Posts Tagged With: family history

Annual Reunion of DePuy and Brodhead families – August 24, 2019; ‘Wheat Plains’ GoFundMe page available

“Wheat Plains,” the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania – Image from my family’s private collection

If you are a DePuy or Brodhead descendant and have not heard, the Association for these two families is holding its annual reunion on August 24th this year. It starts at 9 AM at the National Park Service’s Bushkill Meeting Center at 6414 Milford Road (Rte 209) in East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania. There will likely be a voluntary service project followed by dinner the day before – places still TBD.

To register your participation, you first need to join the Association ($20/year) so that you can receive its quarterly newsletters. The reunion fee is $12.50 per individual or $20 per couple. Funds go towards lunch & meeting room costs.  Contact:  DePuy/Brodhead Family Association, 9031 11th Place West, Everett, WA 98204-2694. Email: depuy.brodhead.family.assoc@gmail.com

By the way, I also just noticed that a GoFundMe page was set up a while back to raise funds for the renovations needed at the historic Brodhead ‘Wheat Plains’ house. There is a $100,000 goal. Click here. The Association is working on other ideas that could help raise funds and build awareness. The house and its grounds certainly mean a great deal to Brodhead descendants and the descendants of other families who settled in that part of Pennsylvania way back in the early 1700s; hopefully a broader base of support will emerge over time, however. As word spreads of the need to preserve this house and others like it in the area, I sure hope people start opening their wallets, if only to give a small gift.

Anyway, back to the reunion, if you’ve never been to this part of Pennsylvania, especially in the summertime, you are in for a treat if you go!

Categories: Brodhead, De Puy (De Pui) | Tags: , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus (1815 – 1892)

Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus – early in her marriage (m. 1839); image from my family’s personal collection.

Today’s post shares an obituary that must surely be familiar to many Angus descendants, but since some may never have seen it, I am including it in this blog. It was originally published in the Elizabeth (NJ) Daily Journal on March 7, 1892. My grandmother typed up the below copy for her two sons.

I have done numerous posts about the James and Wealthy Angus family, so if you are visiting this blog for the first time, you can use the directory on the side of the page to find all the posts relevant to the Angus family. You can also use the search box.

Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus, born on 15 December 1815, was the daughter of prominent Manhattan tailor Isaac Jaques and his first wife Wealthy Cushman. At age 23, she married 28-year-old James Winans Angus.

Piece of Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus’s wedding dress – plaid was quite common in those days. This dress would have been her “best dress” for only the most special of occasions. It was also worn by her daughter (my great grandmother) Wealthy Ann Angus Woodruff (fabric and accompanying note from my family’s personal collection).

Roughly five years into the young couple’s marriage, his coach-making business took him from New Jersey to Mexico City. Eventually she and their two young children joined him, sharing part of the journey—the trip across the Vera Cruz Mountains—with a young Ulysses S. Grant, who had just recently graduated from West Point.

James’s coach-making business took a back seat when the Mexican-American War (1846-1848) broke out. Appointed a commissary by General Winfield Scott, James was responsible for providing supplies to the US Army. The obituary contains other exciting details from their life in Mexico, and I will let you enjoy reading them yourself.

Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus, widow of James Winans Angus, circa 1890; image from my family’s personal collection.

Wealthy was widowed at age 47 and left with 10 children to tend to. Of the 10, only two were over the age of 18. Without James, the family breadwinner, finances naturally became exceptionally tight. Yet somehow she managed to keep the ship afloat, selling off bits and pieces of real estate James had purchased during their married years, and no doubt relying on her older children, once working, to help out on the home front. Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus died of kidney disease* in 1892. She was 74.

Angus family home in Elizabeth, NJ, from 1848-1871. It stood at 927 Elizabeth Avenue.

My grandmother Fannie B. Woodruff Brodhead (Wealthy Angus’s granddaughter via daughter Wealthy Angus Woodruff) was fiercely proud of her Angus roots. Born 11 June 1882 (137 years ago tomorrow!), she was nearly 10 when her grandmother Angus died—old enough to have many memories of time spent visiting her grandmother at the big Angus house at 927 Elizabeth Avenue, Elizabeth, NJ.

Unfortunately, I was just a little 5-year-old when my grandmother died, so I never had a chance to ask her anything of importance. But, here I am a half century later, doing my bit to pass along family history details nonetheless; details she left behind in the hope someone would take up the mantle. Fortunately, someone usually does. I think she would be pleased to know this obituary still has an audience all these years later.

*One Line of Descendants of James Angus by Harriet Stryker-Rodda, Certified Genealogist, Elizabeth, NJ, 1969

Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus obituary – copied by my grandmother, a granddaughter via Wealthy’s daughter Wealthy Angus Woodruff, for her two sons.

Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., Grant, Gen. Ulysses S., Mexican-American, Mexico, New Jersey, Scott General Winfield | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Irene Bell Wait of Perth Amboy, New Jersey—my new theory

Irene Bell Wait (b. 1764) married my fifth great-grandfather David Wait (b. 1754, Edinburgh, Scotland) on 21 April 1874. They lived in Perth Amboy, Middlesex County, New Jersey.

A recent comment left on my post Irene Bell Wait, one of my brick walls, which I wrote nearly 7 years ago, prompted me to go back and re-read it. You know, whenever I read my old posts, which isn’t very often, I kind of come away amazed that I managed to come up with so much information. Maybe some of you fellow family history bloggers feel the same way: “Did I write all that??!”

Anyway, that first post mentions an Andrew Bell, a witness to David Wait’s will, which was executed on October 29, 1810, shortly before David succumbed. His wife Irene Bell had died in 1804 at age 39, leaving him with 11 children, many of whom were still very young when he died. Twenty-year-old daughter Margaret was left a house in which she was to raise her younger siblings.

I wanted to try to connect Andrew Bell with Irene Bell as this was the first time I actually sensed I had a lead as to her possible identity, but my attempts to link the two failed.

My latest theory, and it’s only a very loose theory at the moment, was spawned by a reexamination of materials I’d already read and the discovery of a few new ones, and that is that Andrew Bell (b. 1757) and Irene Bell (b. 1764) were half-siblings.

This hinges on “Andrew Bell” being the Andrew Bell who was born in 1757, in Philadelphia, to English-born John Bell (cir. 1725-1778) and his first wife Hannah Smith, daughter of Frederick Smith of Philadelphia, hatter.* One other child, Cornelia Bell, was born in 1755. She eventually married William Paterson, one of the signers of the Constitution. She is mentioned on the website www.constitutionfacts.com under the heading “The Women Behind the Signers of the U.S. Constitution” (note: the birth and death dates are incorrect).

Andrew Bell and his father John Bell were Loyalists, while Cornelia was pro independence. How the family dealt with these divided loyalties is reflected in the numerous letters Cornelia wrote to her brother during the war years. You can read about this in the book Past and Present: Lives of New Jersey Women

At some point, the marriage between John Bell and Cornelia and Andrew’s mother Hannah Smith ended, and John Bell remarried on 27 April 1763, to widow Annaatje “Anna” Meyer Tilden (1731-1819, daughter of Johannes Pietersz Meyer and Elizabeth Pell**; Find a Grave memorial #16213136). Anna Meyer’s first husband Captain Richard Tilden had died in October 1762 in Philadelphia. They had been married for roughly 11 years and had had two children:

Richard, who died in infancy, and John Bell Tilden, December 1762-1838 (Find a Grave memorial #16213149). Obviously, given the second son’s name was John Bell Tilden, the Tildens had some very close connection to John Bell. And, clearly, John Bell did not hesitate to leave Hannah to go take care of the Captain’s widow and her infant son.

From p. 465-466  of Volume IX of The Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, we can read the following about Captain Richard Tilden and son John Bell Tilden (note that the latter’s birth year here is given as 1761; his tombstone says 1762):

The Tilden or Tylden family is one of great antiquity in England; as far back as the reign of Edward III. We find William Tylden paying aid for land in Kent, when the Black Prince was knighted. ( I ) The first Tilden of whom we have record in America was Captain Richard Tilden of England, who died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. October, 1762. He married Anna Meyer, born in New York, August 31, 1731, daughter of John Meyer and Elizabeth (Pell) Meyer, and granddaughter of William and Elizabeth (Van Tuyl) Pell. She bore him two sons: John Bell, see forward, and one who died in infancy. (II) Dr. John Bell Tilden. son of Captain Richard and Anna (Meyer) Tilden, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, December 9, 1761, baptized in the Episcopal church, and died July 31, 1838, in New Town, now Stephen City, Virginia. He was a student at Princeton College at the time of the revolutionary war and left college to join the Continental army, receiving a commission as ensign. May 28, 1779, in the Second Regiment Pennsylvania line, commanded by Colonel Walter Stewart. He was subsequently promoted to second lieutenant, his commission to date from July 25, 1780. His regiment left York, Pennsylvania, for the southern campaign in the spring of 1781, and he was present at the siege of Yorktown and surrender of General Cornwallis.  At the close of the war he was honorably mustered out of service, and became a member of the Pennsylvania Society of the Cincinnati. During his entire service he kept a diary, which is now in the possession of the Pennsylvania Historical Society, in Philadelphia. Pennsylvania. Dr. Tilden settled in Frederick county, Virginia, where he practiced medicine until the close of his life. Some time prior to 1824 he was ordained to the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal church, and during the agitation of the question of lay representation, he advocated the equal rights of the laity with the clergy in the legislative department of the church, for which he and other prominent members were expelled for so-called heresy. In 1872 the church admitted its error by adopting lay representation into its polity. Long before the subject of African slavery took a political shape, Dr. Tilden manumitted his slaves and sent them to Liberia with one year’s outfit. Dr. Tilden married August 9, 1784, Jane Chambers, born in York county, Pennsylvania, December 18, 1766, died May, 1827, (laughter of Joseph and Martha (McCalmont) Chambers, of York, Pennsylvania. [It goes on to list all the children and their progeny.]

******************************************

John Bell was 38 when he married Anna Tilden. She was 32, so it would have been highly plausible for her to have had more children. Was Irene Bell, one of my fifth great-grandmothers, a product of this union?

Irene Bell was born in 1764. When John Bell died in 1778 at his Bellfield Estate in Bridgewater Township, Somerset County, New Jersey. Irene would have been about 14. The fact that she is not mentioned in John Bell’s will does not seem surprising to me given her age. Note to self to try to find Anna Bell’s will. Perhaps, Irene is mentioned in it.

John Bell’s will appears on page 40 of the New Jersey, Abstract of Wills, 1670-1817 (accessible via Ancestry website, and probably Family Search). In his will, John leaves the following:

  • $500 to wife Anna Meyer Tilden Bell;
  • $200 to ex-wife Hannah Smith;
  • “a negro” to stepson John B. Tilden, who was anti-slavery (as per the Virginia biographical info above) and surely would have freed this individual;
  • “a negro woman, Delia, and her son Rory” to daughter Cornelia Bell;
  • “house and fifty acres of land in Bridgewater Township, Somerset County” to son Andrew Bell;
  • “All my lands in Earls Colne, in County of Essex, England” to friend Mark Grime of Witham, County Essex, England;
  • Residue of Estate to Anna Bell, Cornelia Bell, Andrew Bell, and John Tilden.

*******************************************

Last reflections:  Irene Bell married David Wait in 1784; it had struck me before that some of the names in their family Bible appeared to be the German/Dutch variants. If Irene’s mother was from a Dutch community and had a Dutch upbringing, as Anna Meyer did, this may explain why a few names in the family Bible sound Dutch. Also, her first two sons were named David and John. Perhaps, David’s father was also David.  If Irene’s father was John Bell, the name John would have been thoroughly appropriate for a second-born son.

In one of my past posts, I’d mentioned that there was some confusion as to which side of the Revolutionary War events David Wait was on. Given what I’ve learned recently—about Perth Amboy being a Loyalist stronghold during the War—the version of him coming to America as a member of the British forces and subsequently being captured now makes the most sense. It would also make sense that David felt comfortable marrying into a Loyalist family. The War had only officially ended a little more than six months prior to their marriage.

****************************************

If you have read this far, you are probably someone interested in this family line. Please let me know if you ever find anything that corroborates (or refutes) my “theory”; I will certainly keep chipping away at this. Hopefully we can all get this figured out some day!

PS: I will say that I am very confused by the fact that John Bell had two wives and took the second one while the first was still living. I’ve been doing some reading on marriage, etc. during the pre-Revolutionary Colonial period. Divorce was very uncommon. I will have to look into this some more, but from what I’ve read thus far, the laws in place would likely only have condoned divorce in cases of abuse, adultery, cruelty, or abandonment, and would not have awarded the guilty party the opportunity to remarry while the wronged party was still alive. So was Hannah Smith the guilty party here? Did her actions lead to a divorce and John Bell’s remarriage to Captain Tilden’s widow?

John Bell Tilden was born in December 1872, two months after his father Captain Richard Tilden died. Did Anna name the baby John Bell Tilden because John had been supporting her financially and morally? They married four months after the baby was born.

******************************

*See page 40 of the New Jersey, Abstract of Wills, 1670-1817

**Ancestry.com. New York City, Compiled Marriage Index, 1600s-1800s [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.

Categories: Bell, Loyalists, New Jersey, Perth Amboy, Presbyterian, Revolutionary War, Wait, Woodbridge | Tags: , , | 6 Comments

New book published on General Daniel Brodhead’s daughter Phebe, her husband and their descendants

Author Curtis Dewees recently notified me that his book Joseph and Phebe Dewees of Grayson County, Kentucky and Their Descendants has just been published. It can be ordered from the Grayson County Historical Society, via their Facebook page.  Paypal is accepted; or the book can be ordered by mail at the Society’s address: Grayson County Historical Society, PO Box 84, Leitchfield, Kentucy 42755. The cost is $26.05, including state sales tax and shipping costs.

Congratulations, Curtis!

Categories: Brodhead, Kentucky, Miscellaneous | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Continuation of January 9 post: More Woodruff farm photos from mid-1920s

I forgot I had these two other photos when I did my January 9th post on the Woodruff farm.

My great-grandmother Wealthy Ann Angus Woodruff (5 August 1850 – 27 May 1927) with her grandsons, Charles Brodhead (my Dad) and Richard Angus Brown, outside the barn on the Woodruff farm off Conant Street in Hillside, New Jersey

I have no idea who these ladies and the little girl are, but I’m assuming they worked on the Woodruff farm as this photo was together with the other two.

I offer the below as a comparison; you can see the boys all grown up and ready to go to war. They appear in reverse order in the second photo.

Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., Hillside Union, New Jersey, Woodruff | Tags: , , | 4 Comments

Brodhead Reunion in Kingston, New York, in June 1964

Some of you may remember the post I did several years ago on the 1964 Brodhead family reunion in Kingston, NY, which was held to commemorate the 300th anniversary of Daniel Brodhead and Ann Tye’s arrival in America. Click here to head back to it. Recently I found the below article and photo on Fulton History. I don’t recognize any of these folks, but I thought some of you may. Give a shout out in the comments section if you see one of your family members or want to comment on the reunion in general. Thanks!

Brodhead family reunion in 1964 – just a few of the many Brodheads present for the event

Categories: Anniversaries, Brodhead, Kingston, New York | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Fowler T. Brodhead (1828-1902), famed linguist and foreign language teacher to President Grover Cleveland

New York. Grand ovation to Governor Cleveland in the city of Buffalo, October 2nd. Scene on Main Street / From sketches by C. Upham. 1884. (Credit Library of Congress digital archives http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3c07331); Cleveland was 28th Governor of NY (1983-1985) and prior to that had been Mayor of Buffalo in 1882.

While perusing some old papers on Fulton History, I came across several exceedingly sad obituaries for the very gifted and talented Fowler Thayer Brodhead, who at one point in his life had taught foreign languages to a young Grover Cleveland (1837-1908), but in later years seems to have completely withdrawn from society. He died at 75 from what appears to have been a great deal of self-neglect, in spite of having substantial financial means at his disposal. While the articles seize strongly upon what became of Fowler after his mother’s passing in 1885, an event that supposedly sparked his mental and physical decline, his gifts and talents cannot be denied and deserve to be remembered, especially by those of us who share his Brodhead DNA.

From the Illustrated Buffalo Express, February 16, 1902: “Fowler T. Brodhead, famed as a linguist, teacher of Grover Cleveland, later a hermit, was buried in the Brodhead family plot in Forest Lawn last Friday. […] The story of his life is a tale of sadness. His father came to Buffalo from Hudson in 1830, a lawyer and graduate of Williams College, whose wife was Miss Nancy Thayer of Lee, Mass. The first American Brodhead was Captain Daniel Brodhead of the Yorkshire Regiment that came from England in 1664 and wrested New Netherlands from the Dutch. The Brodheads lived at Washington and Huron streets in 1837 and for years thereafter. The father was a law partner of Judge Masten. Fowler Brodhead was born in Hudson in 1828. He attended Fay’s Academy at Washington and Huron streets and then went to Albany to study medicine. He returned to Buffalo without finishing his course and studied French and German. He taught in the high school and gave private lessons. He became known as a proficient linguist, speaking several languages fluently. It, was related of him that be once sat down with a Frenchman, German, Italian and Spaniard and conversed with the four, each in his own language, fluently, and with ease. He wrote poems in several languages and wrote a play, The Burning of Buffalo, for the old Metropolitan Theater.”

I checked the online records for Forest Lawn Cemetery in Buffalo and found Fowler and his parents William W. Brodhead and Nancy Thayer Brodhead. I went ahead and created memorial pages for them on the Find a Grave website. The three are located in Section: BB Lot: 143-N PT Spaces 1, 2, 3.

Volume 4 of The Brodhead Family has William listed on page 303. William Wheeler Brodhead (F-401) was the son of Luke Brodhead (1777-1845); Luke was a son of Daniel Brodhead and Hester Wyngart and a brother of my fifth-great-grandfather Garret Brodhead. William was baptized on 10 September 1797 at Linlithgo RDC, Livingston, Columbia County, NY, and married Nancy Lucretia Thayer on May 25, 1825 in Westfield, MA.  William “lived in Red Hook, NY at the time of his marriage and later lived Buffalo, NY where he was an attorney in 1850 and a private school teacher in 1860.” Fowler is listed as G-1226, but no information is given for him.

The newspaper articles point to Fowler’s withdrawal from society as coinciding with the death of his mother Nancy in 1885; he died with $4,000 to his name which was a substantial sum in 1902 (about $111,000 today). He lived at 82 10th Street in Buffalo; where the house once stood is now a vacant lot.

A notice of sale that appeared in the Buffalo New York Courier on October 24, 1903, offers the names of several Brodheads: two of Fowler’s nieces and a great-nephew. Charlotte Brodhead and Mary Gertude Brodhead (b. 1829 and 1837 respectively) were daughters of James Oliver Brodhead (1803-1841; Brodhead Family F-404) and wife Caroline Wackerhagen. James Oliver Brodhead was the brother of William W. Brodhead. Francis Reynolds Brodhead (b. 1863) was a nephew of the two sisters via their brother Thomas C. Brodhead (1835-1877), son of James Oliver Brodhead.

As sad as Fowler’s end was, clearly his was a life well lived at least up to a certain point. I’m glad I came upon his story. I do not want him to be forgotten especially since he had no wife or children to pass his story down along the line to today’s generations.

Illustrated Buffalo Express – 16 February 1902 (Credit: FultonHistory dot com)

***************************************

Buffalo Morning Express, 12 February 1902 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

Buffalo Morning Express, 12 February 1902 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

***************************************

Buffalo NY Courier 12 Feb 1902 (Credit: Fulton History)

***************************************

Buffalo New York Courier, 24 October 1903

Categories: Brodhead, Cleveland Grover, Death, New York, Obituaries | Tags: , | 2 Comments

1872 obituary for Garret Brodhead, husband of Cornelia Dingman

Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832) – Photo Credit: James & Barbara Brodhead

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851); Photo Credit: James & Barbara Brodhead

I recently came upon this obituary notice for my third-great-grandfather Garret Brodhead (d. January 8, 1872), husband of Cornelia Dingman and father of Albert Gallatin Brodhead, Daniel Dingman Brodhead, Andrew Jackson (A.J.) Brodhead (my second-great-grandfather), and Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead.  Much of what I’d known of Garret is contained in this post.  The obituary offers wonderful details—who wrote it, I have no idea, but it was someone who had been well acquainted with Garret and Pike County men of Garret’s generation.

Reference is made to Garret’s favorite book Modern Chivalry by Breckenridge; we find out he was living with son A.J. and family in Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe) for about a year before his death; we learn where he was during the War of 1812, that he was a Protestant in the Calvin tradition and a Democrat in politics; and we learn he was extremely interested in his Dutch roots.

Coincidentally, I, too, have been thinking lately about my Dutch roots in the sense that I feel like I need to learn much more about them, so it was interesting to me that Garret had a real preoccupation with them rather than his English roots which probably made up a good 50% of his DNA.

In any case, if you are a descendant and have not yet seen this obituary, I hope you will enjoy reading it as much as I did and that you’ll find out a few new things about our shared ancestor.

Port Jervis Evening Gazette – January 1872 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

 

Categories: Brodhead, Death, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Obituaries, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

September 17, 1922, Golden Anniversary: Garret Brodhead & Annie Kocher

PHOTO & LIST OF NAMES: COURTESY OF MICHELLE CAUSTON. Celebratory gathering of Brodhead family members on the occasion of the 50th wedding anniversary of Garret Brodhead and wife Annie Kocher – September 17, 1922. I have cropped the original image which extends upwards into the skyline. 

The guest list – courtesy of Michelle Causton

Thanks to Brodhead descendant Michelle Causton, I am able to publish here today this marvelous, nearly 100-year-old group photo of the many Brodheads who gathered together on September 17, 1922, to celebrate the Golden Anniversary of Garret Brodhead and Annie Kocher.  Garret (1848-1936) was the son of Andrew Jackson (AJ) Brodhead and Ophelia Easton Brodhead, who had 10 children. He married Annie Kocher (b. 1849) on September 17, 1872. Anyone with more details, such as venue, etc., please feel free to comment below. And do please point out any mistakes I make in this post.

Of the ten children of AJ and Ophelia Brodhead, seven were still alive when this photo was taken. Those who had already passed away were:

  • Calvin Easton Brodhead, d. April 29, 1907 (wife 1 and wife 2 predeceased him)
  • Robert Packer Brodhead, d. May 12, 1922
  • Andrew Douglas Brodhead, d. May 6, 1917 – my great-grandfather

Garret’s siblings James Easton Brodhead, Charlotte Elizabeth Brodhead, Jean Struthers Brodhead, Emily Linderman Brodhead, and Richard Henry Brodhead are all present in the photo.

Only one living sibling appears to have been absent: John Romeyn Brodhead.

I found the numbers in the original image hard to read in some cases, so here is a version that is better labelled in that regard.

Updated to display the numbers better

And for better searchability, I am retyping the list here. Garret’s siblings are in bold. Garret’s (#39) and Annie’s (#41) children are in italics. Many of the young children pictured belonged to Garret and Annie Brodhead’s son Calvin (#27) who married Gertrude McNulty (#28) and converted to Catholicism.

1. James I. Blakslee
2. Madeline McCormick
3. Rollin Crellin
4. Mrs. W. H. Fregans
5. Mr. W. H. Fregans
6. Joseph C. Fuller
7. Henry S. Hampson, Sr.
6. Francis Brodhead
9. Alexander Brodhead, Jr.
10. Mr. Everett (Drove JIB)
11. James E. Brodhead, Jr.
12. William Brodhead
13. Mr. Houghton (Rector)
14. Charles D. Brodhead
15. Frank M. Brodhead
16. Fred Moon
17. Emily E. Brodhead
18. Edith L. Brodhead
19. Alex L. Brodhead, Sr.
20. Mrs. Frank M. Brodhead
21. Ophelia Hampson
22. Mrs. Conrad Kocher Brodhead
23. Conrad Kocher Brodhead
24. Ruth Randall (Brodhead) Fuller
25. Garret Brodhead
26. Laura Leisenring Brodhead
27. Calvin Easton Brodhead
28. Mrs Calvin Easton Brodhead (Gertrude McNulty)
29. Mrs. Garret Brodhead, Jr.
30. Mrs. Fred Moon, Jr.
31. Anna L. Brodhead
32. Mrs. Robert P. Brodhead – Fannie Loveland – widow of Robert Packer Brodhead
33. Miss Bessie Loveland (Fannie Loveland Brodhead’s sister Elizabeth Shepard Loveland)
34. Miss Annie Wasser
35. Mr. Charles Ashley Blakslee
36. Mrs. Charles Ashley Blakslee (Jean Struthers Brodhead)

37. Miss Hannah Leisenring
38. Mrs. Alonzo P. Blakslee
39. Mr. Garret Brodhead
40. Garret B. Fuller
41. Mrs. Garret Brodhead (Annie Kocher)
42. Mr. James E. Brodhead
43. Mrs. James E. Brodhead (Hattie Boyd)
44. Mrs. Frank Burk (Charlotte Elizabeth Brodhead Burk)
45. Mrs. Fred Moon, Sr. (Emily Linderman Brodhead Moon)
46. Mrs. Andrew Douglas Brodhead (Margaret Lewis Martin)
47. Mrs. Richard H. Brodhead (Jane V. Smock)
48. Mr. Richard H. Brodhead

49. Anne K. Brodhead
50. Daniel D. Brodhead
51. Edith D. Brodhead
52. Susan W. Brodhead
53. Boyd Brodhead
54. Mrs. Boyd Brodhead
55. Walter Brodhead
56. Edward Brodhead
57. Laura Brodhead, Jr.
58. Katharine Brodhead
59. Jay C. Fuller
60. Mary H. Brodhead
61. Mrs. Fred P. Prosser (Mary B. Brodhead, m. 1926)
62. Louise Moon
63. Henry Hampson, Jr.
64. Mr. Walter Brodhead
65. Cornelia Moon
66. Philip Brodhead
67. “Patches”
68. William Brodhead
69. ???
70. Gertrude Brodhead (Scott)

Although my family tree for Garret and Annie Brodhead is full of holes, I am including what I have here in the event it helps someone connect more dots; of course anyone with updates or errors to comment on, please feel free to do so in the comments box below.

1-Garret Brodhead b. 11 Feb 1848, Mauch Chunk, Carbon Co., PA (Jim Thorpe,
PA), d. 11 Jul 1936, Woodbridge, Middlesex Co., NJ
+Annie Kocher b. 25 Aug 1849, Mauch Chunk, Carbon Co., PA (Jim Thorpe, PA), d.
After 1920
|–2-Conrad Kocher Brodhead b. 19 Jul 1873, d. After 11 Jul 1936
|–2-Andrew Brodhead b. 19 Jul 1873, Pennsylvania, United States, d. 12 Jul
| 1876, Metuchen, Raritan, Middlesex Co., NJ
|–2-Alonzo Blakslee Brodhead b. 26 Dec 1875, d. 5 May 1907, (Mauch Chunk
| Cemetery, Jim Thorpe, Carbon Co., PA)
| +Dent
|–2-Laura Leisenring Brodhead b. 21 Sep 1878, d. After 11 Jul 1936
|–2-Calvin Easton Brodhead b. 21 Sep 1878, Metuchen, NJ, d. 20 Mar 1945, Ohio
| +Gertrude McNulty b. 1881
| |–3-Sister Ann Marie Brodhead d. After Jun 1964
| |–3-William McNulty Brodhead b. Cir 1906, Red Bank, NJ
| | +Unknown
| |–3-Katharine Brodhead
| |–3-Father Phillip Brodhead
| |–3-Mary Halpin Brodhead
| |–3-Laura Leisinring Brodhead
| |–3-Gertrude Brodhead
| |–3-Edward Joseph Brodhead b. 1918
| | +Doris Pettigrew b. Cir 1918
| |–3-Daniel Dingman Brodhead b. 1922
|–2-Brodhead b. 6 Mar 1883, Perth Amboy, Middlesex Co., NJ
|–2-Ruth Randall Brodhead b. 7 Mar 1884, d. After Jun 1964
| +Joseph Cheever Fuller b. , West Newton, MA
| |–3-David Randall Fuller d. After Aug 1964
|–2-Brodhead b. 3 Jan 1887, Perth Amboy, Middlesex Co., NJ
|–2-Garrett Brodhead Jr. b. 3 Feb 1888, d. 13 Apr 1926, Saranac Lake, Franklin
| Co., New York
+Gertrude Pfeiffer b. 15 Dec 1886, d. 10 Oct 1967, Perth Amboy, Middlesex
Co., NJ

This image provides me with a first glimpse of many “AJ/Ophelia” descendants such as Emily Brodhead Moon’s son (#16), daughter-in-law (#30), and their granddaughter Cornelia (#65, behind “Patches”). Also, Walter Brodhead (#55, sitting with the kids), son of James Easton Brodhead and wife Harriet (“Hattie”);

Close up front row – lots of adorable grandchildren and the delightful family dog “Patches”

Middle section with senior family members – #32: Fannie Loveland (widow of Garret’s brother Robert Packer Brodhead); #35 & #36: Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ashley Blakslee – Mrs. Blakslee is Jean Struthers Brodhead, one of Garret’s sisters; #39 and #41: Garret & Annie (Kocher) Brodhead; #44 and #45 are Garret’s sisters Charlotte Elizabeth Brodhead Burk and widow Emily Linderman Brodhead Moon; #42 & #43: Garret’s brother James Easton Brodhead and wife Harriet Locklin Boyd; #46 is my great grandmother Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead, widow of Andrew Douglas Brodhead; #47 and #48 are Garret’s brother and sister-in-law Richard H. Brodhead and wife Jane V. Smock.

Mostly the middle-aged children, nieces and nephews, cousins…

I see my grandfather Frank Brodhead top left, and my grandmother Fannie Woodruff far right. They must have left my Dad (age 1.5) and his brother home (age 10) 😦

**************************************
As an aside, after Trudy M. kindly commented (below) that the venue for the anniversary gathering was probably the home of her grandparents Calvin & Gertrude Brodhead in Glenburn, Pennsylvania, I was curious as to where Garret and Annie Brodhead lived at that time. I assumed New Jersey. I found the obituary notice, which stated 180 Green Street in Woodbridge, NJ. The house, built in 1916, still stands and over two dozen photos remain on “Realtor” from a 2016 sale. Anyone who is interested can view the listing here.

Categories: Anniversaries, Brodhead, New Jersey | Tags: , | 4 Comments

January 28, 1948: “Back from Gypsy Elopement”

Valentine’s Day is almost here so it seems appropriate to share this little snippet I found among the many newspaper articles my grandmother Fannie Woodruff Brodhead clipped and set aside for safekeeping.

The clipping is about her great niece’s elopement at age 16, to William Bull, 20, in Cape Charles, Northampton County, Virginia. I found the marriage record, which shows the lovebirds got hitched on January 28, 1948. They gave their ages as 21 and 22, respectively. A Newark newspaper picked up on the story with its photo “Back from Gypsy Engagement”.

Obviously this fun-loving couple had a wonderful sense of humor:

Back in Newark NJ] after elopement to Cape Charles, Va., are Abby Sommer Bull, 16, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Sommer of 156 Heller parkway, and William Bull, 20, son of Dr. and Mrs. Louis M. Bull of 92 Heller Parkway. Bridegroom still wears earrings which helped them tell gypsy fortunes to finance trip home after they ran out of cash.

Abby and William were neighbors as you can see from the addresses, so perhaps the families knew that something like this was afoot.

Funny enough, when “googling” William’s name, I happened upon a small article in the January 24, 1914, issue of Horticulture reporting the January 13, 1914, elopement of William’s father Louis M. Bull!

Horticulture by Massachusetts Horticultural Society; Horticultural Society of New York; Pennsylvania Horticultural Society magazine, January 24, 1914

Louis and his bride Gertrude Siebrecht, the daughter of a New York florist (which explains the article’s appearance in Horticulture), were the exact same ages as Abby and William at the time of their elopement–16 and 20. So something tells me that “family tradition” may have also been on young William’s mind as he planned his elopement with his young sweetheart.

And good news: Both marriages lasted a very long time!

Happy Valentines Day, all!

PS: A marriage ban was put into place in June 2018 in New Jersey that prohibited previously allowed marriages at age 16 with parental consent. In Virginia, until 2016, no minimum age for marriage had ever been set.

Another PS for family who may be wondering: Abby was a descendant of James and Wealthy Angus:

  • Her parents: Abigail Van Horn and George Sommer
  • Grandparents: Cecelia Russum Woodruff and Robert Osborne Van Horn
  • Great-grandparents: Wealthy Ann Angus and William Earl Woodruff
  • Great-great-grandparents:  Wealthy Ann Jaques and James W. Angus
  • Categories: Bull, New Jersey, Newark, Essex Co., Sommer, Virginia, Weddings | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

    Powered by WordPress.com.

    Lee's Birdwatching Adventures Plus

    Birdwatching from a Christian Perspective

    Story_Trails

    Family history in stories recalled by Edie and Leo. Edith GAYLORD Allen, Leo ALLEN, Jr

    Princes, Paupers, Pilgrims & Pioneers

    “There are two lasting bequests we can give our children: One is roots, the other is wings.” Teaching children values and giving them the opportunity to excel is essential to good parenting. However, I feel I must also provide my children (and myself) insight into the ones who came before us: our ancestors whose lives and stories have shaped us into who we are. This is my journey; these are their stories…

    Myricopia

    Exploring the Past to Improve the Future

    Buddha walks into a bar ...

    Sits down with The Two Doctors and .....

    Elves Choice

    Holiday Bargains & Recipes

    MarileeWein.com

    DOUBLE GENEALOGY: the ADOPTION WITNESS

    Tastes of Health

    Passionate about Health, Fitness and easily prepared Delicious Food

    Applegate Genealogy

    Helping others discover their roots

    allenrizzi

    Sempre in Movimento! Published Every Friday at 12 PM EST

    Cooking Without Limits

    Food Photography & Recipes

    THEVYPEFFECT

    all about travelling in korea

    My Descendant's Ancestors

    Tips, Tools and Stories for the Family Historian

    Smart Veg Recipes

    Welcome to home made, vegeterian, healthy & kids friendly recipes

    ICI & LA NATURE PICTURES

    Walk and Bike in France. www.icietlanature.com

    The Lives of my Ancestors

    Lives, Biographies and Sketches of my Family History

    Down the Rabbit Hole with Sir LeprechaunRabbit

    Serious about Genealogy? Let this Olde Grey hare show you about

    Diggin' Up Graves

    Genealogy and family history, dirt and all.

    Momoe's Cupboard

    Low Budget Meals and Ideas

    Generations of Nomads

    On the Trail of Family Faces, Places, and Stories Around the World

    Your daily Civil War newspaper [est. 1995]

    All the Civil War news fit to re-print

    Nothing Gilded, Nothing Gained-Author Adrienne Morris

    Books, Art and the Writing Life at Middlemay Farm

    Travels with Janet

    Just another WordPress.com weblog

    Uma Familia Portuguesa

    A história da nossa família

    The Good, the Bad and the Italian

    food/films/families and more

    newarkpoems

    350 years of Newark in verse 1666-2016

    Russian Universe

    Understanding Russia with a Russian

    Almost Home

    Genealogy Research and Consulting

    Old Bones Genealogy of New England

    Genealogy and Family History Research

    Out Here Studying Stones

    Cemeteries & Genealogy

    WeGoBack

    family research ... discover your ancestry

    the Victorian era

    Did I misplace my pince-nez again? Light reading on the 19th century.

    Genealogy Technology

    Family history for the 21st century

    Moore Genealogy

    Fun With Genealogy

    Meeting my family

    RESEARCHING MY FAMILY TREE

    Shaking the tree

    musings on the journey towards knowing and sharing my family's stories

    A Hundred Years Ago

    Food and More

    Scots Roots

    Helping you dig up your Scots roots.

    Root To Tip

    Not just a list of names and dates

    Food Perestroika

    Adventures in Eastern Bloc Cuisine

    Being Em | From Busan to America

    this journey is my own, but i'm happy to share.

    TWISTED LIMBS & CROOKED BRANCHES

    Genealogy - Looking For "Dead People"!

    Cemeteries of Brunswick, Maine

    To live in the hearts we leave behind, is not to die. ~ Thomas Campbell

    %d bloggers like this: