Posts Tagged With: genealogy

1812 marriage certificate for Isaac and Wealthy (Cushman) Jaques

Today I am posting a copy of the original 1812 marriage certificate that belonged to my third-great-grandparents, Isaac Jaques and Wealthy Cushman. It was among the numerous papers and clippings saved by my grandmother. I wish it contained details that would be helpful with connecting the Mayflower dots—e.g., the names of Wealthy’s parents. I assume the marriage took place in either New York City, where Isaac was making a career as a tailor, or Hartford, Wealthy’s birthplace. The couple and their children did not relocate to Elizabethtown, NJ, until 1843.

The pastor’s name was “N. Bangs”. This may very well have been Nathan Bangs, the self-taught itinerant theologian who was very well known at that time. He kept a diary of his travels and eventually wrote a history of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Canada and the US.

Categories: Bangs Nathan, Cushman, Elizabeth, Union Co., Jaques, Methodist Episcopal, New Jersey, Weddings | Tags: , | 2 Comments

The Brackens of Blacklion, County Cavan, Ireland

Anna Bracken Nixon, b. 23 August 1847

The materials for today’s post come courtesy of John Boles of Dublin, whose grandfather Rev. William Armstrong Bracken (b. 1853) was the younger brother of Anna (Bracken) Nixon (b. 1847). She was the mother of sweet-spirited Jennie (Jane) and Louise Nixon, who have already appeared on the pages of this blog. Anna married Edward Nixon on July 11, 1883, in Blacklion Methodist Church, County Cavan, Ireland, with her brother, Rev. William Armstrong Bracken, presiding.

Jane “Jennie” Nixon, eldest child of Anna Bracken and Edward Nixon; taken somewhere near Belfast, John believes

William and Anna Bracken were two of the children of William Copeland Bracken of Toam, County Cavan, and Jane Armstrong of Inishmore, County Fermanagh, who were married on November 6, 1846, in the Old Church of Derryvullan, County Fermanagh.  A description of what remains of that church appears in the 1979 book by Alistair Rowan, North West Ulster: The Counties of London Derry, Donegal, Fermanagh and Tyrone (Yale University Press): DERYVULLAN OLD CHURCH: 1 km SW of Tamlaght Bridge. The ruins of a big hall, 28 ft wide, rebuilt in 1776. The E gable with its round-headed window and some 30 ft of the N wall still stand. In the gable a carved head taken from the medieval church on the same site.

Bracken family cousins (left to right): Jennie Bracken, eldest daughter of Rev. William Armstrong Bracken; May and Louie Bracken, daughters of Hugh Bracken, Blacklion merchant; Jennie Nixon, daughter of Anna Bracken and Edward Nixon; Ena Bracken, daughter of Hugh Bracken. A reunion with Jennie Nixon, who was visiting from the US.

The other children of William C.  and Jane Bracken were Mary Jane Bracken (b. 1849), Hugh Bracken (b. 1851), James Bracken (b. 1855), and Dr. George Bracken (b. 1858). The Bible pages John sent me show that they were all born in Tuam, townland in County Cavan that includes the border village of Blacklion. It was here in an inn that the founder of Methodism John Wesley purportedly found shelter one stormy night in the 1770s. And, according to John, “the Brackens were devoted Methodists right back to the time of John Wesley.”

The family’s devotion as Methodists is on display in a wonderful book by Reverend Alexander Fullerton, a traveling preacher who documented his decades of travel in Fifty Years an Itinerant Preacher : Being Reminiscences of Fifty Years in the Irish Methodist Ministry (Belfast; Irish Methodist Publishing Company, Ltd., 1912). I am grateful to John for alerting me to this book’s existence and providing me with the pages  mentioning Anna Bracken Nixon.

Interestingly the preacher met Anna both in Blacklion, when she was a young girl (1861) and a young woman (1872), and when she was living in the US (1896). She had moved there after she married Edward. He had emigrated to the US with some of his other siblings in 1868. (As an aside, Edward Nixon was my great-grandmother Sarah (Nixon) Boles’ oldest brother; thus Anna was my mother’s great aunt. My mother met her several times and remembers her with great affection.) The Reverend also mentioned meeting up with Robert Nixon, another brother of Sarah Nixon Boles who had ended up in the US and eventually sponsored my grandfather when he emigrated in 1912.

Below are the pages John sent me as well as a bare-bones family tree just so you can follow who’s who. These are some wonderful slices of life that have been preserved, thanks to the Reverend’s diligence in recording all of his travels in such amazing detail. Unfortunately the book is not available online, but Google books allows you to search for snippets, so if you are interested in seeing if other family members are mentioned, you can at least satisfy your curiosity by using their search box.






Categories: Bracken, Co. Cavan, Co. Fermanagh, Ireland, Nixon, Northern Ireland | Tags: , | 2 Comments

112-year-old Brodhead family guestbook — post XI

So these are the last pages of the guest book, which entered into use in June 1908 and, as you’ll see, came to a close on May 31,1913.  At that point, my grandparents were both 31, and that was right about when my grandmother gave birth to her second son Frank Martin Brodhead Jr., so now with two babies to tend to who were just a year apart, using the guestbook must have drifted far into the background.

Robert Packer Brodhead

Infant Frank died 11 months later, and the jolliness of the couple’s early years of entertaining vanished as they descended into a deep chasm of grief. A condolence letter from my grandfather’s Uncle Robert Packer Brodhead (shown here) bears witness to the shock waves felt across the family. Robert, too, had lost his namesake—his first-born child Robert Jr. who died of diptheria at 10. The letter of May 24, 1914:

Dear Frank and Fannie: Doug’s message [Andrew Douglas Brodhead, Frank’s father] came, last night after we had gone upstairs, we thot best not to disturb the family and wait until this morning. Well, I can’t tell you how we all with one accord wished we could comfort you, and our hearts went out to each of you as only hearts that have experienced a loss can go— This morning Mr. Haynes preached about the Angels of Heaven, what they did, and said, among other comforting things, that surely the littlest ones who come into the world had an angel assigned them by God. And how comforting it is to think that your little one was just picked up from this old world and wafted up and up and up into the very presence of God where there is no more sighing or crying or aches or pain. Don’t look into the grave, just look up, and let the grace of God which passeth all understanding guide, comfort, and keep you. We all send our tenderest love. Affectionately, Uncle Bob

In October 1917, my grandparents lost their next child, at birth—a little girl who was never given a name. I can’t begin to imagine what impact that must have had on them.  When my Dad appeared in 1921, alive and well, albeit a bit small since he was a bit early, my grandparents must have walked on eggshells with worry for a long time. But, as the initial birthdays passed, the worry must have given way to relief. My Dad was one who lived life to the full, joining the Marines in WWII and learning to fly small planes; his zest for life and adventurous pursuits must have given them pause at times. They definitely nixed his desire to be a commercial pilot, and that was his big regret later in life. He absolutely would have loved that profession.

But, back to these last two pages. Now, it was very interesting to see the name Mrs. Isaac J. Ayers (October 26, 1909) because this was my grandmother’s Aunt Phoebe, the younger sister of William Earl Woodruff, and I have never seen her mentioned anywhere else in all the materials I have—no photos, letters, etc. I have written about the Ayers family previously so click here if you are interested in going to that post.

The remaining five people on the page and the two on the last page:

  • Erwin D. Grace (sp.?) – Jan. 30, 1910 – 587 Westfield Ave. – “With Miller.”
  • Manley Miller – Jan. 30, 1910 – 591 Westfield Ave. – “Nuf Sed”
  • Netta Miller – May 30, 1913 – 591 Westfield Ave. – “I can’t wait to have this again”
  • Mrs. Thomas F. Russum – Jan. 1st 1910 – 806 Colfax St. Evanston, Ill.
  • Mabel T. Dickinson – Nov. 11, 1911
  • Miss Mary Knowles – May 31st 1913
  • Miss Gertrude Knowles – May 31st 1913

I don’t know who Mr. Grace or the Millers were, but Mrs. Thomas F. Russum was the daughter-in-law of Cecelia Bensley Angus Russum, my grandmother’s aunt. You’ve heard me talk about her before.

Mabel T. Dickinson (1880-1967, third child of Dr. John W. Dickinson and Mary Emma Woodruff) was my grandmother’s first cousin and older sister of past visitor Anna Dickinson Lorentz (b. 1886). Mabel never married.

The Knowles house in Elizabeth, NJ

And the last two visitors were the Knowles girls; these must have been granddaughters of Mary Martha Angus Knowles and Austin Fellows Knowles—the folks who lived in that beautiful old house on Elizabeth Avenue. Mary and Austin had six sons. I’ll have to research the names of their children when I have time for that.

So that’s the guestbook! I hope those of you who have followed along have enjoyed seeing all the pages. And, I think it’s good that they are here for future visitors to come across and perhaps stumble into an ancestor or two.

Adieu for now!

Categories: Brodhead, Dickinson, Knowles, Russum, Woodruff | Tags: , | 2 Comments

112-year-old Brodhead family guestbook — post X

We are nearing the end of the guestbook. Here are two of the last four pages.

On the first page shown below, only the name Anna Dickenson Lorentz stands out to me. This was my grandmother’s first cousin on the Woodruff side of the family. Mary Emma Woodruff (1846-1923) was my great-grandfather William Earl Woodruff’s older sister. She married John W. Dickinson (b. 1843), a dentist, in 1874. They had four children: John (b. 1875), Mary (b. 1877), Madel (b. 1880) and Anna (b. 1886). Anna, who was four years younger than my grandmother, married Douglas C. Lorentz sometime after my grandmother’s own wedding on June 8, 1908, as she appears in my grandmother’s list of wedding gifts under her maiden name.

  • Florence A. Thompson – March 7, 1909 – Goshen, NY
  • Mrs. Isabelle S. Van Riper – March 8, 1909 – 210 Park Ave., Paterson, NJ – “Just Jamie and I for a call”
  • Anna Dickenson Lorentz – March 10, 1909 – 60 Ward St., Orange, ?
  • Hazel M. Knott – March 13, 1909 – 256 South Clinton St, East Orange, NJ
  • Harriet N. Ackerman – March 13, 1909 – 154 Rahway Ave., Elizabeth, NJ
  • Nellie E. Baldwin – 931 South St., Elizabeth, NJ

Elizabeth Daily Journal, Dec. 23, 1898

Mrs. Thomas B. Russum was my grandmother’s aunt Cecelia Bensley (Angus) Russum. Both she and Thomas Bayley Russum have been mentioned in this blog before.

As for Marietta B. Earl, I learned that she was a granddaughter of Marietta (Crane) Earl and Edward B. Earl, who were married on 19 Jan 1859 and subsequently had a large number of children: The 1880 census registered Elizabeth (20), Annie (15), Marietta (10), Grace (1), and Florence (6 mo.), Edward Jr. (16), William (12), Fannie (7), and Alice (4). Daughter Marietta died of consumption in Tucson, Arizona, on 21 December 1898 (see clipping); she’d have been about 28.  The 1900 census, in addition to the above and minus Marietta, showed a brother George (18) and a granddaughter Marietta B. (6). So, evidently one of the siblings named a daughter after Marietta.

The Hillside Times, January 11, 1945

The 1920 census recorded Edward (then 83) and Marietta (then 82) residing with never-married daughters Elizabeth (age 52), Annie (50, dressmaker), Grace (40, nurse), and Florence (39, teacher).

So going back to the guestbook, Florence A. Earl was Marietta B. Earl’s aunt, and Marietta B. was about 15 when she paid my grandparents a visit. As I’ve said before regarding the Earls, there may have been some familial connection (my great-grandfather was William Earl Woodruff, after all), but how far back it goes, I have no idea. Meanwhile I do know that all of these folks went to First Presbyterian Church in Elizabeth, so that may explain the close friendships.

For this family’s Evergreen Cemetery plot, visit their Find a Grave entry. It includes:  Elizabeth Littell Earl,18601944 /// Anna May Earl,18651938 /// William Alexander Earl,18671925 /// Marietta Benton Earl,1870–1898  /// Fannie Crane Earl,18731882 /// Alice Maxwell Earl Crane,18761951 /// Sarah Margaret Earl,18771879 /// Grace Earl,1878–1936  /// Florence Adelaide Earl,18801972 /// George M Earl, 18821963

Categories: Dickinson, Earl, Elizabeth, Union Co., Heirlooms, New Jersey, Russum, Woodruff | Tags: , | Leave a comment

112-year-old Brodhead family guestbook — post IX

Charles C. Martin in a photo of a family gathering circa 1916; PHOTO COURTESY OF James Brodhead of Everett, WA, personal family collection

Here are a few more pages from my grandparents’ guest book. There aren’t many more to go, so this series will be coming to an end soon. I’m publishing three pages here, and unfortunately, I have no idea who most of the visitors were. Only my Dad’s favorite uncle – Charles Conrad Martin – and Claiborne B. Baker (my Dad’s uncle by marriage; first husband of Flora Woodruff) stand out. So I will simply type out the entries for the search engines to pick up. Someday someone out there may find a name here of interest. I do see some Lewises, but whether these Lewises were related to Margaret Lewis (Martin) Brodhead (my grandfather’s mother), I don’t know. Likewise, I see some Potters. Way back in my family tree (Wait/Crow line) there were some Potters. These may have been related to those, although that seems doubtful. 

Mrs. E. W. Brown – Nov. 29, 1908 – Elizabeth, NJ
William Wolverton – December 9, 1908 – Easton, PA
Mabelle Irene Riggleman – December 12, 1908 – Newark, NJ
Naomi Simons – December 12, 1908 – Newark, NJ
J. Edgar Johnston – December 12, 1908 – Newark, NJ
Fred B. Simons – December 12, 1908 – Newark, NJ
W. Potter – December 18, 1908 – Elizabeth, NJ

Gertrude Potter – December 18, 1908
G. W. Hall (or Ball?) – December 20, 1908 – Elizabeth, NJ
Mrs. G. W. Hall – December 20, 1908 – Elizabeth, NJ
Phoebe F. Lewis – January 6, 1909 – Millburn, NJ
David F. Lewis – January 6, 1909 – Millburn, NJ
George R. Hamill (?) – January 17, 1909 – Elizabeth, NJ
H. M. Hefner – January 17, 1909 – Elizabeth, NJ – “Had a dandy drive 1:15 p.m.”

Claiborne B. Baker – February 7, 1909 – Cranbury, NJ
Charles C. Martin – February 24, 1909 – Tompkinsville, Staten Island
Grace G. Condit – February 27, 1909 – 55 Lincoln Ave, Newark, NJ
Fanny Evans – February 27, 1909 – 401 Valley St, South Orange, NJ
Anna K. Keeliver (?) – February 27, 1909 – 142S – 11th St, Newark, NJ
Jamie M. Pittenger – February 27, 1909 – 58 Arlington Ave, Newark, NJ

Categories: Baker, Barksdale, Brodhead, Martin | Tags: , | 4 Comments

Photo of some Angus children circa 1870 – need help with identifications

Here is another photo that I could use some help with. I have tentatively labelled these young fellows based on some resemblance I see with images I’ve come upon of Charles (1852-1938) and Job (1856-1936) as old men. I have never seen a photo of Walter (1861-1945) so I am just guessing there. These were the three youngest sons of James and Wealthy Angus. I think this would have been around 1870. Anyone with some thoughts on who’s who, please chime in. Thank you!

Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., New Jersey | Tags: , | 2 Comments

112-year-old Brodhead family guestbook — post VIII

James Easton Brodhead

The most notable guests on this page were my grandfather’s Uncle Jim and wife: James Easton Brodhead (1851-1943) and Harriet Locklin Boyd (1852-1935), who resided in that big old house in Flemington, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, I have mentioned before.

Cropped from “Mitchell’s 1880 State, County and Township Maps of New Jersey, Maryland and Delaware”

In the ‘Residence’ section, we see that they were en route to Perth Amboy, probably to visit his brother Garret Brodhead (1848-1936) and family, and in the ‘Remarks’ that they were traveling by auto. There were a number of automobiles in existence in 1908. Click here to see what those with means were riding in at that time.

Categories: Brodhead, Elizabeth, Union Co., Flemington, New Jersey, Perth Amboy | Tags: , | Leave a comment

112-year-old Brodhead family guestbook — post VII

Moving further into October, I see Walter Prince Angus (1861-1945) and his wife Edith B. Marshall (1866-1917) came to visit my grandparents on October 1, 1908. This was my grandmother’s Uncle Walter on her mother’s side of the family. He was the youngest child of James and Wealthy Angus and the youngest brother of my grandmother’s mom Wealthy Ann Angus Woodruff. Visiting with them was their daughter Hazel D. Angus (cir. 1887 – after 1920). They also had a son named Edgar (1888-1919) who died at 29 of “gas asphyxiation”. I don’t know the circumstances, unfortunately, but a couple of old Asbury Park newspaper articles I found indicated that he suffered from mental health issues and had been a patient at Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital in Morris Plains, NJ, at one point.

Regarding Walter, I know that he started off as a machinist and at one time worked in that capacity at the Singer Sewing Machine plant in Elizabeth Port.  In 1920, he was working as a superintendent for an oil company.  He died on January 12, 1945, of “broncho-pneumonia,” according to the records of the First Presbyterian Church of Elizabeth.

Joseph Cheever Fuller (6) and Ruth Randall Brodhead Fuller (24) at the 50th wedding anniversary celebration for her parents Garret Brodhead and Annie Kocher. September 17, 1922. (Image credit: Michelle Causton)

On October 3rd, Ruth Randall Brodhead came to visit. This was one of the daughters of Garret Brodhead and Annie Kocher and the sister of Calvin E. Brodhead and Laura L. Brodhead who had visited my grandparents on September 20 and 25, respectively. Born in 1884, Ruth married Joseph Cheever Fuller, an MIT graduate (1911), around 1914. She and my grandfather were first cousins, their shared grandparents having been Andrew Jackson Brodhead and Ophelia Easton Brodhead. Ruth and Joseph appear in the photo inset, taken from the big 1922 50th wedding anniversary gathering for her parents. See this past post.

A great article about Joseph Fuller’s 1910 cross-country automobile adventure appeared in MIT’s Technology Review on February 20, 2013. Click here to be taken to that page.

As for the other names, they are not familiar to me: Elizabeth S. Halsey, Mrs. Charles Hamilton, Charles M. Hamilton. If I come across any info on them, I will post it here.

Categories: Angus, Auto touring, Brodhead, Memorabilia | Tags: , | 2 Comments

Tintype of Angus children: Need help with IDs

I have this very old, Civil War-era tintype of some of the Angus children and could really use help with the identifications.

Please correct me if I am wrong, but I think I have three of them identified: my great-grandmother Wealthy Ann Angus (b. 1850) and her younger sisters Cecelia Bensley Angus (b. 1855) and Lavinia Pratt Angus (b. 1859).  I’m at a loss, however, when it comes to the rest.

There was one other daughter, the oldest of the four—Mary Martha Winans Angus (b. 1846). Is that her in the rear on the left? I know Walter (b. 1861) is not pictured since he was younger than Lavinia, and she appears to be the youngest one here. Likewise, I have seen a photo of Isaac, the oldest child (b. 1840), and one of James W. Angus, Jr., the second oldest (b. 1841), and they are not here either. I have a newspaper photo of Job Winans Angus Jr. (b. 1856; married 1883) as an old man, and don’t see enough of a resemblance with this young man. Same for brother Charles Dujah Angus (b. 1852; married circa 1880), whose photo I have seen on Ancestry.

I am wondering if the young man seated is not George Welsh Angus (b. 1849) and behind him his bride (or bride-to-be) Sophie C. Willey? They were married on May 15, 1870, when he was 21, and she was 22. The way Wealthy and Lavinia are seated towards him, he appears to be the focal point.

And, who is the girl in the middle?

PLEASE feel free to weigh in either in the comments below or via email (for the address, please refer to the “About” page)! Thank you.

Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., New Jersey | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Who’s in that old tennis court photo

It dawned on me today, just after I posted the tennis court photo, that I may have an idea of who the lady and little girl are. I suspect that this is Cecelia Russum (Woodruff) Van Horn (b. 1878) and her little girl Abigail. Abigail was born in 1904, and here she looks to be about 6 (?), so if that’s them, this must be about 1910.

The Van Horn Children: Abigail Van Horn, Frances Van Horn, and Robert Osborn Van Horn

Is this Abigail with her mom Cecelia (Woodruff) Van Horn?

Cecelia (Woodruff) Van Horn (b. 1878)

Elizabeth, NJ, tennis court – photo was among those belonging to Jennie B. (Woodruff) Coleman

Categories: Elizabeth, Union Co., New Jersey, Van Horn, Woodruff | Tags: , | 4 Comments

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