Dingman

Antique “Dingman’s, Pa.” souvenir

Those out there with Dingman roots may want to weigh in on whose image this is on an old souvenir trinket box. Could it be Judge Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862), or someone farther back in the family tree? His father Andrew Dingman Jr. (1753-1839)? Or grandfather Andrew Dingman Sr. (1711-1796)?

Dingman_souvenir2 Dingman_souvenir

Categories: Dingman, Dingmans Ferry, Memorabilia, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | Tags: | 1 Comment

Dingman/Brodhead link to a Dutch “pocket-book” that was 216 years old in 1876

Unknown Master, Dutch (active in the 1620s in Leiden) ; Still-Life with Books (Credit: Wikimedia Commons; uploaded by 'Jarekuploadbot')

Still-Life with Books, Unknown Master, Dutch (active in the 1620s in Leiden); (Credit: Wikimedia Commons; uploaded by ‘Jarekuploadbot’)

From Webster’s Complete Dictionary of the English Language (1886)

From Webster’s Complete Dictionary of the English Language (1886)

The Evening Gazette, Port Jervis, NY, April 29, 1876

The Evening Gazette, Port Jervis, NY, April 29, 1876 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

If it still exists, the little ‘pocket-book’ mentioned in the accompanying newspaper clipping from the Port Jervis (NY) Evening Gazette, dated April 29, 1876, would be 355 years old, which would be pretty remarkable.

The ‘pocket-book’ had long been in the Dingman family until gifted by Andrew Dingman Jr. (1753-1839) to his grandson-son-in-law (my third great-grandfather) Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), who two years before his death gifted the item back to the Dingman family—specifically to ‘A.S. Dingman’. I believe this A. S. Dingman was probably Alfred Stoll Dingman (1839-1907), the elder Dingman’s great-grandson (and Garret’s nephew) who would have been about 31 at the time.

Garret was married to Cornelia Dingman, Judge Daniel Westbrook Dingman‘s daughter. Perhaps the pocket-book was a wedding gift.

Below you will find some background on each of the above as well as Andrew Dingman Sr., father of the aforementioned Andrew Jr.), who was the original Dingman who settled in the Pennsylvania wilderness in 1735 in what is now known as Dingman’s Ferry; and another Andrew Dingman (the Judge’s son and Alfred Stoll Dingman’s father).  (See the tree below.)

If you have access to Ancestry.com, you can view a wonderful photograph of Andrew Dingman Jr. in a group photo with his youngest son Isaac (Alfred’s brother), Isaac’s wife Charlotte, and the couple’s three daughters—Caroline, Melissa, and Helen. Also on Ancestry, you can view a portrait of Judge Daniel Westbrook Dingman who is mentioned in the article, the judge being the son of Andrew Sr. and the father of Andrew Jr. Interestingly one of the below bios mentions the Judge’s ‘corpulent’ size; the portrait on Ancestry of a young Daniel W. Dingman shows a man whose waistline has not yet expanded.

Accompanying images include two photos of waterfalls at the famous Dingmans Falls taken by my grandmother Zillah Trewin (no relation to the Brodheads/Dingmans) during her summer 1907 vacation, and present-day images of the old Dingman stone house (built in 1803-1804) and Dingman’s Ferry bridge (chartered in 1834) that were generously provided by James and Barbara Brodhead following a visit to that area in 2013. I have also included some newspaper clippings found on the Fulton History website; there is one anecdote about Judge Daniel W. Dingman’s handling of one case during which he uses language that would be considered completely inappropriate by today’s standards, and rightly so, of course, but I am including the anecdote here since it is part of history. If you can get beyond the language used, the punishment itself seems fair, if not generous for the crime committed.

So if you are interested in any of these family members, please get a ‘cuppa’ and read on! 🙂 (As always, comments, corrections, and additions are welcome.)

1-Andrew Dingman Sr. b. 11 Feb 1711, Kinderhook Albany Co NY, d. 1796,
Dingmans Ferry Northampton Co PA
+Cornelia Kermer b. 22 May 1720, New York, d. Pennsylvania, United States
|—–2-Andrew Dingman Jr. b. 19 Sep 1753, Northampton Co PA, d. 3 Feb 1839,
| Pike Co PA, bur. Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
+Jane Westbrook b. 9 Apr 1755, NJ, d. 21 Jan 1838, Dingmans Ferry Pike
Co PA, bur. Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
|—–3-Daniel Westbrook Dingman b. 28 Jul 1774, Walpack, Sussex, New
| Jersey, d. 14 Apr 1862, Pike Co PA, bur. Delaware Cemetery,
| Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
| +Mary Westbrook b. 8 Oct 1774, d. 26 Feb 1851, Dingmans Ferry Pike
| Co PA, bur. Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
| |—–4-Andrew Dingman b. 25 Dec 1804, Dingman family homestead, d.
| | 22 Mar 1889, bur. Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike
| | Co., PA
| | +Caroline Eliza Sayre b. 21 Oct 1804, d. 6 May 1885, bur.
| | Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
| | |—–5-Alfred Stoll Dingman (Aug 12, 1837-Jan 28, 1907; married Kate Van Auken; one child Walter)

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ANDREW DINGMAN SR. (1711-1796; married Cornelia Kermer):

History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania; Delaware Township, Chapter VIII, (Philadelphia: RT Peck & Co., 1886), pp. 908-909: The present township of Delaware is bounded on the north by Dingman township, on the east by the Delaware River and New Jersey, on the south by Lehman township and on the west by Porter. The first settlements on the Delaware River were made on the New Jersey side; but in or about the year 1735, Andreas Dingerman, or Andrew Dingman, as it is now written, crossed the Delaware and chose a place in the wilderness for his home, which he called “Dingman’s Choice,” a name which it still retains in local usage, although the post-office is called Dingman’s Ferry.

What the original ferry looked like (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

What the original ferry looked like; eventually the ferry was replaced by a bridge (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

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Original pulley from 1735 (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

When Andrew Dingman first crossed the river to make his habitation on the Pennsylvania side, he had an opportunity to make a choice, as he was the pioneer settler of Delaware township. If he was not the first, he was among the first, and is the first of whom we have authentic account. He certainly made an excellent choice of location for his future home, judging from present developments, for here the Delaware River flows close to the New Jersey hills and leaves a wide flat of rich bottom land on the Pennsylvania side. Here Dingman Creek bursts through the mountain bluffs after dashing over the rocks at the factory in a fall called the Factory Falls, and lower down is the “Bettie Brooks” or “Fulmer Falls.”

High Falls, Dingman's Falls, PA (CREDIT: Zillah Boles Trewin)

High Falls, Dingman’s Falls, PA, 1907  (CREDIT: Zillah Trewin)

Still farther down are the “Deer Leap” and “High Falls.” […]  Here, then, with a broad expanse of fertile river bottom land under his feet, with a creek that would supply water-power for grist and saw-mills flowing through it, surrounded by mountain bluffs, “rock-ribbed and ancient as the sun,” which environ it on two sides, he feasted his eyes upon the lavish bounty of Nature, in her primeval grandeur and magnificence, and inhaled the pure, health-giving air which floated around these mountains, “yet gorgeous in their primitive beauty, forest-crowned,” and intersected with gushing streams of limpid waters, which burst through the rocks from the highlands above in bold and beautiful waterfalls, where for ages they have been wearing deep and still deeper the steep gorges and rocky glens in her riven sides.

Deer Leap, Child's Park (Credit: Zillah Trewin, 1907)

Deer Leap, Child’s Park (Credit: Zillah Trewin, 1907)

Here, amid so much grandeur and beauty, Andrew Dingman made his choice and cut the first bush, built the first log cabin on the riverbank and put the first ferry-boat on the Delaware at what is now known as Dingman’s Ferry. Andrew Dingman was born at Kinderhook, New York, in the year 1711, and settled at Dingman’s Choice in the year 1735, or about that time. His first log cabin was down by the river-bank. About 1750, or some time previous to the French and Indian War, he built a stone house not far from where the Dingman “Reformed Church “now stands, on the site occupied by the house Fannie Dingman’s farmer occupies.

He had two sons, Isaac and Andrew Dingman, Jr., who was born September 19, 1753, in the old stone house which was destroyed during the French and Indian War, in 1755. Dingman immediately rebuilt another house. Mr. Dingman was endowed with a dauntless spirit and had now a farm, with orchards and barns. He was assisted in his labors by his two sons and four slaves. He established a traffic with the Indians, who often visited him, and from his friendly intercourse and dealing with the natives he derived considerable pecuniary advantage. In 1744 he obtained a warrant for the tract which now comprises a part of the M.W. Dingman estate, and in 1750 one for that lot on which the saw-mill at Dingman’s now stands. He subsequently took up, as it is termed, three other lots of land, the last in 1775. There were twenty-seven log and stone houses in Delaware as it was then, including Lehman and other territory west, contemporaneously with that of Andrew Dingman, Sr.

WEST (FRONT) AND SOUTH ELEVATIONS - Dutch Reformed Church, Dingmans Ferry, Pike County, PA (Credit: Library of Congress)

WEST (FRONT) AND SOUTH ELEVATIONS – Dutch Reformed Church, Dingmans Ferry, Pike County, PA (Credit: Library of Congress)

[…] Andrew Dingman built a flat-boat for ferrying purposes with a hand-axe, and it is probable that he built a grist-mill and saw-mill on Dingman’s Creek. An old grist-mill, with one “run” of native stones, stood near the present grist-mill. Judge Dingman used to tell his children about turning the bolt by hand while the miller ground the grist.*

[…] One of Andrew Dingman’s sons, Isaac, when about nineteen years of age, was riding a horse up the road to the barn and when a little north of the old Dingman Hotel (now Fulmer’s), an Indian, who was secreted in the orchard, shot him and ran away. His mother, who happened to be standing in the door holding the future judge, who was then four years of age, by the hand, exclaimed, “Law me, Isaac is shot!” He was mortally wounded, but they started across the river with him in a flat-boat. While they were going over he asked for a drink of water and shortly after died before they reached the Jersey shore, where there was a fort with one cannon. He was buried on the Jersey side, near the abutment of the old bridge.

ANDREW DINGMAN JR. (1753-1839; married Jane Westbrook )

History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886) – page 213-214: [...] …Andrew resided on the Jersey side of the Delaware, but subsequently removed to Dingman’s Ferry, where his father had made a beginning. He was captain of a company and served in the struggle for the independence of the colonies, and after living to see the country again engaged in a war with England in 1812, he survived many years thereafter, and died in 1839, at the age of eighty-three years.

His wife was Jane Westbrook, who bore him two children, — Daniel W. Dingman and Cornelia, who became the wife of Daniel Van Etten, who resided at Connashaw, where the Van Etten family homestead was.

History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania; Delaware Township, Chapter VIII, pp. 908-909:  Andrew Dingman, Jr., “Foddy Dingman,” as he was called, was born in the old stone house September 19, 1753. He married Jane Westbrook, a daughter of Daniel Westbrook, who lived across the river in New Jersey, and had three daughters, each of whom he gave a farm on the flats in Walpack township. Andrew Dingman took the upper farm, and here Daniel Westbrook Dingman was born April 14, 1775, on the Daniel Smith place, in a house that stood opposite Barney Swartwood’s. Subsequently Andrew Dingman, Jr., sold this property and bought on the Pennsylvania side again, near where John Whitaker lives.

Before the Revolutionary War the nearest justice of the peace was Benjamin Van Campen, who lived twenty-two miles from Dingman’s Choice. The county-seat was at Newtown, near Bristol, and there Andrew Dingman attended court.

Genealogical and Family History of the Wyoming and Lackawanna Valleys, Pennsylvania, Volume 1 by Horace Edwin Hayden, Alfred Hand, John Woolf Jordan (Lewis publishing Company, 1906), page 202: The younger Andrew Dingman served as private, Sussex county, (New Jersey) militia, 1779-83, and was pensioned as such March 4, 1831. He was born at Dingman’s Ferry, Pennsylvania, but lived in New Jersey during the Indian depredations ; enlisted 1779 as private in Captain Peter Westbrook’s company, Third battalion Sussex county (New Jersey) militia, and took part in engagement with the Indians, April 19, 1780.

JUDGE DANIEL WESTBROOK DINGMAN (1774-1862; married Mary Westbrook)

History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886) – page 213-214: Daniel W. Dingman (1775-1862), only son of Andrew, inherited his father’s estate at the “Ferry,” and carried on the lumber business and merchandising there during a large part of his active life. He was a leading and influential man socially and politically, and a Democrat of the Andrew Jackson type.

Judge Daniel W. Dingman's stone house (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

Judge Daniel W. Dingman’s stone house (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

Sign on the Dingman home (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

Sign on the Dingman home (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

He was the first elected sheriff of Wayne County, in 1801, and the second holding the office, and served in the State Legislature from 1808 to 1814, during which time Pike County was taken from Wayne, and he gave the new county its name, from General Pike, a hero of the War of 1812, and he also gave Dingman township its name. He was associate judge of Pike County for twenty-six years in succession, and was chosen one of the electors in the election of President Monroe.

His wife, Mary Westbrook (1777-1852), a daughter of Benjamin Westbrook, of Sussex County, N. J., bore him children as follows: Martin W.; Andrew ; Daniel W., Jr., the first Whig prothonotary of Pike County, appointed by Governor Joseph Ritner ; Cornelia, wife of Garret Brodhead, of Dingman’s Ferry ; Margaret, wife of Abram Coolbaugh, of Shawnee, Monroe County ; and Jane, wife of Franklin Brodhead. Of these children, only Andrew and Margaret survive in 1886, the latter being eighty-five years of age.

History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck & Co. 1886), pp. 910-911: In 1793 Daniel W. Dingman was commissioned as lieutenant of a company of militia by Thomas Mifflin, Governor of Pennsylvania. On the 2d of August, 1800, he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the One Hundred and Third Regiment Pennsylvania Militia by Governor McKean. In 1801 he received a commission as high sheriff of Wayne County, by the same Governor. He was the second sheriff of Wayne County, his term extending from 1801 to 1804. The court was held at Wilsonville from 1799 to 1802, when it was removed to Milford for a short time; consequently he commenced at Wilsonville and closed his term at Milford. [For a list of the elections he ran in over the course of his lifetime, click here.]

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Dingmans Bridge sign (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

At one of these places he lived in a log house, the jail being similar to his dwelling. He had two prisoners in this jail. One morning, on arising, he found both his prisoners and the jail were gone. During the night the jail was torn down and the building reduced to saw-logs, while the prisoners were nowhere to be found. About that time he was visited by some gentlemen from New Jersey on business, and…overheard some very uncomplimentary remarks about such a dwelling for a sheriff to live in, good enough, however, for a county-seat that was liable to be removed any day. He was a member of the Legislature of Pennsylvania from 1808 till 1813, and when Pike County was set off from Wayne and Northampton, he was commissioned associate judge by Governor Simon Snyder, October 10, 1814, and continued in that office twenty-six years, when his term expired by limitation under the new Constitution.

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851)

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851); wife of Garret Brodhead (Image credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

John Coolbaugh sat with him for twenty-two years and until Monroe was erected. They were both large, stoutly-built men, and weighed over two hundred pounds each, while Judge Scott, the presiding judge who sat between them, was a tall, spare, intellectual man of great legal attainments. His associates seldom interfered, unless in relation to something of a political nature. Dingman was once Presidential elector and cast his vote for James Monroe. During Jackson’s campaign he cut a tall hickory pole and floated it to Easton, on a raft, when it was raised on Mount Jefferson. When taken down it was made into canes, one of which was presented to General Jackson and another to Judge Dingman. Solomon Dingman, his grandson, now has the cane. In 1846 he was corresponding secretary of the Pennsylvania Historical Society.

Daniel W. Dingman was an active business man and a successful politician of the old Jacksonian Democratic school. He built a hotel which has since been enlarged by Philip Fulmer, until it will accommodate one hundred guests. He also built the Dingman grist-mill, and being given his choice whether he would have an academy or a county-seat located at Dingman’s Ferry, chose an academy.

The three trusses of the Dingman's Ferry Bridge (Credit: Wikimedia Commons, uploaded by Ando228 on 14 Jun 2008)

The three trusses of the Dingman’s Ferry Bridge (Credit: Wikimedia Commons, uploaded by Ando228 on 14 Jun 2008)

In all public matters relating to Pike County, he was a leading man. While in the Legislature he secured an act making Blooming Grove the county-seat, but the commissioners of Wayne County refused to levy a tax for public buildings and the county-seat was finally fixed at Bethany. He and his friends then had the county of Pike erected.

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The Pennsylvania side of the bridge where the tolls are collected (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

He was also influential in getting State appropriations for roads over the barrens of Pike County. Towards the close of his life he built a house in the wilderness, by Lake Teedyuscung or Nichecronk, where he lived a retired life for a number of years. He finally came back to his old home, and died April 12, 1862, at the advanced age of eighty-seven years, and was buried in the Delaware Cemetery at Dingman’s Ferry. Towards the close of his life he seemed to desire posthumous fame and took pride in the fact that he belonged to the Pennsylvania Historical Society. He was thoroughly identified with the early history of Pike County. Dingman’s Ferry, Dingman Creek and Falls were named in honor of the family, and Dingman township was named in honor of the judge. He was kind to Revolutionary heroes and Indian fighters, and General Seeley, Sam Helm, Mapes and Wagdon found a generous stopping-place with him. His only sister, Cornelia, married John Van Etten, and lived where William Courtright now lives at Dingman’s Ferry. She was eighty-six years of age when she died. Daniel W. Dingman married Mary Westbrook. His children were Cornelia, wife of Garret Brodhead; Jane, wife of Franklin Brodhead; Margaret, wife of Abram Coolbaugh. Daniel Dingman lived on the river road.

Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832)

Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832); husband of Cornelia Dingman, granddaughter of Mr. Andrew Dingman, father of Judge (Daniel Westbrook) Dingman (Image credit: James & Barbara Brodhead)

GARRET BRODHEAD (1793-1872; married Cornelia Dingman in 1813)

Genealogical and Family History of the Wyoming and Lackawanna Valleys, Pennsylvania, Volume 1 by Horace Edwin Hayden, Alfred Hand, John Woolf Jordan (Lewis publishing Company, 1906), page 202:
Garret Brodhead, Jr., eldest son of Richard and Hannah (Drake) Brodhead, born December 2, 1793, died East Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania, January 8, 1872 ; married, November 25, 1813, Cornelia Dingman, born October 3, 1797, died June 18, 1883, daughter of Daniel W. and Mary (Westbrook) Dingman. […] Garret Brodhead, Jr., served as private in Captain Adam Hawks’ Second brigade Pennsylvania militia in the war of 1812-15. He was a farmer in Pike county ; from 1850 until 1858 he held an important position in the civil administration of the United States navy yard at Philadelphia. Garret Brodhead and his wife Cornelia Dingman had children : 1. Albert Gallatin, born August 3, 1815, died January 18, 1891 ; married, July 3, 1838, Sally Ann Tolan. 2. Daniel Dingman, see forward. 3. Andrew Jackson, born May 6, 1822, of whom later. 4. Abram Coolbaugh, born August 6, 1824, died October, 1892; married, January 6, 1863, Cornelia M. Ely.

ANDREW DINGMAN (1804-1889; married Caroline Eliza Sayre)

History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886) – page 214: Andrew, son of Daniel W. Dingman, was born on the homestead, on Christmas day, 1804, where he has followed farming and lumbering most of his active life. He now, at the age of eighty- one years, is hale and hearty, and his correct habits through life, his even temperament and quiet ways, together with his integrity in all the relations of life’s work, have gained the esteem of all who know him.

 His wife, Caroline (1804-85), was a daughter of Jedediah Sayre, a large real estate owner of Deckertown, N. J., and her mother was Elizabeth Reifsnyder, of the same place. Their children are : Mary, wife of John W. Kilsby, a farmer at Dingman’s Ferry ; Susan, wife of John W. Mclnnis, of Columbus, Ohio; E . Sayre, of Scranton ; Jane resides with her brother at Hawley ; Margaret, wife of John Lattimore, of Dingman’s Ferry ; Daniel W., of Flatbrookville, Sussex County, N. J.; Alfred S., of Milford ; William H., of Columbus, Ohio ; Dr. A. C, subject of this sketch ; and Isaac, of Dingman’s Ferry.

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Alfred Stoll Dingman p 214 of History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886)

Alfred Stoll Dingman
p 368 of Commemorative Biographical Record of Northeastern Pennsylvania: Including the Counties of Susquehanna, Wayne, Pike and Monroe (Monroe Co., PA: J. H. Beers & Company, 1900)

ALFRED STOLL DINGMAN (b. 12 August 1837; d. 28 Jan 1907; married Kate Van Auken)
Commemorative Biographical Record of Northeastern Pennsylvania: Including the Counties of Susquehanna, Wayne, Pike and Monroe (Monroe Co., PA: J. H. Beers & Company, 1900), page 369:
Alfred Stoll Dingman was born August 12, 1837, at the homestead at Dingman’s Ferry, where he remained until he reached the age of nineteen, assisting his father with the work of the farm and ferry. He then took a position as clerk in a general store at Dingman’s Ferry, owned by Thomas Cortright, and in 1859 he accepted a similar position with C. McCarty, of the same place. On October 16, 1862, he became a member, at Philadelphia, of Company B, 179th P. V. P, becoming first lieutenant under Capt. John B. Frazier. He went first to Newport News, and later to Yorktown, where he remained until June, 1863, doing guard duty at the Fort, and he then marched up the Peninsula to Whitehouse Landing, Va., participating in an engagement near that place in June, 1863. On July 2, 1863, he was discharged at Harrisburg, on account of expiration of term of service, and after his return home he assisted his father for some time. In the spring of 1864 he entered into mercantile business at Dingman’s Ferry with Evert Hornbeck, and one year later bought his partner’s interest, continuing alone until 1869, when he formed a partnership with Henry P. Beardsley. After two years Mr. Beardsley died, and for one year Jacob B. Westbrook was in partnership with our subject, who then sold out to Mr. Westbrook and retired. In 1880 Mr. Dingman removed to Milford, being employed as a clerk for John F. Pinchot, a merchant, until 1889, when he became a traveling salesman for Thomas E. Grecian, a shoe dealer in New York City.

Mr. Dingman has always taken keen interest in politics, being an ardent Republican, and in 1890 he was elected commissioner of Pike county for the term of three years. In 1893 he was again chosen to the office, and on retiring he engaged, in February, 1896, in his present business. He is an able official, and previous to his election as commissioner he had served three years (1884-1887) as county auditor, and three years as school director in Delaware township. Socially he and his family are prominent, and he is identified with the G. A. R., the I. O. O. F., the Rebekahs, and the F. & A. M. (Blue Lodge No. 344), at Milford.

On May 18, 1889, Mr. Dingman was married, at Port Jervis, N. Y., to Miss Kate Van Auken, and one son, Walter V., born March 14, 1890, brightens their home. Mrs. Dingman was born April 13, 1857, at Dingman’s Ferry, a daughter of the late John B. Van Auken, and is a member of an old and highly-esteemed family of Wallpack, NJ… […]

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OBITUARY

Port Jervis Evening Gazette, January 29, 1907

Alfred S. Dingman obit – part 1, Port Jervis Evening Gazette, January 29, 1907 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

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Alfred S. Dingman obit – part 2, Port Jervis Evening Gazette, January 29, 1907 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

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OTHER PRESS CLIPPINGS

AdamsNY_JeffersonCoJournal_20Nov1888_1

Adams NY, Jefferson County Journal, 20 Nov 1888 – part 1 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Adams NY, Jefferson County Journal, 20 Nov 1888 - part 1 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Adams NY, Jefferson County Journal, 20 Nov 1888 – part 2 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Adams NY, Jefferson County Journal, 20 Nov 1888 - part 3 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Adams NY, Jefferson County Journal, 20 Nov 1888 – part 3 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

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Wayne County Herald, Honesdale, PA

Excerpt from article in Wayne County Herald, Honesdale, PA

St Regis Adirondack News (dated 1901-1903), Credit: fultonhistory.com

Port Jervis, Evening Gazette, 26 Feb 1889 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Andrew died less than a month later. Port Jervis, Evening Gazette, 26 Feb 1889 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Dingmans Ferry, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | 2 Comments

Fishing Pike County in the spring of 1877

Image from p 46 of The Determined Angler and the Brook Trout by Charles Bradford (NY & London: GP Putnam's Sons, 1916)

Image from p 46 of The Determined Angler and the Brook Trout by Charles Bradford (NY & London: GP Putnam’s Sons, 1916)

I don’t know what the fishing is like today in Pike County, PA, but here is an 1877 article from The Country, Vol I & II describing the experiences of one visitor to that area from April 1-4, 1877. During those 4 days, this visitor caught 400 fish weighing 45 pounds and brought back to New York 234 fish that “scaled 33 pounds honest weight.” Roughly 88 of them were between 8 – 13.5 inches in length; the other 150 or so, he said, were small trout, but not “fingerlings” — “fat as butter and excellent eating.”  Obviously these were the days before any limits were introduced! Today he’d be able to walk away with just 5 trout per day, and each would have to be at least 7 inches long.

I love the great outdoors and that includes “escaping mentally” to the great outdoors of yesteryear to imagine what things must have been like in a certain location at a certain point in time. If you’re like me, and you enjoy fishing, perhaps you will find this article of interest too. Present-day fishermen and women in Pike Co., feel free to comment about your experiences fishing in that part of PA.

Happy 4th of July, All!
fishing1fishing2fishing3The Country, weekly journal, Vol 1-2, pub. 1877

Credit: Google Books

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Fishing, Fourth of July, Hobbies and Pastimes, Nature, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | 6 Comments

Some Brodheads on an 1891 hunting expedition in Blooming Grove Park—a playground for all seasons (Post 1)

Blooming grove

“Blooming Grove Park—The American Fontainebleau” (Image from Harper’s Weekly, December 17, 1870 — not long ago, I acquired the issue in which it appeared from ‘Timothy Hughes’ Rare & Early Newspapers’ of Williamsport, PA)

When Daniel Brodhead and his family settled in Pennsylvania’s Minisink Valley in the late 1730s, that area was a vast expanse of wilderness, a true frontier. Hunting and fishing was done for survival. As time went on and villages and towns emerged, stores cropped up where one could buy fresh game and produce, but by and large the common man, and definitely the poor man, fed his family by his own hand—through the use of plow, knife, trap, or gun. But by the 19th century, and especially in the second half of that century, the upper classes, wanting to “re-create pioneer values and to approach nature through wildlife,”1 developed a burgeoning interest in field sports. In answer to this demand, entrepreneurs and others caught up in this trend cobbled together fairly massive parcels of land to establish private hunting and fishing clubs which they hoped would rival the great game parks of Europe that served as private parks for the nobility2, and “by 1878, about 25,000 Americans belonged to 600 of these clubs. Among the leaders was the Blooming Grove Park Association.”3 “Blooming Grove Park,” established in Pike County, Pennsylvania (the county to the north of Monroe County, home of settler Daniel Brodhead’s town of “Dansbury”–a.k.a. East Stroudsburg), in 1870 by the Blooming Grove Park Association, was (and still is) an exclusive hunting and fishing club that has expanded far beyond its initial borders.

Map showing the location of this township within Pike County, Pennsylvania (Credit: Wikimedia Commons - contributed by Rcsprinter123 on Dec 6, 2014)

Map showing the location of Blooming Grove Township within Pike County, Pennsylvania (Credit: Wikimedia Commons – contributed by Rcsprinter123 on Dec 6, 2014)

Initially some 14,000 acres in size, encompassing vast tracts of land, lakes, and trout streams, the members-only Park attracted well-heeled outdoors-people throughout the year—men and women, as the above etching shows. Many were wealthy New Yorkers, searching for supreme experiences in the great outdoors. To cater to their need to keep their fingers on the pulse of the nation’s stock market, the club eventually stretched wire all over the park4 so that interested members could check on their business interests at any time during their nature jaunts. Not surprisingly, the Park was initially very poorly received by locals who had happily hunted these territories for generations before abruptly being shut out by those of wealth and power5.

Junius Brutus Stearns (1810 – 1885)

A Day’s Sport At Blooming Grove Park by Junius Brutus Stearns (1810 – 1885)

When established, the Association was granted the right of ‘self-determination’ by the Pennsylvania General Assembly, whereby it was able to establish and enforce its own game laws as well as propagate fish and game for an improved ‘visitor experience’. The Association later became officially known as the Blooming Grove Hunting and Fishing Club, and it remains to this day a very private and exclusive organization. Over time, the public in general came to appreciate the conservation work done on the Club’s lands much of which had been decimated before 1870 by excessive logging. And today, with development accelerating beyond the Club’s borders, the Club’s lands remain safe and protected with little prospect of that changing. According to the “Blooming Grove Township Comprehensive Plan” produced by Community Planning & Management, LLC, in May 2008, which includes a map of the Club’s lands: “Blooming Grove Township holds less potential for development than many of the other municipalities in Pike County and the Pocono Mountains.” So that’s definitely good news from a conservation standpoint.

Trout Fishing by Junius Brutus Stearns (1810 – 1885)

Trout Fishing by Junius Brutus Stearns (1810 – 1885)

Chapter 13 of The History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania (Mathews, Alfred, Philadelphia, R. T. Peck & Co., 1886), gives some background on Blooming Grove Park, including the following: “The Blooming Grove Park Association was projected by Wm. H. Bell, of Branchville, Sussex County, NJ, and Fayette S. Giles [a gentleman jeweler6] in 1870. [Charles Hallock, future founder of Field and Stream worked with Giles as a promoter7.] John C. Westbrook and Lafayette Westbrook deeded 13,000 acres of land to the association, and they have since purchased 1,000 acres in addition. F.S. Giles was the first president of the association. The stockholders have changed, and most of the stock is now held by New York parties. The lands lie in Blooming Grove, Greene and Porter townships, and include Lakes Beaver, Giles, Scott, Bruce, Westbrook, Laura, Ernest and Belle, according to the names which the association have given them. One square mile of the land is inclosed by a wire fence, as a breeding park, in which they have about 200 deer. The club-house is erected on ground overlooking Giles Lake, or Blooming Grove Pond, as it was formerly called, at a cost of about ten thousand dollars.”

salmon_flies

Salmon and Sea Trout Flies from Fly Fishing (1899), Sir Edward Grey, 1920 edition (Wikimedia – Public domain in US)

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Several months ago, a bit after I finally ‘discovered’ some traces of Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead, my second great grandfather’s brother, and while digging through some search results on the Fulton History website, I came upon an article in the Port Jervis, NY, Evening Gazette, entitled “Home of the Bear and the Deer. What a ‘Gazette’ Man Saw in the Hunting Section of Pike County, PA.” The article is dated November 30, 1891, and it was a fun find because it mentions a hunting party that included both my second great grandfather—Andrew Jackson Brodhead—AND his little brother Abram. Andrew would have been 69 at the time, and Abram 67. And it was even more fun because it described them as “famous sportsmen”: At Blooming Grove, “Moses Westbrook’s”, we found a notable party of hunters, some of whom have followed the hounds in the wilds of Pike for 40 consecutive years. Among them were the famous sportsmen, “Abe” C. Brodhead of Lehighton, Pa., Andrew J. Brodhead and George T. Gray, of Flemington, N.J., W. F. Brodhead of Packerton, Pa., and U. S. Grant Tobias of Mauch Chunk, Pa. They were hourly expecting John C. Westbrook, of Milford, and Captain ” Lafe” Westbrook, of Stroudsburg, the great deer slayers of Pike for the past 40 years, it being a fact that they have to their credit the slaying of over 600 deer during that time. It would be unfair not to mention their brother “Mose” in this connection who, although having no record to exhibit, has without doubt killed nearly as many as his brothers.

Sadly, this may have been one of the last times Abram enjoyed a hunting expedition; a little less than a year later, he fell ill and passed away at his daughter Jennie (Brodhead) Linderman‘s home in Bethlehem, PA. Andrew, meanwhile, was blessed to live another 21 years, dodging the “heart attack alley” that seems to zigzag up the Brodhead family tree, so he probably enjoyed many more such outings before being forced by infirmity to give up such pleasures. Serendipitously to finding the article, I found the above 1870 image in Harper’s Weekly and went so far as to purchase the issue so I could include the image here. Don’t worry, I did not have to rob a bank. 😉

Please don't rely on my data as being 100% accurate. Mistakes happen along the way! ;-)

Please verify my data before you use it. Mistakes happen along the way! 😉

p. 103 of The Runkle Family: Being an Account of the Runkels in Europe, and Their Descendants in America by Ben van Doren Fisher (T.A. Wright, 1899) Other members of the hunting party included “George T. Gray, of Flemington, N.J., W. F. Brodhead of Packerton, Pa., and U. S. Grant Tobias of Mauch Chunk, Pa.” Who were these men? Well, I figured out that W. F. Brodhead referred to Colonel William Franklin Brodhead (1842-1932), a cousin of the Brodhead brothers via the Dingman side of the family. William’s mother Jane Dingman was the younger sister of Andrew and Abram’s mother Cornelia Dingman. Jane and Cornelia both married into the Brodhead family.  (See the greatly condensed family tree inset for a visual.) U.S. Grant Tobias (1868-1940), a clergyman, was William’s son-in-law of just six months.  Grant married William’s daughter Edith on May 5, 1891 at the family’s Packerton, PA, home8.  In November 1891, William would have been 49, and Grant9—23. I think George T. Gray must have been a friend of Andrew Jackson Brodhead’s as both men were visiting from Flemington, NJ. I found George and his wife Rachel Ann Cherry in a Runkle family genealogy book10(see clipping inset and end note below). If I have the correct George (and I think I do), he was 66 at the time of this hunting trip.

At first I thought perhaps they were all members of the Blooming Grove Park Association, but when I discovered it was the exclusive preserve of the wealthy, I decided that was unlikely since as far as I know, my second great grandfather, dad to 10 children, was not a wealthy man. Brother Abram, long-time widower and father of one, had been the superintendent of the Lehigh Stove Foundry, and during the Cleveland administration, had held a lucrative position in the Philadelphia mint. Perhaps, he had the means.

Then I looked into what was meant by “Moses Westbrook’s,” and came upon a mention of this location in The Country, Vol. 1-2 (published in 1877; page 369): “Fishing on the Shohola, the large stream which runs through the territory of the Blooming Grove Park Association, is accessible via Lackawaxen, on the Erie Railway. The headquarters are at Moses Westbrook’s hotel at Blooming Grove, an excellent, cheap, comfortable hostelry…” By 1891, the hotel may have had a makeover, but obviously it was still standing, and providing lodging to this hunting party. Whether they were heading to the Association’s lands or other lands within Pike County, once they met up with John C. Westbrook and Captain ”Lafe” Westbrook, I don’t know. But, given the fact that the former had deeded 13,000 acres for the establishment of Blooming Grove Park, it seems likely that he would have been a member there.

John C. Westbrook (Image from The History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Matthews, p. 895)

John C. Westbrook (Image from The History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Matthews, p. 895)

Speaking of the Westbrooks, there were a number of them who married into the Brodhead family, and vice versa, through the years. For example, Andrew and Abram’s aunt Sarah Brodhead (1792-1879) was married to Colonel John Westbrook (1789-1852), and the brothers’ mom Cornelia Dingman Brodhead was the daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851). I have not sufficiently researched the Westbrook tree to know where “John C. Westbrook” fits (or “Lafe” or “Mose”, for that matter). If anyone out there knows, please feel free to give a shout. [Update: There is a bio of John C. Westbrook in The History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties, (RT Peck & Sons, 1886, pp. 894-896); Lafayette (‘Lafe’) was a brother of John C. Westbrook] [Note: See follow-up post on August 5, 2015]

Well, I will close now and leave you with the Evening Gazette article in the event you want to read it in its entirety. For those “scanners” among you, I have highlighted the names of our Brodheads and their friends. When the reporter left Blooming Grove, [the group was] following five deer. No matter what the day’s results were or where exactly their adventures took place, I hope they all enjoyed their time together in the great outdoors.

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PORT JERVIS EVENING GAZETTE, 30 November 1891

HOME OF THE BEAR AND DEER. WHAT A”GAZETTE” MAN SAW IN THE HUNTING SECTION OF PIKE COUNTY, PA

Many Noted Hunters at Present in That Country Searching for the Big Game. Plenty of Deer but Not Many Captured, as Yet—A Brief Mention of Several of the Many Excellent Hunters Homes.

The hunting season of Pike County, Pa., is now at its best, and in all parts of that vast area of wilderness, barrens and swamps lying between the famous valley road and the Paupack country, the birds the deer and the bears are on the alert to escape the death dealing shots of the wily hunters and the keen scent of their swift footed and well trained dogs. When the law is “on” protecting the game, this vast country is nearly as silent as the grave, and the intense quiet is only broken by the occasional sound of the woodman’s axe.

On a recent drive through this section, the writer found many famous hunters at the various “Hunters Homes.” At Sheriff Hoffman’s hospitable home on Sawkill Lake, five miles out from Milford, on the Milford and Owego turnpike, the Hawes Brothers, of Central Valley, NY, men noted in the Adirondacks and in the Maine forests for their skill as hunters, were in full possession and with the Sheriff and his sons were making it lively for the deer and were capturing many birds. We are informed that they took home with them two four-pronged bucks. Mrs. Hoffman, by the way, we found very ill but the honors of the home were excellently carried out by her daughter. The jolly Sheriff laments the fact that he has not this year his usual number of dogs, by death and other causes his kennel is now reduced to sixteen.

At Shohola Falls a party of gentlemen from Nyack, NY, who had been guests of Garry Hart, the owner of the famous Shohola Falls and the adjacent country, had just left and had taken away with them six deer. These gentlemen were assisted in their hunting by the noted Greening Brothers who know every runway and hiding place for deer in that whole country. In this connection we wish to take the liberty of mentioning that Mr. and Mrs. Hart caught the largest trout that were taken in Pike county this season. They caught in the Rattlesnake creek and in the Shohola, in the “Meadows,” seven trout none of which weighed less than 2 ½ pounds and one weighed a trifle over 6 pounds. Mrs. Hart enjoys the reputation of being one of the most expert anglers of that section.

fishing5

Illustration for index page of The Country, Vol 1 & 2, published 1877; find it on Google Books (free) — the index is extensive and there is good reading to be had here. The 19th-century American passion for the great outdoors is on display!

At Blooming Grove, “Moses Westbrook’s”, we found a notable party of hunters, some of whom have followed the hounds in the wilds of Pike for 40 consecutive years. Among them were the famous sportsmen, “Abe” C. Brodhead of Lehighton, Pa., Andrew J. Brodhead and George T. Gray, of Flemington, N.J., W. F. Brodhead of Packerton, Pa., and U. S. Grant Tobias of Mauch Chunk, Pa. They were hourly expecting John C. Westbrook, of Milford, and Captain “Lafe” Westbrook, of Stroudsburg, the great deer slayers of Pike for the past 40 years, it being a fact that they have to their credit the slaying of over 600 deer during that time. It would be unfair not to mention their brother “Mose” in this connection who, although having no record to exhibit, has without doubt killed nearly as many as his brothers.

When the writer left Blooming Grove the party first mentioned were following five deer and we have no doubt that they captured the greater part of them.

Over on the Paupack there were a number of hunters at “Jack” Kimbles and at Marcus Killam’s and all were having fairly good luck. Marcus Killam, now considerably advanced in years, is another of the famous deer hunters of Pike, having killed over 400 deer in the past 60 years. At Dimon’s, also on the Paupack, a number of hunters were gathered. These gentlemen were under the guidance of the noted local guide and deer hunter Henry Quick, and had already started up several deer but, unfortunately, had not been able to get a shot at them. Among the hunters in the Paupack country was a young divine, Rev. F. T. Angevene, of Sharon, Conn. The young clergyman is an ardent sportsman and an excellent shot; although he did miss two deer when out with “Eph” Kimble, of Kimbles, and we do not doubt that he took away with him more game than any other man of the party. The cause of his missing the deer was a peculiar condition of the atmosphere just at sunset and he was not able to correctly estimate distances.

“Sim” Lord, at Lord’s Valley, has also captured several deer but as he was out following a deer the day that we were in his section we did not see him and consequently are not able to mention the hunters that have been making their headquarters at his very hospitable home. We, however, did see his brother Jury Commissioner, Levi Lord, and he stated that game was comparatively plenty at Lord’s Valley and vicinity and the hunters were having excellent sport. [this part was cut off] …but, for some reason explainable only by those who stood on the runways, none of them were stopped. This home is on the head waters of the Rattlesnake creek in the heart of a famous bear, deer, bird and trout section. The great black bear brought to Port Jervis last February, the skin of which was purchased by Counsellor John W. Lyon, of this village, was shot by Dr. Kelly within three quarters of a mile of his residence. Mrs. Kelly, by the way, is an expert shot and on the day of our visit killed a pheasant, or rather ruffed grouse, that will entitle her to take the first premium this year. The bird weighed a trifle over three pounds and was the largest of his species that we had ever seen.

Space will not allow us at this time to mention the bear hunting in Greene township and at the “Knob” and we will rely on our correspondents to give the interesting bear stories to our readers later on.

We would say to our readers who have a love for the sports of the field that there is no better hunting section than Little Pike to gratify their desires in that direction and, more, that the “Hunters Homes” are comfortable and excellent beyond description. You cannot make a mistake, they all, without exception, are ideal ”Hunters’ Paradises.”

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1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 – Page 51 of Better in the Poconos: The Story of Pennsylvania’s Vacationland by Lawrence Squeri (Penn State Press, 2010)
8 – Carbon Advocate wedding announcement, Volume 19, No. 26, Saturday, May 9, 1891
9 – Carbon Advocate, Volume 20, Number 22, Saturday, April 9, 1892:  In A Few Words. We congratulate our popular young friend Grant Tobias, of the County Seat, over the arrival of a bright little son in his family. We hope the little fellow may have a long life and abundant prosperity, while at the same time we feel like closing digits with granddad Brodhead, at Packerton.
10 – Page 103 of The Runkle Family: Being an Account of the Runkels in Europe, and Their Descendants in America by Ben van Doren Fisher (T. A. Wright, 1899)

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1877_PikCo

The cost of a 2-week trip from NYC to Pike Co. in 1877? No more than $30. (The Country, Vol. 1-2; pub. 1877; page 369)

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Fishing, Hobbies and Pastimes, Hunting, Nature, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | 7 Comments

More traces of Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead & Cornelia M. Ely

Down Among the Coal Mines -- Chutes Loading the Canal-Boats on the Lehigh Canal, a wood engraving published in Harper's Weekly, February 1873. Coal was loaded at Mauch Chunk (Image found on Wikimedia Commons; public domain in the US)

Carbon County Scene: “Down Among the Coal Mines — Chutes Loading the Canal-Boats on the Lehigh Canal,” a wood engraving published in Harper’s Weekly, February 1873. Coal was loaded at Mauch Chunk (Image found on Wikimedia Commons; public domain in the US)

One of this blog’s new readers, whose spouse is a descendant of Abram & Cornelia Brodhead, kindly pointed me in the direction of some wonderful Carbon County resources that are available online thanks to the amazing contributions of a Mr. Tony Bennyhoff.  They reveal some interesting details, and I encourage anyone whose ancestors spent time in Carbon County to check them out. You never know what you may find.

What I found were several newspaper notices related to Abram’s passing, and I am sharing them here:

The Lehighton Press, Volume 2, Number 2, Thursday, October 27, 1892:
Death of A. C. Brodhead. Abram C. Brodhead died on Tuesday morning at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Garrett B. Linderman, South Bethlehem. Mr. Brodhead was 68 years of age, and lived for many years in Lehighton. About two months ago he went to South Bethlehem to visit his daughter, and while there he was taken ill. Mr. Brodhead was the youngest brother of the late Judge A. G. Brodhead , of Mauch Chunk; D. D. Brodhead , of Wilkes-Barre; A. J. Brodhead , of Flemington, N. J., and W. F. Brodhead, of Packerton. He was a staunch Democrat, having held several offices in the gift of his party. He was well known and greatly respected. The funeral of the deceased will take place to-day. Interment at Bridgeport, Conn. [Note: W. F. Brodhead, of Packerton, was a cousin on the Dingman side,  the son of William Franklin Brodhead (b 1807) and Jane Dingman (b 1808; Cornelia Dingman’s younger sister).]

Carbon Advocate, Volume 20, Number 50, Saturday, October 29, 1892:
Death of Abr. Brodhead. After an illness dating back a long time Abraham Brodhead died at the home of his daughter at Bethlehem on Monday night at the age of 68 years. For many years deceased resided in this city and was the superintendent of the Lehigh Stove Foundry. During the Grover Cleveland administration he held a lucrative position in the Philadelphia mint. He was an eccentric character in many ways. The news of his death was heard with regret by many old friends here.

View of Mauch Chunk, Carbon County, Pennsylvania, a wood engraving sketched by Theodore R. Davis and published in Harper's Weekly, September 1869 (Found on Wikimedia Commons; image is in public domain in US)

“View of Mauch Chunk, Carbon County, Pennsylvania,” a wood engraving sketched by Theodore R. Davis and published in Harper’s Weekly, September 1869 (Found on Wikimedia Commons; image is in public domain in US)

The Lehighton Press, Volume 2, Number 3, Thursday, November 3, 1892:
Funeral of A. C. Brodhead – The funeral of A. C. Brodhead, of Lehighton, took place on Thursday morning last from the residence of Mrs. G. B. Linderman, the daughter of the deceased, at South Bethlehem. The services were conducted by Rev. Gilbert H. Sterling, after which the remains were taken to Bridgeport, Conn., and there interred beside Mr. Brodhead’s wife. Mr. Brodhead was born in Pike county, August 6, 1824. In his early years Mr. Brodhead was connected with the Lehigh Valley Railroad and was subsequently in the government employ, in the custom house, in New York, and in later years in the mint, in Philadelphia. He was the youngest son of Garrett Brodhead and his wife, Cornelia Dingman , of Delaware, Pa. He was married January 6, 1862, to Cornelia Ely , of Bridgeport, Conn., but his wife died in the second  year thereafter, leaving but one child, Jennie, wife of Garrett B. Linderman. The funeral was largely attended by relatives and friends of the deceased from Lehighton and Mauch Chunk.

And, I found a morsel about Cornelia M. Ely in George Burritt Vanderpoel’s The Ely ancestry: lineage of Richard Ely of Plymouth, England who came to Boston, Mass., about 1655 & settled at Lyme, Conn, in 1660… (NY: Calumet Press, 1902, p. 369):

137313- Cornelia Maria Ely, b. 1842, d. 1864, dau. of Henry Gideon Ely and Cornelia Maria Whiting; m. 1863, Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead, Lehighton, Carbon Co., Pa., who was b. 1824, son of Garrett Brodhead and Cornelia Dingman. Their children:

1. Jennie S, b. 1863.

So Abram was ‘well known and greatly respected’ and ‘an eccentric character in many ways.’ I enjoy hearing little details like that, don’t you?

I am so grateful for this blog’s readers and appreciate all the feedback and help you so generously provide!

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Pennsylvania | 2 Comments

Brodhead family descendants repair Cornelia D. Brodhead headstone

Mauch Chunk Cemetery sign, Jim Thorpe, PA

Mauch Chunk Cemetery sign, Jim Thorpe, PA (PHOTO CREDIT: James and Barbara Brodhead)

I recently heard from James and Barbara Brodhead, who are cousins of mine—James and I share the same great grandparents, Andrew Douglas Brodhead and Margaret Lewis Martin. It was only a few years ago that we made initial contact, quite by chance, on the Internet. This post is part one of two posts on this blog being devoted to their efforts to tidy up and restore some Brodhead family headstones, and with so many old headstones crumbling all across America, perhaps their work will inspire you just as much as it has me! I asked them whether they required permission to undertake this work, and they were advised that since they were family, they were welcome to do what they could. So here, without further ado, is Part I of their project, in James’ own words. Enjoy!

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851)

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851)

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead was born on October 3, 1797, in Dingmans Ferry, Pennsylvania. Her father was Judge Daniel W. Dingman and her mother was Mary Westbrook. Cornelia is buried next to her husband, Garret Brodhead, whom she married at age 16 on November 25, 1813. They are both buried in the Upper Mauch Chunk Cemetery in Jim Thorpe, PA. I am the third great-grandson of Cornelia and Garret.

Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832)

Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832)

As I have a great interest in my family history, in the fall of 2011, my wife, Barbara, and I went to Pennsylvania in search of family history information. We visited the cemetery in Jim Thorpe and located the family plot owned by the Hon. Albert Gallatin Brodhead, Garret and Cornelia’s oldest son. It is situated on the edge of the hill next to the Asa Packer Family Plot. Sadly, we found Cornelia’s headstone had been knocked/fallen over, the center stone was missing, and the base had been moved about 6 feet from its original location. Cornelia’s headstone was laying face up but was about 2/3 buried in the ground.

The Albert Gallatin Brodhead plot in Upper Mauch Chunk Cemetery, Jim Thorpe, PA; Garret Brodhead's stone is visible in the foreground right corner.

The Albert Gallatin Brodhead plot in Upper Mauch Chunk Cemetery, Jim Thorpe, PA; Garret Brodhead’s stone is visible in the foreground right corner.

During our travels, as a way to show respect for our ancestors, we determined to clean the moss and dirt from any family headstones we had found. We carried a kit with a bucket, jugs of water, Simple Green, brushes, plastic putty knives, etc. We knew that Cornelia’s headstone was going to take a lot more effort to fix, so we began planning to make the necessary repairs the next time we would visit.

Cornelia's headstone lying on the ground next to Garret's marker

Cornelia’s headstone lying on the ground next to Garret’s marker

In August of 2013, we were able to return to Pennsylvania; the repair of Cornelia’s headstone a priority on this trip. We were staying in Milford, and we took the 70 mile drive to Jim Thorpe. I began by digging around her headstone and standing it up. (The estimated weight for the base and headstone was approximately 250 lbs each.) A neighbor boy loaned us a shovel. The base, I skidded on wood strips that we had brought, until I returned it to its original location. The base was then leveled. I walked, (tipped back and forth); her headstone over next to the base, then tipped it on to its back onto the base.

4_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 5 copy

5_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 7 copy

6_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 10 copy

7_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 12 copy

8_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 14 copy

9_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

Because of the limited space and the weight, and after several attempts, I was unable to stand the headstone up onto the base. I began to say a silent prayer, asking for help. As I finished and looked up, I could see that Barbara was also praying. It was late, and so we drove back to our motel.

The next morning we went for a walk and found that our planned route was unsafe, (no sidewalks), and so we took a different route. As we were going down a side street I saw a bridge crane and said, “That’s what we need to lift the headstone up!” We realized that we were looking at a shop where they engraved headstones. The foreman, after listening to our dilemma, told us that we would have to slide the stone off the base and stand it up. Then using wood blocks, (cribbing), the stone is tilted side to side and front to back and the blocks are inserted under it. Thus the stone is walked up to the required height and slid into position. He also gave us four small plastic squares to place under each corner and then told us to use 50-year silicone to seal the stone to the base. It worked just as he said.

9a_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

9b_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

9c_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

9d_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

9e_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

9f_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy copy

9g_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy

9h_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy copy

9i_Cornelia Dingman Brodhead Headstone 17 copy
When we return next time we will thoroughly clean all of the Brodhead headstones and put gravel where there is a rain water runoff problem.

This project has helped us feel closer to Garret and Cornelia.

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Dingmans Ferry, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Mauch Chunk Cemetery Jim Thorpe PA | 8 Comments

Charles Reginald Brodhead (1886-1899) and a 4th of July injury that spelled disaster

4th of July fireworksAnother sad story, I’m afraid; can’t seem to get away from them. This one dates back to July 4, 1899, a day that was surely a celebratory one for most Americans. But, sadly, injuries that day from toy pistols and firecrackers left a trail of misery for many families whose young boys died or were near death from tetanus within the subsequent two weeks. The area in and around the south shore of Long Island experienced an unprecedented number of cases of tetanus that July, circumstances that were widely reported upon in the NY/NJ newspapers.

This media comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Public Health Image Library (PHIL), with identification number #7220; image is in Public Domain.

This media comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Public Health Image Library (PHIL), with identification number #7220; image is in Public Domain.

Tetanus, a dangerous bacterial infection commonly referred to as ‘lockjaw’, can lead to an excruciatingly painful death if left untreated. It was only in 1924 that a vaccine appeared. Coincidentally the cause of tetanus was identified in 1899, and it was around that time that a treatment was developed whereby serum was injected directly into the brain to relieve symptoms. Today we take tetanus shots for granted, often forgetting our booster shots every 10 years. But tetanus was once a real killer.

One of the boys affected was Charles Reginald Brodhead, the 13-year-old son of Daniel Dingman Brodhead Jr. and Leonora Hubbard, and brother of Clement P., Maude, Mary Ann, and Lenore. (Daniel Dingman Brodhead Jr.’s dad, also named Daniel Dingman Brodhead, was my 2nd great grandfather‘s brother; Daniel Dingman Brodhead Jr.’s brother was the Wm H. Brodhead whose elopement was the topic of a recent post). There are some photos of Daniel and Leonora Brodhead with their three daughters on Ancestry dot com. I have not come across any of their two boys (the oldest son, Clement, died in 1968).

Painted by Sir Charles Bell in 1809; Painting showing opisthotonos in a patient suffering from tetanus (Wikimedia: Image in Public Domain)

Painted by Sir Charles Bell in 1809; Painting showing opisthotonos in a patient suffering from tetanus (Wikimedia: Image in Public Domain)

At the time of the incident, Charles and his family were living at La Tourette Place, Bergen Point, Hudson Co., New Jersey. Charles was injured slightly by a blank cartridge. His wound healed, and he felt well enough to take a steamboat excursion on the Long Island Sound on Friday, July 7. However, lockjaw set in soon thereafter and he was admitted to Bayonne Hospital where he experienced convulsions for several days and was treated with serum, before succumbing to tetanus on Thursday, July 13. He was buried in the Moravian Cemetery in New Dorp, Staten Island, two days later. Note: Anyone researching this family will find Charles’ father Daniel D. Brodhead buried here as well.

Some of the other boys lost to tetanus that summer included:  Joseph Rezhofsky, 13; Martin Breen, 10; Wm. McNulty, 12; Joseph Lavinsky; Samuel Greenburg, 14; Charles Roth, 12; Christian Wm. Ritachel, 15; Gustavus Salinski, 16; Harry Morrisey, 11;  Harry W. Squier, 11; Giuseppe Consumanno, 14; Lionel Briggs; Samuel Charles, 15; John Dowd, 11; and Dominick Stanton, 12.

Sometimes I get the impression that those who die young and/or childless tend to get short shrift when it comes to genealogical research. So I am glad I came upon this information on Charles Reginald Brodhead. The family trees I have seen that include him only contain a date and/or place of birth. It’s good to know what happened to him even if it was tragic. I think it’s important to remember these individuals; their lives were extremely precious to those closest to them; their presence in a family even for a brief time would have created a dynamic unlikely ever to have been forgotten.

The New York Evening Post, 15 July 1899 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Evening Post, 15 July 1899 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Evening Post, 15 July 1899 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Evening Post, 15 July 1899 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Evening Post, 15 July 1899 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Evening Post, 15 July 1899 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Additional Resources

  • July 14, 1899: New York Times, “Death from Lockjaw in Bayonne“.
  • July 14, 1899: New York Tribune, “Lockjaw Baffles Skill. Boys Die in Agony in Spite of Serum Treatment. Doctors Cannot Cope With the Terrible Disease”.
  • July 15, 1899: The Jersey Journal, obit.
Categories: Bayonne, Brodhead, Brodrick, Death, Dingman, Fourth of July, Moravian Cem Staten Island | 6 Comments

Our Ancestors Who Fought for Independence

Washington at the Battle of Trenton. An engraving by Illman Brothers. From a painting by. E.L. Henry, 1870. Image in public domain due to expired copyright.

This 4th of July, we remember our ancestors who served in the Revolutionary War and, if they were married at that time, the wives who supported them in their service. Yes, nieces and nephews, these patriots are all directly related to you! They are your fifth/sixth great grandfathers!

      • James Angus (b. 1751 in Scotland; d. 14 Mar 1806) Served in Albany County (NY) militia under Colonel Philip P. Schuyler (DAR ancestor no A002822); married Mary Magdaline Baker after the War (in 1781)
      • Lt. Garrett Brodhead (b. 1733 Marbletown, NY; d. 1804 Stroudsburg, PA), served in the Northampton County, PA militia under Col. Brinigh, and served on the frontier. Somewhere I remember reading that he was friends with Gen. LaFayette, but I can’t remember where; I’ll try to search that out. Married to Jane Davis whose father Frederick also served in the War. Garret signed oath of allegiance. (DAR ancestor no. AO14785). Garrett was the brother of Brig. General Daniel Brodhead whose exploits are well documented. The brothers and their siblings and parents were among the earliest settlers of Pennsylvania’s Minisink Valley, having moved there in 1737 from Marbletown, NY, to settle 1000 acres of purchased land. Stroudsburg was initially known as Dansbury, after Garrett’s father Daniel. Another brother, Luke, also served in the Revolutionary War, attaining the rank of captain and serving on the staff of General Lafayette. From the book Colonial Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania: “He [Luke]enlisted in the spring of 1776 as third lieutenant. First American Rifle Regiment, Colonel William Thompson commanding. He was appointed second lieutenant, October 24, 1776, in Major Simon Williams’ regiment. He was wounded and taken prisoner at battle of Long Island. Later he was commissioned captain of the Sixth Pennsylvania Regiment under Colonel Magaw in Continental service. He retired in 1778 incapacitated by wounds received in battle.”

Brigadier General Daniel Brodhead (1736-1809)

      • Lt. Col. Samuel Crow, b. 1741, Woodbridge, NJ; d. 1801 Woodbridge, NJ; Service in NJ militia. (DAR Ancestor no: A028247); married to Elizabeth Potter.
      • Frederick Davis b. 1701, Marbletown, NY; d. 1804 Stroudsburg, PA; Per Sylvester’s History of Ulster Co., NY, p. 74, Frederick signed articles of association for Ulster Co. (DAR Ancestor no: A030300); married to Margerie Van Leuven.
      • Andrew Dingman Jr. b. 1752 Northampton Co., PA; d. 1839 Pike Co., PA. Served in the NJ militia as a staff officer with Captains Van Etten, Nelson, Homer, Westbrook; Took oath of allegiance in 1777. (DAR ancestor no. A032282).  Married to Jane Westbrook. Father of Daniel Westbrook Dingman whose daughter Cornelia was married to Garret Brodhead (1793-1872).
      • Andrew Dingman Sr. b. 1711 Kinderhook, Albany Co. NY; d. 1796 Dingman’s Ferry, Northampton Co., PA. Signed oath of allegiance in 1777; suffered depredations (DAR ancestor no. A032281). Married to Cornelia Kermer. Father of the aforementioned Andrew Dingman Jr.
      • Capt. Samuel Drake, b. 1740 New Jersey; d. 1789 Lower Smithfield, Northampton Co., PA. Served in Capt. Jacob Stroud’s company (4th Battalion) of Pennsylvania militia, 1775, and as captain, 1776. (DAR ancestor no. A033472); married to Sarah Handy.
      • Colonel James Easton (1728-96), was with Ethan Allen at Ticonderoga; commanded a Berkshire County regiment in the Canadian expedition, 1775.  B. Hartford, CT; d. Pittsfield, MA. (DAR ancestor no. A035836); married to Eunice Pomeroy.
      • Normand Easton b. 25 Jun 1758, Litchfield, CT; d. 1806, Greenville, NY; Private; served under Capt. Hine, Lt. Wm Preston, 13th Regiment Militia (DAR Ancestor no: A035842); married Merab Perry after the war.
      • Pvt. Hezekiah Hand, b. cir 1730, d. ante 28 April 1800 in Westfield, NJ; private in the Essex Co., NJ militia, serving under Captain Benjamin Laing. (DAR ancestor no. A050961); married to Nancy.
      • Samuel Barron Jaques, b. abt. 1740, d. 1798 Woodbridge, Middlesex Co., NJ; commanded Rahway Company during the Revolutionary War; married to Mary Coddington.
      • Pvt. Isaac Newman (1731-1808), served as a private in the Associated Exempts of Westchester County at the battle of White Plains. b. Stamford, CT., d. Charlton, N. Y. (DAR ancestor no. A082986); married to Abigail Webb.

Campaigns of the American Revolution 1775-1781 (copyright-free image from Ookaboo)

      • Shubael Trowbridge, b. 1739 Morristown, NJ; d. 1782 Hanover, Morris Co., NJ. Served as a private in Capt. James Keene’s Company, Eastern Battalion, Morris County (NJ) Militia (also known as “The Rams Horns Brigades” (DAR ancestor no. A116272); married to Mary Bayles.
      • David Wait, b. 1754 Edinburgh, Scotland; d. 1810 Perth Amboy, NJ. According to the 1893 Biographical and portrait cyclopedia of the Third congressional district of New Jersey, he came to the colonies as a British soldier, took part in an engagement at Manhattan Island, and was taken prisoner by Americans and retained as a POW in Jamestown, VA, until peace was proclaimed. He then went to Sussex, Essex Co., NJ, and finally settled in Perth Amboy, where he began working as a carpenter in the building known as the “Old Castle” on Water Street, the oldest building in the city. An entirely different account was offered by Harlan Mendenhall in his 1903 book, Presbyterianism in Perth Amboy, New Jersey: “He ran away from his native land to escape service in the army, but the troublous times in America aroused his sympathy and he enlisted in the Continental army. He was captured by the British forces and incarcerated in the Barracks. When peace was declared he became a resident in the city and his descendants are now on the rolls of our church.” Married Irene Bell after the war (in 1784).
      • Johannis Westbrook (DAR Ancestor no: A123311); married to Marie.
      • Capt. Martinus Westbrook, b. 1754, Sussex Co., NJ; d. 1813, Sussex Co., NJ. Served as a captain, 3rd Regiment, Sussex Co., NJ, Militia. (DAR ancestor no. A123311); married to Margaret Lowe.
      • Lt. Elias Winans, b. 1742, Elizabethtown, NJ; d. 1789, Elizabethtown, NJ. Service: New Jersey (DAR ancestor no. A128111); married to Esther Perlee.
      • Pvt. Enos Woodruff, b. 1749 Elizabethtown, NJ; d. 1821 Elizabethtown, NJ; served as a private in the Essex Co., NJ, militia. (DAR ancestor no. A128636); married to Charity Ogden.
      • Major Reuben Potter, b. 1717 Woodbridge, NJ; d. 1799 Woodbridge, NJ; served under Col. Nathaniel Heard, lst Regiment, New Jersey Militia; married to Deborah (last name?, d. Oct 1, 1762).

Happy 4th of July!

Categories: Angus, Brodhead, Crow, DAR numbers, Dingman, Drake, Easton, Fourth of July, Gen. Lafayette, Hand, Jaques, Newman, Revolutionary War, Trowbridge, Veteran's Day, Westbrook, Winans, Woodruff | 1 Comment

The Pre-1900s Weekday Wedding – Past Wedding Traditions

Dress, Evening; 1850-1855; silk, cotton; Metropolitan Museum of Art (accession no. 2009.300.921a, b); visit http://www.metmuseum.org

A while back I read an article on pre-twentieth-century weddings and how the bride would not wear white or have a special dress made, but would appear in her very best dress, whatever color of dress that may have been–black, brown, dark green, and so on. Black would have been handy because it could do double duty as mourning attire. Plaids and florals were also very popular at one time. The idea of purchasing a dress that would only be worn once would have seemed very wasteful, apart from probably being prohibitively expensive (a white dress even more so–imagine trying to clean it without today’s technologies).

Wedding Ensemble, 1878, American, silk, Metropolitan Museum of Art (accession no. 2009.300.18a, b); visit http://www.metmuseum.org

It was only when Queen Victoria married Prince Albert in 1840 in a white satin gown specially made for the occasion, that brides began clamoring for white gowns, but a trend did not really come about until the late 1800s when such dresses could be better produced, transported, and marketed to the public, and were more affordable for the everyday woman.

Weddings often took place in the evening at the home of the bride, often on weekdays, particularly on Thursday evenings. This allowed the work of the day (weekends included), whether on the farm or elsewhere, to be accomplished and livelihoods thus maintained.

Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

A handy day of week calendar allows you to take any date in history and find out what day of the week it was.  I decided to randomly check on some wedding dates I have in my database to see on which days weddings most often fell. As you can see, at least in my little random sample, they fell on all days of the week apart from Friday, with Thursday edging out the other days. And, while June is now the most popular month for weddings, I only found three ceremonies that fell in that month.

Sunday
John Woodruff and Mary Ogden Earl, 2/16/1817
Thomas Trewin and Mary Anne Phillips, 1/27/1839
James W. Angus and Anna Carpenter, 2/27/1870

Monday
John Woodruff and Sarah Cooper, 10/25/1683

Tuesday
George Wills and Mary Pitt Capon, 4/14/1812
Capt. Daniel Brodhead and Hester Wyngart, 9/19/1719
Calvin Easton Brodhead and Laura Leisenring, 12/6/1870
James Easton Brodhead and Harriet Boyd, 5/1/1877
Sampson Wills and Ann Gadsden, 9/22/1789

Wednesday
Francis Woodruff and Mary Jane Trowbridge, 11/12/1845
AJ Brodhead and Ophelia Easton, 12/31/1845
Austin F. Knowles and Mary M. Angus, 9/4/1867

Thursday
Henry Jaques, Sr. and Anna Knight, 10/8/1648
Henry Jaques, Jr. and Hannah Trueman, 4/10/1670
Lt. Garret Brodhead and Jane Davis, 3/15/1759
Garret Brodhead and Cornelia Dingman, 11/25/1813
William Earl Woodruff and Wealthy Ann Angus, 6/20/1872
Robert Packer Brodhead and Frances Loveland, 5/23/1889
Frank Ludey and Metta Ryman, 6/18/1896
Minnie Ludey and Herbert Duryea Crane, 9/24/1897

Saturday
Capt. Richard Brodhead and Magdalena Jansen, 4/19/1692
Timothy Woodruff and Elizabeth Parsons, 9/25/1739
James Winans Angus and Wealthy Ann Jaques, 1/26/1839
Frank Brodhead and Fannie Woodruff, 6/6/1908

For an interesting article on wedding fashions, visit the Monroe County [PA] Historical Society’s site.

I’ll close by including some wedding announcements of various family members. Two have appeared in previous posts, but the other two (of the Ludey siblings) are appearing in this blog for the first time. Wish we had some photos!

Brodhead-Woodruff Wedding Announcement (Probably clipped from the Elizabeth Daily Journal) - from our family's private archives

Brodhead-Woodruff Wedding Announcement (Probably clipped from the Elizabeth Daily Journal) – from our family’s private archives

Brodhead-Loveland Marriage Announcement, 1889

Frank T. Ludey Jr. (1871-1900), age 21  (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Frank T. Ludey Jr. (1871-1900), age 21 (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Ludey-Ryman Wedding, The New York Times, 6/19/1896

Mary ("Minnie") Emma Ludey (1873-1938), age 21 (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Mary (“Minnie”) Emma Ludey (1873-1938), age 21 (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Herbert Duryea Crane  (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Herbert Duryea Crane (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Ludey-Crane Marriage, Jersey City, The Evening Journal, 9/24/1897

Ludey-Crane Marriage, Jersey City, The Evening Journal, 9/24/1897

Categories: Angus, Brodhead, Crane, Dingman, Easton, Jaques, Knowles, Ludey, Phillips, Ryman, Trewin, Trowbridge, Weddings, Woodruff | Leave a comment

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904, (watermark and labeling added by me)

You may recall a previous post about Robert Packer Brodhead in which I related that much material was available about the Brodhead family from the book Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania. We are very fortunate to have a large framed photo display of Robert’s father and mother, Andrew Jackson Brodhead and Ophelia Easton, together with Robert’s nine siblings. The display was assembled in Flemington, NJ, in 1904, and must have been compiled in the early part of the year since Ophelia passed away that April, some 18 months shy of what would have been her and her husband’s 60th wedding anniversary. Son Calvin died several years later, in 1907, from gastritis*. Andrew Jackson Brodhead died at 91 in 1913. So this assembly of photos is a wonderful thing to have.  My great grandmother Margaret Lewis Martin can be credited with identifying each person. She died in the mid-1940s but at some point before then created a diagram showing who was who, and attached it in an envelope to the reverse side of the frame.

Andrew Jackson Brodhead

Andrew Jackson Brodhead

Brodhead_Ophelia_Easton

Ophelia Easton Brodhead

Below in italics is material on the Andrew Jackson & Ophelia (Easton) Brodhead family excerpted from John W. Jordan’s 1911 book, Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania, in three volumes, published by Lewis Publishers of New York. Note: I cropped the individual photos from the compiled version above; also, please note that Mauch Chunk in Carbon County, Pennsylvania, is now known as the town of Jim Thorpe. Click the preceding link to peruse the interesting materials on the Mauch Chunk Historical Society’s website.

Andrew Jackson Brodhead, third son of Garret and Cornelia (Dingman) Brodhead, was born in Northampton (now Pike county), Pennsylvania, May 6, 1822. He received his early education in the common schools of the towns in which his parents lived, at the Dingman Academy, and a term at the Stroudsburg Academic School. He taught school one year, and in 1850 began working in Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania, where he removed his family in 1851. From 1851 to 1857 he was employed as clerk and bookkeeper, and for five years was in business with a partner, repairing cars used by the pioneer coal company of that region. About 1861 Mr. Brodhead began shipping coal for other producers, and in 1877 opened a general store at Hickory Run, Pennsylvania, where he lived until 1883, when he returned to Mauch Chunk. In 1884 he removed to Flemington, New Jersey, his present home. In 1868-69 he was treasurer of Carbon county, Pennsylvania, for several years he was school director of East Mauch Chunk, and served as justice of the peace.

Calvin Easton Brodhead

Calvin Easton Brodhead

1. Calvin Easton, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, December 27, 1846; married (first) December 6, 1870, Laura Clewell Leisenring, born at Mauch Chunk, August 9, 1848, daughter of Alexander William and Ann (Ruddle) Leisenring.  They had Anna Leisenring, born November 12, 1871; Emily Easton, born November 3, 1872; Alexander William, January 1, 1874; married (second) at Oakville, Canada, Mary Lewis, who died March 31, 1905.

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Garret Brodhead

Garret Brodhead

2. Garret, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, February 11, 1848; married, September 17, 1872, Annie Kocher, born in Mauch Chunk, August 25, 1849, daughter of Conrad and Catherine (Wasser) Kocher.  Seven children: Conrad and Andrew Jackson (twins), born July 19, 1873; Alonzo Blakeslee, December 26, 1875; Calvin Easton and Laura Leisenring (twins), born September 21, 1878; Ruth Randall, born March 7, 1884; and Garrett, born January 3, 1888.

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John Romeyn Brodhead

John Romeyn Brodhead

3. John Romeyn, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, June 11, 1849; married, November 13, 1882, Mary Martha Holbert, born in Chemung, New York, March 22, 1858, daughter of Joshua Sayre and Catherine Van Houton (Ryerson) Holbert.  They had Henry Holbert, born September 29, 1883, and Arthur Sayre, born November 26, 1886.

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James Easton Brodhead

James Easton Brodhead

4. James Easton, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, February 22, 1851; married, May 1, 1877, Hattie Lochlin Boyd, born July 11, 1852, daughter of Nathaniel and Jane (Curran) Boyd.  They have Walter, born March 9, 1878; John Romeyn, born September 25, 1880; Frederick Moon, born July 31, 1883; and Nathaniel Boyd, born June 22, 1891.

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Andrew Douglas Brodhead

Andrew Douglas Brodhead

5. Andrew Douglass [misspelling by author, should be Douglas], born in Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania, August 17, 1852; married Margaret Lewis Martin, born January 15, 1859, daughter of Moses and Sarah Augusta (Lewis) Martin.  They have Edith Easton, born November 3, 1879; Frank Martin, born February 5, 1882; Lewis Dingman, born October 5, 1884; Andrew Jackson, born October 3, 1886.

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Charlotte E. Brodhead

Charlotte E. Brodhead

6. Charlotte Easton, born in Mauch Chunk, December 11, 1855; married, October 5, 1887, Franklin Clark Burk, born in Flemington, New Jersey, April 8, 1853, son of Peter Wilson and Clarinda (Bellis) Burk.

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Jean Struthers Brodhead

Jean Struthers Brodhead

7. Jean Struthers, born in Mauch Chunk, November 21, 1857; married, October 15, 1885, Charles Ashley Blakslee, born in Mauch Chunk, July 4, 1859, son of James Irwin and Caroline Jones (Ashley) Blakslee.  They have Gertrude Easton, born June 21, 1887, and Ophelia Easton Blakslee, born January 9, 1895.
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Robert Packer Brodhead

Robert Packer Brodhead

8. Robert Packer, see forward [of book].

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Emily L. Brodhead

Emily L. Brodhead

9. Emily Linderman, born in East Mauch Chunk, June 1, 1862; married Frederick Moon, born September 30, 1851, son of Samuel and Matilda White Moon. They have Frederick Wiles Moon, born July 27, 1882.

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Richard H. Brodhead

Richard H. Brodhead

10. Richard Henry, born in East Mauch Chunk, November 4, 1864; married, March 6, 1890, Jane Vanderveer Smock, born October 15, 1861, daughter of Daniel Polheim and Sarah Jane Smock. They have Estelle Smock, born November 26, 1890; Mary Ophelia, born April 2, 1892; Jean Blakslee, born July 3, 1893, died July 27, 1893, and Richard Henry.

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Quite a few of their resting places have been documented, and in some cases photographed, on Find a Grave’s website. If you go to Andrew Jackson Brodhead’s entry (click here), you can click on links to others of the family who have been documented.

*Note re: Calvin Easton Brodhead, his May, 1, 1907, obituary in The Reading Eagle stated: Calvin E. Brodhead died suddenly in New York City of gastritis. He was born in Pike County in 1846. He was widely known in contract affairs, having served as chief engineer of the Lehigh Valley Railroad for some time. In 1872 he supervised the construction of the Easton and Amboy division of the road. He was well known in Flemington, NJ, where he lived before locating at Mauch Chunk.

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Easton, Flemington, Lewis, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Obituaries | 8 Comments

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