Pennsylvania

Reunion news — De Puy and Brodhead families

The Stroud Mansion. Built by Jacob Stroud, city’s founder and Revolutionary War Colonel, for his eldest son John in 1795. The Stroud Family lived in it until 1893, and in 1921 it became the Historical Society’s headquarters. Image and caption from: Wikimedia Commons. Photo taken and uploaded by User Jerrye & Roy Klotz, MD, on 19 February 2008.

The next annual reunion of the DePuy and Brodhead families is scheduled for 9AM, Saturday, August 25, at the Monroe County (PA) Historical Association (a.k.a. the Stroud Mansion).

According to the De Puy / Brodhead Family Association, which is holding the event, as many as four guest speakers will address attendees. The Monroe County Historical Association Curator will take guests on a private tour that will include a Special Collections Presentation of General Daniel Brodhead’s uniform. Other activities are hoped for/being planned. An optional activity may be on offer for the day before (Friday).

For full information, please contact: depuy dot brodhead dot family dot assoc @ gmail dot com.

 

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Categories: Brodhead, De Puy (De Pui), Miscellaneous, Monroe Co., Pennsylvania | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Hon. Albert Gallatin Brodhead house in Jim Thorpe, PA

Albert Gallatin Brodhead portrait, *between p. 260 and p. 261 of Historic Homes and Institutions and Genealogical and Personal Memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, PA – published in 1905

Coincidentally, I came upon this house while looking for another: the Jim Thorpe (previously known as Mauch Chunk) home of the Honorable Albert Gallatin Brodhead (1815-1891). It’s a beautiful three-story Victorian brick home that has a wonderful tiered rear garden. The verbiage written by the realtor mentions that the home was initially in the possession of the Lockhart family; a Lockhart daughter married a son of Asa Packer.

To view the home, click here.

For more about Albert, please see this post.

I don’t know how long the photos will linger online. The house was sold so the listing is inactive. If you want to save copies for your own personal use, better to do so sooner rather than later.

 

 

 

Categories: Brodhead, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Pennsylvania | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

Garret Brodhead’s Wheat Plains Farm in Pike Co., PA, needs your support

"Wheat Plains," the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

Circa 1900: “Wheat Plains,” the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

The sad state of the Wheat Plains house

2016: The sad state of the Wheat Plains house – victim of the Tocks Island Dam project

Hello, Brodhead descendants & anyone with an interest in Pennsylvania history! You may not be aware of an important project that could greatly use your support: the restoration of Wheat Plains Farm in Pike County, Pennsylvania, the old Garret Brodhead (1730-1804) family homestead that Brodhead family members were forced to abandon in the 1970s due to the Tocks Island Dam project. Below is a letter just received from James and Barbara Brodhead who are spearheading the DePuy-Brodhead Family Association’s efforts to restore the home (now managed by the National Park Service). So please take a few moments to read the below letter and see if you can lend your support. PS: Next summer’s DePuy-Brodhead Family Association annual reunion is likely to be held there; it would be extremely positive if as many Brodhead descendants as possible made the effort to be there to show the NPS that the home’s fate is of concern to many, not just a few. I hope to be there—a great opportunity to support a great cause and meet cousins of all kinds.

 

Dear Family,

As many of you know, some members of the DePuy/Brodhead Family Association have been working with the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area to preserve the Wheat Plains house. Wheat Plains is the farm started by Garret Brodhead on the land he received as partial payment for his service in the Revolutionary War. From 1790 the farm was owned by the Brodhead family until it was sold to Cornelius Swartout in 1871. Robert Packer Brodhead purchased back the farm in 1896 and his descendants remained there until the 1970’s when the land was acquired by eminent domain as part of the Tocks Island Dam Project. The Army Corp of Engineers headed the project. Later the Army Corp of Engineers determined that the river bed would not support the dam. The land then was transferred to the National Parks Service (NPS) who now manages the property. There are currently about 700 buildings remaining in the park on both sides of the Delaware River. Some have historical significance and most have sentimental value. Many buildings are in poor condition. Wheat Plains is structurally sound and it sits in a prominent place on highway 209.

The Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (DWGNRA) is developing a long range plan to identify which buildings should be restored, maintained, or removed. The NPS has limited funds to do this work. Included in their consideration is the cost of maintenance and what the long term usage of the structure will be. Without a defined usage the preservation efforts will be limited.

Now to get to the purpose of this letter. We have been encouraged to send letters to the Superintendent of the DWGNRA and express our interest and support of preserving Wheat Plains or other structures. Please write a politely worded letter expressing your personal interest in preserving Wheat Plains farmhouse and property. Please include personal memories and historical facts that you have. If you have ideas for the usage for the house, (i.e. museum, vacation rental, etc.) please include that also. These letters need to be sent by the end of the year in order to be included in the evaluation process. The sooner the letters arrive the better. The Association created a good impression when we helped clean the house in 2015. It showed the NPS how much we care and your letter will add to that.

When writing your letter please remember that the NPS had nothing to do with taking the land; they were given the task of maintaining it. Please keep your letter kind and considerate.

Please address your letter to:
John J. Donahue, Superintendent
Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area &
Middle Delaware National Scenic and Recreational River
1978 River Road
Bushkill, PA 18324

Please also send copies of your letter to the following at the address above or email a copy to the addresses
given below:
Judson Kratzer – Judson_Kratzer@NPS.gov
Jennifer Kavanaugh – Jennifer_Kavanaugh@NPS.gov

We are in the initial stages of organizing a “Friends of Wheat Plains” non-profit org. to collect donations to help support the preservation of Wheat Plains. More information coming.

We sincerely thank you,
James and Barbara Brodhead
425-418-4742

Categories: Brodhead, Delaware Water Gap, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

March 1888: Luke Brodhead’s collection of Indian relics stolen

In my travels, I came across the below article about the theft of Luke Wills Brodhead’s collection of Indian artifacts, and it reminded me that I should consolidate some information I’ve gathered about him into a blog post. He was a very interesting man and must have been a powerful presence in his community in and around Delaware Water Gap. Autumn is here and soon the colors will be changing in that neck of the woods—a gorgeous spot on the Delaware River that he and his family held dear. Long gone are the massive summer hotels looking down from high above at the flowing waters and rolling hills. City folk have far more places to vacation now. But, this was once a hugely popular area for tourism, and Luke was in the thick of if. Seeing images from that time and his portrait (he and his brothers were extremely tall), I can almost envision him energetically walking about his hotel’s grounds, chatting with guests, and directing his staff on various matters. And then to think of all his historical interests and writings…he was truly a class act!

Philadelphia Enquirer, Wednesday, 12 September 1888*

Luke Wills Brodhead

Luke Wills Brodhead portrait from History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania, by Alfred Mathews, published by RT Peck & Co., 1886

BRODHEAD’S COLLECTION. Stolen Indian Relics Traced to a European Museum.
TRENTON, Sept. 11.—The most remarkable and curious robbery on record has just been made known. It occurred at the Delaware Water Gap last March, when the celebrated collection of Indian relics and specimens of the stone age, which L. W. Brodhead spent a lifetime in gathering, were carried away. The most peculiar feature about this robbery was the fact that only the most valuable specimens were taken, and that the work was done by a student and expert.

Mr. Brodhead is well known all over the country for his excellent collection, and one that would command an immense sum of money even under a forced sale. Mr. Brodhead keeps a hotel. Adjoining his own private parlor he has a library, the chief decorations of which are his arrow heads, axes, spears, rollers, javelins, pipes and bits of ancient pottery. With much care they have been arranged in groups. The arrow heads are tacked on white boards in groups, according to chronology or topography. He takes much pride in showing them to friends. Last winter the side shutter was forced open and the cases rifled and about one-third of the collection was taken away. The most valuable and rarest pieces were taken.

After the blizzard snow had melted away in a ravine near the house, the boards on which they were fastened were found. A detective was employed on the case, and he enjoined secrecy on all members of the household. The relics have been traced to England and are now thought to be in the possession of the officers of a museum. It is also thought that the man, who sold them for a handsome sum, will soon be apprehended. He is said to be a man well known in scientific circles, who acts as a purchasing agent for several European museums.

Luke Wills Brodhead bio from Transactions of the Moravian Historical Society by Moravian Historical Society, published 1900, pp. 38-39

Luke Wills Brodhead was born Sept. 12, 1821, in Smithfield Township, Monroe County, Penna. His parents were Luke and Elizabeth Wills Brodhead; his grandfather was Luke, one of the sons of Daniel Brodhead and his wife Esther Wyngart, who lived in Dansbury, now East Stroudsburg, whither they had come from Marbletown, N. Y. […]

ny_evening_express_1867

New York Express 1867

Luke Wills Brodhead, at an early age, engaged in mercantile business at White Haven for twelve years ; returning to the Delaware Water Gap, he was appointed Postmaster there and, at the end of his term of office, he shared with his brother the management of the Kittatinny House.

In 1872 he built the Water Gap House, which he conducted until the time of his death.

Kittatinny Hotel, Delaware Water Gap, published by Detroit Publishing Company, 1898 (NYPL collections) - Wikimedia Commons

Kittatinny Hotel, Delaware Water Gap, published by Detroit Publishing Company, 1898 (NYPL collections) – Wikimedia Commons – Public domain in US

He was a man of more than ordinary ability and, by his genial personality, he made his house famous throughout the land.

He devoted much time and energy to the study of the records, historical and geological, of the Minnisink Valley, was a frequent contributor to the public press and in 1862 wrote a volume concerning the Delaware Water Gap.

Water Gap House, Detroit Publishing Company, 1905 (Illinois State Library Collections - non-commercial use permitted)

Water Gap House, Detroit Publishing Company, 1905 (Illinois State Library Collections – non-commercial use permitted)

He was a member of the Moravian Historical Society, the Historical Societies of Pennsylvania, Minnesota, Georgia and Kansas, the Minnisink Historical Society and the Numismatic and the Geographical Societies of Philadelphia. He was also a member of the Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revolution.

Mr. Brodhead was twice married – in October, 1850, to Leonora Snyder, who departed in 1877, and in 1881 to Margaret D. Coolbaugh. His son, Dr. Cicero Brodhead, died in 1884, and two daughters, Mrs. John Ivison, of Coatesville, and Mrs. H. A. Croasdale, of Delaware Water Gap, together with his widow survive him.

He was an active and interested member of the Presbyterian Church and by his modest, generous, unselfish and courteous manner he made hosts of friends.

View on roof of Water Gap House by Albert Graves - stereocard -no known copyright restrictions - Boston Public Library collections

View on roof of Water Gap House by Albert Graves – stereocard -no known copyright restrictions – Boston Public Library collections

For some years he had been suffering from chronic bronchitis, although his final illness was very brief. He died on May 7, 1902, and his remains were laid to rest in the Water Gap Cemetery.

[Find a Grave link to grave site]

Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XXVII, Philadelphia: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1903, p. 447-228

[…] Luke W. Brodhead was a man of more than ordinary ability, and for many years was deeply interested in the history and genealogy of the Upper Delaware and Minisink Valley. His published contributions comprise the following:

The Kittatiny House and the Water Gap House - Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

The Kittatiny House and the Water Gap House – Detroit Publishing Co., ca 1900 – Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

“The Delaware Water Gap: Its Scenery, its Legends, and its Early History;” “The Minisinks and its Early People, the Indians;” “An Ancient Petition;” ” Tatamy;” “Settlement of Smithfield;” “Portals of the Minisink: Tradition and History of the ‘Walking Purchase’ Region and the Gateway of the Delaware;” “Early Frontier Life in Pennsylvania: Efficient Military Service of Four Brothers;” “George Lebar;” “Historical Notes of the Minisinks: Capture of John Hilborn by the Indians on Brodhead’s Creek;” “Pioneer Roads, the Old Mine Road, Early People, etc.;” ” The Old Stone Seminary of Stroudsburg in 1815;” “Indian Trails;” “Soldiers in the War of 1812 from the Townships of Smithfield and Stroud;” “Almost a Cetenarian: The Last of the Soldiers of the War of 1812 in Northern Pennsylvania;” “History of the Old Bell on the School­-House at Delaware Water Gap;” “Indian Graves at Pahaquarra;” “Half-Century of Journalism;” “The Depuy Family;” “Early Settlement of the Delaware: Was the Upper Delaware occupied before Philadelphia? Early Occupation of the Upper Delaware;” “Sketches of the Stroud, Van Campen, McDowell, Hyndshaw, Drake, and Brodhead Families.” He was also associate editor of the “History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties.”

In addition to his connection with the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Mr. Brodhead was a member of the Numismatic and Antiquary Society, the Geographical Society, and the Pennsylvania Society Sons of the Revolution, of Philadelphia; the Minisink Valley Historical Society, the Moravian Historical Society, the Georgia Historical Society, the Kansas Historical Society, and several college literary societies.

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Links
Antoine Dutot Museum and Gallery
Spanning the GapPDF newsletter – US Dept of the Interior National Park Service
NJ Skylands “Million dollar highway” by Robert Kopenhaven
Pocono history website

*Article from http://www.fultonhistory.com

Categories: Brodhead, Delaware Water Gap, Pennsylvania | Tags: , | 6 Comments

Antique “Dingman’s, Pa.” souvenir

Those out there with Dingman roots may want to weigh in on whose image this is on an old souvenir trinket box. Could it be Judge Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862), or someone farther back in the family tree? His father Andrew Dingman Jr. (1753-1839)? Or grandfather Andrew Dingman Sr. (1711-1796)?

Dingman_souvenir2 Dingman_souvenir

Categories: Dingman, Dingmans Ferry, Memorabilia, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | Tags: | 1 Comment

More on Lewis D. Brodhead (1884-1933)

Brodhead_LD_obitAmong the newspaper clippings saved by my grandmother was this brief article, likely from the Elizabeth Daily Journal, that reports the death of her brother-in-law Lewis Dingman Brodhead on December 8, 1933. It provides a bit more information than the one from the New York Times I’d mentioned previously in this post. And the new details tell us that my Great Uncle Lewis died fairly immediately of a heart attack at the corner of 4th and Trumball Streets, Elizabeth, NJ, in the plant belonging to the American Swiss File and Tool Company. He was pronounced dead by the arriving ambulance workers from Alexian Brothers Hospital. His body was taken to the morgue at 628 Newark Avenue, a building that now looks abandoned and in need of repair.

This property at 400-416 Trumball Street looks like it could definitely have been there in the 1930s, so perhaps this building was once the plant in which Uncle Lewis worked.

It’s sad to think of him leaving his house at 520 Jefferson Avenue that morning, never to return again. He was just 50. The house he lived in, built in 1902, is a multi-family home today and it may have been multi-family back then as well. He lived with his widowed mother Margaret Martin Brodhead, and I can only imagine the shock she and everyone felt at this sudden, unexpected loss.

Interesting, but not surprising, the article makes no mention of Lewis’s wife Mildred Hancock whose last known whereabouts were Pottsville, Pennsylvania, where she and Lewis resided in the 1920s. I assume they divorced, and then all mentions of Mildred were swept under the carpet. Some day I hope to find out what happened to her.

Brodhead_Lewis_Pottsville2

Categories: Brodhead, Death, Elizabeth, Union Co., Obituaries, Pottsville Schuylkill Co | Tags: | 2 Comments

‘Brodhead Memorial Gateway,’ Evergreen Cemetery – Jim Thorpe, PA

Brodhead_Gate_EvergreenCemetery_JimThorpePA

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in Flemington, NJ, 1904

This pretty entrance with its ornate, wrought-iron arch overhead greets visitors to Evergreen Cemetery in Jim Thorpe (formerly known as Mauch Chunk), Carbon Co., Pennsylvania. And what special gates they are. I am missing page 1 of the accompanying article, but if you read down you will come to discover that these distinctive pillars and gates were given to the cemetery in 1913 by the nine surviving Brodhead children to honor the memory of their parents, Andrew Jackson Brodhead & Ophelia Easton.

A plaque on the left pillar says ‘Brodhead Memorial Gateway, erected 1913.’ (For a close-up look at the plaque, you can view this Instagram image.) If page 1 of the article ever surfaces, I will include it here; unfortunately I don’t know what paper it appeared in—the two pieces I do have are very old and beginning to disintegrate.

Enjoy the article and learning more about how these gates came to be. And, have a good Monday!
Brodhead_Cemetery_gatesBrodhead_cemetery_gates_2

Categories: Brodhead, Evergreen Cemetery Jim Thorpe PA, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Pennsylvania | 2 Comments

Andrew Jackson Brodhead & Ophelia Easton golden wedding anniversary in 1895

Today, I’m sharing a recent, very happy discovery: the commemorative brochure for the December 31, 1895, Golden Wedding Anniversary celebration of Andrew Jackson Brodhead and Ophelia Easton. The contents were written by their youngest child Richard Henry Brodhead who was 31 at the time. It is wonderful to hear him write so warmly about his parents and siblings—a very close-knit family of 12, greatly expanded by 1895 to include spouses and 27 grandchildren.

(For my original post about their anniversary, click here. Another post about their 1845 New Year’s Eve wedding can be found by clicking here.) Enjoy, and have a good Monday.

Brodhead_AJ_anniversary1 001 copy

Brodhead_AJ_anniversary2 001 copy

Brodhead_AJ_anniversary3 001 copy

Categories: Brodhead, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe) | 6 Comments

Blooming Grove Park, Pike Co., PA (Post 3)

Blooming Grove Park

“Blooming Grove Park—The American Fontainebleau” (Image from my personal copy of Harper’s Weekly, December 17, 1870)

This past June I did a post on an 1891 Brodhead hunting expedition in Blooming Grove Park, Pike Co., Pennsylvania (and a subsequent follow-up). I just realized, while leafing through the December 17, 1870, Harper’s Weekly newspaper that contained the great scenes from Blooming Grove, that I failed to include in my post the accompanying article about this private 12,000-plus-acre hunting and fishing club. So, I will include it here now. It’s interesting (and good) to see how even back then, conservation was on people’s minds. You have to wonder what may have happened to all that land had it not fallen under the club’s protection.

As for the article, I had to chuckle when I read that the train took “only” 4.5 hrs to get to Blooming Grove from NYC, a distance of some 87 miles that is described as being one of the Park’s great advantages, which indeed it was at that time—and still is today. While Blooming Grove is still private/members-only, that part of Pennsylvania offers many other areas that are freely accessible to outdoors-lovers. We are still hoping to get up there next summer for some trout fishing and family-history-hunting expeditions.

BloomGrove_article

A clipping of the article on Blooming Grove from my personal copy of Harper’s Weekly, December 17, 1870

Categories: Brodhead, Fishing, Hunting, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | Tags: | 5 Comments

1907 elopement: Momma Brodhead outfoxed by determined daughter

Louise & G. Welles VanCampen, 1908 copy

G. Welles Van Campen & Louise (Lulu) Brodhead, 1907; From personal family archives of John Ford. Used with permission.

The topic of eloping is not new to this blog. I’ve done several posts about late 19th- and early 20th-century ancestors in our family tree dashing off to marry their special someone in a “damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead” spirit. I eloped myself, so I can relate. However, while today, for many, it’s all about keeping things simple, back then, it was  an activity that could definitely land you on page one of your local paper, or even on front pages of papers around the country. I still find it astounding that when I search the absolutely vast newspaper archives of Genealogy Bank for images of any Brodheads, only three appear, and one of them is the one-and-only Mildred Hancock at the time of her 1911 elopement with my great-uncle Lewis D. Brodhead. Yes, if you eloped back in those days, you would definitely get yourself noticed!

The September 1, 2001, article “Elopement Feared” by Terry Schulman noted: The generation of 1900, caught up in the rebellious spirit of the new age, seemed much more willing to disobey parents where matters of the heart were concerned. Mildred and Lewis are great examples! And, so are the subjects of this post.

One of this blog’s readers, John Ford, recently shared with me the details of his grandmother Louise (Lida, Lulu) R. Brodhead’s daring 1907 elopement with G. Welles Van Campen, and kindly offered to let me include the story in this blog. (John and I have Garret Brodhead (1733-1804) as our common ancestor, however, he is a descendant of Garret’s first wife/partner Cornelia Schoonhoven, and I am a descendant of Garret’s wife Jane Davis (see tree below).)

In this case, news of the elopement made it at least to one Philadelphia paper. This was likely thanks to the fact that Louise’s mom Mary Brodhead went after the pair in hot pursuit, in an attempt to thwart the impromptu nuptials. The drama played out along the Pennsylvania side of the Delaware River between Bushkill and Matamoras, and ended in Sparrowbush, NY, just outside Port Jervis. It’s not hard to picture in your mind the emotions that likely unfolded on that fateful November day as horses and buggies made a beeline for the PA/NY line… New York was a safe spot to elope back then, although that changed a year later when the Cobb marriage-license law went into effect. Its purpose in part appears to have been to quell the surge of cross-border elopements, and elopements in general. (See Harper’s Weekly article for more info.)

map

The story was recounted six decades later on the occasion of the couple’s 60th anniversary, and the second account is more detailed than the first and offers a bit of conflicting information on how things “went down.” Chalk that up to the sands of time sweeping a few changes across the memory trail, or the fact that the original article took some artistic license. Either way, it is quite a fun story, one that certainly livens up a family’s history and is interesting to recount from one generation to the next.

As you read the articles, bear in mind what John told me about Mom Mary, who with husband Daniel Van Etten Brodhead ran a successful farm and later a boarding house business in Bushkill: She was a feisty and very independent woman…  She loved to drive a fast horse and had an ex-trotter as her favorite buggy horse. 

Enjoy the story, and thanks again to John for contributing it! If anyone out there wants to contact John, he can be reached at “candjford1 at verizon dot net.”

Original Elopement Article1

Clipping from the Philadelphia North American newspaper, issue dated 29 November 1907 – From personal family archives of John Ford. Used with permission.

Mary (Schoonover) Brodhead (1865-1948), Bushkill, PA. Photo taken circa 1939. From personal family archives of John Ford. Used with permission.

Mary (Schoonover) Brodhead (1865-1948), Bushkill, PA. Photo taken circa 1939. From personal family archives of John Ford. Used with permission.

Elopement Article1

Article transcribed here due to low resolution issues; From personal family archives of John Ford. Used with permission.

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The Pocono Record, The Stroudsburgs, PA, Friday, 24 November 1967

Impulsive Elopement Leads to Sixty Years of Marriage

The warmth and quiet of the Van Campen home, 150 Washington St., east Stroudsburg, as they prepared to celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary on Thanksgiving Day was a far cry from their original wedding day on that chill November 23, 1907, when G. Welles Can Campen and Lulu Brodhead eloped.

They hadn’t planned to be married that day at all. Lulu Brodhead, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Brodhead of Bushkill, was teaching school and her mother thought that she ought to wait until Spring before marrying that daring young road tester for the Mathewson Motor Car, made in Wilkes Barre. At least in the Spring they would both be 21.

330px-Tam-o-shanters

Tartan tam o’ shanters. Wikipedia.

Mrs. Brodhead was in Dingmans Ferry when Van Campen came calling in his hired livery rig. He suggested that, with her father’s approval, she ride with him to Dingmans to join her mother. Slipping on a man’s coat against the November chill and her blue tamoshanter [hat – see image inset], she set out with him.

When her mother met them on the road, she jumped to the conclusion that they were eloping and ordered them to follow her home under no uncertain terms. Rebelliously, they decided since she’s suggested the idea of an elopement, they’d carry it through.

The only place they could marry without a license was in New York State. Meanwhile, Mrs. Brodhead had discovered the innocence of their errand, and knowing how her scolding might have affected them, set out in pursuit.

With the carriage across the road, she tried to block their way to Matamoras but they managed to get by and side by side they raced down the streets of Matamoras. She beat them to block the bridge entrance.

Nothing daunted, they turned down a side road which ended at the river, rented a boat, bailed it out and rowed to the other side, landing in a bramble patch. They found a young English minister in Sparrowbush to marry the bedraggled pair and returned home.

Mrs. Brodhead, whose heart was as warm as her temper, was quick to give in, kissed them, and they lived happily ever after.

And, usefully. They have four children living: Mrs. Walter Ford of Maryland; Daniel, California; Allen of Philadelphia and Bernard of East Stroudsburg. They have eight grandchildren and 10 [?] great grandchildren.

They plan to spend their anniversary having Thanksgiving with a daughter, Jeanie Tonkey, in Easton.

Of course, Mr. Van Campen plans to drive. He probably has driven longer than any local resident. He was a road tester for the Mathewson Car Co. in Wilkes Barre starting in 1904 and continuing until they produced their last car in 1912.

He recalled that he used to drive over a dirt road to Blakeslee to test he cars on the only hard road in the county, and experimental road from Blakeslee to Pocono Summit.

He spent a total of 32 years in the automobile business and they also operated a resort hotel. As chief of Civil Defense, he was active in flood relief during the 1955 flood in the Bushkill area where they lived for most of their married life.

In 63 years of driving he has never scratched a car on the highway.

Mrs. Van Campen is a member of the Bushkill Garden Club, the Jacob Stroud Chapter of the DAR and the Seventh Day Adventist Church.

Both are descendants of pioneer families in this area. Mrs. Van Campen’s father was named for Daniel Brodhead, pioneer settler of East Stroudsburg.

Mr. Van Campen is the great-great-grandson of Col. Abram Van Campen whose homestead in Pahaquarry Twp. Is part of the historical treasures of the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area.

*****************************************************************************************************

FAMILY TREE

1-Lt. Garret Brodhead b. 21 Jan 1733, Marbletown Ulster Co NY, d. 5 Sep 1804, Stroudsburg Monroe Co PA, bur. Dansbury Cemetery, Stroudsburg, Monroe Co., PA
+Cornelia Schoonhoven b. Abt Jan 1733, Minisink, N.J, d. After 2 Feb 1771
|—–2-Garret Brodhead Jr. b. 20 Mar 1756, d. 21 Sep 1835, Dingmans Ferry
| Northampton Co PA, bur. Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
+Affe Decker b. 19 Oct 1759, Northampton Co PA, d. 15 May 1840, Dingmans Ferry Northampton Co PA, bur. Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
|—–3-Nicholas Brodhead b. Delaware Twp., Pike Co., PA
+Margaret Owens b. 22 Mar 1800, Newfoundland, NJ d. 9 Apr 1873
|—–4-David Owen Brodhead b. 24 Jul 1824, d. 31 Jan 1911, bur. Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
+Maria Van Etten b. 21 Mar 1832, d. 24 Jan 1916, bur.
Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
|—–5-Daniel Van Etten Brodhead b. 21 Sept 1858, Delaware Twp, Pike Co., PA, d. 25 Jun 1941 Bushkill, Pike Co., PA
| +Mary Schoonover b. 28 Nov 1865, Bushkill, Pike Co., PA, d. 5 Oct 1948, Bushkill, Pike Co., PA
| |—–6-Louise Rex Brodhead b. 20 Jan 1887, Bushkill, Lehman Twp, Pike Co., PA. d. 1 Jul 1974, St. Michaels, MD
| | +George Welles Van Campen b. Mar. 2, 1887, Dorancetown, PA, d. Feb. 5, 1972, East Stroudsburg, PA

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Obituary of Mary Brodhead (Provided by John Ford. No newspaper or date indicated, but probably in the East Stroudsburg or Stroudsburg paper):

Mary Brodhead, one of the best known residents of the Bushkill section of Pike county, passed away at the General Hospital, East Stroudsburg, on Oct. 6 at 4:30 p. m., after being hospitalized one month. She had been in ill health the past year. Deceased was the widow of the late Daniel V. Brodhead, who preceded her in death seven years ago. They conducted the Brodhead boarding house for over 36 years. Mrs. Brodhead was endeared to all who knew her by her gentle and friendly character and by her human interest in the joys and sorrows of her friends and family. She is survived by two daughters, Mrs G. Welles Van Campen of Bushkill and Mrs. Joseph F. Schultzback of Philadelphia; four grandchildren. and eight great grandchildren. Mrs. Brodhead was 82 years of age, and a member the Bushkill Reformed Church. Funeral services were strictly private. Interment was made in Bushkill Cemetery.

Ford Family Recollections of Mary Brodhead (Provided by John Ford, in addition to what was shared above):
[…] She loved eels, caught from the river and whenever we (Walter, and sons John and David Ford) went fishing for bass in the Delaware, and caught an eel, we would bring it to her to fry up and eat. […] She was always trying something different on the farm such as trying to raise mushrooms in the basement on the farm (unsuccessfully). Mildred remembers her using a machine with an iron hopper and crank to grind up broken china to give to the chickens. When she and her husband were elderly, Pe-pa (husband Daniel) continued to reside in the farm-house/boarding house with daughter Louise, husband George Welles, and family. Me-ma resided in the house built by their daughter Helen and husband as a summer place on land given to them by Daniel and Mary across the creek between the old road and Route 209 and a little up the hill from the farm house.

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Ford Family Recollections of Louise Brodhead Van Campen (Provided by John Ford)

Louise […] finished high school and taught school in the Brodhead School near Bushkill for several years. […] Louise worked very hard when they had boarders at their boarding house and was an excellent cook – her raised biscuits and ginger snaps were favorites of the grandchildren. She used to like to fish and once, when a water snake went after a fish, she went after it with a shovel. They used to use the fireplace in the basement of the bungalow on the farm for heating water for washing and they would have large iron kettles on the bridge over the brook for the washing. They would host huge gatherings of their children and grandchildren at the farm for Thanksgiving and other Holidays when the numerous great grandchildren would roam the woods, play in the brook, fish in the river, etc. She was a very devout lady, belonging to the Methodist Church in East Stroudsburg and eventually became a Seventh Day Adventist. She was very kind, had a sweet smile and never an unkind word about anyone.

Categories: Brodhead, Bushkill, Dingmans Ferry, Matamoras, Van Campen | 6 Comments

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