US Federal 1910

Lavinia P. Angus (1858-1940s)—geometry whiz; who knew?!

1820 watercolor portrait of French mathematicians Adrien-Marie Legendre and Joseph Fourier; Boilly, Julien-Leopold. (1820). Album de 73 Portraits-Charge Aquarelle’s des Membres de I’Institut (Wikimedia Commons: Image in Public Domain)

1820 watercolor portrait of French mathematicians Adrien-Marie Legendre and Joseph Fourier; Boilly, Julien-Leopold. (1820). Album de 73 Portraits-Charge Aquarelle’s des Membres de I’Institut (Wikimedia Commons: Image in Public Domain)

I know, I’m breaking my self-imposed vow of ‘blog silence until the New Year’, but once I’ve assembled enough information about someone, I just feel compelled to get it ‘out there’ as quickly as possible! So here I go again–

My dad occasionally spoke of his [Great] ‘Aunt Vean’ (short for ‘Lavinia’). Unfortunately, so much time has passed since his passing, I can’t remember the context. I only recall that whatever he ever had to say about her was complimentary and implied that she was quite a pistol.

Beyond that, until recently, I did not know much else about her. I only knew she was the youngest daughter of Wealthy and James Angus and that she had once been married to a gentleman with the surname Marthaler. Lavinia’s father James passed away when she was just a toddler so her memories of him would have been minimal. She had numerous older brothers and sisters (including my great grandmother Wealthy who was about eight years her senior) who would have helped raise her.  (As an aside, one of her older brothers was Job Angus about whom I wrote a previous post containing a letter from Texas.)

With a bit of digging, more info about Aunt Vean has come to light, including the curious blurb entitled ‘Fast Mathematics’ that was published in 1875 in National Teachers’ Monthly, Vol. 2 (p. 192–see the accompanying image on this page). Lavinia, born in September 1858, would have been about 17 at the time, and obviously she was a very bright young lady. Somehow she managed to memorize in one night 17 geometry theorems of famed French mathematician Adrien-Marie Legendre, and then recite them all the next day in class in a record time of 1 minute 40 seconds. I looked up all these theorems (posted on this page as an image–click on it to enlarge) to see what was entailed, and indeed, her feat was incredibly impressive. While she never went on to attend college, it’s obvious if she had, she would have possessed the determination to succeed at whatever subject matter she put her mind to.

1875, p. 192

National Teachers’ Monthly, Vol. 2, 1875, p. 192

The 18 theorems Aunt Vine memorized and recited

The 17 theorems Aunt Vine memorized and recited; click on image to enlarge it.

‘Aunt Vean’ married John Philip Marthaler in Elizabeth, NJ, on 24 May 1879. She was 21 at the time, and he was roughly 7 years older than she. The 1880 census shows a Lavinia and Philip ‘Morthala’ living at 163 Kent Street in Brooklyn with a young man named Hulet Valentine, whose occupation is listed as “Root beer”. Philip was working as a clerk in a store. Sadly the marriage did not last for long—Philip must have died sometime before 1885. The NJ state census of that year shows Lavinia back living with her mom Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus, and the 1900 and subsequent censuses list her as a widow. There is no indication that she ever remarried, and as far as I am aware she and Philip never had any children.

I found ‘Vean’ in all the Federal censuses taken between 1900 and 1940, and also in the 1905 NJ census. As you can see below, further down the page, her first and last names were commonly misspelled. She lived in Newark, NJ, until sometime before 1940 when she is shown to be living in nearby Montclair. She was most often shown as a boarder, and a woman named Elizabeth Booth (a decade younger than ‘Vean’) seemed to be a friend who appeared alongside her in a number of these records. That surprised me a bit considering Lavinia had so many siblings–I would have thought someone would have taken her in; but perhaps she inherited sufficient funds to stay out on her own or simply preferred to remain independent from the family. In 1900 ‘Vean’ was working as a stenographer; from 1910 onward, her occupation is listed as ‘none’. Her friend Elizabeth continued working until sometime between 1920 and 1930; in the 1930 and 1940 census she also reported no occupation.

‘Aunt Vean’ was listed as 81 in the 1940 census. I don’t have a date of death for her. I may find it in my dad’s memoirs—but he was off fighting in the Pacific for some of the 1940s and may not have made record of it.

The only physical memento we have of ‘Vean’ is a little vase that she gave to her niece (my grandmother), Fanny (Woodruff) Brodhead. Meanwhile, some of Aunt Vean’s letters may exist somewhere out there. The family history paper, One Line of Descendants of James Angus, written by Harriet Stryker-Rodda and published in 1969 (available in the Family Search Library–see my Links page) reported:  Lavinia’s letters, written in her later years, have been preserved in the family because of her interest in the family’s history and the fact that she had a retentive mind even as she got older. Perhaps, those letters will come to light someday. It would be wonderful to know more of the family history from her recollections and to see what her relationships with others were like.

As always, corrections, additions, and comments welcome!!!

All of the below from the Family Search website:

Lavinia P Marthaler Boarder United States Census, 1940
birth: 1859 New Jersey
residence: 1940 Ward 3, Montclair, Montclair Town, Essex, New Jersey, United States
other: Martha E Macbeth, Bessie Wetherby, Signa Hjertstrom, Mabel V Crane, M Elizabeth Booth, Sarah E Vanduyne…
Lavinia Marthaler Boarder United States Census, 1900
birth: September 1864 New Jersey
residence: 1900 District 5 Newark city Ward 2, Essex, New Jersey, United States
other: Joseph O Nichols, Eliza D Nichols, Sayres O Nichols, Julia C Nichols, Mary E Booth, Dora Flithner
Lavenea P Marthaler Boarder United States Census, 1930
birth: 1859 New Jersey
residence: 1930 Newark (Districts 1-250), Essex, New Jersey, United States
other: Elizabeth M Booth
Lavania Marthaler Head United States Census, 1920
birth: 1860 New Jersey
residence: 1920 Newark Ward 8, Essex, New Jersey, United States
other: Elizbeth Baldwin, Emma Mackain, M Elizbeth Booth, Bonnie Lomax
Lavinia Marthalles Head United States Census, 1910
birth: 1860 New Jersey
residence: 1910 Newark Ward 8, Essex, New Jersey, United States
Lavenia Marthaler New Jersey, State Census, 1905
birth: 1860
residence: 1905 , Essex, New Jersey, United States
other: Mary E Booth
Lavinia Morthala Wife United States Census, 1880
birth: 1859 New Jersey, United States
residence: 1880 Brooklyn, Kings, New York, United States
spouse: Phillip Morthala
other: Hulet Valentine
Categories: Angus, Brodhead, Brooklyn, Marthaler, New Jersey 1885, New Jersey 1905, US Federal 1860, US Federal 1880, US Federal 1900, US Federal 1910, US Federal 1920, US Federal 1930, US Federal 1940, Woodruff | 7 Comments

Another Brodhead elopes, this time in 1911 at NYC’s ‘Little Church Around the Corner’

Credit: Aukirk, 22 Oct. 2012. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Credit: Aukirk, 22 Oct. 2012. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Completely by chance, I came across a grainy 1911 photo of a “Mrs. L. D. Brodhead,” under the headline: “Lutherville Girl Who Eloped.” The photo was from the Baltimore Sun whose old issues can be found on Genealogy Bank. I certainly did not recognize her nor did I expect to. However, having just published the story about William Hall Brodhead and Mary Van Tassel’s elopement, I couldn’t help but be intrigued by news of yet another Brodhead elopement. So, I found the accompanying article, expecting I’d come upon some “new” Brodheads down there in Maryland (“my Brodheads” were mostly from the NJ/NY/PA area), probably some distant relations… But, life changed in an instant–half way into paragraph No. 2, my jaw dropped and all I could think was “Holy cow!” The Brits have the greatest word: “gobsmacked”– and that’s exactly what I was. The groom’s name? “Lewis D. Brodhead of Elizabeth, New Jersey.”

1904 Stereoview card:

1904 Stereoview card: “The Elopement: A Hasty Descent” (Wikimedia; source: Library of Congress – public domain)

“Uncle Lewie,” as my dad used to call him, died of a heart attack on 8 December 1933 at age 49, when my Dad was just 12. At the time of his death, which took place in his office, Lewis was on the board of the American Swiss File and Tool Company. The December 10 obituary notice in the New York Times mentions only his mother and two brothers as surviving him.

All my Dad remembered about Uncle Lewie was that he was a bit too fond of his drink, had a reputation for being quite a character, and had never married or had children. And there I was–almost 80 years after Lewie’s death–suddenly confronted with proof that he’d been married—to one Mildred Elizabeth Hancock on 23 June 1911. How bizarre. It was shocking. Even my 90-year-old mother was shocked, and it takes a lot to shock her these days. My late father would have been completely flummoxed by this. How could it be that neither of his parents ever mentioned Uncle Lewie has having been married?! It’s extremely odd, and all I could immediately surmise was that the marriage was either a very brief one or a very troubled one that ended in divorce and was swept under the rug permanently. But it still seemed a bit nuts that my dad would not have heard anything about it.

Top: Uncle Lewie's mom and dad: Andrew Douglas Brodhead and Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead. Their three sons: Frank Martin (seated left), Lewis Dingman (right), and Andrew Jackson (standing in rear) (PHOTO of the three brothers courtesy of James E. Brodhead)

Top: Uncle Lewie’s mom and dad: Andrew Douglas Brodhead and Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead. Their three sons: Frank Martin (seated left), Lewis Dingman (right), and Andrew Jackson (standing in rear) (PHOTO of the three brothers courtesy of James E. Brodhead)

Lewis (b. 5 October 1884) was the second of three sons of Andrew Douglas Brodhead (son of Andrew Jackson Brodhead) and Margaret Lewis Martin (a daughter Edith died in early childhood); I cannot help but wonder what their and the rest of the family’s reaction was to this elopement. My grandfather (Uncle Lewie’s older brother) Frank M. Brodhead (b. 5 Feb. 1882) and wife Fannie Woodruff, who lived in Elizabeth, would have been entering their third year of marriage at that time. Youngest brother Andrew (b. 3 October 1886) was still living at home in 1905 but was gone by 1910, so I don’t know where he was at the time of Lewis’s 1911 elopement (Andrew married in 1916).

The elopement of Mildred Hancock, daughter of Laura and Josias A. Hancock, caused a great deal of buzz in the local Maryland press. Mildred was described as “one of the most attractive belles of the [Lutherville, MD] community” This was the second Hancock to elope in the space of three months, and Mildred broke the news to her parents via telegram. Mildred, 18 years of age, had been employed for five months in a touring theatrical troupe, partially against the wishes of her parents. Sometime during her brief stage career, she met Lewis, who became a regular member of the audience. She left the troupe and returned to Baltimore. Apparently Lewis was a traveling hardware salesman, and he soon found reason to visit Maryland regularly on business. He met Mildred’s mother on several occasions, but never met Mr. Hancock. In June 1911, Lewis was in NYC on business and Mildred insisted on making a trip to NYC at that time, not telling her parents the trip involved Lewis.

Published before 1920 by The American Art Publishing Co., New York City; H. Finkelstein & Son (Wikimedia Commons: Public domain)

Published before 1920 by The American Art Publishing Co., New York City; H. Finkelstein & Son (Wikimedia Commons: Public domain)

Library of Congress image, 1904 (Wikimedia commons: Public domain)

Library of Congress image, 1904 (Wikimedia commons: Public domain)

They eloped, marrying at the Church of the Transfiguration on 29th Street (a.k.a. The Little Church Around the Corner; Episcopalian). Afterwards they “made merry” in Atlantic City and elsewhere on the Jersey shore. The Hancocks eventually telegraphed their blessing (no indication given that a blessing arrived from M/M A.D. Brodhead). Lewis then made his way to Canada on a business trip and Mildred returned home to her parents where all awaited Lewis’s August 26 visit to finally meet Mr. Hancock. Then, according to Mildred, Lewis and she would be leaving for a honeymoon although she had no idea where, just that it was going to be an “awfully long distance” away and that she wanted to go to Europe soon as well. The article contained a number of comments made by Mildred that made her come across as immature and a bit ditzy. It closed by saying Mr. & Mrs. L. D. Brodhead planned to make their home in Springfield, MA (And they did end up going there).

So, the big question for me was: Did the marriage last? Well, the answer is “yes”–at least for 11 years. I found Lewis’s 12 September 1918 registration card for WWI. His home address was listed as 132 Bushkill Street, Easton North, Pennsylvania. He stated his place of employment as manager at Crew Levick Co. (an oil company) in Easton, and lists wife Mildred as sharing his Bushkill St. home address. He described himself as “tall” and “slender”, and as having brown eyes and black hair.

'A portion of the Yuengling Brewery at night, as visible from Mahantango Street, Pottsville. Artwork now adorns the entrances on the front of the building' (Wikimedia: Author Mredden, 13 Mar 2007)

‘A portion of the Yuengling Brewery at night, as visible from Mahantango Street, Pottsville. Artwork now adorns the entrances on the front of the building’ (Wikimedia: Author Mredden, 13 Mar 2007)

Lobby Card c. 1921 featuring the first appearance on film by Laurel and Hardy, in Lucky Dog produced in 1919 and released in 1921. Published 1921; photo may have been taken as early as 1919. Author unknown (Wikimedia: Public domain in USA)

Lobby Card c. 1921 featuring the first appearance on film by Laurel and Hardy, in Lucky Dog produced in 1919 and released in 1921. Published 1921; photo may have been taken as early as 1919. Author unknown (Wikimedia: Public domain in USA)

I found the next trace of Lewis and Mildred in a 1922 Pottsville, PA, directory. They were living at 109 S. Centre Street. Why Pottsville, home of the famous Yuengling Brewery, (America’s oldest; est. 1829)? I don’t know, but it wasn’t for the beer as prohibition had gone into effect in 1920. Perhaps a clue comes from the Wikipedia entry for the town: Until the middle of the 20th century, Pottsville was a popular destination for many traveling acts and vaudeville performers. The 1929 film Berth Marks stars the comedy legends Laurel and Hardy as they attempt to reach Pottsville by train for one of their booked performances. Pearl Bailey had once resided in Pottsville during the early part of her entertaining career. Soldiers in training at nearby Fort Indiantown Gap were prohibited from visiting Pottsville during most of World War II due to the large amounts of illicit venues and activities present during the time. Maybe Mildred was involved with the theatre there, or maybe the couple just liked the city’s “vibe”. It was, after all, the roaring ’20s.

So sometime between 1922 and Lewis’s death in 1933, Mildred died or the pair split up. She is not mentioned in his obituary. I’ve searched high and low for further clues, but have so far come up empty-handed. A trip to Pottsville to look at old court records and library archives will probably be required to figure this one out! If anyone reading this has any clues, please share!

Update 9/17/13:  I found an Elizabeth city directory for 1931 showing Lewis (salesman) living with his widowed mother Margaret Lewis Brodhead at 11 Elmwood Place. No mention of Mildred. Also, I forgot to mention that Lewis was buried in the family plot at Evergreen Cemetery in Hillside, NJ.

Follow-up Posts:
Lewis Dingman Brodhead – death
Mildred Elizabeth Hancock Brodhead – remarriage

Resources: YouTube Videos: To Live in the 1920s ; Flappers: The Roaring 1920s

Categories: Brodhead, Hancock, Lutherville, Maryland, New Jersey 1905, Pottsville Schuylkill Co, Providence, Rhode Island, Scandal, US Federal 1910 | 8 Comments

Civil War drummer boy John B. Jaques, Jr.: Mustered out 148 years ago today

Wounded Drummer Boy, oil on board, 1865-1869, by Eastman Johnson (In collections of San Diego Museum of Art*)

Wounded Drummer Boy, oil on board, 1865-1869, by Eastman Johnson (In collections of San Diego Museum of Art*)

In the midst of all that was going on in tailor John B. Jaques’ family, his namesake had the chutzpah to volunteer for service as a drummer boy in the closing months of the Civil War. The boys were supposed to be 18 to enlist, but as you can see from some of these images, boys much younger than that went into service.

John B. Jaques Jr. (b. 15 October 1848, Elizabeth, NJ) was 16 when he enlisted on 24 Feb 1865. You may recall from the last post that his dad was arrested twice (that we know of) that year, once in March for forgery and once in November for larceny. We don’t know John Jr.’s motivations–was he doing this for love of country and belief in the cause? Trying to escape a troubled home life? Looking for adventure? How proud (and worried) the family must have been. Sadly this brave decision did not seem to impact father John’s behavior.

Gen. Richard Busteed and drummer boy, US National Archives**

Gen. Richard Busteed and drummer boy, US National Archives**

Until discovering this detail about John Jr., and doing a bit of research on the role of drummer boys in the Civil War, I had no idea what an integral role these boys played. They actually required a great deal of training to learn all the various drum rolls and beats that could substitute for orders given vocally which were often much too difficult for troops to hear over the din of battle. And at battle’s end, they helped carry the wounded off the field to wherever care was being rendered.  Drummer boys accompanied commanding officers at all hours of the day and night and had to be ready at a moment’s notice to sound whatever drum roll was appropriate for the operation being initiated. These children were truly heroes, and apparently many of them went on to serve in the capacity of soldiers once their stints as drummer boys came to an end.

John B. Jaques, Jr. was mustered in on 2 March 1865, and mustered out on 13 July 1865 at Newark, NJ. He served in Company I, 40th Regiment New Jersey, which left New Jersey on 4 March 1865. According to the National Park Service website’s Civil War information about the 40th Regiment, John Jr. would have been part of the following: Siege operations against Petersburg December, 1864, to April, 1865. …Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Assault on and capture of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. March to Danville April 23-27, and duty there till May 18. March to Richmond, Va., thence to Washington, DC, May 18-June 3. Corps Review June 8. I found evidence that John spent some time in the hospital before being mustered out. The Newark Daily Advertiser listed him in the ‘Affairs at the Hospital’ section of the issue dated 19 June 1865: Patients have lately been admitted as follows: … Jno. B. Jaques, drummer, Co. I, 40th N.J…. It could not have been anything too serious as the 1890 Census of Union Veterans did not list him as having any disability.

Surrender at the Appomattox

Surrender at the Appomattox, 9 April 1865

I’m very impressed by John Jr. even though his stint in the Union Army was so brief at just 5 months and 7 days. It still took a lot of courage for a lad of 16. And to have been present at Appomattox must have been quite special as well as a huge relief for all concerned.

After the war, John Jr. went on to have a career in the jewelry industry. He first worked in a jewelry shop (1870) and then a jewelry factory (1880). On 19 January 1893, he applied in New Jersey for a Civil War pension (Application no. 1,144,113; Certificate no. 1025165). In 1910, the census record listed his profession as ‘jeweler.’ John Jr. appeared again on the Civil War Pension Index on 5 Dec 1910.

John Jr. married Katherine (Katie) Griffith on 14 Jun 1871, in Newark, Essex, NJ. They had four children born between roughly 1872 and 1877 — two girls and two boys: Mary F., Isaac, William S., and Ida. Imagine the stories he was able to tell his children and grandchildren! Hopefully his home life with Katherine was far less stressful than the one he endured in his childhood.

John died at age 62 on 13 June 1911 (exactly 102 years and 1 month ago). I found his date of death in US Army Veterans Administration pension payment records (Certificate No. 1025165). He was categorized as an “Army Invalid,” and he appears to have originally filed for that status on 29 November 1898.

That’s all I know for the moment about John Jr., so I will finish here. Be sure to click on some of the resource links below. There are some great images there.

Here’s to John B. Jaques Jr. for his bravery, dedication to country, and contributions to preserving our nation and putting an end to slavery. May he be resting in peace.

drummers

Resources:

*Wounded Drummer Boy, oil on board painting by Eastman Johnson, 1865-69, San Diego Museum of Art. This file is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

**This file was provided to Wikimedia Commons by the National Archives and Records Administration as part of a cooperation project. The National Archives and Records Administration provides images depicting American and global history which are public domain or licensed under a free license.

Categories: Appomattox, Civil War, Grant, Gen. Ulysses S., Jaques, Lee General Robert E, Petersburg, VA, US Federal 1870, US Federal 1880, US Federal 1910 | 2 Comments

George Wills Descendants in America — An Update

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin with daughter Zillah Trewin Boles, 1883, who later married Wm R. Boles of Dumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin with daughter Zillah Trewin Boles, 1883, who later married Wm R. Boles of Dumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin with ZillahTrewin Boles' daughter `Betty' Boles, August 12, 1923

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin with Zillah Trewin Boles’ daughter `Betty’ Boles, August 12, 1923

A few posts ago, I shared news of some photos having been taken of the grave markers in the Trewin-Ludey plot at Evergreen Cemetery in Hillside, NJ. I’d noted that Elizabeth Sargent Trewin’s brother William Sargent was buried there together with his wife Sarah. The whereabouts of Wm and Elizabeth’s sister Sarah was unknown. In fact, other than a date of birth, I knew nothing about her. The three siblings as well as another brother, Rev. Samuel Sargent, were the children of Mary Wills and William Sargent who left England with their parents to start a new life in America during the post-Civil War reconstruction. (Recall from numerous previous posts that Mary Wills’s was George Wills’s youngest daughter.)

2/15/1926 Obituary for Elizabeth Sargent Trewin (the 2 sons mentioned were stepsons, William Clarence and Albert Phillips; their mother was Edith Fry, William Trewin’s 1st wife); “Mrs. Coles” is a typo–should be “Mrs. Boles”

Well, one big clue as to what became of Sarah (b. cir. 1858-1860) has been right under my nose for months and I failed to realize it. Buried at the bottom of Elizabeth Sargent Trewin’s obituary notice was the name of a surviving sister, Mrs. R.O. Hemion! With that tidbit, I discovered some census records that revealed that Sarah went by the name Sadie, and that she was married to Richard O. Hemion, a machinist, who was born in 1857 in Rockland County, NY,  to John and Catharine Hemion. In 1880, he was working as a cigar maker in Jersey City, NJ, and living with an older sister, Amelia Curyansen, and her family.  [I saw some message boards stating the surname was actually Auryansen, and was misspelled in that record. Auryansen is a Dutch surname, and evidently the history of the family in America goes way back.] It is in Jersey City that he must have become acquainted with Sadie. According to the 1900 census, they were married in roughly 1882. The pair settled in East Rutherford, NJ, and had four children: Cora, Mabel, Everett, and Edith (see below for dates). By 1920, Sadie is listed as a widow and living with children Cora and Everett, by then in their thirties. I could not view the actual records for 1910 and 1920 since you have to be an ancestry.com subscriber to access them (one of my pet peeves). So, who knows what other little morsels lie within those records…

Hemion Family in 1900 Census

Another big plus was finding out the year of the Sargent family’s emigration to the US: 1870! I discovered this morsel in the original 1900 census record as well (available free of charge through FamilySearch).

So hip hip hooray–another little piece of the family puzzle solved! I would love to hear from any Hemion descendants out there.

GEORGE WILLS and MARY CAPON U.S. DESCENDENTS

1-Mary Wills b. 11 Nov 1829, Wolverton, Buckinghamshire, England, d. 6 Dec
1877, Jersey City, Hudson, New Jersey
+William Sargent b. 2 Sep 1828, Weedon Beck, Northamptonshire, c. 10 Dec 1829,
Weedon and Flore, Northamptonshire, England
|–2-Rev. Samuel Sargent b. 1852, Blisworth, Northamptonshire, England, d. 3
| Nov 1926, New Jersey
| +Ella Tunison b. Abt 1854, United States
| |—–3-Vivian T. Sargent b. 7 Aug 1891, Camden, New Jersey
| | +Packard
| |—–3-Rev. Norman Vincent Sargent b. Feb 1889, Kansas
|–2-Elizabeth Sargent b. 15 Sep 1854, St. Sepulchre, Northampton,
| Northamptonshire, England, d. 1926, Elizabeth, Union Co, NJ, bur. 6 Feb
| 1926, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union, NJ
| +William Trewin b. 21 Mar 1847, Hardin Street, Woolwich Dockyard, Co. Kent
| (now Greater London), England, d. 4 Dec 1916, Elizabeth General Hospital,
| Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. 7 Dec 1916, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside,
| Union, NJ
| |—–3-Zillah May Trewin b. 11 Jun 1883, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, d. 11 May
| | 1955, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside,
| | Union, NJ
| +William Robert Boles b. 24 Feb 1892, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland,
| d. 2 Mar 1950, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. Evergreen Cemetery,
| Hillside, Union, NJ
|–2-Sargent TWIN b. 15 Sep 1854, d. 1854
|–2-Sadie Sargent b. 1858, St. Sepulchre, Northampton, England
| +Richard O. Hemion b. Feb 1857, Rockland Co., New York
| |—–3-Cora S. Hemion b. Abt 1883, Rockland Co., New York
| |—–3-Mabel Hemion b. Abt 1885, Rockland Co., New York
| |—–3-Everett Hemion b. Abt 1887, Rockland Co., New York
| |—–3-Edith Hemion b. Abt 1889, Rockland Co., New York
|–2-William Sargent b. 1861, St. Sepulchre, Northampton, Northamptonshire,
| England, d. 24 Jul 1896, Elizabeth, Union Co, NJ, bur. 27 Jul 1896,
| Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union Co., NJ
| +Sarah Jane Bowley b. Abt 1844, United States, d. 3 Jan 1904, bur. 6 Jan
| 1904, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union Co., NJ
|–2-Sargent TWIN, died in infancy
|–2-Sargent TWIN, died in infancy
|–2-Sargent, died in infancy
|–2-Sargent, died in infancy
|–2-Sargent, died in infancy
|–2-Sargent, died in infancy
|–2-Sargent, died in infancy

Happy Easter to All!

Categories: East Rutherford, Bergen Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Hemion, Hillside Cemetery Lyndhurst NJ, Jersey City, Hudson Co., Obituaries, Sargent, Trewin, US Federal 1900, US Federal 1910, US Federal 1920, Wills | 6 Comments

Francis Woodruff & Ezra Ayers Families

Mary Jane Trowbridge

Mary Jane Trowbridge

Francis Woodruff

Francis Woodruff

On March 16, I posted an update on members of the Francis Woodruff family. There were four children: Emma (b. 1846), William (b. 1849), Matthias (b. 1851), and Phebe (b. 1855). You may recall that Phoebe and Matthias had married siblings from the Ezra Ayers family: Phebe married Isaac J. Ayers, and Matthias married Mary S. Ayers. I did a bit of digging on the Ayers family and emerged with the below family tree. There were nine children in all!

 1-Ezra Ayers b. Jun 1821, New Jersey 
  +Mary Ann b. Oct 1823, England
|--2-Sarah M. Ayers b. Cir 1846, d. After 1910
|--2-Isaac J. Ayers b. Jan 1848, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|   +Phebe M. Woodruff b. 11 Oct 1855, Union Twp, Essex, NJ
|  |--3-Anna W. Ayers b. Aug 1875, Newark, Essex Co., NJ
|  |--3-Charles S. Ayers b. May 1878, New Jersey
|  |--3-Amy M. Ayers b. Jul 1888, New Jersey
|  |--3-Isaac Ayers b. Abt 1880, Newark, Essex Co., NJ
|--2-Francis Ayers b. Abt 1851, d. After 1910
|--2-Mary S. Ayers b. 1853, d. After 1910
|   +Matthias Woodruff b. 1851, d. 6 Apr 1892, Chatham, Morris Co., NJ
|  |--3-Frances Woodruff b. Abt 1875, d. After 1910
|--2-Emma Ayers b. Abt 1856, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|--2-Samuel Ayers b. Abt 1858, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|--2-Joseph Ayers b. Abt 1860, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|--2-Elizabeth Ayers b. Abt 1862, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|--2-Judith Ayers b. Dec 1863, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|--2-Annie Ayers b. Abt 1866, New Jersey, d. After 1910

In August 1850, when Ezra was 29, he and his wife were living in Woodbridge, Middlesex Co., NJ, with Sarah (age 4) and Isaac (age 2). His occupation is listed as a tailor and he has declared real estate with a value of $1,200 (roughly $35,000 today). He was born in NJ, while his wife was born in England.

Trolley Cars Running Near Newark Courthouse Circa early 1900s
(Charles Cummings and John O’Connor. Newark: An American City)

I hit pay dirt with the 1870 census (both records freely available on Family Search, by the way) which shows the couple with all nine children living in the Tenth Ward of Newark, Essex Co., NJ. Isaac is 48 by now and listed as a retail grocer. His real estate is now valued at $12,000 (nearly $210,000 in today’s currency) and his personal estate at $1,500 (about $26,000 today). Wife Mary is still “keeping house” (with nine children, I can’t imagine what else she would be doing!), but now daughter Sarah (24) is a clerk in a “Fancy Store” and Isaac (22) is a “Grocers Clerk”, likely in his dad’s store. Son Francis is 19 with no occupation listed for him. In school are Mary (16), Emma (14), Joseph (10), and Elizabeth (8). Little Annie, age four, born when mother Mary was 41, is still at home. Interestingly an Isaac Jones is also in residence. He is 76 and listed as born in England, so it seems likely he is Mary’s father. The census shows that her mother was born in England as well.

Newark Public Service Terminal, 1917 View (copyright-free image)

How the Ayers and the Woodruffs became acquainted, I do not know. Francis was a farmer so perhaps he sold his produce at Ayers’s market. In any case, it was not long after this 1870 census that the two marriages–those of Matthias Woodruff to Mary S. Ayers, and Isaac J. Ayers to Phebe Woodruff–took place. Although Phebe is the younger of the two Woodruff siblings, I’ll begin with her. She (19) married Isaac Ayers (26) on October 23, 1874, in Union, NJ. A Google search on Isaac J. Ayers name revealed a website for a restaurant at 13 Waverly Place in Madison, NJ, called Poor Herbie’s. Their website information reveals that the building their restaurant is located in was operated as a grocery store by Isaac J. Ayres in 1877, the year a major fire destroyed a large commercial area. The fire allegedly began in that very building. [For an image of the building as it appears today, click here. Poor Herbie’s is on the left.] Isaac remained in the grocery business; the 1880 census lists him as a grocer in Newark, NJ.

Isaac and Phebe Ayers had four children: Anna W. (b. 1875), Charles S. (b. 1878), Amy M. (b. 1888), and Isaac Jr. (b. about 1880). Only the older three children appear in the 1900 census, so I gather Isaac Jr. must have died young. The 1900 census lists Isaac Sr. as a farmer who owned his farm free and clear. Anna (24) is not working, Charles (22) is a real estate clerk, and Amy (11) is at school. Ten years later (in 1910), the census record shows Isaac still as a farmer in Union, NJ. The record says at “Truck place”–I have no idea what that means, but he is listed as an employer. Wife Phebe and daughter Annie (34) are at home, while daughter Amy (21) is listed as a public school teacher. That is, thus far, the extent of what I know about this family.

Now, back to Matthias (b. 1851), who greatly intrigues me; he married Mary S. Ayers (b. 1853) on November 21, 1872, in Newark, Essex Co., NJ. They had a single child, a son, Frances, who was born about 1875. Matthias died on April 6, 1892, in Chatham, Morris Co., NJ, in the couple’s twentieth year of marriage. So what was going on with Matthias for those twenty years and why did he pass away relatively young? I could not find him in 1880 or 1890 census records. I did find Mary in 1900 and 1910, but, of course, by then Matthias was already long gone.

Suffrage Hikers in Newark, NJ, 1913
(copyright-free image)

In 1900, Mary (47) is back living with her elderly parents, Ezra and Mary Ann Ayers, and sister Judith E. Ayers (36). Their residence is listed as 130 Elm Street, Newark City, NJ. Ezra, 76, is listed as a dealer in dry goods, owning his own home free and clear. Mary states all 9 of her children are still living. This time she lists herself as born in England and her parents as having both been born in Wales.

Newark Paper Boys, 1909*
(Photo Credit: Shorpy website, see link to large Shorpy photo at end of post)

By 1910, Ezra must have passed away. Mary, 85, is listed as the head of the household at 130 Elm Street. Once again, she lists all nine children as still living. Matthias’s widow, Mary Ayers Woodruff (now 56, working in dry goods, store retail), is still living there, as is her son Frances, age 35, single, and a dentist. Also resident are daughter Emma J. Brown, a widow, aged 50, working as a sales woman in dry goods; daughter Judith E. Ayers (44; single, no occupation); daughter Annie M. Ayers (40; single, no occupation); and a 17-year-old servant named Helen Lannigan.

Matthias’s son Frances would have been 17 when he (Matthias) died. Perhaps Frances’s path to dentistry was owed to his great uncle John Dickinson (a dentist) who was married to Emma Woodruff (Francis Woodruff’s sister and Matthias’s aunt). What happened to Frances? I gather he never married, but who knows, maybe we will find out differently.

Dentist in His Office, Unknown Artist, American; Date: 1900s (Metropolitan Museum collections, visit http://www.metmuseum.org)

I found a death record for a Frances Woodruff born on August 18, 1874. If this was “our” Frances, he lived to the ripe old age of 93, passing away in February 1967 and last residing in Orange, Essex, New Jersey. But, I’ll need to see the death certificate to know for sure whether that’s him.

Relevant to Matthias’s whereabouts for those twenty years of marriage, I recall coming across some letters a long time ago that revealed a bit about Matthias’s relationship with his father Francis Woodruff. Matthias wrote the letters either from Wyoming or North Dakota. As I recall he talked about farming wheat. Perhaps Matthias was working land out there to support Mary and Frances, but the way he spoke in the letter, it sounded like he had a boatload of kids to support, but now I know there was just Frances. He also, as I recall, asked his dad Francis Woodruff for money. I will try to find those letters and include them in the blog.

Well, enough for today. Until next time!

*Shorpy Image: click here.

Categories: Ayers, Newark, Essex Co., US Federal 1870, US Federal 1880, US Federal 1900, US Federal 1910, Woodruff | Leave a comment

F.C. Ludey and the End of a Family Line

Emma Trewin had married Francis C. Ludey on 15 February 1871 in Elizabeth, NJ. Born in May 1845, Francis would have been 25. Emma, born in May 1850, would have been 20.

F.C. Ludey, age 70

Francis was the son of German immigrants, Jacob and Eliza, whose names I found on the marriage record. If Francis had any siblings, I have yet to find them. I have seen the surname spelled a variety of ways: Ludy, Ludey, Luddy, etc., and this tends to make searches complicated.

Francis served in the Civil War Union Army in New Jersey’s Company C, 14th Regiment, from 26 August 1862 – 18 June 1865. His Civil War Pension Index Card spelled his name “Ludy.” The Find a Grave website has documented his resting place with a photograph of the memorial. The interment took place in January 1918 in the family’s Evergreen Cemetery plot.

It appears that Francis and Emma started out residing in Elizabeth, but moved to Bayonne, NJ, sometime between 1880-1900.

Sunday School March, 7 Jun 1908

Francis was evidently a very devout Christian given his involvement with the Methodist Episcopal Church in Bayonne, NJ, where he served as Sunday School superintendent and head of a Missionary Society. As for Francis Ludey’s everyday life, it appears from the 1880 census that he worked as a gas fitter. The 1910 census described him as a mechanic.

I can only imagine how sad it must have been for Francis and Emma Ludey to lose so many of their children so young. And the loss of son Frank, whose school notebook we found amidst family papers, must have been a particularly devastating blow given he’d made it to adulthood, was just married, and appeared to have his whole life ahead of him. His death eliminated the possibility that the Ludey name would be carried on by a male descendent.

Photo found in Ludey Family Bible; Reverse says either “1886” or “1866” and then “age 47”. Was this the church pastor?

Auxillary Missionary Society certificate with Ludey signature

Ludey Family Bible

Ludey Family Bible Title Page

Date of printing of Ludey Family Bible

Bookmark in Ludey Family Bible: Mrs. FC Ludey “Mery Christmas” in a child’s handwriting

Categories: Bayonne, Census Records, Civil War, Elizabeth, Union Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Ludey, Methodist Episcopal, Trewin, US Federal 1860, US Federal 1910 | Leave a comment

Emma Trewin Ludey

The youngest of the three Trewin siblings was Emma. She was born on 4 May 1850 in England.  I found this date of birth in the leaflet distributed to guests at her funeral.

Emma Trewin Ludey funeral leaflet

According to this leaflet, her birthplace was “Cambellwell,” but I believe this was probably meant to be Camberwell as the former does not appear to exist, and the latter is situated in South London to the west of Woolwich Arsenal, which is where Emma’s father, Thomas Trewin, worked until the family emigrated to Canada in 1857.

Distance from Woolwich to Camberwell

Emma would have been 9 years old when her family relocated to Jersey City, NJ, from Toronto, Canada, where they had been living for the two years following their arrival in Quebec from England. On 15 February 1871, Emma, then 20 years of age, married Francis C. Ludey in Elizabeth, NJ. Together they had six children. I know this because the 1900 Census, which lists her incorrectly as “Susan Ludy,” states that there were six children altogether but that only two were living as of the 1900 Census (Mary Emma and Louisa). The couple spent a number of years living in Bayonne, NJ.

William & Elizabeth Trewin and Francis & Emma Ludey on Holiday, Bethlehem, PA, 1915 (Image from my family’s personal collection)

From what I have pieced together, the children were:

Francis T. Ludey, born in 1871. He married Metta S. Ryman on 18 June 1896 in Summit. NJ. Less than four years later, Francis (aka Frank) passed away. NJ Deaths and Burials shows a Frank T. Ludry passing away in Summit, NJ, on 11 January 1899. The occupation listed was “C Traveller.” I have no idea what that meant, unless “C” meant “Sea” in which case, perhaps he worked on ships? I believe this “Ludry” spelling to be a typo as “r” and “e” are neighbors on the keyboard and the birth year listed in the record (1871) fits with census records that estimate the year of birth as 1872. Our old family cemetery records show a Frank Ludey being buried in the family plot in Evergreen Cemetery on 13 January 1900. Perhaps the family had the year mistakenly written down as 1900? I have not checked with the cemetery yet. But in any case, a death on the 11th of the month would make a burial on the 13th plausible. (Update 4/14/12: see later posts on Frank T. Ludey which include cause of death)

Online, I found Metta working as a kindergarten teacher in 1896, as staff librarian at Pratt Institute in 1901, and from 1915-1920 working as the librarian-in-charge at Jarvie Memorial Library in Bloomfield, NJ. The 1920 Census shows her as a widow living with her parents in Essex, NJ. She died on 8 July 1952 and was buried with her parents, Charles S. Ryman and Mary Wells, in Milford Cemetery, Milford, Pike Co., PA. The grave can be found on Find a Grave’s website. I believe Metta lived most of her adult life as a widow since women back then typically gave up employment upon getting married and she obviously developed quite a career as a librarian. And being buried with her parents would also indicate she had lived most of her life as a single person. I would certainly be interested in knowing more about Frank Ludey and how/why he passed away so young. Update (1/3/2012): see photo of Frank in later post; click here.

Mary Emma Ludey (aka “Minnie”), born on 5 February 1873, in Elizabeth. She is also buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Hillside. Minnie was married twice, first to Herbert Duryea Crane (a life insurance salesman per the 1900 census; you must open the original census document to find that out) in Bayonne, NJ, on 23 September 1897 (I just love the NJ Marriage record which has his first name spelled “Herebert” and her surname spelled “Lendey”! See why you have to be creative with your searches?!). They had a daughter named Metta Beryl who was born in 1899. Minnie eventually divorced and was living at 17 West 32nd Street in Bayonne, NJ, when she met and married her second husband Lynn Everett Jennison, a professor of history at Bayonne High School, in April 1916. According to the announcement in the NY Times, Professor Jennison was Minnie’s daughter’s instructor and they became acquainted during a parent-teacher conference to discuss the daughter’s progress. The article refers to the daughter as May. I do not know yet whether this was daughter Metta Beryl’s nickname which she may have gone by in everyday life.  The Professor, who’d been a widower, had two daughters from his first marriage with Hestis Jennison: Eleanor S. Jennison (b. circa 1905) and Amelia W. Jennison (b. circa 1906). The 1920 Census showed the couple living in Bayonne. By 1930 they had relocated to Elizabeth, NJ. Mary Emma Ludey passed away on 20 October 1938 at the age of 65.  Lynne Jennison survived her by almost 30 years. He passed away in Duval, Florida, in June 1967 at the age of  88.

Louise Beryl Ludey was born circa 1875 in Union Co., NJ. She married George Bonney (b. 1873) on 13 January 1894 in Port Richmond, NY. The 1900 Census shows a son Harold L. Bonney (b. 1896) and Dorothy B. Bonney (b. June 1898; married Jonathan Beltz; daughter Elenor, b. 1929). At the time the family was living in Bayonne City, Hudson Co., NJ, and George was working as a boiler maker. In addition, Rhode Island Births and Christening records show a son, Francis George Bonney, born on 24 November 1905. The 1910 Census shows the family still living in Providence, Rhode Island, with George still working as a boiler maker.

William W.F. Ludey was born on 11 July 1877 in Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ. According to cemetery records he was buried that same day. See below.

Another child was born on 16 September 1878 per NJ Births and Christening records. Though no name is given in the record, I believe this was Anna L. Ludey who was buried on 28 December 1878. Our family cemetery records state that William W.F. Ludey and Anna L. Ludey died very young and were buried with their grandparents, one child sharing the plot with grandfather Thomas J. Trewin, and the other child sharing a plot with grandmother Mary Phillips Trewin.

Note: The 1880 Census for “Frank Ludy” and Emma Ludy” shows a daughter Lulu Ludey born in 1876. I suspect that “Lulu” and Louisa may be one in the same person. Or Lulu could have been the sixth child about whom Emma Ludey referred in the 1900 census.

___________________________

Emma lived with her daughter Mary Emma “Minnie” Jennison and Mary’s husband Lynn Jennison after Francis Ludey passed away, in Bayonne, NJ, and then in Elizabeth, NJ. Emma died at age 83 on 9 June 1933 in Elizabeth, NJ. She was buried three days later in Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, alongside her husband Francis C. Ludey. Some more about him in the next post.

Emma Trewin Ludey, obituary notices

Categories: Bayonne, Census Records, Elizabeth, Union Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Jennison, Ludey, Obituaries, Ryman, Trewin, US Federal 1880, US Federal 1900, US Federal 1910, US Federal 1920 | Leave a comment

Thomas Trewin Jr. — Bookbinder

Traveling on the ship Ion was also Thomas (12/1839 – 7/1913), son of Thomas Trewin and Mary Anne Phillips. He would have been 18 at the time of the trans-Atlantic crossing and 20 when the family relocated to Jersey City, NJ. His date of birth I found in the 1900 Census. His name was transcribed (incorrectly) as “Thomas ? Frenen.”  His date of death is based on family burial records, showing he was buried in Evergreen Cemetery on 31 July 1913 in the Trewin family plot. He was 73.

I don’t know a lot about Thomas. The 1885 NJ state census shows him living with his sister Emma and her husband Francis C. Ludey in Bayonne, Hudson Co., NJ. According to 1900 and 1910 Census records, he was still residing with Emma and Francis in Bayonne. His status, when listed, was single. He may have lived with is parents until their passing in the late 1870s and then moved in with Emma who had married in 1871. So it could well be that Thomas never married. The 1910 Census lists his occupation as “Bookbinder.”

That unfortunately is about all I know about Thomas. He was active in the religious life of his church as is evidenced by his signature on the below document, a certificate for an auxiliary missionary society of the Methodist Episcopal Church dated 1877. Thomas Trewin served as Secretary and Francis C. Ludey as President. The certificate is for Ludey’s son, Francis T. Ludey. Update: 12/11, please see this follow-up blog post with photos of Thomas!

Auxillary Missionary Society certificate with Trewin signature (Image from my family’s personal collection)

Categories: Bayonne, Census Records, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Ludey, Methodist Episcopal, New Jersey 1885, Trewin, US Federal 1900, US Federal 1910 | Leave a comment

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