Boles

Another descendant of the Nixon family of Fermanagh Co., Northern Ireland

My grandmother Zillah May Trewin’s best friend Catherine Mae Roberts, April 1905; they appear together in the 2nd photo from the right.

My grandmother Zillah May Trewin’s best friend Catherine Mae Roberts, April 1905; they appear together in the 2nd photo from the right.

This is Catherine Mae Roberts, one of my grandmother Zillah Trewin’s best friends from childhood, in April 1905. Catherine was a cousin of the Nixon sisters (Jennie & Louise), about whom I have previously written. From the second photo from the right, in which my grandmother appears with Mae, you can tell they were good chums. Fourteen years after these photos were taken, my grandmother would marry Mae’s cousin William Robert Boles whose mother Sarah was a sister of Mae’s mother Jane. Below is a family tree of sorts in the event one of you wants to see the details. (Anyone who wants to help me fill in some of the blanks, please give me a shout at ‘chipsoff at gmail dot com’!)

I love the smiles. And the hats!!! What were they made of?!

{{Information |Description=Advertisting poster for hats for C.A. Browning & Co., Boston. French, 1904–05. France. Lithograph, printed in color, on paper. Anonymous firm. Poster advertising hats for C. A. Browning and Co., 32 Franklin Street Boston. (In public domain is US due to being published before

Advertising poster for hats for C.A. Browning & Co., Boston. French, 1904–05. France. Lithograph, printed in color, on paper. Anonymous firm. Poster advertising hats for C. A. Browning and Co., 32 Franklin Street Boston. (In public domain is US — see below *)

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Courtesy of Fulton History dot com

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Sunday, March 26, 1905 (Courtesy of Fulton History dot com)


1-William Nixon b. Cir 1802, Ireland, d. 10 Aug 1871, Manhattan, New York, 
  New York
 +Rachael Millar b. Cir 1818, Ireland, d. Possibly 10 May 1890, Manhattan, New 
  York, New York, bur. Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, 
  USA
|--2-Edward Nixon b. Cir 1839-1845, Ireland, d. Betw 1889 and 1900
|   +Anna Bracken b. Aug 1847, Northern Ireland, d. After 1930
|  |--3-Jane Bracken Nixon b. 15 Apr 1884, Manhattan, New York, New York, d. 
|  |    May 1972, Ocean Grove, Monmouth, NJ
|  |--3-William Thomas Nixon b. 24 Aug 1885, Manhattan, New York, New York, d. 
|  |    Sep 1967, Suffolk, New York
|  |   +Marion Zoller 
|  |--3-George Robert Bracken Nixon b. 12 Feb 1887, Bridgeport, Connecticut
|  |   +May L. Swenarton b. Cir 1889, New Jersey
|  |  |--4-George W. Nixon b. Cir 1914, New Jersey
|  |  |--4-Frank L. Nixon b. Cir 1919
|  |--3-Louise E. Nixon b. 22 Jul 1889, Bridgeport, Connecticut, d. Oct 1979, 
|  |    Ocean Grove, Monmouth, NJ
|--2-Mark Nixon b. Cir 1845, Ireland, d. 28 Mar 1893, New York, New York, bur. 
|    31 Mar 1893
|   +Mary Quaile b. Abt 1846, Derrintober, Drumshambo, Ireland, d. possibly 25 
|    Nov 1876, Derrintober, Drumshambo, Ireland
|  |--3-Florence Katherine Nixon b. 25 Sep 1869, New York, New York, d. 21 Aug 
|  |    1944, Porter Hospital, Middlebury, Addison, Vermont
|  |--3-Evangeline Roberta Nixon b. Sep 1873, bur. 15 Dec 1960, Green-Wood 
|  |    Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, USA
|      +Joseph Russell Parker b. 29 Sep 1879, d. 1950, bur. Green-Wood 
|       Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, USA
|--2-Elizabeth Nixon b. Cir 1849, Ireland, d. After 2 Jun 1880
|--2-Jane Nixon b. 28 Dec 1851, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 7 Feb 
|    1938, East Orange, Essex Co., NJ, bur. 9 Feb 1938, Jersey City, Hudson 
|    Co., NJ
|   +William Elliott Roberts b. 12 Dec 1842, Enniskillen, Co. Fermanagh, 
|    Ireland, d. 4 Apr 1907, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, bur. Jersey City, 
|    Hudson Co., NJ
|  |--3-William Roberts b. 1876, d. 10 Mar 1942
|  |--3-Charles Benjamin Roberts b. 9 Aug 1878, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 
|  |    14 Mar 1962
|  |   +Grace Yates b. 1882
|  |--3-Edward Roberts b. 1880, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 22 Sep 1951
|  |   +Ruth Deming 
|  |--3-Catherine Mae Roberts b. 3 May 1882, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 13 
|  |    Dec 1966
|  |   +Emory Chenoweth b. 1878
|  |--3-Harry James Roberts b. 12 Dec 1886, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 2 
|  |    Feb 1974, Novato, Marin Co., CA, bur. 8 Feb 1975, Cheyenne, Laramie 
|  |    Co., WY
|  |   +Mary Elizabeth Baldwin b. 21 Nov 1884, d. 3 Feb 1971
|  |  |--4-Paul Nixon Roberts b. 30 Jul 1922, East Orange, Essex Co., NJ, d. 26 
|  |  |    Jan 1941
|  |--3-Herbert George Roberts b. 17 Oct 1888, Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, d. 
|  |    19 Nov 1972
|      +Ella Marjorie Harrison b. 1892
|--2-Thomas Nixon b. Cir 1852, Ireland, d. After 2 Jun 1880
|   +Eliza d. Bef 2 Jun 1880
|--2-Sarah Nixon b. 26 May 1855, Ireland, d. Sep 1938, Dublin South, 
|    Ireland, bur. Kentstown Cemetery, Co. Meath, Ireland
|   +Edward Boles b. 4 Jun 1855, Fingreagh Upper, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 24 
|    Oct 1940, Meath Hospital, Dublin, Ireland, bur. Kentstown Cemetery, Co. 
|    Meath, Ireland
|  |--3-Jane Kathleen Boles b. 7 Jul 1889, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 
|  |    5 Jun 1982, Belfast, Northern Ireland
|  |--3-John James Boles b. 10 Jan 1891, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 
|  |    Dec 1935
|  |--3-William Robert Boles b. 24 Feb 1892, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, 
|  |    Ireland, d. 2 Mar 1950, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. 4 Mar 1950, 
|  |    Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union, NJ
|  |   +Zillah May Trewin b. 11 Jun 1883, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, d. 11 May 
|  |    1955, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. 13 May 1955, Evergreen Cemetery, 
|  |    Hillside, Union, NJ
|  |--3-Edward Benjamin Boles b. 9 Apr 1894, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, 
|  |    d. 21 Nov 1970, bur. Clandeboye Cemetery, Bangor, Northern Ireland, UK
|  |--3-Beulah Sarah Boles b. 9 Apr 1894, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. 
|  |    1900, co. Leitrim, Ireland
|  |--3-Mary Elizabeth Boles b. 5 Jun 1896, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, 
|  |    d. 26 Jul 1928, Cloneen, near Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland
|--2-Rachael Nixon b. Cir 1856, Ireland, d. After 1886, United States
|   +Charles F. Hodgson 
|  |--3-Elizabeth Hodgson b. 18 May 1886, Manhattan, New York, New York
|--2-Mary Nixon b. Cir 1858, Ireland, d. After 2 Jun 1880
|--2-Benjamin Nixon b. 2 Aug 1862, Ireland, d. 5 Aug 1939
|   +Mary Graham Clark b. 9 Mar 1864, New York, NY, d. 23 Jan 1948
|--2-Robert Nixon b. Jan 1863, Ireland, d. After 1912
|   +Blanche Shaw b. Mar 1868, d. After 1912
|  |--3-Nixon b. Betw 1891 and 1900, d. Betw 1891 and 1900
|  |--3-Dorothy R. Nixon b. Aug 1895
|  |--3-Marguerite Nixon b. Cir 1902
|  |--3-Margaret A. Nixon b. Cir 1906
|--2-Catherine Nixon b. 3 Jan 1864, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, d. After 
|    Oct 1886
|   +Charles Hugh Larkin 
|--2-James Nixon 
|--2-John Nixon 
|--2-William Nixon

********************************************************************************

*This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published (or registered with the U.S. Copyright Office) before January 1, 1923. This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 70 years or less.

Categories: Boles, Chenoweth, Elizabeth, Union Co., Fashion & Beauty, New Jersey, Roberts | Tags: , , , , | 9 Comments

Circa 1895 photograph of Benjamin Boles and wife Mary Galbraith

Below is a photo of my great-grandfather Edward Boles‘s youngest brother Benjamin Boles, who was born on 28 February 1871 in Fingreagh, Inishmagrath, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, and Benjamin’s wife Mary Galbraith. They had one child, a son, James Newton Boles, who was born on 14 September 1898, in Tipperary. Mary died in childbirth and, from what my mother has told me, after Mary’s death, Benjamin, a shopkeeper, renounced all of his worldly possessions in order to become an evangelist in a religious movement that had recently gotten underway in Ireland.

Benjamin never remarried, as far as we know, and his son was raised by Benjamin’s sister Jane and Jane’s husband William Pearson. I don’t know when Benjamin passed away; I have a photo of him that was taken in 1943, so it was sometime after that. I imagine the photo below was taken on the occasion of Benjamin and Mary’s marriage given that her one glove is off and she appears to be wearing rings. Or perhaps on the occasion of their engagement since he is ring-less. I also have this lovely photo of Mary all by herself, and this undated photo of father and son.

Boles_Benjamin_and_Mary

Mary Galbraith and Benjamin Boles

Boles_Mary

Mary Galbraith

Ben Boles with son Newton Boles

Ben Boles with son Newton Boles (1920s?)

 

Categories: Boles, Co. Tipperary, Galbraith, Ireland, Religion | Tags: , | 4 Comments

Family recipe Friday — Four sweet bread recipes from Violet Boles

My grandfather's cousin Violet Boles with a furry friend, 1957.

My grandfather’s cousin Violet Boles with a furry friend, 1957.

To close out the week, I will leave you with four recipes left us by Violet Boles, my mom’s 1st cousin (once removed). Violet was born in Knocknagrally, County Laois, Ireland, in 1904. According to my mother she worked in the hotel industry on the Isle of Wight for a number of years. She emigrated to the US after her marriage to James Newton Boles (b. 1898, Tipperary, Ireland) in the early 1960s. Ordinarily I would not write about folks in the family tree who lived so close to the present day, but Newton (who went by his middle name) and Violet had no children; so, I hope they would not mind me sharing a bit about them here.

My mom’s father William Boles was very close to Newton, his cousin six years his junior. William, who emigrated to the US in 1912, was at least some of Newton’s inspiration to do the same, according to my mother. Newton emigrated in 1925 to Ontario, Canada, and from there made his way to Detroit, where he worked for Uniroyal for many years.

Newton and Violet  eventually retired to 800 20th Avenue North in St. Petersburg, FL, tending their backyard fruit trees and enjoying the warm temperatures and steady sunshine. I remember them showing us their avocado and orange trees—an exotic sight for us. They were wonderfully kind and caring people; both had a twinkle in their eye, and Newton especially had a terrific sense of humor. He was a very fun-loving man. My mother thought the world of him.

Boles_Newt_and_Violet_StPete_house

Newton & Violet Boles in front of their St. Petersburg home

I’ll never forget visiting them in February 1975 or 1976 when Newton was already in his 70s, and how Newton took us up I-4 to ride on Disney’s newly opened ‘Space Mountain’ roller coaster. We were amazed that he took the roller coaster with us and that he seemed to take it all in stride. Newton was a rather wild driver, so between the journey itself and the nerve-shattering, vertebrae-jarring ‘Space Mountain’ ride, we had a very memorable time!

Violet’s banana bread recipe is the best one I’ve ever come across. I’ve made it many times (I love the typo: ‘chapped walnuts’!) The date loaf is delicious, too (that recipe is cut off at the end, but you just add the remaining ingredients, mix, and bake at 350 for 50-60 min., depending on your altitude).

I’ve yet to try the carrot and cranberry breads, but know I will get to them eventually.

So enjoy these, if you are so inclined, and let me know how things turn out. Have a good weekend!

(Note: Newton died in 1983 at 84, and Violet in 1993 at 89. They were interred at St. Petersburg’s Memorial Park Cemetery.)

Boles_Violet_breads1

Boles_Violet_breads2

Categories: Boles, Co. Laois, Co. Tipperary, Food: Family Recipes & Favorites, St. Petersburg | 6 Comments

Some descendants of the Nixon family of Fermanagh, Northern Ireland

Louise and Jennie Nixon, 1964

Photo from my family’s private collection: Sisters Louise (75) and Jennie Nixon (80) in 1964

These lovely elderly ladies are Louise E. Nixon and Jane ‘Jennie’ Bracken Nixon, nieces of my great-grandmother Sarah (Nixon) Boles of Co. Leitrim, Ireland, whose parents—William Nixon and Rachel Miller—and numerous siblings moved to the United States in the late 1860s. The ladies were my grandfather William Boles‘s cousins.

A previous post on Sarah Nixon Boles mentioned the fact that most, if not all, of her family relocated to New York after the US Civil War. This Nixon family is presumably part of the Nixon family of Fermanagh*—about which much has been written (e.g., The Families of French of Belturbet and Nixon of Fermanagh, and Their Descendants by Henry B. Swanzy, published in 1908).  However, I have yet to figure out the family’s location in the larger Nixon family tree.

William and Rachel Nixon were about 67 and 51, respectively when they arrived in America in 1869 (the year given me by the descendant of Benjamin, one of their sons). Joining them were supposedly all of their children (I’ve found 11, although my mother’s records list 14) except for my great-grandmother Sarah: Mark Nixon (b. cir. 1839/1845), Edward Nixon (b. cir 1845); Elizabeth ‘Lizzie’ Nixon (b. cir. 1849); Jane Nixon (b. 1851); Thomas Nixon (b. cir. 1852); Sarah Nixon (b. 1855); Rachel Nixon (b. cir 1865); Mary Nixon (b. cir 1858); Benjamin Nixon (b. cir 1862); Robert Nixon (b. 1863); Catherine Nixon (b. 1864); the last three (whom I have yet to find a trace of) were James, John, and William.

Passenger List - The Caledonia - sailed from Moville, Ireland to NY, NY on 14 Sep 1868 (Source Citation: Year: 1868; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: M237; Microfilm Roll: 301; Line: 22; List Number: 989.)

Passenger List – The Caledonia – sailed from Moville, Ireland to NY, NY on 14 September 1868 (Source Citation: Year: 1868; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: M237; Microfilm Roll: 301; Line: 22; List Number: 989.)

The passenger list inset for the ship Caledonia , which set sail from Moville on Lough Foyle at the northern tip of Northern Ireland to New York on 14 September 1868, shows the names of some Nixons–the names seem to fairly well coincide with some of the Nixon children’s names & ages. If these indeed are ‘our Nixons’, it would indicate that the older children may have come ahead of the parents and younger children.

While researching the family, I found William, Rachel and a number of the children in the 1870 US Federal Census, living in NYC Ward 18. William is listed as a ‘farmer’, an answer based certainly on his past occupation in Ireland. The children in the household were: Edward (30), Thomas (20), Eliza (22), Jane (18), Rachel (15), Mary (10), and ‘Bennett’ (10, this was probably ‘Benjamin’).

1870 Census Record ("United States Census, 1870," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M8X8-K4T : accessed 25 February 2015), Rachael Nixon, New York, United States; citing p. 34, family , NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,539.)

1870 Census Record (“United States Census, 1870,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M8X8-K4T : accessed 25 February 2015), Rachael Nixon, New York, United States; citing p. 34, family , NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,539.)

William Nixon died before the 1880 US Federal Census, as Rachel Nixon is listed in that census record as a widow ‘keeping house’ and living at 203 16th Street, NY, NY. and living with children Edward, Lizzie, Thomas, Rachel, Benjamin, Robert, Mary, and Kate, and several lodgers. The census record indicates that family members were involved in the dry goods business. Son Thomas (28 and now widowed) is listed as being a ‘dry goods buyer’ as is son Edward, age 35 and single. Benjamin (20) is listed as a ‘dry goods clerk’ as is Robert (18). (The 1900 Census indicates that Robert emigrated in 1879.)

Looking at old newspapers, I found the following mortuary notice in the New York Herald, dated 11 Aug 1871: At his [Gramercy] residence, 346 East 17th Street, on Thursday, August 10, William Nixon, aged 69 years. Funeral will take place on Saturday, August 12, at one o’clock PM from Seventeenth Street Methodist Episcopal Church, between First and Second avenues. Relatives and friends are invited to attend.

Wikimedia Commons: Manhattan neighborhoods (map); Author= Stilfehler; Oct. 15th, 2007

Wikimedia Commons: Manhattan neighborhoods (map); Author= Stilfehler; Oct. 15th, 2007

Almost two decades later, I found a notice for a Rachel Nixon (New York Herald, 12 May 1890): On Saturday, May 10, 1890, Rachel Nixon, age 72 years. The relatives and friends of the family are invited to attend the funeral services at her late [East Village] residence, No. 224 East 12th Street, on Monday evening, May 12, 1890 at eight o’clock. Interment in Green-wood.

A William Nixon (bur. August 1871, Find a Grave memorial #127997780) and a Rachel Nixon (bur. 5-13-1890; Find a Grave memorial #106845856) are buried in Green-wood Cemetery Lot 17245 Section 17, Grave 114. The grave is unmarked according to the Find a Grave photographer who kindly attempted to find the graves for me. I’m not yet certain that I have the correct Rachel and William, but hope to pin all this down at some point. Meanwhile I toss this info out there to my readers and future readers who may already have turned over these stones and arrived at some conclusions.

Son Edward Nixon and wife Anna (Bracken) Nixon, who emigrated from No. Ireland in 1883, had four children: Jane ‘Jennie’ (b. 1884), William (b. 1885), George (b. 1887), and Louise (b. 1889). The first two children were born in Manhattan. The second two were born in Bridgeport, CT. Edward died sometime between 1889 and 1900, as Anna is a widow as of the 1900 census. There is an Edward Nixon in the same plot at Green-wood Cemetery (Burial 1899-03-29, Lot 17245 Section 17, Grave 114; (Find a Grave #106846467), perhaps giving a bit more weight to the possibility that the Green-wood plot is indeed where our Nixon ancestors were laid to rest.

By the 1900 Census, Anna (Bracken) Nixon and her children (ages 16, 15, 13, 11), sister Mary J. Bracken, and a lodger are living at 160 Virginia Avenue in Jersey City Ward No. 8, Hudson Co., NJ, and it was there that the family remained for many years. Neither Jennie nor Louise ever married. Jennie devoted her life to working as a teacher in the Jersey City public school system, and Louise worked for many years as a stenographer and then executive secretary for the president or vice president of a company in NYC. Eventually the sisters joined forces with their brother William and his wife Marion to buy a large house at 680 Orchard Street in Oradell, NJ, where they spent happy years before moving into the Francis Asbury Manor Methodist rest home in Ocean Grove, NJ. Jane died in May of 1972, and Louise in October 1979.

Jennie Boles with Louise and Jennie Nixon, spring 1964

Photo form my family’s private collection: Jennie Boles (75) of Ireland with her American cousins Louise (75) and Jennie Nixon (80), early spring 1964, New Jersey

Serendipitously it was during their years in Jersey City that Jennie and Louise befriended my grandmother Zillah Trewin who lived there with her parents William Trewin and Elizabeth (Sargent) Trewin. According to my mother, Zillah was great friends with the Nixon sisters, as well as their cousins (the children of Jane Nixon and Wm Elliott Roberts), and it was through that friendship that she ultimately met and married their cousin (my grandfather) William Boles who emigrated to the US in 1912 at the encouragement of his uncle Robert Nixon who sponsored him.

I remember Jennie and Louise well. They were very fun ladies—full of good humor and always had a twinkle in their eyes. I always enjoyed the times spent with them, and best remember our visits to their Ocean Grove apartment. As I recall, we would drive down to see them on Saturdays since the roads in Ocean Grove are closed to all traffic on Sundays. We always took them out to lunch, and I remember taking them down to some restaurant near the ocean in Spring Lake, a short drive to the south. They were two sweethearts and it was very sad to lose them. I would love to have them here now to have some family history chats with them. When I was a teenager that topic was far from my mind.

I’ll close this post with a couple of Louise’s recipes (‘Chocolate Flake Candy’ and ‘Date Balls’) I recently came upon while re-binding my mom’s old recipe notebook. I haven’t tried either of them yet as I am trying to shift a bit of weight. Such temptations would surely sabotage my results! But they will stay on my radar!

If you’ve made it this far in the post, I wish you a great day. If you have anything to add, share, correct, etc., please don’t hesitate to get in touch or leave a comment!

Nixon_Louise_recipe

Recipes typed up by Louise Nixon for my mother

Jennie and Louise’s Nixon Tree Branch
1-William Nixon b. Cir 1802, Ireland, d. Bef 2 Jun 1880; possibly 10 Aug
1871 +Rachael Millar b. Cir 1818, Ireland, d. Possibly 10 May 1890, Manhattan, New
York, New York
|—–2-Edward Nixon b. Cir 1845, Ireland, d. Betw 1889 and 1900
| +Anna Bracken b. Aug 1847, Northern Ireland, d. After 1930
| |—–3-Jane Bracken Nixon b. 15 Apr 1884, Manhattan, New York, New York,
| | d. May 1972, Ocean Grove, Monmouth, NJ
| |—–3-William Thomas Nixon b. 24 Aug 1885, Manhattan, New York, New
| | York, d. Sep 1967, Suffolk, New York
| | +Marion Zoller
| |—–3-George Robert Bracken Nixon b. 12 Feb 1887, Bridgeport,
| | Connecticut
| | +May L. Swenarton b. Cir 1889, New Jersey
| | |—–4-George W. Nixon b. Cir 1914, New Jersey
| | |—–4-Frank L. Nixon b. Cir 1919
| |—–3-Louise E. Nixon b. 22 Jul 1889, Bridgeport, Connecticut, d. Oct
| | 1979, Ocean Grove, Monmouth, NJ

Categories: Boles, Co. Fermanagh, Drumkeeran, Co. Leitrim, Food: Family Recipes & Favorites, Green-Wood Cemetery Brooklyn NY, Ireland, Jersey City, Hudson Co., Manhattan, Methodist Episcopal, New York, Nixon, Trewin, US Federal 1880 | 2 Comments

Sarah Nixon Boles (1855-1938) of Drumkeeran, Co. Leitrim, Ireland

In Memoriam - September 1838

CLICK to ENLARGE – In Memoriam – September 1938 – The Irish Christian Advocate

Sarah Nixon Boles, undated

Sarah Nixon Boles, undated photo

I recently found in a box of old papers an ‘In Memoriam’ article about my great-grandmother Sarah Boles Nixon that appeared in September 1838 in the Irish Christian Advocate newspaper, an Irish Methodist publication in existence from 1883-1971. The clipping (right) is a wonderful testament to Sarah’s character and faith in God. She passed her faith on to her children, as many who knew them personally would attest. They were wonderfully kind and caring people.

(Note: Some of the below info has appeared in past posts.)

Sarah was born in County Leitrim, Ireland, on 26 May 1855 to William Nixon and Rachel Millar (perhaps, ‘Miller’). This is the Nixon family of Fermanagh*—about which much has been written (e.g., The Families of French of Belturbet and Nixon of Fermanagh, and Their Descendants by Henry B. Swanzy, published in 1908), however, I have yet to figure out Sarah’s exact location in this Nixon family tree.

Supposedly Sarah was one of 14 children. I’ve come across birth dates for 11 of the 14, and so far, age-wise, Sarah appears to have fallen somewhere in the middle of the pack.

According to our family records, on 26 July 1888, at the age of 33, Sarah married Edward Boles, a farmer—also 33, at the Drumkeeran Methodist Church, Drumkeeran, Co. Leitrim.  Edward was the oldest of the eight children of James Boles of Fingreagh Upper, Co. Leitrim, and wife Jane Payne. (See the Rootsweb page Boles of Leitrim for a partial family tree.)

County Leitrim

County Leitrim (User Morwen on en.wikipedia; This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license)

Edward and Sarah lived in Clooneen, which is a rural area located about a half mile to the northeast of the small village of Drumkeeran. Between 1889 and 1896, Sarah gave birth to six children: Jane (“Jennie”) Kathleen, John James, William Robert, Edward (“Ben”) Benjamin, Beulah Sarah, and Mary (“May”) Elizabeth. Beulah (Ben’s twin) died in 1900 at age 6; May died of TB in her early 30s. John died in December 1935 in a car accident (a “huge blow” to the family, according to my mother).  He was in his early forties.

As I’ve mentioned before, my grandfather William emigrated to the US in 1912. He was sponsored by Sarah’s brother Robert, a silk salesman, who had emigrated in 1879 and was living in Summit, NJ. That left  just Jennie and Ben in Ireland. Both outlived their parents—in fact, Jennie lived to the age of 92.

On a visit to Ireland in July 1935, my mother got to meet Edward and Sarah for the first and only time. She was twelve and remembers walking with Edward through the fields around the Follistown house counting sheep and chatting with him, but having a hard time understanding him through his Irish accent. He was very tall and seemed a giant to her. Sarah she remembers as being super petite and ‘absolutely ancient-looking’ from a 12-year-old’s perspective. She also found Sarah hard to understand through her accent. (Sarah sent my mom a gold coin every Christmas; of course, my mom’s mother took them immediately for ‘safekeeping’ and then when WWII hit, they all disappeared to contribute to the war effort. Mom understood but was pretty unhappy about that!)

But, back to Edward & Sarah—eventually (early 1930s?), the family purchased land in Follistown, Navan, Co. Meath (about an hour’s drive to the northwest from Dublin); a house was built and sons John and Ben took charge of farming the land. The farm was left to Ben to run after John died.

Follistown House, July 1963

Follistown House

Edward and Sarah spent their final years at the house in Follistown. Sarah died in September 1938 and Edward in October 1940.

They were both laid to rest in Kentstown Cemetery, Co. Meath.

Now, on a side note, something I find very interesting is that Sarah’s parents and most, if not all of her siblings, emigrated to the United States, but Sarah chose to remain behind.

According to information I received earlier this year from a descendant of Sarah’s brother, Benjamin Nixon, the parents moved to NYC in 1869, when Sarah would have been about 14. I presume she would have stayed behind with relatives, but I have no idea with whom that could have been. I’ll have to try to find her in whatever records survived or weren’t affected by the Four Courts fire of 1922.

In recent months, I’ve learned a bit more about the Nixon family in the US, so more about them in a future post. As always, comments, additions, and corrections are welcome.

(*Fermanagh is one of the six counties of Northern Ireland.)

CLICK to ENLARGE the below images:

Sarah and her husband and four of her children, Clooneen, Co. Leitrim

Sarah and her husband and four of her children, perhaps, ca. 1912, when my grandfather departed for the US

Edward and Sarah (Nixon) Boles

Edward and Sarah (Nixon) Boles outside the house in Follistown

Boles_William_WWI copy

Son William R. Boles, born 1892, served in the US army in WWI, though he was not yet an American citizen

Left to right: John Boles, my mother, William Boles (Taken in July 1935)

Left to right: John Boles, my mother, and William Boles (Taken in July 1935; five months later John — who never married — was killed in a car accident.)

Categories: Boles, Drumkeeran, Co. Leitrim, Follistown Navan Co. Meath, Ireland, Kentstown Churchyard Co. Meath Eire, Nixon, Obituaries | 2 Comments

World War I Album Photos — William Boles — Part IV

Here are the remaining photos in my grandfather’s album. I think some of these must have been taken when in training at Camp McClellan in Alabama as one photo contains a large crowd of African Americans. Click on photos to enlarge or view in slideshow format.  Happy Easter, everyone!

Categories: Boles, World War I | 1 Comment

World War I Album Photos — William Boles — Part III

As promised in the previous post, here are some more photos from my grandfather William Boles’ photo album taken while serving in the US Army’s 29th Division 112th Heavy Field Artillery. I’ll post the remainder soon as time allows. CLICK ON AN IMAGE AND THEN YOU CAN VIEW THEM AS A SLIDE SHOW.

Categories: Boles, Trewin, World War I | 2 Comments

World War I Album Photos — William Boles — Part II

As an update to my previous posts on William Boles’ World War I service, I am posting some more photos from his album. There are still 30-40 left to scan and post. I will try to get to that next week.

Meanwhile, for the previous posts, please follow these links:
World War I Itinerary
World War I Itinerary (cont’d.)
NJ WWI Service Medallion
World War I photos

Note: To the above “WWI Itinerary” post I have added two photos showing troops on deck a ship; I presume these were taken either heading over to Europe (on the SS Melita) or coming back (USS Orizaba). I have also added some more links to texts that corroborate the itinerary. I read in this document that a lack of equipment kept the men in William’s regiment from taking part in the American offensive. To view the below photos as a slideshow, click on the first photo and then use the arrows to move to the next photo.

Categories: Boles, S.S. Melita, World War I | Leave a comment

More Edward Boles family photos

Apart from those photos posted in the previous post on the Edward Boles family, these are the only other early photos I have. Standing in the rear of the first photo are May Boles and her father Edward Boles. The pretty young woman with the headband on the right is Sophie Boles, a niece of Edward’s (daughter of Edward’s younger brother Robert). Seated in front is Sophie’s mother (Jane Stuart Boles, wife of Robert Boles), Jennie Boles (another of Edward’s daughters), and Sarah Nixon Boles (Edward’s wife and mother of Jennie & May). I don’t have a date for the photo, but it was taken before July 1928, which is when May died.

Boles family members

Boles family members in front of their home in Cloneen, Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim

The second photo is of Sophie Boles with her brother Robert Boles (children of Robert and Jane Boles, who had one more child – James Herbert), and on the right is cousin Jennie Boles (Edward Boles’ daughter, my grandfather’s sister).

Sophie Boles and brother Robert Boles with cousin Jennie Boles, early 1920s?

Sophie Boles and brother Robert Boles with cousin Jennie Boles, early 1920s?

Drumkeerin location marked with red balloon

Drumkeerin location marked with red balloon

Categories: Boles, Drumkeeran, Co. Leitrim | 6 Comments

Edward Boles family photos, late 1800s, early 1900s

Edward Boles of Fingreah

Edward Boles of Fingreagh (1855-1940), probably around 1875-1880, taken in Dublin

My great grandfather Edward Boles was born on June 4, 1855, in Fingreagh Upper, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, to James Boles of Fingreagh and Jane Payne. The couple had seven children: Edward, Robert, James, Jane, Alexander, William and Benjamin. Edward died on October 26, 1940, in Dublin. His wife, my great grandmother, was Sarah Nixon. She was one of 14 children of William Nixon and Rachael Millar: Edward, James, William, Elizabeth, Rachael, Jane, Mary, Sarah, Kate, Mark, Benjamin, John, Thomas, and Robert. Supposedly there were two sets of twins. I’m not sure whether they all survived to adulthood, but supposedly, of those who did, Sarah was the only one (or one of the very few) who did not end up emigrating to the US. I have yet to figure out if that was really the case.

Edward (a farmer) and Sarah Boles had six children: John James, Jane Kathleen (“Jennie”), Mary Elizabeth (“May”), William Robert (my grandfather), and Edward Benjamin (“Ben”). Ben’s twin Beulah Sarah died young. My grandfather William R. Boles was 20 when he emigrated to the US (Oct 21, 1912, from Londonderry via the ship Columbia), and I suspect the one photo below was taken on the eve of his departure. It was his Uncle Robert Nixon (one of Sarah Nixon Boles’ brothers), living on Elm Street in Summit, NJ, with wife Blanche, who sponsored him when he initially came to the US.

In front of the Drumkeerin house "Clooneen": Edward Boles seated with wife Sarah holding his left shoulder. In rear: John, Jenny, Mary "May", and Ben. Possibly taken in 1912.

In front of the Co. Leitrim house in Cloneen: Edward Boles seated with wife Sarah holding his left shoulder. In rear: John, Jennie, May, and Ben. Possibly taken in 1912, before my grandfather’s emigration to the US. Edward was tall — over 6′, while Sarah was very petite — 4’11” or thereabouts.

William R. Boles, served in US army in WWI

William R. Boles, served in US army in WWI, while still a British subject.

James Boles and wife Sarah Nixon, probably late 1930s

Great grandparents, James Boles and wife Sarah Nixon, probably mid-1930s; Sarah died in Sept 1938, and Edward in Oct 1940.

Fingreagh Upper (B) and Drumkeeran (A)

Fingreagh Upper (B) and Drumkeerin (A)

Categories: Boles, Columbia, Drumkeeran, Co. Leitrim, Ireland, Nixon, World War I | 2 Comments

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