately however, and (for me) it’s a bit of a struggle to split the bird in half. Sandra goes the traditional stuffed-bird route, and rubs a garlic-herb-butter mix under the skin. The result is pretty delicious.

Feel free to share any favorite recipes in the comment box below. And, enjoy your Thanksgiving 2014!

P.S. What an ideal time to talk about family history and family traditions!

Lithograph by Forbes Litho. Mfg. Co., Boston [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

President Theodore Roosevelt (Republican from NY) – Lithograph by Forbes Litho. Mfg. Co., Boston [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

*************************************************************

PROCLAMATION By PRESIDENT THEODORE ROOSEVELT:

It has pleased Almighty God to bring the American people in safety and honor through another year, and, in accordance with the long unbroken custom handed down to us by our forefathers, the time has come when a special day shall be set apart in which to thank Him who holds all nations in the hollow of His hand, for the mercies thus vouchsafed to us. During the century and a quarter of our national life we as a people have been blessed beyond all others, and for this we owe humble and heartfelt thanks to the Author of all blessings.

The year that has closed has been one of peace within our borders as well as between us and all other nations. The harvests have been abundant, and those who work, whether with hand or brain, are prospering greatly. Reward has waited upon honest effort. We have been enabled to do our duty to ourselves and to others. Never has there been a time when religious and charitable effort has been more evident. Much has been given to us and much will be expected from us. We speak of what has been done by this Nation in no spirit of boastfulness or vainglory, but with full and reverent realization that our strength is as nothing unless we are helped from above. Hitherto we have been given the heart and the strength to do the tasks allotted to us as they severally arose. We are thankful for all that has been done for us in the past, and we pray that in the future we may be strengthened in the unending struggle to do our duty fearlessly and honestly, with charity and good will, with respect for ourselves and love towards our fellow men.

Thanksgiving postcard circa 1910. Published by Wolf-Clapsaddle. Credit: Wikimedia

Thanksgiving postcard circa 1910. Published by Wolf-Clapsaddle. Credit: Wikimedia

In this great Republic the effort to combine national strength with personal freedom is being tried on a scale more gigantic than ever before in the world’s history. Our success will mean much, not only for ourselves, but for the future of all mankind, and every man or woman in our land should feel the grave responsibility resting upon him or her, for in the last analysis this success must depend upon the high average of our individual citizenship, upon the way in which each of us does his duty by himself and his neighbor.

Now, therefore, I, Theodore Roosevelt, President of the United States, do hereby appoint and set apart Thursday, the twenty-fourth of this November, to be observed as a day of festival and thanksgiving by all the people of the United States, at home or abroad, and do recommend that on that day they cease from their ordinary occupations and gather in their several places of worship or in their homes, devoutly to give thanks to Almighty God for the benefits He has conferred, upon us as individuals and as a Nation, and to beseech Him that in the future His divine favor may be continued to us.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington, this first day of November, in the year of Our Lord one thousand nine hundred and four, and of the independence of the United States, the one hundred and twenty-ninth.

*************************************************************************************

Food writer Jule De Ryther turns up the heat in the 1904 Thanksgiving kitchen:

New York Press, 20 Nov. 1904 (Courtesy of www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Press, 20 Nov. 1904 (Courtesy of www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Press, 20 Nov. 1904 (Courtesy of http://www.fultonhistory.com)

*************************************************************************************

A little Black Friday shopping anyone? Men’s sweaters – 98 cents; Kashmir rugs – $8.75; women’s coats – $6.95 [CLICK TWICE to ENLARGE]:

Black Friday advertisement, Friday's Buffalo NY Courier, 24 Nov. 1904

Black Friday advertisement, Friday’s Buffalo NY Courier, 24 Nov. 1904

Thanksgiving

New York Sun, Friday, 25 Nov 1904 (Courtesy: http://www.fultonhistory.com)

Taking Home Turkey From Raffle (Credit: Library of Congress*)

Taking Home Turkey From Raffle (Credit: Library of Congress*)

Thanksgiving_NY_Sun_25Nov1904_parades Thanksgiving_NY_Sun_25Nov1904_parades2 Thanksgiving_NY_Sun_25Nov1904_parades3

Thanksgiving_NY_Sun_25Nov1904_parades4

New York Sun, Friday, 25 Nov 1904 (courtesy of http://www.fultonhistory.com)

 PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGES: New York City, Thanksgiving holiday scenes, 1911. Courtesy of Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA; VISIT:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2005675293/

Categories: 1900s, Brodhead, Holidays & Festivities, New Jersey, Roosevelt President Teddy, Thanksgiving, Trewin, Woodruff | 6 Comments

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Understanding Russia with a Russian

Almost Home

Genealogy Research and Consulting

Old Bones Genealogy of New England

Genealogy and Family History Research

Out Here Studying Stones

Cemeteries & Genealogy

WeGoBack

family research ... discover your ancestry

the Victorian era

Did I misplace my pince-nez again? Light reading on the 19th century.

Genealogy Technology

Family history for the 21st century

Moore Genealogy

Fun With Genealogy

Meeting my family

RESEARCHING MY FAMILY TREE

Shaking the tree

musings on the journey towards knowing and sharing my family's stories

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