Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe)

‘Brodhead Memorial Gateway,’ Evergreen Cemetery – Jim Thorpe, PA

Brodhead_Gate_EvergreenCemetery_JimThorpePA

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in Flemington, NJ, 1904

This pretty entrance with its ornate, wrought-iron arch overhead greets visitors to Evergreen Cemetery in Jim Thorpe (formerly known as Mauch Chunk), Carbon Co., Pennsylvania. And what special gates they are. I am missing page 1 of the accompanying article, but if you read down you will come to discover that these distinctive pillars and gates were given to the cemetery in 1913 by the nine surviving Brodhead children to honor the memory of their parents, Andrew Jackson Brodhead & Ophelia Easton.

A plaque on the left pillar says ‘Brodhead Memorial Gateway, erected 1913.’ (For a close-up look at the plaque, you can view this Instagram image.) If page 1 of the article ever surfaces, I will include it here; unfortunately I don’t know what paper it appeared in—the two pieces I do have are very old and beginning to disintegrate.

Enjoy the article and learning more about how these gates came to be. And, have a good Monday!
Brodhead_Cemetery_gatesBrodhead_cemetery_gates_2

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Categories: Brodhead, Evergreen Cemetery Jim Thorpe PA, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Pennsylvania | 2 Comments

Andrew Jackson Brodhead & Ophelia Easton golden wedding anniversary in 1895

Today, I’m sharing a recent, very happy discovery: the commemorative brochure for the December 31, 1895, Golden Wedding Anniversary celebration of Andrew Jackson Brodhead and Ophelia Easton. The contents were written by their youngest child Richard Henry Brodhead who was 31 at the time. It is wonderful to hear him write so warmly about his parents and siblings—a very close-knit family of 12, greatly expanded by 1895 to include spouses and 27 grandchildren.

(For my original post about their anniversary, click here. Another post about their 1845 New Year’s Eve wedding can be found by clicking here.) Enjoy, and have a good Monday.

Brodhead_AJ_anniversary1 001 copy

Brodhead_AJ_anniversary2 001 copy

Brodhead_AJ_anniversary3 001 copy

Categories: Brodhead, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe) | 6 Comments

More traces of Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead & Cornelia M. Ely

Down Among the Coal Mines -- Chutes Loading the Canal-Boats on the Lehigh Canal, a wood engraving published in Harper's Weekly, February 1873. Coal was loaded at Mauch Chunk (Image found on Wikimedia Commons; public domain in the US)

Carbon County Scene: “Down Among the Coal Mines — Chutes Loading the Canal-Boats on the Lehigh Canal,” a wood engraving published in Harper’s Weekly, February 1873. Coal was loaded at Mauch Chunk (Image found on Wikimedia Commons; public domain in the US)

One of this blog’s new readers, whose spouse is a descendant of Abram & Cornelia Brodhead, kindly pointed me in the direction of some wonderful Carbon County resources that are available online thanks to the amazing contributions of a Mr. Tony Bennyhoff.  They reveal some interesting details, and I encourage anyone whose ancestors spent time in Carbon County to check them out. You never know what you may find.

What I found were several newspaper notices related to Abram’s passing, and I am sharing them here:

The Lehighton Press, Volume 2, Number 2, Thursday, October 27, 1892:
Death of A. C. Brodhead. Abram C. Brodhead died on Tuesday morning at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Garrett B. Linderman, South Bethlehem. Mr. Brodhead was 68 years of age, and lived for many years in Lehighton. About two months ago he went to South Bethlehem to visit his daughter, and while there he was taken ill. Mr. Brodhead was the youngest brother of the late Judge A. G. Brodhead , of Mauch Chunk; D. D. Brodhead , of Wilkes-Barre; A. J. Brodhead , of Flemington, N. J., and W. F. Brodhead, of Packerton. He was a staunch Democrat, having held several offices in the gift of his party. He was well known and greatly respected. The funeral of the deceased will take place to-day. Interment at Bridgeport, Conn. [Note: W. F. Brodhead, of Packerton, was a cousin on the Dingman side,  the son of William Franklin Brodhead (b 1807) and Jane Dingman (b 1808; Cornelia Dingman’s younger sister).]

Carbon Advocate, Volume 20, Number 50, Saturday, October 29, 1892:
Death of Abr. Brodhead. After an illness dating back a long time Abraham Brodhead died at the home of his daughter at Bethlehem on Monday night at the age of 68 years. For many years deceased resided in this city and was the superintendent of the Lehigh Stove Foundry. During the Grover Cleveland administration he held a lucrative position in the Philadelphia mint. He was an eccentric character in many ways. The news of his death was heard with regret by many old friends here.

View of Mauch Chunk, Carbon County, Pennsylvania, a wood engraving sketched by Theodore R. Davis and published in Harper's Weekly, September 1869 (Found on Wikimedia Commons; image is in public domain in US)

“View of Mauch Chunk, Carbon County, Pennsylvania,” a wood engraving sketched by Theodore R. Davis and published in Harper’s Weekly, September 1869 (Found on Wikimedia Commons; image is in public domain in US)

The Lehighton Press, Volume 2, Number 3, Thursday, November 3, 1892:
Funeral of A. C. Brodhead – The funeral of A. C. Brodhead, of Lehighton, took place on Thursday morning last from the residence of Mrs. G. B. Linderman, the daughter of the deceased, at South Bethlehem. The services were conducted by Rev. Gilbert H. Sterling, after which the remains were taken to Bridgeport, Conn., and there interred beside Mr. Brodhead’s wife. Mr. Brodhead was born in Pike county, August 6, 1824. In his early years Mr. Brodhead was connected with the Lehigh Valley Railroad and was subsequently in the government employ, in the custom house, in New York, and in later years in the mint, in Philadelphia. He was the youngest son of Garrett Brodhead and his wife, Cornelia Dingman , of Delaware, Pa. He was married January 6, 1862, to Cornelia Ely , of Bridgeport, Conn., but his wife died in the second  year thereafter, leaving but one child, Jennie, wife of Garrett B. Linderman. The funeral was largely attended by relatives and friends of the deceased from Lehighton and Mauch Chunk.

And, I found a morsel about Cornelia M. Ely in George Burritt Vanderpoel’s The Ely ancestry: lineage of Richard Ely of Plymouth, England who came to Boston, Mass., about 1655 & settled at Lyme, Conn, in 1660… (NY: Calumet Press, 1902, p. 369):

137313- Cornelia Maria Ely, b. 1842, d. 1864, dau. of Henry Gideon Ely and Cornelia Maria Whiting; m. 1863, Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead, Lehighton, Carbon Co., Pa., who was b. 1824, son of Garrett Brodhead and Cornelia Dingman. Their children:

1. Jennie S, b. 1863.

So Abram was ‘well known and greatly respected’ and ‘an eccentric character in many ways.’ I enjoy hearing little details like that, don’t you?

I am so grateful for this blog’s readers and appreciate all the feedback and help you so generously provide!

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Pennsylvania | 2 Comments

Brodhead family descendants repair Cornelia D. Brodhead headstone

Mauch Chunk Cemetery sign, Jim Thorpe, PA

Mauch Chunk Cemetery sign, Jim Thorpe, PA (PHOTO CREDIT: James and Barbara Brodhead)

I recently heard from James and Barbara Brodhead, who are cousins of mine—James and I share the same great grandparents, Andrew Douglas Brodhead and Margaret Lewis Martin. It was only a few years ago that we made initial contact, quite by chance, on the Internet. This post is part one of two posts on this blog being devoted to their efforts to tidy up and restore some Brodhead family headstones, and with so many old headstones crumbling all across America, perhaps their work will inspire you just as much as it has me! I asked them whether they required permission to undertake this work, and they were advised that since they were family, they were welcome to do what they could. So here, without further ado, is Part I of their project, in James’ own words. Enjoy!

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851)

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851)

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead was born on October 3, 1797, in Dingmans Ferry, Pennsylvania. Her father was Judge Daniel W. Dingman and her mother was Mary Westbrook. Cornelia is buried next to her husband, Garret Brodhead, whom she married at age 16 on November 25, 1813. They are both buried in the Upper Mauch Chunk Cemetery in Jim Thorpe, PA. I am the third great-grandson of Cornelia and Garret.

Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832)

Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832)

As I have a great interest in my family history, in the fall of 2011, my wife, Barbara, and I went to Pennsylvania in search of family history information. We visited the cemetery in Jim Thorpe and located the family plot owned by the Hon. Albert Gallatin Brodhead, Garret and Cornelia’s oldest son. It is situated on the edge of the hill next to the Asa Packer Family Plot. Sadly, we found Cornelia’s headstone had been knocked/fallen over, the center stone was missing, and the base had been moved about 6 feet from its original location. Cornelia’s headstone was laying face up but was about 2/3 buried in the ground.

The Albert Gallatin Brodhead plot in Upper Mauch Chunk Cemetery, Jim Thorpe, PA; Garret Brodhead's stone is visible in the foreground right corner.

The Albert Gallatin Brodhead plot in Upper Mauch Chunk Cemetery, Jim Thorpe, PA; Garret Brodhead’s stone is visible in the foreground right corner.

During our travels, as a way to show respect for our ancestors, we determined to clean the moss and dirt from any family headstones we had found. We carried a kit with a bucket, jugs of water, Simple Green, brushes, plastic putty knives, etc. We knew that Cornelia’s headstone was going to take a lot more effort to fix, so we began planning to make the necessary repairs the next time we would visit.

Cornelia's headstone lying on the ground next to Garret's marker

Cornelia’s headstone lying on the ground next to Garret’s marker

In August of 2013, we were able to return to Pennsylvania; the repair of Cornelia’s headstone a priority on this trip. We were staying in Milford, and we took the 70 mile drive to Jim Thorpe. I began by digging around her headstone and standing it up. (The estimated weight for the base and headstone was approximately 250 lbs each.) A neighbor boy loaned us a shovel. The base, I skidded on wood strips that we had brought, until I returned it to its original location. The base was then leveled. I walked, (tipped back and forth); her headstone over next to the base, then tipped it on to its back onto the base.

4_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 5 copy

5_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 7 copy

6_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 10 copy

7_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 12 copy

8_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 14 copy

9_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

Because of the limited space and the weight, and after several attempts, I was unable to stand the headstone up onto the base. I began to say a silent prayer, asking for help. As I finished and looked up, I could see that Barbara was also praying. It was late, and so we drove back to our motel.

The next morning we went for a walk and found that our planned route was unsafe, (no sidewalks), and so we took a different route. As we were going down a side street I saw a bridge crane and said, “That’s what we need to lift the headstone up!” We realized that we were looking at a shop where they engraved headstones. The foreman, after listening to our dilemma, told us that we would have to slide the stone off the base and stand it up. Then using wood blocks, (cribbing), the stone is tilted side to side and front to back and the blocks are inserted under it. Thus the stone is walked up to the required height and slid into position. He also gave us four small plastic squares to place under each corner and then told us to use 50-year silicone to seal the stone to the base. It worked just as he said.

9a_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

9b_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

9c_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

9d_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

9e_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

9f_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy copy

9g_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

9h_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy copy

9i_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy
When we return next time we will thoroughly clean all of the Brodhead headstones and put gravel where there is a rain water runoff problem.

This project has helped us feel closer to Garret and Cornelia.

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Dingmans Ferry, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Mauch Chunk Cemetery Jim Thorpe PA | 8 Comments

The Hon. Albert Gallatin Brodhead (1815-1891) of Mauch Chunk, PA

Albert Gallatin Brodhead portrait, *between p. 260 and p. 261

Albert Gallatin Brodhead portrait, *between p. 260 and p. 261

An upcoming post is going to mention the Honorable Albert Gallatin Brodhead, oldest brother of my second great grandfather Andrew Jackson Brodhead, so I thought I would take this moment to post a bio about Albert. It was published in 1905 in Historic Homes and Institutions and Genealogical and Personal Memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, PA* (see end of this post for full citation and a link to view the book online). This fabulous 500-plus-page book is rich with biographical information and portraits of many prominent individuals in Lehigh Valley history. If you have prominent ancestors who lived in that area, it would be worth checking the book’s index to see if your ancestor’s name appears there. Albert was the son of Garret Brodhead (1793-1872) and Cornelia Dingman (1797-1885), and had two other brothers besides my second great grandfather: Daniel Dingman Brodhead and Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead. In his younger years, Albert worked for the venerable Asa Packer. whose daughter Lucy Evelyn was married to Albert’s cousin Dr. Garret B. Linderman, son of Rachel Brodhead (Garret’s sister) and Dr. John J. Linderman.

Brodhead_Albert_Gallatin_b1815

A much younger Albert Gallatin Brodhead

According to p. 674 of a different book The History of the Counties of Lehigh & Carbon, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, by Alfred Mathews & Austin N. Hungerford (published in Philadelphia, Pa., 1884), which is also rich in information, Albert settled in Mauch Chunk first, and his parents and brothers followed thereafter:  Hon. A. G. Brodhead came here in 1841, and has ever since been identified with railroad enterprises. He was made superintendent of the Beaver Meadow Railroad in 1850, and has filled the position with ability ever since, the name of his office changing with the ownership of the road, and now being superintendent of the Beaver Meadow Division of the Lehigh Valley Railroad. He has been prominently identified with the movements which brought the gas- and water-works into existence, and with other local enterprises, and in 1869 was elected to the State Senate. His father, Garret Brodhead, came to Mauch Chunk some years after his own settlement and died here, and his brothers, Andrew, Abram, and Daniel, also became residents in the valley.

If you read the below bio on Albert, you will discover a man of great accomplishment and fine character. It greatly impressed me that—in addition to family members—700 guests showed up from all over the country to help Albert and his wife Sally celebrate their golden anniversary on July 3, 1888. A few years after that, his death came unexpectedly at the hands of a bout of flu from which he failed to recover. Even on his deathbed, he was thinking of others and making provisions to ensure his family would be properly cared for. Until I read this bio, I’d never realized that he died on the same month and day (18 Jan.) as both his parents (Garret, 18 Jan 1872; Cornelia, 18 Jan 1885). Quite an alignment of stars, I must say. But somehow that seems fitting—Albert, with all his accomplishments and having been the first-born child, may well have been the apple of their eye. And, in his final moments, the significance of that month and day may well have crossed his mind.  The description of Albert’s funeral, included in this bio, is poignant and shows just how beloved a figure he was in the Mauch Chunk community. He and his parents are buried in the Upper Mauch Chunk Cemetery.

Note: Paragraph 1 of page 261 mentions an uncle ‘A. G. Gallatin’. This must be a reference to his uncle Albert Gallatin Brodhead, younger brother of Albert’s father Garret, and the person after whom young Albert was named.

*Between p. 260 & p. 261

*p. 260

*p. 261

*p. 261

*p. 262

*p. 262

p. 263

*p. 263

*p. 264

*p. 264

*Historic Homes and Institutions and Genealogical and Personal Memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, PA, Volume II, by John Woolf Jordan Edgar Moore Green, and George Taylor Ettinger (Lehigh Valley, PA: Lewis Publishing Co., 1905) is available on Google eBooks. Click the link.

Categories: Brodhead, Lehigh Valley, Linderman, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Mauch Chunk Cemetery Jim Thorpe PA, Packer, Tolan | Leave a comment

19th-century Carbon County, PA — Lindermans, Packers, & Brodheads

Postcard picture from 1915 of a "bird's eye view" of w:Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania, then known as "Mauch Chunk". (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain Image)

Postcard picture from 1915 of a “bird’s eye view” of w:Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania, then known as “Mauch Chunk”. (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain Image)

Happy New Year! I hope a wonderful time was had by all this past Christmas. Best wishes for a happy and healthy 2014!

Just a quick post to draw your attention to an interesting blog: Cultured Carbon County: Capturing the essence of Carbon County Pennsylvania’s history one story at a time.

I came upon one of its posts, Mauch Chunk’s Plague Year and the Linderman Brothers – Love and Peril in Our Time of Cholera, while searching for information on Dr. Garret Brodhead Linderman (grandson of Richard H. Brodhead (1772-1843) and Hannah Drake whose daughter Rachel Brodhead married Dr. John J. Linderman). There is ton of information here, including some photos and newspaper clippings, and when you have time, it is well worth the read.

Dr. Garrett B. Linderman and his brother Dr. Henry B. Linderman (once director of the Philadelphia mint) came to Mauch Chunk’s aid after a cholera epidemic struck the community in the 1850s (allegedly sparked by the huge influx of workers who’d come to the area for Lehigh Valley Railroad construction projects) and killed two of the small town’s three physicians. (Note: Mauch Chunk changed its name to Jim Thorpe in the 1950s.)

Asa Packer Mansion in Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), PA (Wikimedia Commons-Image in public domain)

Asa Packer Mansion in Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), PA (Wikimedia Commons-Image in public domain)

Judge Asa Packer (From Portrait and Biographical Record of Lehigh, Northampton and Carbon Counties (Chicago: Chapman Publishing Company, 1894))

Judge Asa Packer (From Portrait and Biographical Record of Lehigh, Northampton and Carbon Counties (Chicago: Chapman Publishing Company, 1894))

Dr. Garrett Brodhead went on to marry Lucy Evelyn Packer, daughter of Judge Asa Packer (millionaire owner of Lehigh Valley Railroad, philanthropist of humble beginnings; founder of Lehigh University; donor of $33 million to Mauch Chunk and the Lehigh Valley) and Sarah Minerva Blakslee. Of the Packer’s seven children, Lucy was the only one to bear children. Garret became a major coal operator in the area and amassed a considerable fortune. Lucy and Garrett had five children. First- and second-born Asa and Harry died as infants. The remaining three were Sallie Linderman, Robert Packer Linderman, and Garret Brodhead Linderman, Jr. Sallie and Robert died quite young (Sallie** in 1898 at 38; Robert in 1903, at 39). (Sadly, the Linderman-Packer fortunes were caught up in a scandal brought on by lone surviving heir Garret B. Linderman Jr.’s fraudulent activities, for which he went to prison in 1908.)

Linderman-Schwab Mansion in Fountain Hill Histori District, Bethlehem (Wikimedia Commons, Author Shuvaev, Taken 22 Jun 2013; Public Domain through Attribute Sharre-Alike 3.0)

Linderman-Schwab Mansion in Fountain Hill Historic District, Bethlehem (Wikimedia Commons, Author Shuvaev, Taken 22 Jun 2013; Public Domain through Attribute Sharre-Alike 3.0)

Lucy died in 1873, and Garrett Sr. remarried in 1880 to Frances Evans and had three daughters with her: Lillian, Ida, and Helen. Garrett Sr. died in 1885. Lucy’s sister Mary Packer Cummings, who had no children, was also very philanthropic. She bequeathed the Packer mansion in Mauch Chunk to the town of Mauch Chunk and the residence is now a museum.

Looking at the family tree of my second great grandparents Andrew Jackson (A. J.) Brodhead (a 1st cousin of Dr. Garrett B. Linderman) and Ophelia Easton Brodhead, who lived for many years in Mauch Chunk, it’s easy to see what the Packer and Linderman names meant to them as residents of that town: A. J. and Ophelia included these surnames in the names of two of their children: Robert Packer Brodhead and Emily Linderman Brodhead Moon.

Biographies of Garrett B. Linderman Sr. and his sons Robert and Garrett Jr. can be found in the National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, by James Terry White, published 1894:

Garret B. Linderman Sr.

Garret B. Linderman Sr.

p165_Linderman_RP

Robert P. Linderman

p337_Linderman_GB

Garrett Brodhead Linderman Jr.

The Citizen newspaper, Honesdale, PA, Wednesday, 11 Aug 1909 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The Citizen newspaper, Honesdale, PA, Wednesday, 11 Aug 1909

****************************************************************************************************************************************
**Interesting side note: After Sallie Linderman died, her husband Warren Abbott Wilbur remarried to Kate Ellen Brodhead (daughter of Charles Brodhead and Camilla Mary Shimer / granddaughter of Albert Gallatin Brodhead and Ellen Middaugh / and great granddaughter of Hon. Richard H. Brodhead and Hannah Drake). So 1st wife Sallie and 2nd wife Kate were second cousins. Warren A. Wilbur and Kate Ellen Brodhead’s daughter Blanche married George Randolph Hearst, oldest son of William Randolph Hearst and his wife Millicent Veronica Wilson. UPDATE/CORRECTION FROM “STEVE”, 21 APR 2015: “Although this connection appears in a number of places, including FindAGrave, and several Ancestry.com trees, I’m pretty sure it’s not correct. Warren Willber had two children that I know of with his first wife, Sallie Packer Linderman: Robert Eldredge Wilbur, and Stella Wilbur. I think Stella died as an infant. He remarried in 1901 to Miss Kate Ellen Brodhead. She was 39 at the time, and Warren was 41. In the 1910 census, they are listed without any children, and in that census there is a column for number of children, and number of children living, and it shows 0 in both columns for Kate. By this time, Kate is 48, and Warren is 50. In the 1920 census, they again appear with no children. From this, I don’t see how they could have had a daughter named Blanche. The clincher however, is an article about a local girl, Blanche Wilbur, eloping with George Randolph Hearst. The only problem is, she was local to Idaho Falls, Idaho, her father is listed as O.K. Wilbur. The Blanche Wilbur that married Hearst was born around 1905. This Idaho connection is supported by the FindAGrave entry for Blanch, which is in conflict with the link there to Warren Wilbur.”

Additional Resources:
Find a Grave – Lindermans buried at Nisky Hill Cemetery in Bethlehem
Find a Grave – Brodheads in Nisky Hill Cemetery, Bethlehem, PA
Find a Grave – Packers at Nisky Hill Cemetery in Bethlehem
Find a Grave – Packers in Mauch Chunk Cemetery
Asa Packer Mansion Museum
Lehigh University – Lucy Packer Linderman
Robert Packer Linderman
Fountain Hill, Bethlehem’s Elite
Fountain Hill Historic District

Categories: Bethlehem Northamp Co, Blakslee, Brodhead, Easton, Evergreen Cemetery Jim Thorpe PA, Linderman, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Mauch Chunk Cemetery Jim Thorpe PA, Nisky Hill Cemetery Bethlehem, Packer | 2 Comments

New Year’s Eve 1895: An Unbroken Family Celebrates a 50th Wedding Anniversary

James E. Brodhead's palatial home in Flemington, NJ, where celebrations took place on New Year's Eve

James E. Brodhead’s palatial home in Flemington, NJ, where celebrations took place on New Year’s Eve

After bombarding my readers with posts on a variety of disasters, tragedies, and scandals (please accept my apologies!), finally some good news. I’ve come upon a little news brief marking the 50th wedding anniversary of my 2nd great grandparents, Andrew Jackson Brodhead and Ophelia Easton Brodhead. It was a remarkable gathering in that all 10 of their children were present—quite a feat considering all the illnesses around back then that could easily have diminished the family’s size. The article described the odds of such a gathering as being one in 100,000. Of the 12 family members, mother Ophelia was the first to pass away–on 26 April 1904. Had she made it another 20 months, the family would have achieved an astounding 60 years of togetherness, but 58 years is still pretty darned good!

(Note: The article incorrectly states that Andrew J. Brodhead was a direct descendant of Gen. Daniel Brodhead of Revolutionary fame. He was a direct descendant of the General’s brother, Garret.)

New York Press, 2 January 1896 (credit: www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Press, 2 January 1896 (credit: http://www.fultonhistory.com)

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904 (Names and dates added by me)

Categories: Anniversaries wedding, Brodhead, Easton, Flemington, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe) | 5 Comments

Cupid’s Arrow —> William H. Brodhead

Cupid in a Wine Glass, oil painting by Abraham Woodside, 1840s, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (Wikimedia - expired copyright - in public domain)

Cupid in a Wine Glass, oil painting by Abraham Woodside, 1840s, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (Wikimedia: in public domain due to exp. copyright)

In early 1893, William Hall Brodhead, 35, was a very busy guy who may have already resigned himself to a life of bachelorhood, whether by default or by design. He was living and working in Wilkes-Barre (Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania) and was one of the most well-known and established coal operators in the area. William was from a very prominent Pennsylvania family–Daniel Dingman Brodhead (brother of my 2nd great grandfather Andrew Jackson Brodhead) and Mary Ann Brodrick were his parents; Garret Brodhead and Cornelia Dingman, and Irish immigrants James Brodrick and Elizabeth Dogherty — his grandparents. (All the Brodheads mentioned in this post were descendants of Daniel Brodhead and Hester Wyngart, original Pennsylvania Minisink Valley settlers.)

Portraits of the Heads of State Departments and Portraits and Sketches of Members of the Legislature of Pennsylvania, 1893-1894 compiled by Wm Rodearmel (Harrisburg, PA: E.K. Meyers Printing House, 1893)

Major William Hall Brodhead. Credit: “Portraits of the Heads of State Departments and Portraits and Sketches of Members of the Legislature of Pennsylvania, 1893-1894” compiled by Wm Rodearmel (Harrisburg, PA: E.K. Meyers Printing House, 1893); expired copyright

Daniel D. and Mary Brodhead had nine children between 1848 and 1870, and William was child no. 5. Two of his older siblings (James and Elizabeth) and one of his younger siblings (Alice) died young. Oldest brother Henry and younger brother Albert were still bachelors, at 45 and 25, respectively. Baby of the family Emily was 22 and also yet unmarried. Robert, age 32, may have been between marriages. His first wife Susan Amelia Shoemaker, a descendant of Elijah Shoemaker, died shortly after their marriage. He remarried Minnie Stafford of Rome, Georgia, and they started having children in 1896. So, at this point — early 1893 — the only one who had splashed out into post-marriage parenthood was fourth-born, 37-yr-old Daniel Dingman Brodhead, Jr. It looks like he and wife Leonora Hubbard had two of their five children by then: Clement P. and Charles R.. Baby Maude H. (b. 1893) may also have put in her appearance by then.

Any thoughts of competition between the Andrew Jackson (A. J.) Brodhead family and Daniel Dingman (D. D.) Brodhead families with regards to producing grandchildren must have vanished quickly. The two families were very large — A. J. and wife Ophelia had 10 kids between 1843 and 1864. By early 1893, A. J.’s & Ophelia’s kids had produced roughly 30 grandchildren for them, a ten-fold advantage over D. D. and wife Mary’s offspring.

But, back now to William Hall Brodhead. He was a busy guy professionally at this stage as evidenced by his biography published in Portraits of the Heads of State Departments and Portraits and Sketches of Members of the Legislature of Pennsylvania, 1893-1894 by E. K. Meyers Printing House of Harrisburg (p. 208; I have highlighted the most relevant details in bold):

WILLIAM HALL BRODHEAD was born in the Seventh ward of Philadelphia in 1857. In 1873 removed with his family to Mauch Chunk and from that place into the Wyoming Valley region. Since that time has been engaged about the mines in various capacities. He is a direct descendant of Captain Daniel Brodhead, of the British army, who came to this country in 1664 for the purpose of protecting British interests in the Dutch settlement, and settled on the Hudson river. Two of the Captain’s grandsons came over into Pennsylvania, and Pennsylvania, and one of them, Daniel Brodhead, who died in 1754, is now buried in the Moravian cemetery at Bethlehem. His son, Daniel Brodhead, was on Washington’s staff, and the first surveyor general of Pennsylvania. So it will be seen that the subject of this sketch comes from good old revolutionary ancestry. He received his education in the public schools of Philadelphia. Had never held any political office before moving to Wilkes-Barre in 1890, though had taken a lively interest in politics. Six month after moving to the above mentioned city he was delegate to the Luzerne County convention. In 1892 he was elected to the Legislature on the Democratic ticket and ran 350 votes ahead of President Cleveland in his district. He was put on the Committee on Military Affairs, Corporations, Judiciary, Local and Retrenchment and Reform. He introduced a bill creating a Mining institution for the purpose of educating young men in the several branches of mining, to better fit them to become foremen and fire bosses ; also a bill for the purification and improvement of the water supply in the Wyoming Valley ; also a bill providing for the repeal of an act which requires the tax collector of Wilkes-Barre to be appointed, and providing that the office shall become an elective one, to be filled by the votes of the people and bill providing that the funeral expenses of paupers shall be paid by the county, instead as now by the poor district in which such indigent person had a residence. Mr. Brodhead takes a very active interest in the National guard and is now the senior captain of the Ninth regiment. He and his boys did service at Homestead last fall for five weeks. As will be seen by the number and character of the bills he has presented, he takes a lively interest in affairs affecting his constituents, and attends well to the duties devolving upon him as a member.

William was an officer in Pennsylvania’s Ninth Regiment, National Guard, and during the summer of 1893, he attended the regiment’s annual camp. That year it was held in the town of Berwick (Columbia Co.), and ‘lo and behold, during the course of his stay there, he was introduced to Mary Jackson Van Tassel, a young lady of about 19-20 who came from a very prominent Pennsylvania family. The two developed a bit of a friendship that would blossom into something much greater weeks later when William was on a hunting expedition near Berwick and fell very ill. His prognosis was dire, and when Miss Van Tassel learned of William’s illness she went to care for him, watching over him day and night. Cupid’s arrow hit its mark and, thankfully, against all odds, William made a full recovery. Love has a habit of doing that, eh?!

William was totally smitten, and the parents on both sides, no doubt totally mortified by the age difference, worked behind the scenes to sabotage the couple’s young love. This went on for over a year until William and Mary quite obviously had enough and went behind everyone’s backs to be married in secret on December 5, 1894.

Wm Hall Brodhead, image from Wyoming Valley in the 19th Century. Art Edition by SR Smith, Vol I, Wilkes-Barre Leader Print, 1894

Wm Hall Brodhead, image from Wyoming Valley in the 19th Century. Art Edition by SR Smith, Vol I, Wilkes-Barre Leader Print, 1894


Even that day, they had been under heavy scrutiny by Mary’s mother who was completely bamboozled by Mary’s race out a back door to a taxi that whisked her away to waiting William. They fled to the Columbia County Court House for a marriage license and then sped to a Methodist parsonage where a Rev. Ferguson proclaimed them man and wife. No doubt because of William’s prominent position in Wilkes-Barre and the two families’ prominence in eastern Pennsylvania society, the marriage made it into a number of papers, including The New York Herald (you can read the article below). Amazingly, another wedding took place that day — that of William’s oldest brother Henry Conrad Brodhead. That wedding provided the perfect camouflage for William to work his plan on his side of the family. With all the Brodheads probably gone to NYC for Henry’s wedding, William was able to jump into action with no possibility of any of his detractors interfering.

After the wedding, William and Mary returned to Wilkes-Barre to await their families’ forgiveness; then they planned to head off to California for the winter.

Tragically, there was to be no happy ending for William and Mary. Whatever it was that ailed him on his hunting trip may have returned in the spring of 1895 for he passed away at home in Wilkes-Barre on 7 June 1895, just three days after his younger sister Emily’s wedding to Robert Honeyman.

But William’s legacy lived on in the form of William Hall Brodhead, Jr. who was born later that year — on 1 December 1895. And, if I’m correct, that child lived to the ripe age of 77. Major William H. Brodhead Sr. was buried in Wilkes-Barre’s Hollenback Cemetery — no doubt a very sad day for all, especially his young wife after just six months of marriage.

New York Herald, part 1 (credit: fultonhistory.com)

New York Herald, part 1 (credit: fultonhistory.com)

New York Herald, 9 June 1895 (www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Herald, 9 June 1895 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Categories: Brodhead, Brodrick, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Mauch Chunk Cemetery Jim Thorpe PA, Methodist, Obituaries, Philadelphia, Scandal, Van Tassel, Wilkes-Barre Luzerne Co | 6 Comments

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904, (watermark and labeling added by me)

You may recall a previous post about Robert Packer Brodhead in which I related that much material was available about the Brodhead family from the book Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania. We are very fortunate to have a large framed photo display of Robert’s father and mother, Andrew Jackson Brodhead and Ophelia Easton, together with Robert’s nine siblings. The display was assembled in Flemington, NJ, in 1904, and must have been compiled in the early part of the year since Ophelia passed away that April, some 18 months shy of what would have been her and her husband’s 60th wedding anniversary. Son Calvin died several years later, in 1907, from gastritis*. Andrew Jackson Brodhead died at 91 in 1913. So this assembly of photos is a wonderful thing to have.  My great grandmother Margaret Lewis Martin can be credited with identifying each person. She died in the mid-1940s but at some point before then created a diagram showing who was who, and attached it in an envelope to the reverse side of the frame.

Andrew Jackson Brodhead

Andrew Jackson Brodhead

Brodhead_Ophelia_Easton

Ophelia Easton Brodhead

Below in italics is material on the Andrew Jackson & Ophelia (Easton) Brodhead family excerpted from John W. Jordan’s 1911 book, Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania, in three volumes, published by Lewis Publishers of New York. Note: I cropped the individual photos from the compiled version above; also, please note that Mauch Chunk in Carbon County, Pennsylvania, is now known as the town of Jim Thorpe. Click the preceding link to peruse the interesting materials on the Mauch Chunk Historical Society’s website.

Andrew Jackson Brodhead, third son of Garret and Cornelia (Dingman) Brodhead, was born in Northampton (now Pike county), Pennsylvania, May 6, 1822. He received his early education in the common schools of the towns in which his parents lived, at the Dingman Academy, and a term at the Stroudsburg Academic School. He taught school one year, and in 1850 began working in Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania, where he removed his family in 1851. From 1851 to 1857 he was employed as clerk and bookkeeper, and for five years was in business with a partner, repairing cars used by the pioneer coal company of that region. About 1861 Mr. Brodhead began shipping coal for other producers, and in 1877 opened a general store at Hickory Run, Pennsylvania, where he lived until 1883, when he returned to Mauch Chunk. In 1884 he removed to Flemington, New Jersey, his present home. In 1868-69 he was treasurer of Carbon county, Pennsylvania, for several years he was school director of East Mauch Chunk, and served as justice of the peace.

Calvin Easton Brodhead

Calvin Easton Brodhead

1. Calvin Easton, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, December 27, 1846; married (first) December 6, 1870, Laura Clewell Leisenring, born at Mauch Chunk, August 9, 1848, daughter of Alexander William and Ann (Ruddle) Leisenring.  They had Anna Leisenring, born November 12, 1871; Emily Easton, born November 3, 1872; Alexander William, January 1, 1874; married (second) at Oakville, Canada, Mary Lewis, who died March 31, 1905.

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Garret Brodhead

Garret Brodhead

2. Garret, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, February 11, 1848; married, September 17, 1872, Annie Kocher, born in Mauch Chunk, August 25, 1849, daughter of Conrad and Catherine (Wasser) Kocher.  Seven children: Conrad and Andrew Jackson (twins), born July 19, 1873; Alonzo Blakeslee, December 26, 1875; Calvin Easton and Laura Leisenring (twins), born September 21, 1878; Ruth Randall, born March 7, 1884; and Garrett, born January 3, 1888.

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John Romeyn Brodhead

John Romeyn Brodhead

3. John Romeyn, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, June 11, 1849; married, November 13, 1882, Mary Martha Holbert, born in Chemung, New York, March 22, 1858, daughter of Joshua Sayre and Catherine Van Houton (Ryerson) Holbert.  They had Henry Holbert, born September 29, 1883, and Arthur Sayre, born November 26, 1886.

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James Easton Brodhead

James Easton Brodhead

4. James Easton, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, February 22, 1851; married, May 1, 1877, Hattie Lochlin Boyd, born July 11, 1852, daughter of Nathaniel and Jane (Curran) Boyd.  They have Walter, born March 9, 1878; John Romeyn, born September 25, 1880; Frederick Moon, born July 31, 1883; and Nathaniel Boyd, born June 22, 1891.

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Andrew Douglas Brodhead

Andrew Douglas Brodhead

5. Andrew Douglass [misspelling by author, should be Douglas], born in Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania, August 17, 1852; married Margaret Lewis Martin, born January 15, 1859, daughter of Moses and Sarah Augusta (Lewis) Martin.  They have Edith Easton, born November 3, 1879; Frank Martin, born February 5, 1882; Lewis Dingman, born October 5, 1884; Andrew Jackson, born October 3, 1886.

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Charlotte E. Brodhead

Charlotte E. Brodhead

6. Charlotte Easton, born in Mauch Chunk, December 11, 1855; married, October 5, 1887, Franklin Clark Burk, born in Flemington, New Jersey, April 8, 1853, son of Peter Wilson and Clarinda (Bellis) Burk.

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Jean Struthers Brodhead

Jean Struthers Brodhead

7. Jean Struthers, born in Mauch Chunk, November 21, 1857; married, October 15, 1885, Charles Ashley Blakslee, born in Mauch Chunk, July 4, 1859, son of James Irwin and Caroline Jones (Ashley) Blakslee.  They have Gertrude Easton, born June 21, 1887, and Ophelia Easton Blakslee, born January 9, 1895.
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Robert Packer Brodhead

Robert Packer Brodhead

8. Robert Packer, see forward [of book].

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Emily L. Brodhead

Emily L. Brodhead

9. Emily Linderman, born in East Mauch Chunk, June 1, 1862; married Frederick Moon, born September 30, 1851, son of Samuel and Matilda White Moon. They have Frederick Wiles Moon, born July 27, 1882.

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Richard H. Brodhead

Richard H. Brodhead

10. Richard Henry, born in East Mauch Chunk, November 4, 1864; married, March 6, 1890, Jane Vanderveer Smock, born October 15, 1861, daughter of Daniel Polheim and Sarah Jane Smock. They have Estelle Smock, born November 26, 1890; Mary Ophelia, born April 2, 1892; Jean Blakslee, born July 3, 1893, died July 27, 1893, and Richard Henry.

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Quite a few of their resting places have been documented, and in some cases photographed, on Find a Grave’s website. If you go to Andrew Jackson Brodhead’s entry (click here), you can click on links to others of the family who have been documented.

*Note re: Calvin Easton Brodhead, his May, 1, 1907, obituary in The Reading Eagle stated: Calvin E. Brodhead died suddenly in New York City of gastritis. He was born in Pike County in 1846. He was widely known in contract affairs, having served as chief engineer of the Lehigh Valley Railroad for some time. In 1872 he supervised the construction of the Easton and Amboy division of the road. He was well known in Flemington, NJ, where he lived before locating at Mauch Chunk.

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Easton, Flemington, Lewis, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Obituaries | 8 Comments

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