Heirlooms

112-year-old Brodhead family guestbook — post X

We are nearing the end of the guestbook. Here are two of the last four pages.

On the first page shown below, only the name Anna Dickenson Lorentz stands out to me. This was my grandmother’s first cousin on the Woodruff side of the family. Mary Emma Woodruff (1846-1923) was my great-grandfather William Earl Woodruff’s older sister. She married John W. Dickinson (b. 1843), a dentist, in 1874. They had four children: John (b. 1875), Mary (b. 1877), Madel (b. 1880) and Anna (b. 1886). Anna, who was four years younger than my grandmother, married Douglas C. Lorentz sometime after my grandmother’s own wedding on June 8, 1908, as she appears in my grandmother’s list of wedding gifts under her maiden name.

  • Florence A. Thompson – March 7, 1909 – Goshen, NY
  • Mrs. Isabelle S. Van Riper – March 8, 1909 – 210 Park Ave., Paterson, NJ – “Just Jamie and I for a call”
  • Anna Dickenson Lorentz – March 10, 1909 – 60 Ward St., Orange, ?
  • Hazel M. Knott – March 13, 1909 – 256 South Clinton St, East Orange, NJ
  • Harriet N. Ackerman – March 13, 1909 – 154 Rahway Ave., Elizabeth, NJ
  • Nellie E. Baldwin – 931 South St., Elizabeth, NJ

Elizabeth Daily Journal, Dec. 23, 1898

Mrs. Thomas B. Russum was my grandmother’s aunt Cecelia Bensley (Angus) Russum. Both she and Thomas Bayley Russum have been mentioned in this blog before.

As for Marietta B. Earl, I learned that she was a granddaughter of Marietta (Crane) Earl and Edward B. Earl, who were married on 19 Jan 1859 and subsequently had a large number of children: The 1880 census registered Elizabeth (20), Annie (15), Marietta (10), Grace (1), and Florence (6 mo.), Edward Jr. (16), William (12), Fannie (7), and Alice (4). Daughter Marietta died of consumption in Tucson, Arizona, on 21 December 1898 (see clipping); she’d have been about 28.  The 1900 census, in addition to the above and minus Marietta, showed a brother George (18) and a granddaughter Marietta B. (6). So, evidently one of the siblings named a daughter after Marietta.

The Hillside Times, January 11, 1945

The 1920 census recorded Edward (then 83) and Marietta (then 82) residing with never-married daughters Elizabeth (age 52), Annie (50, dressmaker), Grace (40, nurse), and Florence (39, teacher).

So going back to the guestbook, Florence A. Earl was Marietta B. Earl’s aunt, and Marietta B. was about 15 when she paid my grandparents a visit. As I’ve said before regarding the Earls, there may have been some familial connection (my great-grandfather was William Earl Woodruff, after all), but how far back it goes, I have no idea. Meanwhile I do know that all of these folks went to First Presbyterian Church in Elizabeth, so that may explain the close friendships.

For this family’s Evergreen Cemetery plot, visit their Find a Grave entry. It includes:  Elizabeth Littell Earl,18601944 /// Anna May Earl,18651938 /// William Alexander Earl,18671925 /// Marietta Benton Earl,1870–1898  /// Fannie Crane Earl,18731882 /// Alice Maxwell Earl Crane,18761951 /// Sarah Margaret Earl,18771879 /// Grace Earl,1878–1936  /// Florence Adelaide Earl,18801972 /// George M Earl, 18821963

Categories: Dickinson, Earl, Elizabeth, Union Co., Heirlooms, New Jersey, Russum, Woodruff | Tags: , | Leave a comment

112-year-old Brodhead family guestbook — Post VI

Mr. & Mrs. Frank M. Brodhead Guest Book, 1908

Flora May Woodruff Baker, circa 1910

The next page from the guestbook! On August 18, 1908, Flora M. Baker and son, residing at Cranbury & Conant Street, visited for lunch. This was my grandmother’s older sister Flora May Woodruff (1877-1962) and her infant son Norment Woodruff Baker (1908-1979). Flora was married to Claiborne Barksdale Baker (b. 1870). He passed away in 1916, and she eventually was remarried to a gentleman named John Jacob Ulrich (b. 1884) and moved to California.

Evelyn Angus visited on September 4. I believe this was Evelyn L. Angus (1894-1981), the daughter of Charles Dujah Angus (1852-1938) and Harriet Hartnett (1858-1951). Charles was child #7 of James W. and Wealthy (Jaques) Angus. If this is the correct Evelyn, she was also the one who tended to my grandmother Fannie Woodruff Brodhead, in the weeks leading up to her death from pneumonia in 1965. Evelyn was one of my grandmother’s many 1st cousins.

Image credit: Michelle Causton. Original group photo cropped to show: Circled (left to right): Laura L. Brodhead, Calvin E. Brodhead, Gertrude M. Brodhead, and William McNulty Brodhead (on the occasion of the Golden Wedding Anniversary of Garret and Annie Brodhead (parents of Calvin, Laura, and siblings)).

September 8th saw the arrival of another Woodruff cousin—Lucetta Crane Woodruff (1867-1956), one of the never-married daughters of Ogden Woodruff and Phebe Asenath Bonnell, who had 12 children in all.

The next guests, on September 20, were on my grandfather’s side of the family—first cousin Calvin Easton Brodhead (1878-1945) with wife Gertrude Brodhead (1881-1961) and baby son William McNulty Brodhead (1906-1976). Eventually this family, which grew to have many more children, moved to Ohio.

The Central New Jersey Home News, New Brunswick, NJ, March 22, 1945

The last name on the page is Laura Leisenring Brodhead (1878-1949), Calvin’s twin sister, who resided in Perth Amboy. I don’t believe she ever married, but feel free to correct me on that. Shown here is a cropped image of the September 21, 1922, Brodhead family gathering on the occasion of Calvin and Laura’s parents’ 50th wedding anniversary. I have circled and noted who’s who.

Laura remarked in the guest book: “Tennis is great”. Perhaps she and my grandparents played a game of tennis earlier that day?  Sounds like it! I published a tennis-related photo once before (below). Perhaps, this was the court they played on. The time period looks about right.

Have a good and safe Sunday everyone. And, remember, “this too shall pass,” and we will be the stronger for it.

Elizabeth, NJ, tennis court

Categories: Baker, Brodhead, Heirlooms, Memorabilia, Woodruff | Tags: , | Leave a comment

112-year-old Brodhead family guestbook — Post I

Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

In the coming weeks, I’m going to be publishing the pages of a guest book that was given to my grandparents when they moved into their new home at 736 Jersey Avenue in Elizabeth, Union Co., New Jersey, in June 1908.  Their minister Rev. William Force Whitaker of the First Presbyterian Church of Elizabeth was the first guest who signed in, and his handwriting matches the handwriting you see here, so the book evidently was a gift from him. About 18 months’ worth of guests is recorded. Many of you will recognize the names of those who stopped by. I’m not publishing all the pages at once since I will have comments to make about certain names and want to research some others.

I am going to assume that the house number 736 is correct, however, a previous post I did on my grandparents’ wedding contained a newspaper announcement that gave the house number as 732.  It could be that parents (Andrew D. and Margaret Brodhead) lived at 732, since I have seen that as their address, and my grandparents at 736.  A visit to Google street view indicates that both those homes have been replaced (quite recently it appears) by a townhouse-looking structure, so, alas, the number discrepancy is neither here nor there—there shall never be real estate listings showing the inside of those two dwellings.

The pages below show a child’s scribbles, revealing that my Dad or his brother must have gotten his hands on the guest book at some point. Or perhaps the scribbles were made by the children of some visitors…

The first page shows the following guests — after the Reverend (who resided at 142 Stiles Street, Elizabeth, NJ):

The Van Horn Children: Abigail Van Horn, Frances Van Horn, and Robert Osborn Van Horn

In any case, I will welcome your comments as you see names you recognize. Please feel free to share any information you may know about the people behind them for the benefit of other family members who follow this blog. Thank you!


Categories: Baker, Barksdale, Brodhead, Coleman, Elizabeth, Union Co., Family Homes, Heirlooms, New Jersey, Presbyterian, Townley, Woodruff | Tags: , , | 10 Comments

Ebay auction: Daguerreotype of Elizabeth D. Brodhead (1851-1938) as a child & one of her father, too

THE KINGSTON DAILY FREEMAN. TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 5, 1916. (Credit: FultonHistory.com)

Just a quick post to say that a daguerreotype of Elizabeth Dorcas Brodhead is up for auction on eBay. To view the item, click here.  Shown here as a child, she went on to marry Philetus Kortright (1846-1916). She was the daughter of Richard Brodhead (1815-1865) and Eliza Maria Jansen Brodhead (1823-1908); see Find a Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/19501036

A search of Ancestry trees shows that this Richard Brodhead appears to have been the the son of Oliver C. Brodhead (1774-1858) and Dorcas Hallock (1787-1853). Oliver was a grandson of Daniel Brodhead (1693-1755) and Hester Wyngart (1687-1758) via their son Revolutionary War captain Charles W. Brodhead (1729-1789). (I am, as are some of you, a direct descendant of Charles’s brother Garret Brodhead.)

Just wanted to pass this auction info along in case some Brodheads out there who read this blog and are closely related to Elizabeth would be interested in trying to acquire this unique and precious item.

Oops! After posting this, I noticed a daguerreotype of Richard is up for auction, too. Click here.

Categories: Brodhead, Heirlooms, Memorabilia, New York | Tags: , , | 8 Comments

January 1876 autograph album: A gift to Elizabeth Sargent Trewin from her Sunday School class

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin (Image from my family’s personal collection)

In January 1876, my great-grandmother Elizabeth Sargent (b. 15 September 1854 in Northampton, England) was given an autograph book by her Jersey City, New Jersey, Sunday School class. She was 21 years old and evidently was a teacher to students not much younger than she. This was six-and-a-half years before she married widower William Trewin and became a second mother to his two sons, Bert (10) and Clarence (12). My grandmother Zillah arrived in June 1883, 11 months after they walked down the aisle. I have written numerous posts about both these families so if you are new to this blog and want to know more about them, it’s here! Just use the search box, or scroll down a bit and click on the relevant link in the directory on the left side of this page.

This autograph album captures autographs she acquired over the years and includes a couple of entries made by my mother who was 3 when Elizabeth died in February 1926.

Some of the entries are very faded, and I have tried to adjust those for some degree of readability. The entries that stand out to me are those made by family members:

Lulu Ludey, a niece by marriage, who wrote on November 26, 1885, at age 10: “Aunt Lizzie – When you are Old and Drinking your tea, put on your specs and Think of me. Your niece, Lulu Ludey”

Betty Boles, granddaughter, who wrote on November 27, 1933, at age 10: “For get me not. The violet loves a sunny bank, The cowslip loves the lea – The scarlet creeper loves the elm. But I love only thee. Your loving Granddaughter, Betty Boles”

Elizabeth Sargent’s autograph album (From my family’s personal collection)

Albert (Bert) Trewin, stepson, wrote on April 12, 1883, at not quite age 11: “Mamma, Lost yesterday somewhere between sunrise and sunset two golden hours each filled with sixty golden minutes, No reward is offered for they are gone forever. Your son, B. Trewin”

Zillah Trewin, daughter, who wrote in 1892, at age 9: “Mama – When after years when this you see I wonder what your name will be, Yours truly, Zillah Trewin”

Betty Boles, granddaughter, wrote in January 1933, at age 9: “Roses are red, Violets are blue, Sugar is sweet, and so are you. With love your granddaughter, Betty Boles”

Zillah Trewin, daughter, wrote on January 2, 1897, at age 14: “Dear Mama, Six little words I have for thee, Be happy and think of me. From your loving daughter, Zillah M. Trewin”

I “got lost” in this little album yesterday and must say reading through the entries lifted my spirits. Apart from my 96-year-old mother, all of these people are long long gone, and yet they seem very near to me today.

Presented to Miss Sargent by her Sunday School Class as a token of love. January 1876

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Categories: Boles, Heirlooms, Jersey City, Hudson Co., Memorabilia, New Jersey, Sargent, Trewin | Tags: , , , , | 8 Comments

Memories of the Woodruff farm, “sugar bread,” and picking daisies…

Wealthy Ann Angus Woodruff (5 August 1850 – 27 May 1927) with grandsons Dick Brown and Charles Brodhead, circa 1924, at the old Woodruff Farm on Conant Street in Hillside, NJ. The house still stands, but the barn and fields are no more.

The old wooden bucket used in my great grandmother’s kitchen to hold sugar

Last year I came upon the above photo of my great-grandmother Wealthy Ann Angus Woodruff. She is pictured outside the barn of the old Woodruff farmhouse in Hillside, NJ. The house still stands, but the barn and surrounding fields were eventually lost to development. This is the only old photo I’ve seen of the premises there, and the fact that it includes my father and his cousin Dick Brown makes it even more special.

When my late Dad retired in the late 1980s, he set out to write down his recollections of the years in his life leading up to his marriage to my Mom; his logic for stopping there was that we all knew what came next. At the time that bothered me, but all these years later, I can see his point. Why potentially ruffle the feathers of your kids and other family members by writing something they may read some day and take the wrong way?

Wm Earl Woodruff & Wealthy Ann Angus on the occasion of their 50th wedding anniversary

Of course, I am exceedingly grateful for the details he left us about his growing up years. Here are some recollections of 1927 that pertain to the old Woodruff family farm house and the wooden sugar bucket (photo, right):

…Grandma Woodruff died. A real blow to everyone. I remember seeing her in her casket in the living room of the old farmhouse on Conant Street in Hillside, NJ. I remember going into the field and picking some daisies and bringing them in the house and placing them in her stone cold hands. I remember the old barn. One day the young hired hand dared me to eat horse feed. I did and got sick as a dog. I remember an old horse-drawn wagon in the yard. Dick Brown (my cousin) and I used to play on it and pretend we were driving. Grandma used to make me ‘sugar bread’. Homemade bread, home-churned butter with lots of sugar on it. She also fed me lots of sweet tea. Nothing not from scratch!…

My Dad’s Grandma Woodruff had six daughters with her husband William Earl Woodruff. I have no contact with descendants of the sisters of my grandmother but, of course, would be pleased to hear from any of them at any time.

Categories: Angus, Death, Heirlooms, Hillside Union, New Jersey, Woodruff | Tags: , , , | 5 Comments

Barksdale family heirloom

It’s almost a year ago that I found in a box an old button hook that belonged to my grandmother Elizabeth Sargent Trewin’s sister-in-law Sarah Bowley Sargent. I put a poll up asking how folks would handle an item like that—one that was more distantly related to them. Most respondents were happy to put the item back in the box and hand it down. I chuckled when I saw that.

Poll.JPG

I was confronted with a similar situation again recently when I  came across a small prayer book dated 1849; on the cover appear the initials “A. M. Barksdale” and the street address “2204 Monument Avenue” is written inside. The opposite side of that page contains a line from Dante’s Divine Comedy in Italian and English: “Down through the world of infinite bitterness.”

Clueless as to whom the book once belonged, I must admit that discarding it crossed my mind. But, I was too curious and ended up putting my detective hat on.

I won’t bore you with the zigs and zags of my small bit of research. Suffice it to say that I am quite certain the book belonged to Agnes Morton Barksdale (1834-1908) and that the address is that of the home of “Francis D. Barksdale”, a cousin (once removed) who lived at that street address in Richmond, Virginia. The house, built in 1909, still stands.

I don’t think Agnes ever married or had children. She was the daughter of Dr. Claiborne Williams Barksdale (b. 1802) and his second wife Sallie Norment Whitlock. The family lived in Halifax Co., Virginia. Their children were:

  • Claiborne Whitlock Barksdale (1833 – 1902)
  • Agnes Morton Barksdale (1834 – 1908)
  • Judith Beverly Barksdale (1836 – 1891)
  • Mary Barksdale (1838 – 1854)
  • Sallie Claiborne Barksdale (1840 – 1916)
  • Achilles Whitlock Barksdale (1842 – 1916)
  • Thomas White Barksdale (1844 – 1902)
  • Howard Barksdale (1846 – 1907)


How did we end up with the book? That was the biggest question of all, and it took a while to figure it out.

In a nutshell, one of my grandmother’s sisters married a descendant of one of Agnes’s sisters, Sallie Claiborne Barksdale. That descendant died not long after they married, and my grandmother’s sister remarried and moved to California. Somehow this book remained behind in New Jersey with my grandmother.

I must say, my initial inclination was to dispose of it somehow, but I am glad I took the time to connect the dots and find the story behind this object. It was obviously used quite a bit by Agnes given the wear in the leather. I’ve sent a few emails to some folks I’ve found who appear to be bona fide descendants of Agnes’s siblings but have not yet heard back. I’ll have to wait and see where this little book’s fate takes it from here…

UPDATE 4/3/2017: I am pleased to report that this little prayer book is en route to a new home with a bona fide descendant of Dr. Claiborne Barksdale and his wife Sallie N. Whitlock.


Categories: Barksdale, Heirlooms, Miscellaneous | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

Powered by WordPress.com.

TJR MinT

Not Just Food

Dream To Cook

Taste heavenly good

Bruno Biancardi

LANDSCAPE OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY

Ailish Sinclair

Stories and photos from Scotland

Briar Rose Blog

a lifestyle blog by Briar Rose

The Walking Sketchbook

Creating Outdoors in Nature

Paddy Tobin, An Irish Gardener

Our garden, gardens visited, occasional thoughts and book reviews

Dr. Mary Ann Niemczura

Author of "A Past Worth Telling"

Very Nearly Tea Time

Celebrating the best about the ritual of tea

Gerry's Family History

Sharing stories from my family history

The History Interpreter - Janet Few

Presenting and Preserving the Past

What Florida Native Plant Is Blooming Today?™

Daily Photo of Plants Native to Florida

Jet Eliot

Travel and Wildlife Adventures

The Chiddicks Family Tree

Every Family has a story to tell..........Welcome to mine

kelleysdiy

Where Creativity and Imagination Creates Wonderful Ideas for Your Home!

Chaotic Shapes

Art and Lifestyle by Brandon Knoll

thedihedral.wordpress.com/

Climbing, Outdoors, Life!

Dusty Roots & Forgotten Treasures

Researching, Preserving, and Sharing Genealogical Information For Future Generations

WitzEnd Family History

Adventures in Genealogy of the Witzel and Kroening Families

American in Korea

Everything International

The Genealogist's Craft

My aim is to tell interesting stories of how genealogical information comes to be. Please pull up an armchair ...

omordah.wordpress.com/

Art by Susan M. L. Moore

Lee's Birdwatching Adventures Plus

Birdwatching from a Christian Perspective

Story_Trails

Family history in stories recalled by Edie and Leo. Edith GAYLORD Allen, Leo ALLEN, Jr

Princes, Paupers, Pilgrims & Pioneers

“There are two lasting bequests we can give our children: One is roots, the other is wings.” Teaching children values and giving them the opportunity to excel is essential to good parenting. However, I feel I must also provide my children (and myself) insight into the ones who came before us: our ancestors whose lives and stories have shaped us into who we are. This is my journey; these are their stories…

Myricopia

Exploring the Past to Improve the Future

Buddha Walks Into A Wine Bar ....

Sits down with The Two Doctors and .....

MarileeWein.com

DOUBLE GENEALOGY: the ADOPTION WITNESS

Tastes of Health

Recipes For Delicious Food & Healthy Lifestyle

Applegate Genealogy

Helping others discover their roots

allenrizzi

Sempre in Movimento! Published Every Monday and Friday at 12 PM EST

Cooking Without Limits

Food Photography & Recipes

THEVYPEFFECT

all about travelling in korea

Smart Veg Recipes

Welcome to home made, vegeterian, healthy & kids friendly recipes

ICI & LA NATURE PICTURES

Walk and Bike in France and Europe www.walk-bike-camino.com

The Lives of my Ancestors

Lives, Biographies and Sketches of my Family History

Down the Rabbit Hole with Sir LeprechaunRabbit

Serious about Genealogy? Let this Olde Grey hare show you about

Diggin' Up Graves

Genealogy and family history, dirt and all.

Fiction Gets Real: Classic Literary Characters Transported To The Modern World

https://www.amazon.com/Jane-Eyre-Gets-Real-Annabelle-ebook/dp/B00FAS3I7O

Momoe's Cupboard

Low Budget Meals and Ideas

Generations of Nomads

On the Trail of Family Faces, Places, and Stories Around the World

Your daily Civil War newspaper [est. 1995]

All the Civil War news fit to re-print

Author Adrienne Morris

The Writing Life at Middlemay Farm

Travels with Janet

Just another WordPress.com weblog

%d bloggers like this: