Memorabilia

112-year-old Brodhead family guest book — Post VI

Mr. & Mrs. Frank M. Brodhead Guest Book, 1908

Flora May Woodruff Baker, circa 1910

The next page from the guestbook! On August 18, 1908, Flora M. Baker and son, residing at Cranbury & Conant Street, visited for lunch. This was my grandmother’s older sister Flora May Woodruff (1877-1962) and her infant son Norment Woodruff Baker (1908-1979). Flora was married to Claiborne Barksdale Baker (b. 1870). He passed away in 1916, and she eventually was remarried to a gentleman named John Jacob Ulrich (b. 1884) and moved to California.

Evelyn Angus visited on September 4. I believe this was Evelyn L. Angus (1894-1981), the daughter of Charles Dujah Angus (1852-1938) and Harriet Hartnett (1858-1951). Charles was child #7 of James W. and Wealthy (Jaques) Angus. If this is the correct Evelyn, she was also the one who tended to my grandmother Fannie Woodruff Brodhead, in the weeks leading up to her death from pneumonia in 1965. Evelyn was one of my grandmother’s many 1st cousins.

Image credit: Michelle Causton. Original group photo cropped to show: Circled (left to right): Laura L. Brodhead, Calvin E. Brodhead, Gertrude M. Brodhead, and William McNulty Brodhead (on the occasion of the Golden Wedding Anniversary of Garret and Annie Brodhead (parents of Calvin, Laura, and siblings)).

September 8th saw the arrival of another Woodruff cousin—Lucetta Crane Woodruff (1867-1956), one of the never-married daughters of Ogden Woodruff and Phebe Asenath Bonnell, who had 12 children in all.

The next guests, on September 20, were on my grandfather’s side of the family—first cousin Calvin Easton Brodhead (1878-1945) with wife Gertrude Brodhead (1881-1961) and baby son William McNulty Brodhead (1906-1976). Eventually this family, which grew to have many more children, moved to Ohio.

The Central New Jersey Home News, New Brunswick, NJ, March 22, 1945

The last name on the page is Laura Leisenring Brodhead (1878-1949), Calvin’s twin sister, who resided in Perth Amboy. I don’t believe she ever married, but feel free to correct me on that. Shown here is a cropped image of the September 21, 1922, Brodhead family gathering on the occasion of Calvin and Laura’s parents’ 50th wedding anniversary. I have circled and noted who’s who.

Laura remarked in the guest book: “Tennis is great”. Perhaps she and my grandparents played a game of tennis earlier that day?  Sounds like it! I published a tennis-related photo once before (below). Perhaps, this was the court they played on. The time period looks about right.

Have a good and safe Sunday everyone. And, remember, “this too shall pass,” and we will be the stronger for it.

Elizabeth, NJ, tennis court

Categories: Baker, Brodhead, Heirlooms, Memorabilia, Woodruff | Tags: , | Leave a comment

112-year-old Brodhead family guest book — Post V

Untitled (Cracked watermelon) By Charles Ethan Porter – ca. 1890; Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Another page from the guest book my grandparents started using right after they were married. And here we see my grandmother’s parents came to pay the newlyweds a visit: William Earl Woodruff (1848-1928) and Wealthy Ann Woodruff (1850-1927). The date was August 9, 1908. They resided at their farm on Conant Street and commented “Our first time to dinner to help eat watermelon.”

Wm Earl Woodruff & Wealthy Ann Angus

The following day, three visitors arrived: Mary Earl Woodruff of 854 Salem Road — “My first call”; Carrie E. Woodruff of 902 Salem Road — “Spent a pleasant evening”; and Mr. and Mrs. George Maxwell Earl of 637 Jefferson Avenue, Elizabeth — “Here for dinner.”

Mary Earl Woodruff (1880-1957) and Carrie Elizabeth Woodruff (1875-1967) were daughters of Ogden Woodruff and Phoebe Bonnell. Neither of the sisters ever married. They were my grandmother’s aunts even though the age difference between them and my grandmother was only 2 and 7 years, respectively.

Bertha Winans Woodruff (1888 – 1973)

Mr. George Maxwell Earl (1882-1978) was born in Elizabeth and baptized at the First Presbyterian Church there. He and my grandfather may have gone to school together or, perhaps, met through the church. George’s wife was Edith Willis (1881-1978; b. Pennsylvania). The couple appeared in a different blog post I did about my grandparents’ wedding and the list of gifts they received.

I do not know who Jessie A. Pierson was, but below her name in pencil is “Sister Bertha”—the same Bertha who visited previously.

Some August guests

Categories: Brodhead, Earl, Elizabeth, Union Co., Memorabilia, New Jersey, Woodruff | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

Daguerreotype of Richard Brodhead still available on eBay

The daguerreotype of Richard Brodhead mentioned in last week’s post is still available on eBay: Click here. The one of his daughter Elizabeth Dorcas Brodhead sold for just over the opening bid amount of $99.

1-Capt. Daniel Brodhead b. 20 Apr 1693, Marbletown, NY, d. 22 Jul 1755,
Bethlehem, PA
+ Hester Gerritse Wyngart b. 1697, d. After 1743
|–2-Capt. Charles Brodhead b. 7 Sep 1729, d. 7 Feb 1789, (Modena Rural
| Cemetery, Modena, Ulster Co, NY)
| + Mary Oliver b. 1740, d. 7 Sep 1814, (Modena Rural Cemetery, Modena,
| Ulster Co, NY)
| |–3-Charles C. Brodhead b. 20 Apr 1772, Oneida County, NY, USA, d. 14 Sep
| | 1852, Utica, Oneida Co., NY
| |–3-Oliver C. Brodhead b. 1775, d. 1858
| + Dorcas Hallock b. 1787, d. 1853
| |–4-Charles C. Brodhead b. 1806, d. 1890
| |–4-Richard Brodhead b. 1815, d. 1865
| + Eliza Maria Jansen b. 1823, d. 1908

Categories: Brodhead, Marbletown, Memorabilia, New York | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Ebay auction: Daguerreotype of Elizabeth D. Brodhead (1851-1938) as a child & one of her father, too

THE KINGSTON DAILY FREEMAN. TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 5, 1916. (Credit: FultonHistory.com)

Just a quick post to say that a daguerreotype of Elizabeth Dorcas Brodhead is up for auction on eBay. To view the item, click here.  Shown here as a child, she went on to marry Philetus Kortright (1846-1916). She was the daughter of Richard Brodhead (1815-1865) and Eliza Maria Jansen Brodhead (1823-1908); see Find a Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/19501036

A search of Ancestry trees shows that this Richard Brodhead appears to have been the the son of Oliver C. Brodhead (1774-1858) and Dorcas Hallock (1787-1853). Oliver was a grandson of Daniel Brodhead (1693-1755) and Hester Wyngart (1687-1758) via their son Revolutionary War captain Charles W. Brodhead (1729-1789). (I am, as are some of you, a direct descendant of Charles’s brother Garret Brodhead.)

Just wanted to pass this auction info along in case some Brodheads out there who read this blog and are closely related to Elizabeth would be interested in trying to acquire this unique and precious item.

Oops! After posting this, I noticed a daguerreotype of Richard is up for auction, too. Click here.

Categories: Brodhead, Heirlooms, Memorabilia, New York | Tags: , , | 8 Comments

January 1876 autograph album: A gift to Elizabeth Sargent Trewin from her Sunday School class

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin (Image from my family’s personal collection)

In January 1876, my great-grandmother Elizabeth Sargent (b. 15 September 1854 in Northampton, England) was given an autograph book by her Jersey City, New Jersey, Sunday School class. She was 21 years old and evidently was a teacher to students not much younger than she. This was six-and-a-half years before she married widower William Trewin and became a second mother to his two sons, Bert (10) and Clarence (12). My grandmother Zillah arrived in June 1883, 11 months after they walked down the aisle. I have written numerous posts about both these families so if you are new to this blog and want to know more about them, it’s here! Just use the search box, or scroll down a bit and click on the relevant link in the directory on the left side of this page.

This autograph album captures autographs she acquired over the years and includes a couple of entries made by my mother who was 3 when Elizabeth died in February 1926.

Some of the entries are very faded, and I have tried to adjust those for some degree of readability. The entries that stand out to me are those made by family members:

Lulu Ludey, a niece by marriage, who wrote on November 26, 1885, at age 10: “Aunt Lizzie – When you are Old and Drinking your tea, put on your specs and Think of me. Your niece, Lulu Ludey”

Betty Boles, granddaughter, who wrote on November 27, 1933, at age 10: “For get me not. The violet loves a sunny bank, The cowslip loves the lea – The scarlet creeper loves the elm. But I love only thee. Your loving Granddaughter, Betty Boles”

Elizabeth Sargent’s autograph album (From my family’s personal collection)

Albert (Bert) Trewin, stepson, wrote on April 12, 1883, at not quite age 11: “Mamma, Lost yesterday somewhere between sunrise and sunset two golden hours each filled with sixty golden minutes, No reward is offered for they are gone forever. Your son, B. Trewin”

Zillah Trewin, daughter, who wrote in 1892, at age 9: “Mama – When after years when this you see I wonder what your name will be, Yours truly, Zillah Trewin”

Betty Boles, granddaughter, wrote in January 1933, at age 9: “Roses are red, Violets are blue, Sugar is sweet, and so are you. With love your granddaughter, Betty Boles”

Zillah Trewin, daughter, wrote on January 2, 1897, at age 14: “Dear Mama, Six little words I have for thee, Be happy and think of me. From your loving daughter, Zillah M. Trewin”

I “got lost” in this little album yesterday and must say reading through the entries lifted my spirits. Apart from my 96-year-old mother, all of these people are long long gone, and yet they seem very near to me today.

Presented to Miss Sargent by her Sunday School Class as a token of love. January 1876

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Categories: Boles, Heirlooms, Jersey City, Hudson Co., Memorabilia, New Jersey, Sargent, Trewin | Tags: , , , , | 8 Comments

A Florida Friday: Arcadia — old rodeo town & antiques graveyard where resurrections occur daily

Last month we drove an hour northeast of here to visit the historic town of Arcadia (population about 8,000). We’d driven through there before on a few occasions, stopping for lunch but never sticking around to check out all the antique stores—something for which Arcadia is famous. I must say, I am not a big antiques shopper, but I have never in my life seen so many antiques and so many vintage items and so much crazy STUFF!

We got there pretty early and after perusing a few cavernous antiques malls, had a delicious lunch at Mary Margaret’s Tea and Biscuit Restaurant where the wait staff dresses in period outfits. When it was time for dinner, we stopped at the Magnolia Street Seafood and Grill Restaurant, which is the top-rated place in town. It did not disappoint; in fact, it was honestly some of the best seafood I’ve had; the hush puppies were amazing.

In our wanderings, I saw loads and loads of old unlabelled photos and CDVs—I know this is a common phenomenon all over the country, but that kind of thing saddens me to no end.

However, there was a bright spot in all this lost family history since I was able to reunite one massive mid-nineteenth-century family Bible that originally belonged to a Long Island Civil War veteran with a living descendant I tracked down via Ancestry.com.  I connected him with the shop owner, and for $50, this Bible (complete with loads of handwritten names in the middle under Births/Marriages/Deaths) was heading back into that family. I felt good about that, and it wasn’t hard to do, so I am glad I made the effort. The last family member to own it died in 1986, so it had been floating around “out there” in the universe for quite some time.

The only other thing I saw that was actually labelled was the below wedding photo of Mae and Victor Falsitta. I found someone I believe to be a descendant on Ancestry, but they never responded to my message. Perhaps, someone will find the photo here. I do remember which shop I saw it in, so any Falsitta family member reading this, feel free to contact me.

Plenty of people were shopping and buying, giving lots of old items a fresh start with a new owner. By and large, shoppers were on the older side, which is understandable. However, I could not help but wonder what will become of all this stuff once those of us over a certain age are no longer around. But that’s neither here nor there, really. Some other stuff will eventually replace all of this stuff or add to it. (Somehow I can’t imagine these places being even more packed.)

What did I buy? Just a few cookie cutters and a couple of kitchen gadgets that intrigued me. I learned that my grandmother’s mouli grater is not one of a kind, nor is my Dad’s old cake cutter. My grandmother’s old meat grinder that we use every Christmas to make cranberry and orange relish also has plenty of “siblings”… So anyone out there with a particular nostalgia about a certain item has a pretty good chance of finding it, or one like it, in Arcadia.

State of Florida; base map – 1940 (Library of Congress digital ID: http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gmd/g3930.ct000499)

Arcadia is packed with history, and all these antiques stores are mini-museums and an education in themselves. I would definitely recommend a visit; its an old town with that old Florida feel—something you don’t get to experience much when you stick to the coastal towns and cities in the southern part of the state. Arcadia is also famous for being a rodeo town. The first one took place in 1928 as a fundraiser to get a building constructed. The most recent rodeo event was held earlier this  month and attracts fans and competitors from all over the US. Perhaps, we will try to go next year just to have that experience.

Anyway, happy Friday, everyone! Here are some photos from our travels…

Categories: Arcadia, Florida, Memorabilia | Tags: , , | 8 Comments

Antique “Dingman’s, Pa.” souvenir

Those out there with Dingman roots may want to weigh in on whose image this is on an old souvenir trinket box. Could it be Judge Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862), or someone farther back in the family tree? His father Andrew Dingman Jr. (1753-1839)? Or grandfather Andrew Dingman Sr. (1711-1796)?

Dingman_souvenir2 Dingman_souvenir

Categories: Dingman, Dingmans Ferry, Memorabilia, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | Tags: | 1 Comment

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