Illinois

David Wait Family of Perth Amboy, NJ: Puzzle in the John O. Wait Tree Solved

In the last post, I alluded to a puzzle in the tree of John Oliver Wait, son of David Wait. What I was referring to was the fact that the Wait family Bible lists two children in addition to John’s twelve children with wife Elizabeth Crow: Sarah Augusta Lewis and Charles Smith Lewis. Their dates of birth are such that they could not have been Elizabeth’s children as Elizabeth gave birth to other children around that time. This left me mystified as to whose children the Lewis kids were. It seemed odd that they had a different surname from Wait. I wondered if they belonged to one of John’s oldest daughters, but I dismissed that idea a bit since the eldest daughters were still quite young. Moreover, I would have expected to see a marriage to a Lewis listed for one of the girls. Then I read about the founding of the first Presbyterian Church in Perth Amboy by Capt. John Angus, David Wait, and John Lewis, and it occurred to me that those families and their  descendants were probably pretty intertwined. Perhaps the Lewis children were adopted by the Waits after some tragedy in the Lewis family.

Well, I finally came across some really convincing evidence two nights ago on what the real facts were. I’d often searched for a “Sarah A. Lewis” but had little success. This time I tried “Augusta Lewis” and was amazed to find her listed under the 1850 census at age 14, still in the John and Elizabeth Wait household. That on its own did not provide any revelations as to who her parents were, but I did not see Charles Lewis listed with her, so I thought–why not try to see what happened to him? I’d never searched his name before. Since Charles and Lewis are common names, I decided to throw in the Smith middle name. So I searched under the full name and year & place of birth, and was stunned to find a death record for a Charles Smitt Lewis in Blue Mound, Macon Co., Illinois, who died in 1921 at age 86. Yes, it was him, Sarah Augusta Lewis’s brother, “Smitt” misspelling and all.  Best of all, the record lists the parents: “Juebb Lewis” and “Margaret Waili”, and “Waili” certainly was a misspelling/”mistranscription” of “Waite” (a common and logical misspelling of “Wait”). [Note: Since writing this post, I have seen Juebb listed on a family tree as Jacob; given the crazy spelling of Waili, perhaps Juebb is indeed also a misspelling. ]

So, much like the blog entry Truin and Trewin, Thomas and Thos, this goes to show that it can really pay off to be creative with your searches. Who would ever expect to find Sarah A. Lewis, by using Augusta for her first name? Not me, anyway. (Incidentally, later records for her replace the “Augusta” with “Ann”.) And then for that misspelling to lead to another record with a misspelling of Smith, and then that to lead to Margaret Wait misspelled as Waili.

In summary, my original thought that the Lewis kids were children of one of John and Elizabeth’s daughters was correct. Margaret gave birth at age 16 and then 18. She was still living with John and Elizabeth when she was 34 (as per the 1850 census). Her surname is listed as “Waite,” not “Lewis,” so I don’t know what happened to “Juebb.” The 1850 census does not describe Margaret as a widow, but I assume he may have passed away. Margaret herself passed away in 1851 at the young age of 34.

Charles Smith Lewis married Nancy E. Lewis, an Indiana native. He was already in Macon Co., Illinois, in 1860, at age 25, according to census records. He is listed then as single. By the 1880 census, he is listed with Nancy, 7 years his junior, and three children: Margaret A., Sarah E., and Charles W. (18, 13, and 6, respectively). His occupation is listed as “lumber dealer.” The death record lists Charles Smith Lewis as being buried in Hall Cemetery in Blue Mound, Macon Co., Illinois. I searched Find a Grave’s website for any Lewises in Hall Cemetery and found C.S. Lewis and Nancy E. Lewis.  (I’d never have thought to search for him under “C.S.”–just one more bit of evidence to suggest creativity is vital when searching records.) May they rest in peace.

I’ll keep researching the Waits in Perth Amboy, but at least now, that one big puzzle has finally been solved!

Categories: Blue Mound, Macon Co., Census Records, Lewis, Perth Amboy, US Federal 1850, US Federal 1860, US Federal 1880, Wait | Leave a comment

Powered by WordPress.com.

Spared & Shared 2

-- rescuing history from old letters one page at a time

Parrotfish Journey

I travel , YOU should too...

TOWER AND FLIGHTS

In The Beginning Man Tried Ascending To Heaven via The Tower Of Babel. Now He Tries To Elevate His Existence Using Hallucinogenic Drugs. And, Since The 20th Century, He Continually Voyages Into Outer Space Using Spacecrafts. Prayer Thru Christ Is The Only Way To Reach Heaven.

London, Hollywood

I'm Dominic Wells, an ex-Time Out Editor. I used to write about films. Now I write them.

Uma Familia Portuguesa

A história da nossa família

Trkingmomoe's Blog

Low Budget Meals for the New Normal

The Good, the Bad and the Italian

food/films/families and more

dvn ms kmz time travel

This is all about my travels to the past... my reflections and musings about yesteryear, as I find the stories of a people passed away and learn how to tell them.

newarkpoems

350 years of Newark in verse 1666-2016

Russian Universe

Understanding Russia with a Russian

Bulldog Travels

Everything and Nothing Plus Some Pretty Photos

Dances with Wools

knitting, spinning, dyeing, and related fiber arts

Life After Caregiving

On caregivers, faith, family, and writing...

Why'd You Eat That?

Food Folklore for the everyday scholar. These are the stories behind the foods we eat.

Cooking without Limits

Food Photography & Recipes

Circulating Now

from the historical collections of the world's largest biomedical library

The Pioneer Woman

Plowing through Life in the Country...One Calf Nut at a Time

Almost Home

Genealogy Research and Consulting

Old Bones Genealogy of New England

Genealogy and Family History Research

ferrebeekeeper

Reflections Concerning Art, Nature, and the Affairs of Humankind (also some gardening anecdotes)

Map of Time | A Trip Into the Past

Navigating Through Someplace Called History

Out Here Studying Stones

Cemeteries & Genealogy

WeGoBack

family research ... discover your ancestry

the Victorian era

Did I misplace my pince-nez again? Light reading on the 19th century.

"Greatest Generation" Life Lessons

This is the story of an ordinary family, trying to live an ordinary life during an extraordinary time frame, and the lessons they learn through experience.

The Civil War Gazette

Keeping the stories alive from the American Civil War

Moore Genealogy

Fun With Genealogy

Meeting my family

RESEARCHING MY FAMILY TREE

Shaking the tree

musings on the journey towards knowing and sharing my family's stories

Among My Branches

Exploring My Kernan, Lapham, Hamilton, & Sebok Ancestries One Branch at a Time

A Hundred Years Ago

Food and More

Scots Roots

Helping you dig up your Scots roots.

Root To Tip

Not just a list of names and dates

Food Perestroika

Adventures in Eastern Bloc Cuisine

My Aunt the WAC

Marian Solomon's midlife transition from the farm to the Women's Army Corps (WACs)

Being Em | From Busan to America

this journey is my own, but i'm happy to share.

Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter

The Daily Online Genealogy Newsletter

Irish in the American Civil War

Exploring Irish Emigration & Irish Involvement in the American Civil War

TWISTED LIMBS & CROOKED BRANCHES

Genealogy: Looking For "Dead People"!

Cemeteries of Brunswick, Maine

To live in the hearts we leave behind, is not to die. ~ Thomas Campbell

Heart of a Southern Woman

A snapshot of life one blog post at a time.

Zimmerbitch

age is just a (biggish) number) NUMBER

The People of Pancho

At Play In The Archive

TRACK

Truth and Reconciliation for the Adoption Community of Korea

Rose of Sharon Healing

Healing for the Nations

DNAeXplained - Genetic Genealogy

Discovering Your Ancestors - One Gene at a Time

%d bloggers like this: