World War I

Excellent pictorial resource on World War I – published 1919

During my garage clean-out operation I came across the very large book War of the Nations: Portfolio in Rotogravure Etchings Compiled from the Mid-Week Pictorial, 1914-1919, published by the New York Times in 1919. It contains some amazing images from World War I such as the ones below. I checked and it is available online so I thought I would pass along the link to anyone who may also find this resource of value. Visit Internet Archive – click here.

book1

book2

book3

book9

book9a

book4

book5

book6

book7

book8

Categories: World War I | 6 Comments

World War I Album Photos — William Boles — Part IV

Here are the remaining photos in my grandfather’s album. I think some of these must have been taken when in training at Camp McClellan in Alabama as one photo contains a large crowd of African Americans. Click on photos to enlarge or view in slideshow format.  Happy Easter, everyone!

Categories: Boles, World War I | 1 Comment

World War I Album Photos — William Boles — Part III

As promised in the previous post, here are some more photos from my grandfather William Boles’ photo album taken while serving in the US Army’s 29th Division 112th Heavy Field Artillery. I’ll post the remainder soon as time allows. CLICK ON AN IMAGE AND THEN YOU CAN VIEW THEM AS A SLIDE SHOW.

Categories: Boles, Trewin, World War I | 2 Comments

World War I Album Photos — William Boles — Part II

As an update to my previous posts on William Boles’ World War I service, I am posting some more photos from his album. There are still 30-40 left to scan and post. I will try to get to that next week.

Meanwhile, for the previous posts, please follow these links:
World War I Itinerary
World War I Itinerary (cont’d.)
NJ WWI Service Medallion
World War I photos

Note: To the above “WWI Itinerary” post I have added two photos showing troops on deck a ship; I presume these were taken either heading over to Europe (on the SS Melita) or coming back (USS Orizaba). I have also added some more links to texts that corroborate the itinerary. I read in this document that a lack of equipment kept the men in William’s regiment from taking part in the American offensive. To view the below photos as a slideshow, click on the first photo and then use the arrows to move to the next photo.

Categories: Boles, S.S. Melita, World War I | Leave a comment

Edward Boles family photos, late 1800s, early 1900s

Edward Boles of Fingreah

Edward Boles of Fingreagh (1855-1940), probably around 1875-1880, taken in Dublin

My great grandfather Edward Boles was born on June 4, 1855, in Fingreagh Upper, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, to James Boles of Fingreagh and Jane Payne. The couple had seven children: Edward, Robert, James, Jane, Alexander, William and Benjamin. Edward died on October 26, 1940, in Dublin. His wife, my great grandmother, was Sarah Nixon. She was one of 14 children of William Nixon and Rachael Millar: Edward, James, William, Elizabeth, Rachael, Jane, Mary, Sarah, Kate, Mark, Benjamin, John, Thomas, and Robert. Supposedly there were two sets of twins. I’m not sure whether they all survived to adulthood, but supposedly, of those who did, Sarah was the only one (or one of the very few) who did not end up emigrating to the US. I have yet to figure out if that was really the case.

Edward (a farmer) and Sarah Boles had six children: John James, Jane Kathleen (“Jennie”), Mary Elizabeth (“May”), William Robert (my grandfather), and Edward Benjamin (“Ben”). Ben’s twin Beulah Sarah died young. My grandfather William R. Boles was 20 when he emigrated to the US (Oct 21, 1912, from Londonderry via the ship Columbia), and I suspect the one photo below was taken on the eve of his departure. It was his Uncle Robert Nixon (one of Sarah Nixon Boles’ brothers), living on Elm Street in Summit, NJ, with wife Blanche, who sponsored him when he initially came to the US.

In front of the Drumkeerin house "Clooneen": Edward Boles seated with wife Sarah holding his left shoulder. In rear: John, Jenny, Mary "May", and Ben. Possibly taken in 1912.

In front of the Co. Leitrim house in Cloneen: Edward Boles seated with wife Sarah holding his left shoulder. In rear: John, Jennie, May, and Ben. Possibly taken in 1912, before my grandfather’s emigration to the US. Edward was tall — over 6′, while Sarah was very petite — 4’11” or thereabouts.

William R. Boles, served in US army in WWI

William R. Boles, served in US army in WWI, while still a British subject.

James Boles and wife Sarah Nixon, probably late 1930s

Great grandparents, James Boles and wife Sarah Nixon, probably mid-1930s; Sarah died in Sept 1938, and Edward in Oct 1940.

Fingreagh Upper (B) and Drumkeeran (A)

Fingreagh Upper (B) and Drumkeerin (A)

Categories: Boles, Columbia, Drumkeeran, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, Nixon, World War I | 2 Comments

William Boles’s New Jersey WWI Service Medallion

We happened upon a box containing this WWI service medallion presented by the State of New Jersey to its citizens who served in the 1st World War. This was awarded to William R. Boles, my grandfather, whose WWI photos and itinerary appear in past blog posts. He never had his name engraved in the rectangular box on the Victory side, but he carried it on a chain so no doubt it meant a great deal to him.

Categories: Boles, World War I | Leave a comment

Some Updated Posts: William Boles & Bertha Woodruff

I recently scanned in a photo of grandfather William Boles in his WWI US Army uniform. Please see the post WWI Itinerary. He was a very handsome young man.

Also uploaded recently were two watercolor paintings by Bertha Winans Woodruff, one of hydrangeas and the other a mixed floral arrangement. You can find them in them in the 9/16/11 post devoted to her. Click here.

Categories: Boles, Woodruff, World War I | 4 Comments

With Gratitude for Our Veterans

On this Veteran’s Day, we give thanks for all our nation’s veterans, including those in our own family. I’m sure I have not gotten them all listed below, but I will add more as I come across them. As you’ll see there are quite a number who served in the Revolutionary War.

And more of some of our family’s veterans:

Revolutionary War

  • Col. Samuel Crow
  • Captain Martinus Westbrook, 3rd Reg. Sussex Co. NJ Militia
  • Pvt. Shubael Trowbridge, Capt. James Keene’s Company, Eastern Battalion, Morris County Militia, also known as “The Rams Horns Brigades”
  • Andrew Dingman
  • Isaac Neumann, Westchester Co. NY
  • Lt. Garret Brodhead
  • Norman Easton
  • Hezekiah Hand
  • Capt. Samuel Drake, served in Captain Jacob Stroud’s company
  • David Wait, Scottish Immigrant

War of 1812

  • Garret Brodhead
  • Hon. Richard Brodhead (1771-1843)

Mexican-American War

  • James W. Angus

Civil War

  • Moses Martin, Company I, NJ 28th Infantry Regiment
  • Pvt. Uzal Trowbridge, Company A, 1st NJ Infantry; killed in action at Gaines’s Mill
  • Pvt. Henry Augustine Trowbridge, Company C, NJ 14th Infantry NJ Volunteers
  • John Barron Jaques Jr., Drummer, Company I, 40th Regiment New Jersey
  • Charles B. Jaques, Assistant Surgeon, Company F & S, 7th Regiment New Jersey
  • William Trewin, clerk, Union Army War Office

World War I

  • William R. Boles

 

Categories: Civil War, Mexican-American, Revolutionary War, Veteran's Day, War of 1812, World War I, WWII | Leave a comment

William Boles’s World War I Itinerary — Part II

I decided to scan the notepad paper upon which William Boles kept track of his WWI whereabouts. So here they are. I especially love how he refers to the US as “God’s country” (page 4). To view photos he took while serving, click here. To view the medal awarded to him by the State of NJ upon his return to civilian life, click here.

Page 1

Page 2

Page 3

Page 4

Categories: Boles, World War I | Leave a comment

William Boles’s World War I Itinerary – Part I

Photo belonging to Wm Boles of the ship either going over or coming back

Photo belonging to Wm Boles of the ship either going over or coming back

William R. Boles, age 25

I discovered a little notebook belonging to William Boles that contains brief details about his WWI whereabouts in service with the 29th Division, 112th Heavy Field Artillery. Thought I would transcribe it to share it here. I have done my best to decipher some of the French towns. The writing in brackets ([]) is mine:

Enlisted July 3, 1917

Left Montclair [NJ] July 25th for Sea Girt [NJ].
Left Sea Girt September 24th
Arrived Camp McClellan [Alabama] Sept. 28th
Left Camp McClellan June 20, 1918
Arrived Camp Mills [Long Island, NY], June 22
Left Camp Mills, June 28

SS Melita

Boarded the good ship Melita at 8 a.m. Friday morning, June 28, 1918 at Pier 2 at West 24th Street, NY [Note: the Melita was built as a passenger ship for the Hamburg-America Line, but ended up being purchased by Canadian Pacific. The ship entered service in January 1918 and was used for troop transport during WWI; to view some ship interiors, click here.]

Pulled away from Pier at 10 a.m. arriving at Liverpool, England, on July 10th. Train for So. Hampton where we arrived late that night, remaining until the following day.
Left S. Hampton, July 11 [via the swift steamer Prince George]
Arrived Le Havre, July 12
Left Le Havre, July 13
Arrived Portiers [Poitiers], July 15
Left Portiers, August 25
Arrived Vannes [Vienne], August 26
Left Vannes, Nov. 11
Arrived Trampot, Nov. 13
Left Trampot, December 6
Arrived Écot, Dec. 7
Left Écot, Dec. 7
Arr. Clefmont, Dec. 7
Left Clefmont, Dec. 9
Arr. Villars, Dec. 9
Left Villars, Dec. 10
Arrived Raincourt, Dec. 10
Remaining there for a sojourn of four months. Leaving on the 11th April 1919.
Arrived Oisseau Petit [Oisseau-le-Petit] on Apr. 13
Left Oisseau Petit [Oisseau-le-Petit] on May 6
Arrived H. Nazaire [St. Nazarine], May 7
Left H. Nazaire, May 11 [via the transport USS Orizaba]
Arriving at Newport News [Virginia] in God’s Country on May the 21st.
Leaving May 28
and [illegible] May 29 [A parade and official welcome took place in Atlantic City]
and returned to civil life on the fourth day of June in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and nineteen.

Photo belonging to Wm Boles of the ship either going over to Europe or coming back

For images of the actual notebook, see next post.
For more on the SS Melita, click here and here.
For more on the 112th Field Artillery Regiment, see pages 17 & 18 of this document. They corroborate the itinerary.
Additional resource on Google Books: 29th Infantry Division: A Short History of a Fighting Division by Joseph H. Ewing, pages 11-17.

Categories: Boles, S.S. Melita, World War I | Leave a comment

Powered by WordPress.com.

Hello Hygge

Finding hygge everywhere

Well, That Was Different

Travel Stories, Expatriate Life, Undiplomatic Commentary and Some Pretty Good Photos

Sketching Family

Urban Sketching

Observaterry

Terry's view on things

Giselle Potter

Illustrator

Emma

Politics, things that make you think, and recreational breaks

The Sketchbook

MOSTLY MONTREAL, MOST OF THE TIME

Smart Veg Recipes

Welcome to home made, vegeterian, healthy & kids friendly recipes

Jane Austen's World

This Jane Austen blog brings Jane Austen, her novels, and the Regency Period alive through food, dress, social customs, and other 19th C. historical details related to this topic.

Travels with Janet

Just another WordPress.com weblog

Do Svidanya Dad

Exploring Dad's Unusual Story From NJ to the USSR

La Audacia de Aquiles

"El Mundo Visible es Sólo un Pretexto" / "The Visible World is Just a Pretext".-

TOWER AND FLIGHTS

In The Beginning Man Tried Ascending To Heaven via The Tower Of Babel. Now He Tries To Elevate His Existence Using Hallucinogenic Drugs. And, Since The 20th Century, He Continually Voyages Into Outer Space Using Spacecrafts. Prayer Thru Christ Is The Only Way To Reach Heaven.

London, Hollywood

I'm Dominic Wells, an ex-Time Out Editor. I used to write about films. Now I write them.

Uma Familia Portuguesa

A história da nossa família

Trkingmomoe's Blog

Low Budget Meals for the New Normal

The Good, the Bad and the Italian

food/films/families and more

dvn ms kmz time travel

This is all about my travels to the past... my reflections and musings about yesteryear, as I find the stories of a people passed away and learn how to tell them.

newarkpoems

350 years of Newark in verse 1666-2016

Russian Universe

Understanding Russia with a Russian

Bulldog Travels

Everything and Nothing Plus Some Pretty Photos

Dances with Wools

knitting, spinning, dyeing, and related fiber arts

Life After Caregiving

On caregivers, faith, family, and writing...

Why'd You Eat That?

Food Folklore for the everyday scholar. These are the stories behind the foods we eat.

Cooking without Limits

Food Photography & Recipes

The Pioneer Woman

Plowing through Life in the Country...One Calf Nut at a Time

Almost Home

Genealogy Research and Consulting

Old Bones Genealogy of New England

Genealogy and Family History Research

ferrebeekeeper

Reflections Concerning Art, Nature, and the Affairs of Humankind (also some gardening anecdotes)

Map of Time | A Trip Into the Past

Navigating Through Someplace Called History

Out Here Studying Stones

Cemeteries & Genealogy

WeGoBack

family research ... discover your ancestry

the Victorian era

Did I misplace my pince-nez again? Light reading on the 19th century.

"Greatest Generation" Life Lessons

This is the story of an ordinary family, trying to live an ordinary life during an extraordinary time frame, and the lessons they learn through experience.

Moore Genealogy

Fun With Genealogy

Meeting my family

RESEARCHING MY FAMILY TREE

Shaking the tree

musings on the journey towards knowing and sharing my family's stories

A Hundred Years Ago

Food and More

Scots Roots

Helping you dig up your Scots roots.

Root To Tip

Not just a list of names and dates

%d bloggers like this: