January 28, 1948: “Back from Gypsy Elopement”

Valentine’s Day is almost here so it seems appropriate to share this little snippet I found among the many newspaper articles my grandmother Fannie Woodruff Brodhead clipped and set aside for safekeeping.

The clipping is about her great niece’s elopement at age 16, to William Bull, 20, in Cape Charles, Northampton County, Virginia. I found the marriage record, which shows the lovebirds got hitched on January 28, 1948. They gave their ages as 21 and 22, respectively. A Newark newspaper picked up on the story with its photo “Back from Gypsy Engagement”.

Obviously this fun-loving couple had a wonderful sense of humor:

Back in Newark NJ] after elopement to Cape Charles, Va., are Abby Sommer Bull, 16, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Sommer of 156 Heller parkway, and William Bull, 20, son of Dr. and Mrs. Louis M. Bull of 92 Heller Parkway. Bridegroom still wears earrings which helped them tell gypsy fortunes to finance trip home after they ran out of cash.

Abby and William were neighbors as you can see from the addresses, so perhaps the families knew that something like this was afoot.

Funny enough, when “googling” William’s name, I happened upon a small article in the January 24, 1914, issue of Horticulture reporting the January 13, 1914, elopement of William’s father Louis M. Bull!

Horticulture by Massachusetts Horticultural Society; Horticultural Society of New York; Pennsylvania Horticultural Society magazine, January 24, 1914

Louis and his bride Gertrude Siebrecht, the daughter of a New York florist (which explains the article’s appearance in Horticulture), were the exact same ages as Abby and William at the time of their elopement–16 and 20. So something tells me that “family tradition” may have also been on young William’s mind as he planned his elopement with his young sweetheart.

And good news: Both marriages lasted a very long time!

Happy Valentines Day, all!

PS: A marriage ban was put into place in June 2018 in New Jersey that prohibited previously allowed marriages at age 16 with parental consent. In Virginia, until 2016, no minimum age for marriage had ever been set.

Another PS for family who may be wondering: Abby was a descendant of James and Wealthy Angus:

  • Her parents: Abigail Van Horn and George Sommer
  • Grandparents: Cecelia Russum Woodruff and Robert Osborne Van Horn
  • Great-grandparents: Wealthy Ann Angus and William Earl Woodruff
  • Great-great-grandparents:  Wealthy Ann Jaques and James W. Angus
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    Categories: Bull, New Jersey, Newark, Essex Co., Sommer, Virginia, Weddings | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

    A Florida Friday: Subtle seasonal changes at the Six-Mile Cypress Slough Preserve

    We’ve visited the Six-Mile Cypress Slough Preserve in Fort Myers twice. Once last March and most recently this past January where we spotted the above alligator coming out of the cool water to sun itself. The cypress trees were bare and missing much of the water they are used to standing in during rainier times of year.

    Many people think of Florida as the land of eternal summer, but that’s definitely not the case. The seasons here are distinctive, as any year-rounder will tell you. Of course, we don’t have the extremes experienced in more northern climates (and most of us probably like it that way), but if you live here long enough or visit at different times of year, you do notice the differences, especially if you come in summer. As you scroll down the photos below, you can see the changes between January (left) and March (right) – (or, perhaps, top/bottom, if you are viewing this on a cellphone/tablet); we visited at the same time of day, but you can see the lighting looks different; summer is on its way.

    Categories: Florida, Nature | Tags: , , | 4 Comments

    Brodhead family’s historic Wheat Plains homestead to be saved and restored by National Park Service

    “Wheat Plains,” the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

    This post is a follow-up to information I shared previously about Wheat Plains, the farmstead located in Pike County, PA, on land whose original Brodhead owners were Revolutionary War veteran Lieutenant Garret Brodhead and his wife Jane Davis. The farmhouse and structures evolved over generations of Brodheads living there.

    The Federal Government-backed Tocks Island Dam project from the 1970s took properties such as this one from their owners, and although the dam project fell through, the US government retained ownership of the properties within the project’s borders. Over time, due to funding issues, the National Park Service was unable to maintain the farmhouse and it fell into disrepair; see my August 2012 post The current sorry state of the Garret Brodhead house.

    Wheat Plains house exterior, 2013, Image copyright: James and Barbara Brodhead

    Fortunately the DePuy / Brodhead Family Association got involved to try to save the structures before they reached the point of no return. See the July 2014 post The Brodhead-Linderman Cemetery: Descendants work on clean up and restoration; the May 2015 post  Garret Brodhead’s Wheat Plains farmhouse – an August clean-up project, and the November 2016 post Garret Brodhead’s Wheat Plains Farm in Pike Co., PA, needs your support.

    The fantastic news, which many of you may have heard, is that last summer at the annual DePuy / Brodhead Family Association reunion, the National Park Service announced its plans to save Wheat Plains. This project will be ongoing and financial contributions* to support it are welcome. Below are excerpts from the recent newsletter I received from the association.

    I want to personally thank the Association’s members for their hard work, dedication, and commitment to preserving the property whose ongoing existence is important not only to our shared family history but also to Pennsylvania’s history and our nation’s history. Thanks to their extraordinary efforts and the NPS’s commitment to the property, Wheat Plains will be enjoyed and celebrated for generations to come.

    *Donations of any size are welcome: DePuy/Brodhead Family Association, 9031 11th Place West, Everett, WA 98204-2694

    The De Puy Brodhead Family Association Newsletter, January 7, 2019

    News reported by Kevin De Puy, President: The biggest news for the Family last year was the announcement from Ranger Kristy Boscheinen, Chief of Special Projects Division of the National Park Service that “Wheat Plains” Revolutionary Homestead of Lt. Garret Brodhead was put on the list for restoration. Wheat Plains is located at mile marker 8 on Route 209 near East Stroudsburg, PA. […] The Family gave a $12,000.00 donation for the restoration process and donations continue to come in, and all donations will be presented this August at this years reunion[**]. The family also did a service project at Wheat Plains joined by Kristy, Ranger Kathleen Hudak two professional young men, one a Marketing Analyst and the other a Historic Building Architect (wish I had their names). We cleared the brush and debris from behind the homestead and up the embankment and cleaned out the water canal in front of the Spring House. The East side of the Homestead was painted and NPS is working on clearing up the mold in the cellar so a major support beam can be replaced. This restoration is going to be several years endeavor and should be the main focus of the Family and I can see our Family having a reunion at Wheat Plains in the Fall when all is said and done. We can mosey around, having fun much like they did back in the day. Again, I would like to remind everyone that the DePuy side has just as much a vested interest in this as do Brodhead. Elizabeth DePuy, daughter of Nicolas DePuy ( Fort DePuy at Shawnee on the Delaware ) was married to General Daniel Brodhead, the brother of Lt. Garret Brodhead, and I imagine the General and Elizabeth may have frequented Wheat Plains quite a few times. This does not mean that we will not support nor take on other endeavors; Wheat Plains should be at the fore front.

    **Reunion scheduled for August 24, 2019, 9 a.m., tentatively at the Bushkill Meeting Center, 6414 Milford Road (route 209), East Stroudsburg, PA 18302. For more information, contact James and Barbara Brodhead at 614 400 9581.

     

    Categories: Brodhead, De Puy (De Pui), Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

    A Florida Friday: Wood Stork on a mission

    This is perseverance… at one point this Wood Stork drops the fish and seems to momentarily question the wisdom of what it’s doing… meanwhile, another wood stork ambles by in the background, along the water’s edge… when I drove by an hour later, this little fellow/gal was still at it.

    Categories: Florida, Nature | Tags: , , , | 4 Comments

    Elizabeth, NJ, circa 1849: Life at the Angus home on Elizabeth Avenue

    Yummy quince preserves from France found at our local Tuesday Morning store

    A few days ago, I made an unexpected discovery at our local Tuesday Morning store: jars and jars of quince preserves, not a common sight here. And that reminded me of a very interesting post I’d planned to do a while back but never got around to.

    Many descendants of the Angus family may already be familiar with the information I am about to disclose, but on the off-chance these details never found their way down your branch of the family tree, I will go ahead and share.

    Lovett’s illustrated catalogue of fruit and ornamental trees and plants for the autumn of 1891. Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection.; J.T. Lovett Company. Credit: www. biodiversitylibrary. org/page/42764492

    A while back, I did a post mentioning the fact that almost every yard in America within the right growing range would have once featured a quince tree; it was a fruit that was essential to the process of canning and preserving food. Well, a letter reveals that in addition to numerous other types of fruit trees, my/our second-great-grandparents Angus had a quince tree on their 927 Elizabeth Avenue, Elizabeth, New Jersey, property. I know this because I came across a copy of a letter that mentions the trees and a few more interesting things about the Angus family’s life in the mid-1800s.

    Thomas F. Russum, son of Thomas and Cecelia (Angus) Russum and one of the many Angus grandsons, copied the letter on February 24, 1934, on his letterhead stationery (address 6 Seneca Avenue, White Plains, New York). The original letter had been written circa 1849 by a roughly nine-year-old Isaac G. de G. Angus to his godmother in Mexico. Thomas copied the letter before passing it on to Isaac’s son Addison Clark Angus, who was then living at 1833 Chestnut Street in Philadelphia.

    I surmise that Thomas must have found the letter among old family papers and decided to send the original letter—which evidently the godparents returned to Wealthy Angus after learning of Isaac’s 1885 death at age 45—to Addison, Isaac’s sole surviving child. (For some background on the Mexico connection, please refer to this past post.)

    Angus family home at 927 Elizabeth Avenue, Elizabeth, New Jersey, from 1848-1871; the house was torn down a long time ago. A law office occupies this land today.

    Isaac’s letter, though brief, is absolutely wonderful. Nowhere else have I ever seen/heard/read anything about the Angus household at that time. So, if you have never seen this letter before, I hope you will enjoy reading it. (I have retained the spelling but have added some punctuation for readability and some bracketed information.)

    My dear Madrina [Godmother],

    My Ma has just written you a letter so I think I will follow her example and write one too. We are all pretty well. We have another little brother. His name is George Welsh. I wish you could see him. He is a very nice little baby and we like him very much. My Pa and Ma wishes very much that you was here. They talk of you and Dona Margarita and Pepa everyday. Jacob [Jacob Baker Angus, 1844-1850] has forgotten all his Spanish and they are afraid that Jimmy [James Winans Angus Jr. 1841-1897] and I will too. Ma hears us read and gives us a lesson almost every day. Won’t you come and live with us. You would like this country. I like it very much. My Pa has got a big house and a very nice garden with apples, pears, plums, quinces and other fruit in it. And he has got a very pretty carriage and horse and some chickens and two little pigs. Give my love to Dona Margarito a Pepa. Tell my Padrino [Godfather] I think he might write me a letter if he ever thinks of me. Give my love to him and all my other friends such as Don Bernardo’s mother. We live in the next house to my Grandpas [Isaac Jaques] and we go there every day. I have no more to write now. You must answer this soon.

    Your affectionate godson
    Isaac Gabriel de Guadalup Angus

    Still Life: Fruit, Bird, and Dwarf Pear Tree by Charles V. Bond, American, 1856

    The letter was written after the birth of George Welsh Angus (13 May 1849) and before the death of Jacob “Jimmy” Baker Angus (8 June 1850 – scarlet fever).

    The family had departed Mexico in early 1849, after a roughly seven-year stay, due to father James’s health issues. It seems likely that young Isaac wrote this letter in summer/fall when the thought of fruit trees would have been top of mind for a child.

    Isaac writes about liking his new country. Even though he was born in Elizabeth, he’d spent the bulk of his life thus far in Mexico City. Returning to daily life in Elizabeth must have been a huge adjustment for him and his siblings. Certainly they must have enjoyed being next door to their grandfather Isaac Jaques and grandmother Wealthy Cushman Jaques who would have been in their mid- to late-50s at that time and, no doubt, delighted to have daughter Wealthy and her growing family back in their midst.

    View Near Elizabethtown, N. J., oil painting by Régis François Gignoux, 1847, Honolulu Museum of Art

    The contrasts between Mexico City (oldest capital city in the Americas, with a population probably somewhere in the neighborhood of 200,000 by 1850) and Elizabeth (1850 population: 5,583) must have made a big impression on the family, as I’m sure did the difference in climate. New Jersey winters are usually cold and bleak. The painting on the left, painted two years before the Anguses returned home, shows just what wintry conditions may have awaited them. For Wealthy and James especially, their Mexico life and their adventures there during the US-Mexico War must have lingered in their minds for a very long time. And, until they’d fully acclimatized themselves, daily life in Elizabeth may have seemed a bit boring. Of course, the city of Manhattan, with its population of ~500,000 was close by, so perhaps they were happy to come home and get caught up on all the changes that had taken place in their absence. This was, after all, HOME.

    I can’t help but wonder what kind of reception the family received from the community when they returned to live in Elizabethtown.  There must have been a lot of curiosity about these somewhat “exotic”” neighbors with their unique international experiences and ability to speak Spanish.

    Bird’s-eye view of Mexico City as seen from convent of San Cosme (1847). Panorámica de la ciudad de México desde el convento de San Cosme (1847). Artist: N. Currier (Wikimedia Commons: In Public Domain in US (70 years) and Mexico (100 years)

    From the letter, we can see that Wealthy was tutoring the children daily, trying to make sure the children would not forget their Spanish; young Isaac does not mention his younger sister Mary Martha who was probably about three at the time. (Another six children would make their appearances between 1850 and 1861, one of them being my great-grandmother Wealthy Ann Angus Woodruff.)

    Photograph of Isaac G. de G. Angus, Princeton 1860 grad, from the collections of the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, Princeton, NJ. Reproduced here in low resolution with their permission. Call number AC-104, Box 117.

    Obviously the family had warmly embraced their Mexican friends and now, with such distance between them, only had letter-writing as a way of remaining in touch. The fact that the godparents returned this letter to mother Wealthy Jaques Angus after Isaac’s death in 1885, some 35 years after they’d left Mexico, indicates that the families remained in contact.

    It would be fabulous to know who these godparents and friends in Mexico were. Unfortunately I have not come across those details yet.

    If anyone out there has more information about anything related to this post, please do share. Thank you.

     

     

     

    Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., Mexico, New Jersey, Russum | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

    Family recipe Friday: “Yummy eggs” recipe from 1932 children’s cookbook

    I love the cover of this 1932 children’s cookbook. The little girl looks so serious about getting her dough rolled out just right. I detect a tiny bit of frustration. My mother remembers trying out many of these recipes as a child in the kitchen with her mother. “Yummy eggs” is one she has mentioned through the years somewhat nostalgically, but this is the first time I’ve actually taken the time to look through the little book to review all the recipes on offer. In Mom’s honor I fixed her some of these eggs yesterday morning for breakfast. Super easy recipe but I never cooked eggs that way before. Anyway, her happy smile said it all.

    Cover of my Mom’s well-worn copy of Kitchen Fun: A Cook Book For Children, 1932, by Louise Price-Bell

    Recipe from my mother’s very well-worn copy of Kitchen Fun: A Cook Book For Children

    Categories: Food: Family Recipes & Favorites | Tags: , , , | 4 Comments

    Isaac G. de G. Angus (1840-1885) – Part II

    Photograph of Isaac G. de G. Angus, from the collections of the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, Princeton, NJ. Reproduced here in low resolution with their permission. Call number AC-104, Box 117.

    In April 2015, I posted quite an extensive write-up on Isaac G. de G. Angus, which included a fair amount of information about his parents, my second-great-grandparents, James W. Angus and Wealthy Jaques Angus. For that post, please click here. I’m publishing this “Part II” today, not that it is a continuation of that post, but rather simply a bit more information about Isaac, including a photo, and his time at Princeton University, information I found while visiting Princeton University’s digitized online archives.

    Due to ownership/copyright restrictions, it’s best that you go to the site yourself to view these items/request copies for your own files. (See links below.)  I did pay for a high-resolution version of the image, but I am not permitted to publish it here.

    Princeton’s archives include a letter dated September 5, 1859, written by James W. Angus. Isaac must have had some behavioral issues that barred him from returning for his senior year. The letter pleads with Dr. John Maclean to allow Isaac to return, vouching that he (Isaac) much regrets his inappropriate behavior (which appears to have involved alcohol) and seems a changed person who is ready to get back to business at Princeton. If Isaac were to fail again, James promised not to bother Dr. Maclean any further. Obviously Princeton agreed to take him back since he graduated in 1860.

    Also available via Princeton’s archives is a small note with accompanying envelope, both written by Isaac’s wife Susan Robinson on December 9, 1986, advising Princeton that her husband had passed away.

    I hope you enjoyed this little tidbit about the Angus family. Have a great day!

    P.S. I believe this image of Isaac may be on Find a Grave, perhaps in higher res.

    Princeton Links:

    http://findingaids.princeton.edu/collections/AC339/c0008

    http://findingaids.princeton.edu/collections/AC104.02/c4758

    Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., New Jersey | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

    Family recipe Friday: Sarah Nixon Boles’s custard supreme

    Edward and Sarah (Nixon) Boles

    This handwritten recipe came from my mother’s grandmother Sarah Nixon Boles about whom I have written previously. Whether she wrote this out for my grandparents Boles during their 1935 visit to Ireland or sent it to them in the mail at their Elizabeth, NJ, address, I don’t know, but this is her handwriting, and the recipe must have been a family favorite for it to get such special treatment.

    Custard Supreme recipe, 1930s

    I like custard; I know some people are not fond of it; but I find it to be great comfort food. Before publishing the recipe here, I felt compelled to give it a try, and I must say it came out very well and was so delicious my husband came back for more. I’m sure this is probably meant to be served in a somewhat warm and runny state over cake/with fruit, etc., but this is SW Florida, and it seemed more fitting to chill it for several hours to serve with fresh strawberries.

    As for recipe tips, when it says to cook until spoon is coated, basically just insert a metal spoon and see if a film gathers on it. It does not have to be thick. And it takes quite a bit of time to completely fold in the egg whites at the end, so maintain your patience there.

    Custard supreme with strawberries

    As an aside, several years ago, I made a request on the Find a Grave website (which sadly (IMO) was taken over by Ancestry) for someone to photograph the graves of Sarah Nixon Boles (1855-1938) and her husband Edward Boles (1855-1940), and finally someone managed to do it in late 2016, right before my annus horriblis (2017) got underway so I never managed to mention it here until now. They are buried in the Kentstown Churchyard Cemetery, Balrath, County Meath, Ireland, alongside their son John who died in a road accident in December 1935. Here is a link if you are interested in “visiting” their final resting place.

    Categories: Boles, Food: Family Recipes & Favorites, Nixon | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

    “Walking” around the 1870s and “bumping into” two amazing sisters

    Business card from the Chiropodal Institute, operating at 208 Broadway, at the corner of Fulton Street, New York City

    I found Dr. W. E. Rice’s business card on the floor of my mom’s garage when I was clearing it out last spring. I have no idea whose it was or why they chose to keep it, or why nobody in the last 149 threw it out. And, seeing as how it’s been “here” so long, I certainly wasn’t going to be the one to do it. Besides, it’s kind of fun to look at, warts and all. Imagine all the feet shuffling along Broadway in agony in the 1870s only to enter No. 208 to have their “lives” transformed.

    As you can see, I managed to trace this podiatry business back to the 1870s. It was not hard to do (but what came next was a big surprise). My quick Google search brought up two copies of Woodhull & Claflin’s Weekly, a publication I’d never heard of. One issue from February 14, 1874, and the other from September 13, 1873. Expecting it to be an average, mild-mannered magazine from that period, I quickly realized this was an entirely different animal, for along with the masthead’s proclamation:

    P R O G R E S S ! F R E E  T H O U G H T ! U N T R A M M E L E D  L I V E S !
    BREAKING THE WAY FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS.
    …my visit to the ad pages at the end of each issue turned up ads for the services of clairvoyants and mystics, and an illustrated mail-order book about sexual physiology, mentioning words one never would expect to find on the pages of any Victorian-Era publication.

    Dr. Rice’s ad in the September, 13, 1873, issue of Woodhull & Claflin’s Weekly

    My first thought was: why did Dr. W. E. Rice decide this was a good place to advertise?! Assuming there was method to his madness, I decided to do a bit of research on Woodhull & Claflin’s Weekly, initially thinking, of course (given the time), that this was a paper named after two gentlemen. Two eccentric gentlemen? Perhaps, my mind wandering, this Woodhull was some descendant of Abraham Woodhull, the Washington spy…? (Watch the AMC TURN series, if you have not already.) But, no, what I found was something even more interesting: amazingly this was a publication, a highly controversial one, produced by two sisters: Victoria California Woodhull and her younger sister Tennessee Celeste Claflin.

    From the February 14, 1874 issue; the sisters had many followers and no doubt made a small fortune from these sales.

    Way ahead of their time, and perhaps even ahead of our time in some ways, the two tackled all sorts of subject matter, including women’s suffrage, free love, supposed scandals (some of their own invention), vegetarianism, and spirituality, and made their mark in some then men-only careers. They were among the first women to run a publication; they were the first women to operate a brokerage firm on Wall Street; they were leaders of the women’s suffrage movement, and Victoria even ran in the presidential election of 1872. The running mate she named? Frederick DouglassWoodhull & Claflin’s Weekly did not last too long; at its height, 20,000 issues were sold, but over time, the controversies associated with its content (mostly written by the two sisters, Victoria’s husband Colonel Blood, and an anarchist by the name of Stephen Pearl) and its own scandals dragged it down. Advertisers fled. By 1876, it was breathing its last.

    Cabinet photograph of Victoria C. Woodhull. Albumen silver print on card. Date between 1866-1873. Source: Harvard Art Museum/Fogg Museum, Historical Photographs and Special Visual Collections Department, Fine Arts Library; Author Mathew Brady (1822-1896). US PUBLIC DOMAIN – Wikimedia Commons

    Fortunately for me (and you, if you are interested in learning more), the Museum of the City of New York has a blog that has published a two-part story about these Ohio-born sisters, the children of a snake oil salesman father and a religious fanatic mother, and how they ended up in Manhattan befriending Cornelius Vanderbilt, and I encourage you to give it a look when you have time. Their lives were truly fascinating. (For Part I, click here, and for Part II, here.)

    When I come upon such interesting historical figures, whether I agree with their thoughts and views or not, I wonder why I’ve never heard of them before and realize, in the overall scheme of things, I know very little about American history beyond what I learned in school. Discoveries like this always make me want to learn more.

    Tennessee Celeste Claflin. Author Geo. Stinson & Co., publishers, Portland, ME. Source: Wikimedia Commons – US PUBLIC DOMAIN

    I was somewhat surprised to learn that later in life these two firebrands walked back and even reversed many of their positions, and that they eventually moved to England and lived out their lives there…  I was expecting a much more fiery finish in this country for these ladies. But, nonetheless, they made their mark, and are worth knowing about in this 21st century of ours.

    Anyway, I hope you’ve learned something new by stopping here today.

    I am now tucking Dr. Rice’s business card away for one of the younger crowd to find some day.

    Categories: 1870s, Advertisements, Claflin Tennessee, Woodhull Victoria | 1 Comment

    A Florida Friday: Relax and watch some manatees float by…

    For a little Friday relaxation, you may enjoy watching some manatees floating down the springs at Blue Spring State Park on their way to the St. John’s River. On cold winter days, manatees are typically abundant here as the springs remain a constant 72 degrees year round. Blue Springs State Park is in Orange City, Florida, an easy drive from Orlando, if you ever happen to visit the area. We did not see many on the day we were there, even though it was very chilly, but the sight of these three floating by made our trip especially worthwhile.

    To see what’s happening right now, check out the live webcams! In 2018, 485 manatees spent the winter here–imagine that!

    Dr. Charles B. Jaques, son of Isaac Jaques and Wealthy Ann Cushman, and brother of my second-great-grandmother Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus

    On a family history note, these springs (of which there are many in central and northern Florida) are not far from Enterprise, FL, the place my second-great-grandmother’s nephew, Charles Jaques Jr., passed away on May 10, 1886, at age 22. He was the son of Dr. Charles Jaques and Katherine Louise De Forrest.

    Enterprise is just 7.5 miles from Orange City, and I can’t help but wonder whether Charles came upon these springs in his travels around this area, which back then (mid-1880s) would have been frontier land and just starting to get populated.

    From the 1850s – 1880s, the St. John’s River was an important transportation route, and steamboats would have landed regularly at Blue Springs Landing. It seems possible that Charles would have made his way here via a St. John’s River steamboat, and I’d like to think that he saw manatees in the springs and the river along the way, sightings he would surely have reported back to friends and loved ones, and hopefully he had a chance to do that.

    There is something very special and memorable about manatees, and if you ever get a chance to visit Florida in the winter, do your best to try to see some.

    Categories: Florida, Jaques, Manatees, Miscellaneous | Tags: , | 3 Comments

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    Genealogy - Looking For "Dead People"!

    Cemeteries of Brunswick, Maine

    To live in the hearts we leave behind, is not to die. ~ Thomas Campbell

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