Pennsylvania

1907 elopement: Momma Brodhead outfoxed by determined daughter

Louise & G. Welles VanCampen, 1908 copy

G. Welles Van Campen & Louise (Lulu) Brodhead, 1907; From personal family archives of John Ford. Used with permission.

The topic of eloping is not new to this blog. I’ve done several posts about late 19th- and early 20th-century ancestors in our family tree dashing off to marry their special someone in a “damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead” spirit. I eloped myself, so I can relate. However, while today, for many, it’s all about keeping things simple, back then, it was  an activity that could definitely land you on page one of your local paper, or even on front pages of papers around the country. I still find it astounding that when I search the absolutely vast newspaper archives of Genealogy Bank for images of any Brodheads, only three appear, and one of them is the one-and-only Mildred Hancock at the time of her 1911 elopement with my great-uncle Lewis D. Brodhead. Yes, if you eloped back in those days, you would definitely get yourself noticed!

The September 1, 2001, article “Elopement Feared” by Terry Schulman noted: The generation of 1900, caught up in the rebellious spirit of the new age, seemed much more willing to disobey parents where matters of the heart were concerned. Mildred and Lewis are great examples! And, so are the subjects of this post.

One of this blog’s readers, John Ford, recently shared with me the details of his grandmother Louise (Lida, Lulu) R. Brodhead’s daring 1907 elopement with G. Welles Van Campen, and kindly offered to let me include the story in this blog. (John and I have Garret Brodhead (1733-1804) as our common ancestor, however, he is a descendant of Garret’s first wife/partner Cornelia Schoonhoven, and I am a descendant of Garret’s wife Jane Davis (see tree below).)

In this case, news of the elopement made it at least to one Philadelphia paper. This was likely thanks to the fact that Louise’s mom Mary Brodhead went after the pair in hot pursuit, in an attempt to thwart the impromptu nuptials. The drama played out along the Pennsylvania side of the Delaware River between Bushkill and Matamoras, and ended in Sparrowbush, NY, just outside Port Jervis. It’s not hard to picture in your mind the emotions that likely unfolded on that fateful November day as horses and buggies made a beeline for the PA/NY line… New York was a safe spot to elope back then, although that changed a year later when the Cobb marriage-license law went into effect. Its purpose in part appears to have been to quell the surge of cross-border elopements, and elopements in general. (See Harper’s Weekly article for more info.)

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The story was recounted six decades later on the occasion of the couple’s 60th anniversary, and the second account is more detailed than the first and offers a bit of conflicting information on how things “went down.” Chalk that up to the sands of time sweeping a few changes across the memory trail, or the fact that the original article took some artistic license. Either way, it is quite a fun story, one that certainly livens up a family’s history and is interesting to recount from one generation to the next.

As you read the articles, bear in mind what John told me about Mom Mary, who with husband Daniel Van Etten Brodhead ran a successful farm and later a boarding house business in Bushkill: She was a feisty and very independent woman…  She loved to drive a fast horse and had an ex-trotter as her favorite buggy horse. 

Enjoy the story, and thanks again to John for contributing it! If anyone out there wants to contact John, he can be reached at “candjford1 at verizon dot net.”

Original Elopement Article1

Clipping from the Philadelphia North American newspaper, issue dated 29 November 1907 – From personal family archives of John Ford. Used with permission.

Mary (Schoonover) Brodhead (1865-1948), Bushkill, PA. Photo taken circa 1939. From personal family archives of John Ford. Used with permission.

Mary (Schoonover) Brodhead (1865-1948), Bushkill, PA. Photo taken circa 1939. From personal family archives of John Ford. Used with permission.

Elopement Article1

Article transcribed here due to low resolution issues; From personal family archives of John Ford. Used with permission.

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The Pocono Record, The Stroudsburgs, PA, Friday, 24 November 1967

Impulsive Elopement Leads to Sixty Years of Marriage

The warmth and quiet of the Van Campen home, 150 Washington St., east Stroudsburg, as they prepared to celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary on Thanksgiving Day was a far cry from their original wedding day on that chill November 23, 1907, when G. Welles Can Campen and Lulu Brodhead eloped.

They hadn’t planned to be married that day at all. Lulu Brodhead, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Brodhead of Bushkill, was teaching school and her mother thought that she ought to wait until Spring before marrying that daring young road tester for the Mathewson Motor Car, made in Wilkes Barre. At least in the Spring they would both be 21.

330px-Tam-o-shanters

Tartan tam o’ shanters. Wikipedia.

Mrs. Brodhead was in Dingmans Ferry when Van Campen came calling in his hired livery rig. He suggested that, with her father’s approval, she ride with him to Dingmans to join her mother. Slipping on a man’s coat against the November chill and her blue tamoshanter [hat – see image inset], she set out with him.

When her mother met them on the road, she jumped to the conclusion that they were eloping and ordered them to follow her home under no uncertain terms. Rebelliously, they decided since she’s suggested the idea of an elopement, they’d carry it through.

The only place they could marry without a license was in New York State. Meanwhile, Mrs. Brodhead had discovered the innocence of their errand, and knowing how her scolding might have affected them, set out in pursuit.

With the carriage across the road, she tried to block their way to Matamoras but they managed to get by and side by side they raced down the streets of Matamoras. She beat them to block the bridge entrance.

Nothing daunted, they turned down a side road which ended at the river, rented a boat, bailed it out and rowed to the other side, landing in a bramble patch. They found a young English minister in Sparrowbush to marry the bedraggled pair and returned home.

Mrs. Brodhead, whose heart was as warm as her temper, was quick to give in, kissed them, and they lived happily ever after.

And, usefully. They have four children living: Mrs. Walter Ford of Maryland; Daniel, California; Allen of Philadelphia and Bernard of East Stroudsburg. They have eight grandchildren and 10 [?] great grandchildren.

They plan to spend their anniversary having Thanksgiving with a daughter, Jeanie Tonkey, in Easton.

Of course, Mr. Van Campen plans to drive. He probably has driven longer than any local resident. He was a road tester for the Mathewson Car Co. in Wilkes Barre starting in 1904 and continuing until they produced their last car in 1912.

He recalled that he used to drive over a dirt road to Blakeslee to test he cars on the only hard road in the county, and experimental road from Blakeslee to Pocono Summit.

He spent a total of 32 years in the automobile business and they also operated a resort hotel. As chief of Civil Defense, he was active in flood relief during the 1955 flood in the Bushkill area where they lived for most of their married life.

In 63 years of driving he has never scratched a car on the highway.

Mrs. Van Campen is a member of the Bushkill Garden Club, the Jacob Stroud Chapter of the DAR and the Seventh Day Adventist Church.

Both are descendants of pioneer families in this area. Mrs. Van Campen’s father was named for Daniel Brodhead, pioneer settler of East Stroudsburg.

Mr. Van Campen is the great-great-grandson of Col. Abram Van Campen whose homestead in Pahaquarry Twp. Is part of the historical treasures of the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area.

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FAMILY TREE

1-Lt. Garret Brodhead b. 21 Jan 1733, Marbletown Ulster Co NY, d. 5 Sep 1804, Stroudsburg Monroe Co PA, bur. Dansbury Cemetery, Stroudsburg, Monroe Co., PA
+Cornelia Schoonhoven b. Abt Jan 1733, Minisink, N.J, d. After 2 Feb 1771
|—–2-Garret Brodhead Jr. b. 20 Mar 1756, d. 21 Sep 1835, Dingmans Ferry
| Northampton Co PA, bur. Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
+Affe Decker b. 19 Oct 1759, Northampton Co PA, d. 15 May 1840, Dingmans Ferry Northampton Co PA, bur. Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
|—–3-Nicholas Brodhead b. Delaware Twp., Pike Co., PA
+Margaret Owens b. 22 Mar 1800, Newfoundland, NJ d. 9 Apr 1873
|—–4-David Owen Brodhead b. 24 Jul 1824, d. 31 Jan 1911, bur. Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
+Maria Van Etten b. 21 Mar 1832, d. 24 Jan 1916, bur.
Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
|—–5-Daniel Van Etten Brodhead b. 21 Sept 1858, Delaware Twp, Pike Co., PA, d. 25 Jun 1941 Bushkill, Pike Co., PA
| +Mary Schoonover b. 28 Nov 1865, Bushkill, Pike Co., PA, d. 5 Oct 1948, Bushkill, Pike Co., PA
| |—–6-Louise Rex Brodhead b. 20 Jan 1887, Bushkill, Lehman Twp, Pike Co., PA. d. 1 Jul 1974, St. Michaels, MD
| | +George Welles Van Campen b. Mar. 2, 1887, Dorancetown, PA, d. Feb. 5, 1972, East Stroudsburg, PA

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Obituary of Mary Brodhead (Provided by John Ford. No newspaper or date indicated, but probably in the East Stroudsburg or Stroudsburg paper):

Mary Brodhead, one of the best known residents of the Bushkill section of Pike county, passed away at the General Hospital, East Stroudsburg, on Oct. 6 at 4:30 p. m., after being hospitalized one month. She had been in ill health the past year. Deceased was the widow of the late Daniel V. Brodhead, who preceded her in death seven years ago. They conducted the Brodhead boarding house for over 36 years. Mrs. Brodhead was endeared to all who knew her by her gentle and friendly character and by her human interest in the joys and sorrows of her friends and family. She is survived by two daughters, Mrs G. Welles Van Campen of Bushkill and Mrs. Joseph F. Schultzback of Philadelphia; four grandchildren. and eight great grandchildren. Mrs. Brodhead was 82 years of age, and a member the Bushkill Reformed Church. Funeral services were strictly private. Interment was made in Bushkill Cemetery.

Ford Family Recollections of Mary Brodhead (Provided by John Ford, in addition to what was shared above):
[…] She loved eels, caught from the river and whenever we (Walter, and sons John and David Ford) went fishing for bass in the Delaware, and caught an eel, we would bring it to her to fry up and eat. […] She was always trying something different on the farm such as trying to raise mushrooms in the basement on the farm (unsuccessfully). Mildred remembers her using a machine with an iron hopper and crank to grind up broken china to give to the chickens. When she and her husband were elderly, Pe-pa (husband Daniel) continued to reside in the farm-house/boarding house with daughter Louise, husband George Welles, and family. Me-ma resided in the house built by their daughter Helen and husband as a summer place on land given to them by Daniel and Mary across the creek between the old road and Route 209 and a little up the hill from the farm house.

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Ford Family Recollections of Louise Brodhead Van Campen (Provided by John Ford)

Louise […] finished high school and taught school in the Brodhead School near Bushkill for several years. […] Louise worked very hard when they had boarders at their boarding house and was an excellent cook – her raised biscuits and ginger snaps were favorites of the grandchildren. She used to like to fish and once, when a water snake went after a fish, she went after it with a shovel. They used to use the fireplace in the basement of the bungalow on the farm for heating water for washing and they would have large iron kettles on the bridge over the brook for the washing. They would host huge gatherings of their children and grandchildren at the farm for Thanksgiving and other Holidays when the numerous great grandchildren would roam the woods, play in the brook, fish in the river, etc. She was a very devout lady, belonging to the Methodist Church in East Stroudsburg and eventually became a Seventh Day Adventist. She was very kind, had a sweet smile and never an unkind word about anyone.

Categories: Brodhead, Bushkill, Dingmans Ferry, Matamoras, Van Campen | 2 Comments

Dingman/Brodhead link to a Dutch “pocket-book” that was 216 years old in 1876

Unknown Master, Dutch (active in the 1620s in Leiden) ; Still-Life with Books (Credit: Wikimedia Commons; uploaded by 'Jarekuploadbot')

Still-Life with Books, Unknown Master, Dutch (active in the 1620s in Leiden); (Credit: Wikimedia Commons; uploaded by ‘Jarekuploadbot’)

From Webster’s Complete Dictionary of the English Language (1886)

From Webster’s Complete Dictionary of the English Language (1886)

The Evening Gazette, Port Jervis, NY, April 29, 1876

The Evening Gazette, Port Jervis, NY, April 29, 1876 (Credit: Fulton History dot com)

If it still exists, the little ‘pocket-book’ mentioned in the accompanying newspaper clipping from the Port Jervis (NY) Evening Gazette, dated April 29, 1876, would be 355 years old, which would be pretty remarkable.

The ‘pocket-book’ had long been in the Dingman family until gifted by Andrew Dingman Jr. (1753-1839) to his grandson-son-in-law (my third great-grandfather) Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), who two years before his death gifted the item back to the Dingman family—specifically to ‘A.S. Dingman’. I believe this A. S. Dingman was probably Alfred Stoll Dingman (1839-1907), the elder Dingman’s great-grandson (and Garret’s nephew) who would have been about 31 at the time.

Garret was married to Cornelia Dingman, Judge Daniel Westbrook Dingman‘s daughter. Perhaps the pocket-book was a wedding gift.

Below you will find some background on each of the above as well as Andrew Dingman Sr., father of the aforementioned Andrew Jr.), who was the original Dingman who settled in the Pennsylvania wilderness in 1735 in what is now known as Dingman’s Ferry; and another Andrew Dingman (the Judge’s son and Alfred Stoll Dingman’s father).  (See the tree below.)

If you have access to Ancestry.com, you can view a wonderful photograph of Andrew Dingman Jr. in a group photo with his youngest son Isaac (Alfred’s brother), Isaac’s wife Charlotte, and the couple’s three daughters—Caroline, Melissa, and Helen. Also on Ancestry, you can view a portrait of Judge Daniel Westbrook Dingman who is mentioned in the article, the judge being the son of Andrew Sr. and the father of Andrew Jr. Interestingly one of the below bios mentions the Judge’s ‘corpulent’ size; the portrait on Ancestry of a young Daniel W. Dingman shows a man whose waistline has not yet expanded.

Accompanying images include two photos of waterfalls at the famous Dingmans Falls taken by my grandmother Zillah Trewin (no relation to the Brodheads/Dingmans) during her summer 1907 vacation, and present-day images of the old Dingman stone house (built in 1803-1804) and Dingman’s Ferry bridge (chartered in 1834) that were generously provided by James and Barbara Brodhead following a visit to that area in 2013. I have also included some newspaper clippings found on the Fulton History website; there is one anecdote about Judge Daniel W. Dingman’s handling of one case during which he uses language that would be considered completely inappropriate by today’s standards, and rightly so, of course, but I am including the anecdote here since it is part of history. If you can get beyond the language used, the punishment itself seems fair, if not generous for the crime committed.

So if you are interested in any of these family members, please get a ‘cuppa’ and read on! :-) (As always, comments, corrections, and additions are welcome.)

1-Andrew Dingman Sr. b. 11 Feb 1711, Kinderhook Albany Co NY, d. 1796,
Dingmans Ferry Northampton Co PA
+Cornelia Kermer b. 22 May 1720, New York, d. Pennsylvania, United States
|—–2-Andrew Dingman Jr. b. 19 Sep 1753, Northampton Co PA, d. 3 Feb 1839,
| Pike Co PA, bur. Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
+Jane Westbrook b. 9 Apr 1755, NJ, d. 21 Jan 1838, Dingmans Ferry Pike
Co PA, bur. Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
|—–3-Daniel Westbrook Dingman b. 28 Jul 1774, Walpack, Sussex, New
| Jersey, d. 14 Apr 1862, Pike Co PA, bur. Delaware Cemetery,
| Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
| +Mary Westbrook b. 8 Oct 1774, d. 26 Feb 1851, Dingmans Ferry Pike
| Co PA, bur. Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
| |—–4-Andrew Dingman b. 25 Dec 1804, Dingman family homestead, d.
| | 22 Mar 1889, bur. Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike
| | Co., PA
| | +Caroline Eliza Sayre b. 21 Oct 1804, d. 6 May 1885, bur.
| | Delaware Cemetery, Dingmans Ferry, Pike Co., PA
| | |—–5-Alfred Stoll Dingman (Aug 12, 1837-Jan 28, 1907; married Kate Van Auken; one child Walter)

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ANDREW DINGMAN SR. (1711-1796; married Cornelia Kermer):

History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania; Delaware Township, Chapter VIII, (Philadelphia: RT Peck & Co., 1886), pp. 908-909: The present township of Delaware is bounded on the north by Dingman township, on the east by the Delaware River and New Jersey, on the south by Lehman township and on the west by Porter. The first settlements on the Delaware River were made on the New Jersey side; but in or about the year 1735, Andreas Dingerman, or Andrew Dingman, as it is now written, crossed the Delaware and chose a place in the wilderness for his home, which he called “Dingman’s Choice,” a name which it still retains in local usage, although the post-office is called Dingman’s Ferry.

What the original ferry looked like (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

What the original ferry looked like; eventually the ferry was replaced by a bridge (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

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Original pulley from 1735 (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

When Andrew Dingman first crossed the river to make his habitation on the Pennsylvania side, he had an opportunity to make a choice, as he was the pioneer settler of Delaware township. If he was not the first, he was among the first, and is the first of whom we have authentic account. He certainly made an excellent choice of location for his future home, judging from present developments, for here the Delaware River flows close to the New Jersey hills and leaves a wide flat of rich bottom land on the Pennsylvania side. Here Dingman Creek bursts through the mountain bluffs after dashing over the rocks at the factory in a fall called the Factory Falls, and lower down is the “Bettie Brooks” or “Fulmer Falls.”

High Falls, Dingman's Falls, PA (CREDIT: Zillah Boles Trewin)

High Falls, Dingman’s Falls, PA, 1907  (CREDIT: Zillah Trewin)

Still farther down are the “Deer Leap” and “High Falls.” […]  Here, then, with a broad expanse of fertile river bottom land under his feet, with a creek that would supply water-power for grist and saw-mills flowing through it, surrounded by mountain bluffs, “rock-ribbed and ancient as the sun,” which environ it on two sides, he feasted his eyes upon the lavish bounty of Nature, in her primeval grandeur and magnificence, and inhaled the pure, health-giving air which floated around these mountains, “yet gorgeous in their primitive beauty, forest-crowned,” and intersected with gushing streams of limpid waters, which burst through the rocks from the highlands above in bold and beautiful waterfalls, where for ages they have been wearing deep and still deeper the steep gorges and rocky glens in her riven sides.

Deer Leap, Child's Park (Credit: Zillah Trewin, 1907)

Deer Leap, Child’s Park (Credit: Zillah Trewin, 1907)

Here, amid so much grandeur and beauty, Andrew Dingman made his choice and cut the first bush, built the first log cabin on the riverbank and put the first ferry-boat on the Delaware at what is now known as Dingman’s Ferry. Andrew Dingman was born at Kinderhook, New York, in the year 1711, and settled at Dingman’s Choice in the year 1735, or about that time. His first log cabin was down by the river-bank. About 1750, or some time previous to the French and Indian War, he built a stone house not far from where the Dingman “Reformed Church “now stands, on the site occupied by the house Fannie Dingman’s farmer occupies.

He had two sons, Isaac and Andrew Dingman, Jr., who was born September 19, 1753, in the old stone house which was destroyed during the French and Indian War, in 1755. Dingman immediately rebuilt another house. Mr. Dingman was endowed with a dauntless spirit and had now a farm, with orchards and barns. He was assisted in his labors by his two sons and four slaves. He established a traffic with the Indians, who often visited him, and from his friendly intercourse and dealing with the natives he derived considerable pecuniary advantage. In 1744 he obtained a warrant for the tract which now comprises a part of the M.W. Dingman estate, and in 1750 one for that lot on which the saw-mill at Dingman’s now stands. He subsequently took up, as it is termed, three other lots of land, the last in 1775. There were twenty-seven log and stone houses in Delaware as it was then, including Lehman and other territory west, contemporaneously with that of Andrew Dingman, Sr.

WEST (FRONT) AND SOUTH ELEVATIONS - Dutch Reformed Church, Dingmans Ferry, Pike County, PA (Credit: Library of Congress)

WEST (FRONT) AND SOUTH ELEVATIONS – Dutch Reformed Church, Dingmans Ferry, Pike County, PA (Credit: Library of Congress)

[…] Andrew Dingman built a flat-boat for ferrying purposes with a hand-axe, and it is probable that he built a grist-mill and saw-mill on Dingman’s Creek. An old grist-mill, with one “run” of native stones, stood near the present grist-mill. Judge Dingman used to tell his children about turning the bolt by hand while the miller ground the grist.*

[…] One of Andrew Dingman’s sons, Isaac, when about nineteen years of age, was riding a horse up the road to the barn and when a little north of the old Dingman Hotel (now Fulmer’s), an Indian, who was secreted in the orchard, shot him and ran away. His mother, who happened to be standing in the door holding the future judge, who was then four years of age, by the hand, exclaimed, “Law me, Isaac is shot!” He was mortally wounded, but they started across the river with him in a flat-boat. While they were going over he asked for a drink of water and shortly after died before they reached the Jersey shore, where there was a fort with one cannon. He was buried on the Jersey side, near the abutment of the old bridge.

ANDREW DINGMAN JR. (1753-1839; married Jane Westbrook )

History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886) – page 213-214: [...] …Andrew resided on the Jersey side of the Delaware, but subsequently removed to Dingman’s Ferry, where his father had made a beginning. He was captain of a company and served in the struggle for the independence of the colonies, and after living to see the country again engaged in a war with England in 1812, he survived many years thereafter, and died in 1839, at the age of eighty-three years.

His wife was Jane Westbrook, who bore him two children, — Daniel W. Dingman and Cornelia, who became the wife of Daniel Van Etten, who resided at Connashaw, where the Van Etten family homestead was.

History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania; Delaware Township, Chapter VIII, pp. 908-909:  Andrew Dingman, Jr., “Foddy Dingman,” as he was called, was born in the old stone house September 19, 1753. He married Jane Westbrook, a daughter of Daniel Westbrook, who lived across the river in New Jersey, and had three daughters, each of whom he gave a farm on the flats in Walpack township. Andrew Dingman took the upper farm, and here Daniel Westbrook Dingman was born April 14, 1775, on the Daniel Smith place, in a house that stood opposite Barney Swartwood’s. Subsequently Andrew Dingman, Jr., sold this property and bought on the Pennsylvania side again, near where John Whitaker lives.

Before the Revolutionary War the nearest justice of the peace was Benjamin Van Campen, who lived twenty-two miles from Dingman’s Choice. The county-seat was at Newtown, near Bristol, and there Andrew Dingman attended court.

Genealogical and Family History of the Wyoming and Lackawanna Valleys, Pennsylvania, Volume 1 by Horace Edwin Hayden, Alfred Hand, John Woolf Jordan (Lewis publishing Company, 1906), page 202: The younger Andrew Dingman served as private, Sussex county, (New Jersey) militia, 1779-83, and was pensioned as such March 4, 1831. He was born at Dingman’s Ferry, Pennsylvania, but lived in New Jersey during the Indian depredations ; enlisted 1779 as private in Captain Peter Westbrook’s company, Third battalion Sussex county (New Jersey) militia, and took part in engagement with the Indians, April 19, 1780.

JUDGE DANIEL WESTBROOK DINGMAN (1774-1862; married Mary Westbrook)

History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886) – page 213-214: Daniel W. Dingman (1775-1862), only son of Andrew, inherited his father’s estate at the “Ferry,” and carried on the lumber business and merchandising there during a large part of his active life. He was a leading and influential man socially and politically, and a Democrat of the Andrew Jackson type.

Judge Daniel W. Dingman's stone house (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

Judge Daniel W. Dingman’s stone house (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

Sign on the Dingman home (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

Sign on the Dingman home (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

He was the first elected sheriff of Wayne County, in 1801, and the second holding the office, and served in the State Legislature from 1808 to 1814, during which time Pike County was taken from Wayne, and he gave the new county its name, from General Pike, a hero of the War of 1812, and he also gave Dingman township its name. He was associate judge of Pike County for twenty-six years in succession, and was chosen one of the electors in the election of President Monroe.

His wife, Mary Westbrook (1777-1852), a daughter of Benjamin Westbrook, of Sussex County, N. J., bore him children as follows: Martin W.; Andrew ; Daniel W., Jr., the first Whig prothonotary of Pike County, appointed by Governor Joseph Ritner ; Cornelia, wife of Garret Brodhead, of Dingman’s Ferry ; Margaret, wife of Abram Coolbaugh, of Shawnee, Monroe County ; and Jane, wife of Franklin Brodhead. Of these children, only Andrew and Margaret survive in 1886, the latter being eighty-five years of age.

History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck & Co. 1886), pp. 910-911: In 1793 Daniel W. Dingman was commissioned as lieutenant of a company of militia by Thomas Mifflin, Governor of Pennsylvania. On the 2d of August, 1800, he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the One Hundred and Third Regiment Pennsylvania Militia by Governor McKean. In 1801 he received a commission as high sheriff of Wayne County, by the same Governor. He was the second sheriff of Wayne County, his term extending from 1801 to 1804. The court was held at Wilsonville from 1799 to 1802, when it was removed to Milford for a short time; consequently he commenced at Wilsonville and closed his term at Milford. [For a list of the elections he ran in over the course of his lifetime, click here.]

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Dingmans Bridge sign (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

At one of these places he lived in a log house, the jail being similar to his dwelling. He had two prisoners in this jail. One morning, on arising, he found both his prisoners and the jail were gone. During the night the jail was torn down and the building reduced to saw-logs, while the prisoners were nowhere to be found. About that time he was visited by some gentlemen from New Jersey on business, and…overheard some very uncomplimentary remarks about such a dwelling for a sheriff to live in, good enough, however, for a county-seat that was liable to be removed any day. He was a member of the Legislature of Pennsylvania from 1808 till 1813, and when Pike County was set off from Wayne and Northampton, he was commissioned associate judge by Governor Simon Snyder, October 10, 1814, and continued in that office twenty-six years, when his term expired by limitation under the new Constitution.

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851)

Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851); wife of Garret Brodhead (Image credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

John Coolbaugh sat with him for twenty-two years and until Monroe was erected. They were both large, stoutly-built men, and weighed over two hundred pounds each, while Judge Scott, the presiding judge who sat between them, was a tall, spare, intellectual man of great legal attainments. His associates seldom interfered, unless in relation to something of a political nature. Dingman was once Presidential elector and cast his vote for James Monroe. During Jackson’s campaign he cut a tall hickory pole and floated it to Easton, on a raft, when it was raised on Mount Jefferson. When taken down it was made into canes, one of which was presented to General Jackson and another to Judge Dingman. Solomon Dingman, his grandson, now has the cane. In 1846 he was corresponding secretary of the Pennsylvania Historical Society.

Daniel W. Dingman was an active business man and a successful politician of the old Jacksonian Democratic school. He built a hotel which has since been enlarged by Philip Fulmer, until it will accommodate one hundred guests. He also built the Dingman grist-mill, and being given his choice whether he would have an academy or a county-seat located at Dingman’s Ferry, chose an academy.

The three trusses of the Dingman's Ferry Bridge (Credit: Wikimedia Commons, uploaded by Ando228 on 14 Jun 2008)

The three trusses of the Dingman’s Ferry Bridge (Credit: Wikimedia Commons, uploaded by Ando228 on 14 Jun 2008)

In all public matters relating to Pike County, he was a leading man. While in the Legislature he secured an act making Blooming Grove the county-seat, but the commissioners of Wayne County refused to levy a tax for public buildings and the county-seat was finally fixed at Bethany. He and his friends then had the county of Pike erected.

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The Pennsylvania side of the bridge where the tolls are collected (Credit: James and Barbara Brodhead)

He was also influential in getting State appropriations for roads over the barrens of Pike County. Towards the close of his life he built a house in the wilderness, by Lake Teedyuscung or Nichecronk, where he lived a retired life for a number of years. He finally came back to his old home, and died April 12, 1862, at the advanced age of eighty-seven years, and was buried in the Delaware Cemetery at Dingman’s Ferry. Towards the close of his life he seemed to desire posthumous fame and took pride in the fact that he belonged to the Pennsylvania Historical Society. He was thoroughly identified with the early history of Pike County. Dingman’s Ferry, Dingman Creek and Falls were named in honor of the family, and Dingman township was named in honor of the judge. He was kind to Revolutionary heroes and Indian fighters, and General Seeley, Sam Helm, Mapes and Wagdon found a generous stopping-place with him. His only sister, Cornelia, married John Van Etten, and lived where William Courtright now lives at Dingman’s Ferry. She was eighty-six years of age when she died. Daniel W. Dingman married Mary Westbrook. His children were Cornelia, wife of Garret Brodhead; Jane, wife of Franklin Brodhead; Margaret, wife of Abram Coolbaugh. Daniel Dingman lived on the river road.

Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832)

Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832); husband of Cornelia Dingman, granddaughter of Mr. Andrew Dingman, father of Judge (Daniel Westbrook) Dingman (Image credit: James & Barbara Brodhead)

GARRET BRODHEAD (1793-1872; married Cornelia Dingman in 1813)

Genealogical and Family History of the Wyoming and Lackawanna Valleys, Pennsylvania, Volume 1 by Horace Edwin Hayden, Alfred Hand, John Woolf Jordan (Lewis publishing Company, 1906), page 202:
Garret Brodhead, Jr., eldest son of Richard and Hannah (Drake) Brodhead, born December 2, 1793, died East Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania, January 8, 1872 ; married, November 25, 1813, Cornelia Dingman, born October 3, 1797, died June 18, 1883, daughter of Daniel W. and Mary (Westbrook) Dingman. […] Garret Brodhead, Jr., served as private in Captain Adam Hawks’ Second brigade Pennsylvania militia in the war of 1812-15. He was a farmer in Pike county ; from 1850 until 1858 he held an important position in the civil administration of the United States navy yard at Philadelphia. Garret Brodhead and his wife Cornelia Dingman had children : 1. Albert Gallatin, born August 3, 1815, died January 18, 1891 ; married, July 3, 1838, Sally Ann Tolan. 2. Daniel Dingman, see forward. 3. Andrew Jackson, born May 6, 1822, of whom later. 4. Abram Coolbaugh, born August 6, 1824, died October, 1892; married, January 6, 1863, Cornelia M. Ely.

ANDREW DINGMAN (1804-1889; married Caroline Eliza Sayre)

History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886) – page 214: Andrew, son of Daniel W. Dingman, was born on the homestead, on Christmas day, 1804, where he has followed farming and lumbering most of his active life. He now, at the age of eighty- one years, is hale and hearty, and his correct habits through life, his even temperament and quiet ways, together with his integrity in all the relations of life’s work, have gained the esteem of all who know him.

 His wife, Caroline (1804-85), was a daughter of Jedediah Sayre, a large real estate owner of Deckertown, N. J., and her mother was Elizabeth Reifsnyder, of the same place. Their children are : Mary, wife of John W. Kilsby, a farmer at Dingman’s Ferry ; Susan, wife of John W. Mclnnis, of Columbus, Ohio; E . Sayre, of Scranton ; Jane resides with her brother at Hawley ; Margaret, wife of John Lattimore, of Dingman’s Ferry ; Daniel W., of Flatbrookville, Sussex County, N. J.; Alfred S., of Milford ; William H., of Columbus, Ohio ; Dr. A. C, subject of this sketch ; and Isaac, of Dingman’s Ferry.

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Alfred Stoll Dingman p 214 of History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886)

Alfred Stoll Dingman
p 368 of Commemorative Biographical Record of Northeastern Pennsylvania: Including the Counties of Susquehanna, Wayne, Pike and Monroe (Monroe Co., PA: J. H. Beers & Company, 1900)

ALFRED STOLL DINGMAN (b. 12 August 1837; d. 28 Jan 1907; married Kate Van Auken)
Commemorative Biographical Record of Northeastern Pennsylvania: Including the Counties of Susquehanna, Wayne, Pike and Monroe (Monroe Co., PA: J. H. Beers & Company, 1900), page 369:
Alfred Stoll Dingman was born August 12, 1837, at the homestead at Dingman’s Ferry, where he remained until he reached the age of nineteen, assisting his father with the work of the farm and ferry. He then took a position as clerk in a general store at Dingman’s Ferry, owned by Thomas Cortright, and in 1859 he accepted a similar position with C. McCarty, of the same place. On October 16, 1862, he became a member, at Philadelphia, of Company B, 179th P. V. P, becoming first lieutenant under Capt. John B. Frazier. He went first to Newport News, and later to Yorktown, where he remained until June, 1863, doing guard duty at the Fort, and he then marched up the Peninsula to Whitehouse Landing, Va., participating in an engagement near that place in June, 1863. On July 2, 1863, he was discharged at Harrisburg, on account of expiration of term of service, and after his return home he assisted his father for some time. In the spring of 1864 he entered into mercantile business at Dingman’s Ferry with Evert Hornbeck, and one year later bought his partner’s interest, continuing alone until 1869, when he formed a partnership with Henry P. Beardsley. After two years Mr. Beardsley died, and for one year Jacob B. Westbrook was in partnership with our subject, who then sold out to Mr. Westbrook and retired. In 1880 Mr. Dingman removed to Milford, being employed as a clerk for John F. Pinchot, a merchant, until 1889, when he became a traveling salesman for Thomas E. Grecian, a shoe dealer in New York City.

Mr. Dingman has always taken keen interest in politics, being an ardent Republican, and in 1890 he was elected commissioner of Pike county for the term of three years. In 1893 he was again chosen to the office, and on retiring he engaged, in February, 1896, in his present business. He is an able official, and previous to his election as commissioner he had served three years (1884-1887) as county auditor, and three years as school director in Delaware township. Socially he and his family are prominent, and he is identified with the G. A. R., the I. O. O. F., the Rebekahs, and the F. & A. M. (Blue Lodge No. 344), at Milford.

On May 18, 1889, Mr. Dingman was married, at Port Jervis, N. Y., to Miss Kate Van Auken, and one son, Walter V., born March 14, 1890, brightens their home. Mrs. Dingman was born April 13, 1857, at Dingman’s Ferry, a daughter of the late John B. Van Auken, and is a member of an old and highly-esteemed family of Wallpack, NJ… […]

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OBITUARY

Port Jervis Evening Gazette, January 29, 1907

Alfred S. Dingman obit – part 1, Port Jervis Evening Gazette, January 29, 1907 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Dingman_AS_obit2

Alfred S. Dingman obit – part 2, Port Jervis Evening Gazette, January 29, 1907 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

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OTHER PRESS CLIPPINGS

AdamsNY_JeffersonCoJournal_20Nov1888_1

Adams NY, Jefferson County Journal, 20 Nov 1888 – part 1 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Adams NY, Jefferson County Journal, 20 Nov 1888 - part 1 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Adams NY, Jefferson County Journal, 20 Nov 1888 – part 2 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Adams NY, Jefferson County Journal, 20 Nov 1888 - part 3 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Adams NY, Jefferson County Journal, 20 Nov 1888 – part 3 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

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Wayne County Herald, Honesdale, PA

Excerpt from article in Wayne County Herald, Honesdale, PA

St Regis Adirondack News (dated 1901-1903), Credit: fultonhistory.com

Port Jervis, Evening Gazette, 26 Feb 1889 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Andrew died less than a month later. Port Jervis, Evening Gazette, 26 Feb 1889 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Dingmans Ferry, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | 2 Comments

Brodhead 1891 hunting expedition follow-up: ‘Lafe’, John, & ‘Mose’ Westbrook

This post is a follow-up to the one I did recently about an 1891 Brodhead hunting expedition in Blooming Grove. The participants included some members of the Westbrook family, and I have since discovered traces of them in the book Commemorative Biographical Record of Northeastern Pennsylvania: Including the Counties of Susquehanna, Wayne, Pike and Monroe (Monroe Co., PA: J. H. Beers & Company, 1900), on pages 32-34; and 40-41.

It turns out that John Coolbaugh Westbrook, Moses (‘Mose’) Westbrook, and Lafayette (‘Lafe’) Westbrook were brothers—children of Hannah Coolbaugh (1790-1874) and Solomon Westbrook (1794-1852). The book includes images of John and Lafayette, and while containing scant information on Moses, it goes into detail on the two other brothers. For those who are interested in reading about them, I am including the relevant excerpts from the book here. Some of the information in the below two bios overlaps, but I decided not to edit the overlapping bits out. There is much to wade through, but perhaps you will find clues relevant to your own research. I always especially enjoy reading what these biographers had to say about the character and appearance of their subjects. If you wade through these bios, you will be able to pick some interesting things out about both John and Lafayette.

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Lafayette (‘Lafe’) Westbrook

HON. LAFAYETTE WESTBROOK, of Stroudsburg, is one of Monroe county’s favorite citizens, having been chosen many times to offices of trust and responsibility. As a business man, a soldier and a citizen, he has shown those qualities of character which command respect and admiration, and the story of his successful career will be of lasting interest.

Capt. Westbrook comes of good Colonial stock, members of the family having served with distinction in the Indian wars and in the Revolutionary war, but, unfortunately, the records of the early generations have not been preserved as fully as might be wished. The family is of Anglo-Saxon origin, but religious persecution in England caused their emigration to Holland at an early period. In 1630 the name appeared on the records at Albany, N. Y., among the settlers on the manor of Patroon Van Rensselaer. On October 9, 1665, John Westbrook was at Portsmouth, N. H., and in 1689-90 the names of Job and John appeared on the records. In 1721, Col. Thomas Westbrook, said to have come from Stroudwater, Gloucestershire, England, was a shipbuilder and large landowner in the State of Maine, and the town of Westbrook, Maine, was named in his honor. In that year he commanded the expedition against Norridgewock, which broke up the settlement of the famous Jesuit priest, Father Ralle, and captured his papers. In 1723 he was appointed by Gov. Dunmore as the chief in command of the Eastern frontier.

I. Anthony Westbrook, the first ancestor concerning whom we have any definite information, removed from Guilford, Ulster Co., N. Y., about 1737, and located in Montague township, Sussex Co., N. J., where he became the owner of a large tract of land along the Delaware river and on Minisink Island. He was prominent among the settlers there, holding the office of justice of the peace, and left a record of the earliest marriages contracted in the Minisink Valley. He married Antic Van Etten, and among their children were two sons, Jacob and Johannes.

II. Jacob Westbrook, a son of Anthony, was married. March 24, 1746 to Lydia Westfall, and had six children. Blandina, Johannes, Sofferine, Solomon, Maria and Jane.

III. Solomon Westbrook, the next in the line of descent in which we are now interested, was born in 1762 and died in 1824. He located in Delaware township. Pike Co., Penn., and there owned 700 acres of land upon which he built a stone house that was occupied by the family and for nearly a century, and in times of danger was used as a fort. In 1801 he was assessed with 150 acres of improved land, and at that time he was justice of the peace: Like many of the large agriculturists of his day, he owned slaves, and he was regarded as a wealthy and substantial citizen. He married Margaret DeWitt, and they had the following children: Jacob (1786-1847), who settled upon a portion of the old homestead, and was the father of John I. Westbrook, of Port Jenvis, NY; Col. John, born in 1789, who settled at the homestead, and was a member of Congress from 1841 to 1843; Solomon, our subject’s father; Sofferine; and Margaret, wife of William H. Nyce.

IV . Solomon Westbrook was born in 1794, and died in. 1852. He was a man of hue business ability, and was well known throughout the Delaware valley! In 1819 he sold his farm to his brother Jacob, and purchased another in Middle Smithfield township, Pike county, where he resided until 1829. He then sold his place to John V. Coolbaugh, removed to Philadelphia for a year, and for five years following he conducted a hotel at Dingman’s Ferry owned by Judge Dingman. While there (in 1832) he opened a store, and he also carried on mercantile business at Bushkill in 1830-31, and at Tafton in 1835-36. For some time he was interested in lumbering at Blooming Grove. In 1835 he removed to the old stone house on the homestead, and in 1837 a paralytic stroke nearly incapacitated him for business, depriving him of the power of -speech. In 1842 he’ returned to Blooming Grove, where he and his wife spent their remaining years, his sons taking care of his lumber business. He took much interest in local politics during his active years, and from 1822 to 1825 he served as sheriff of Pike county. He married Hannah Coolbaugh (1790-1874), a daughter of Judge John Coolbaugh, of Middle Smithfield township, Pike county, and they had six children : Margaret (deceased, who married the late John B. Stoll, of Branchville, later a resident of Newark, NJ.; John C, of Pike county; who is mentioned elsewhere; Hiram, late a real-estate dealer of Ridgewood, NJ.; Lafayette, our subject; Moses C, a farmer at the old home in Blooming Grove; and Susan, who married the late Theodore Grandon of Newark, New Jersey.

V. Capt. Lafayette Westbrook was born December 15, 1824, near Dingman’s Ferry, in Pike county, and received an excellent education for that day at Delaware Academy. He became proficient as a surveyor, and in 1850 and 1853 was elected surveyor of Pike county, serving two terms with marked success. I Ie is considered an authority on the location of land in that region, and at one time he assisted in making a map of Dike count)-; throughout his life he has been more or less occupied with surveying.

In 1850, our subject was chosen to represent Pike and Monroe counties in the State Legislature, and so well did he perform his duties that he was re-elected the following year. In 1862 he assisted in raising Company B, 151st P. V. I., and entered the service with the rank of first lieutenant. In March 17, 1863, he was made captain, and this rank he held until honorably discharged, on July 27, 1863, at the expiration of his term. While in the service he was never absent from his command for one moment, and he took part in several important engagements, including the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. On his return home he resumed work as a surveyor, and he also engaged extensively in lumbering in Blooming Grove, where he resided until 1882; in 1874 he was elected county surveyor against his own wishes. In 1866, he was again chosen representative in the State Legislature, his district being changed to Pike and Wayne counties. His ability and experience made his services of so great value to his fellow citizens that, in 1867, he was re-elected without opposition. In 1877 and 1878, under the new constitution, he again represented Pike county in the Legislature – each county being entitled to a member – thus completing six years of service in this capacity. The Captain has been regarded for many years as one of the leading Democrats of this section, and at various conventions, State and National, he has taken an honorable part in the work of the party. At times he has held local offices, including that of justice of the peace, and his interest in educational advancement has been shown by his services as school director. During all these years he has conducted his lumber business in connection with surveying, but in 1882 he removed to Stroudsburg, relinquishing a portion of ‘ his business cares; his investments, however, receive his personal attention, and for some time he has acted as a director and as vice-president of the East Stroudsburg National Bank. The Captain looks much younger than he is, and his active and cultured mind makes him a most agreeable companion. Socially he is much esteemed, and he is identified with the Masonic Fraternity being a Master Mason in the Lodge at Milford, Pike county. During the war he received a certificate from the Grand Lodge: which he still holds In October 1876, Captain Westbrook married Miss Emma Hill, of Newton, NJ; their only child died at an early age.

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John C. Westbrook

John C. Westbrook

JOHN COOLBAUGH WESTBROOK. Few citizens of this section enjoy to as high a degree the confidence of the public as does this well-known resident of Milford, whose popularity is attested by his frequent election to offices of responsibility and trust. For many years he has served ably and acceptably as prothonotary and county auditor, and as recorder of deeds, register of wills, clerk of the Orphans’ Court, Clerk of Court of Assertions, he has also shown characteristic ability, zeal and fidelity.

Mr. Westbrook comes of good old pioneer stock, and traces his descent to an English family, some of whose members went to Holland at an early period to escape religious persecution. The records at Albany, N. Y., show that in 1630 some of that name were settlers on the manor lands of Patroon Van Rensselaer, having come with a Dutch colony. On October 9, 1665, John Westbrook was at Portsmouth, N. H., and in 1689-90 Job and John Westbrook were there. In 1721 Col. Thomas Westbrook, a wealthy land owner and ship builder of Maine, said to have come from Stroudwater, Gloucestershire, England, commanded the expedition against Norridgewock, which broke up the settlement of the famous Jesuit priest Father Ralle, and captured his papers. Two years later he was appointed by Gov. Dunmore as chief in command of the eastern frontier of the Colony of Maine, and he seems to have wielded an important influence in that commonwealth, the town of Westbrook having been named after him. In every generation the love of liberty has been a leading characteristic of the family, and its members have not hesitated to make open resistance to tyranny, several having served in the Revolutionary army. The definite records of our subject’s ancestry began with Anthony Westbrook, who came to Pennsylvania from Guilford, Ulster Co., N. Y., and settled in the Minisink Valley, where he acquired a large tract of land. In 1737 he was a justice of the peace and an elder in the Reformed Dutch Church, while his brother Johannes, who preceded him, was also prominent in the settlement. Anthony Westbrook married Antie Van Etten, and had at least two children, Jacob and Johannes.

Jacob Westbrook became the owner of a large tract of land on the east bank of the Delaware river, about eight miles below Port Jervis, in what is now Montague township, Sussex Co., N. J. His substantial stone house was often used as’ a fort during the troubles with the Indians, as was that of his son Johannes, three miles farther down the Delaware river. Like other pioneer families the Westbrooks kept slaves in the early days. Jacob Westbrook was married March 24, 1746, to Lydia Westfall, and had six children: Blandina, Johannes, Sofferine, Solomon, Maria and Jane.

Solomon Westbrook, our subject’s grandfather, was born October 6, 1762, and died March 30, 1824. In 1792 he located upon a tract of 700 acres of land on the west bank of the Delaware river in Delaware township, Pike county, and his residence, a large stone house, stood on the stage road, two miles below Dingman’s Ferry. In 1801 he was assessed with 150 acres of improved land, and was serving as justice of the peace. On September 24, 1782, he married Margaret De Witt, by whom he had five children: Jacob (1786-1847), who resided on a part of the homestead, and was the father of John I. Westbrook, of Port Jervis; Col. John (1789- 1852), a leading spirit in the State militia, a member of Congress (1841-1843), and one of the ablest men this section ever produced; Solomon, our subject’s father; Sofferine; and Margaret (Mrs. William H. Nyce).

Solomon Westbrook (2), the father of our subject, was born in 1794, and died in 1852. he was a successful business man, and was also active in politics, serving one term as sheriff of Pike county ( 1822-1825). In 1819 he sold his farm to his brother Jacob, and purchased another in Middle Smithfield township, where he remained about ten years; but in 1829 he disposed of the place to John V. Coolbaugh, and removed to Philadelphia. In 1830 be returned and opened a store at Bushkill, which he carried on for a year, while for five years he conducted a hotel at Dingman’s Ferry. In 1832 he opened a store there, and he also carried on mercantile business at Tafton in [835-36. In the meantime he became extensively engaged in lumbering at Blooming Grove, but a paralytic stroke in 1837 deprived him of the power of speech while he was yet in the prime of manhood, lie had removed with his family in 1835 to the old stone house in Delaware township; then in 1842 the family located at Blooming Grove, where his sons carried on the lumber business for many years. His wife was Hannah Coolbaugh, of Middle Smithfield township. Pike comity. Of their children, Margaret, the eldest (deceased) was the wife of John B. Stoll, of Branchville; John C, our subject, is mentioned more fully below; Hiram (deceased) was a real-estate dealer at Ridgewood, NJ, and was twice married, (first) to Eunice A. Horton, and (second) to Jennie M. Maston ; Lafayette, a resident of Stroudsburg, is mentioned elsewhere; Moses C., a farmer on the homestead at Blooming Grove, married Emily Jones; Susan a resident of Milford, married (first) Theodore Grandon, and ( second) William H. Bell, both of whom are now deceased.

Our subject was born May 24. 1820, in Middle Smithfield township, Pike county, then a portion of Delaware township. He began his education in the country schools, afterward studying for some time with Rev. Mr. Allen at Milford. At the age of fifteen he became a clerk in his father’s store at Dingman’s Ferry, and after the latter’s health failed he took charge of the business, assisted by Col. H. S. Mott. Together with his brothers he also managed the lumber business at Blooming Grove, and later he cleared a farm there upon which he built a sawmill and a gristmill. In 1845 he was elected prothonotary of Pike county, on the Democratic ticket, and removed to Milford. After serving two terms he returned to Blooming Grove, and in the fall of 1863 he was again chosen to that office, which he held for six years. In 1870 he removed to Branchville, NJ., and during the following year he secured from various individuals the land for Blooming Grove Park. In 1872 he went to Berks county, Penn., and for three years acted as foreman in the construction of the Boston & South Mountain R. R., running from Harrisburg to Poughkeepsie. In the fall of L875 he returned to Milford, and was elected prothonotary, to which office he has since been continuously re-elected, having held the office in all thirty-five years. Socially Mr. Westbrook and his family are prominent, and he is connected with various orders; he is a Master Mason, having joined the fraternity at Hawley.

On December 31, 1850, Mr. Westbrook was married at Milford to Miss Jane Wells, and four children have blessed the union: Alice B., who resides in Milford, married (first) Dr. Governor Emerson, and after his decease wedded the late Milton B. Mott, formerly editor of the Milford Dispatch, and a representative in the State Legislature. Hannah married John Williamson, of Branchville, N. J., now deceased. Frank Brodhead and Lafayette died unmarried. Mrs. Westbrook was born at Milford, January 24, 1824, only child of Peter and Jane Wells, and, both parent’s dying when she was an infant, she was reared by her grandmother, Jane Wells.

Categories: Brodhead, Coolbaugh, Dingmans Ferry, Pennsylvania, Pike Co., Westbrook | Tags: | Leave a comment

A 1915 Brodhead family road trip

Cover

1915 AUTOMOBILE TRIPS AND SIGHT-SEEING GUIDE (Used with permission of mapsofpa.com)

I love the little morsels that can be gleaned from old newspapers (and the fact that old newspapers published personal tidbits that would never make it into today’s papers). Here’s a little morsel about a road trip taken in October 1915 by three of A. J. Brodhead & Ophelia Easton Brodhead‘s surviving adult children: Garret Brodhead (67), Jean Struthers (Brodhead) Blakslee (57), and Charlotte Elizabeth (Brodhead) Burk (60).

Trenton Evening Times' Flemington news section --- 24 October 1915

Trenton Evening Times‘ Flemington news section — 24 October 1915

Along for the ride were their brother James Easton Brodhead‘s wife (Harriet Locklin Boyd) and youngest son (Nathaniel Boyd Brodhead – 24), Garret’s wife Annie Kocher, Jean’s husband Charles Blakslee, and Charlotte’s husband Franklin C. Burk. Destination — Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. This was two years after the 50th anniversary events took place at the historic battleground.

Charlotte E. Brodhead Burk

Charlotte E. (Brodhead) Burk

Jean Struthers Brodhead

Jean Struthers (Brodhead) Blakslee

Garret Brodhead

Garret Brodhead

Overland Model 82 Touring 1915 |Source: Wikimedia: contributed by author Lglswe on 2008-08-09

Overland Model 82 Touring 1915 |Source: Wikimedia: contributed by author Lglswe on 2008-08-09

The distance from Flemington to Gettysburg is about 168 miles. Today, it’s a 2-hour and 40-minute journey. Back in 1915 (see map below—click to enlarge), I imagine it must have taken quite a bit longer given road conditions and vehicle capabilities. Of course, we don’t know what they were driving. I perused the vehicles showcased on the Early American Automobile website, which has many amazing vehicles on display, and my eyes settled on the 1915 Overland Model 82 Touring Automobile. Imagine taking a road trip over the roads of that era in a setup like that. An earlier vehicle, the 1909 Thomas Flyer 6/40 Touring car, is shown inset to give you an idea of what a packed touring car could look like. They could really ‘pack ’em in’—the more the merrier, I suppose, especially since getting stuck in muddy unpaved roads was more of a possibility back then, and you’d need plenty of man- and woman-power to get out of a jam. But hopefully the weather was fine and dry and the Brodhead contingent had only to admire the autumn leaves and the splendid scenery as they made their way to Gettysburg!

Overland automobile 1909

Advertisement for the Overland 1909

Osborne Auto Party, Salt Lake City, 1909. Car is a 1909 Thomas Flyer 6/40 Touring car with optional wind screen. (Source: WIkimedia Commons, Photographer:Shipler Commercial Photographers; Shipler, Harry. First published circa 1909.

Osborne Auto Party, Salt Lake City, 1909. Car is a 1909 Thomas Flyer 6/40 Touring car with optional wind screen. (Source: WIkimedia Commons, Photographer:Shipler Commercial Photographers; Shipler, Harry. First published circa 1909.

 The Official Automobile Bluebook 1914, Volume 3 New Jersey-Pennsylvania and Southeast

Map (cropped) – from The Official Automobile Bluebook 1914, Volume 3 ,New Jersey-Pennsylvania and Southeast. I’ve added pink arrows to highlight the two locations. (Used with permission of mapsofpa.com)

The below clip is from YouTube (published by manowaradmiral on June 7, 2012). If you go to the YouTube page the contributor has posted a lengthy, interesting description of the 1915 Overland Model 80’s specifications and capabilities. Click here.

An aerial view of Gettysburg from the observation tower on Oak Hill, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 1909. Caption [back side of the post card] reads:

An aerial view of Gettysburg from the observation tower on Oak Hill, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 1909. Caption [back side of the post card] reads: “Immediate foreground was scene of first day’s Battle; across the plain Ewell hurled the main body of his corps on the Federal column, which was driven through the Streets of Gettysburg, but reformed on the unconquered heights of Cemetery Hill. Culps Hill shows to the left: Cemetery Hill in centre background; The Round Tops to the right.” Postcard number: 221. (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Devil's Den — Gettysburg National Military Park, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Dansk: Devils Den, Library of Congress,LC-USZ62-40269, foto fra 1909 (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Devil’s Den — Gettysburg National Military Park, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.
Dansk: Devils Den, Library of Congress,LC-USZ62-40269, foto from 1909 (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Postcard collection of the Presbyterian Historical Society (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

Postcard collection of the Presbyterian Historical Society (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

Categories: Auto touring, Brodhead, Flemington, Gettysburg, New Jersey, Pennsylvania | 2 Comments

Fishing Pike County in the spring of 1877

Image from p 46 of The Determined Angler and the Brook Trout by Charles Bradford (NY & London: GP Putnam's Sons, 1916)

Image from p 46 of The Determined Angler and the Brook Trout by Charles Bradford (NY & London: GP Putnam’s Sons, 1916)

I don’t know what the fishing is like today in Pike County, PA, but here is an 1877 article from The Country, Vol I & II describing the experiences of one visitor to that area from April 1-4, 1877. During those 4 days, this visitor caught 400 fish weighing 45 pounds and brought back to New York 234 fish that “scaled 33 pounds honest weight.” Roughly 88 of them were between 8 – 13.5 inches in length; the other 150 or so, he said, were small trout, but not “fingerlings” — “fat as butter and excellent eating.”  Obviously these were the days before any limits were introduced! Today he’d be able to walk away with just 5 trout per day, and each would have to be at least 7 inches long.

I love the great outdoors and that includes “escaping mentally” to the great outdoors of yesteryear to imagine what things must have been like in a certain location at a certain point in time. If you’re like me, and you enjoy fishing, perhaps you will find this article of interest too. Present-day fishermen and women in Pike Co., feel free to comment about your experiences fishing in that part of PA.

Happy 4th of July, All!
fishing1fishing2fishing3The Country, weekly journal, Vol 1-2, pub. 1877

Credit: Google Books

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Fishing, Fourth of July, Hobbies, Nature, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | 4 Comments

Some Brodheads on an 1891 hunting expedition in Blooming Grove—a playground for all seasons

Blooming grove

“Blooming Grove Park—The American Fontainebleau” (Image from Harper’s Weekly, December 17, 1870 — not long ago, I acquired the issue in which it appeared from ‘Timothy Hughes’ Rare & Early Newspapers’ of Williamsport, PA)

When Daniel Brodhead and his family settled in Pennsylvania’s Minisink Valley in the late 1730s, that area was a vast expanse of wilderness, a true frontier. Hunting and fishing was done for survival. As time went on and villages and towns emerged, stores cropped up where one could buy fresh game and produce, but by and large the common man, and definitely the poor man, fed his family by his own hand—through the use of plow, knife, trap, or gun. But by the 19th century, and especially in the second half of that century, the upper classes, wanting to “re-create pioneer values and to approach nature through wildlife,”1 developed a burgeoning interest in field sports. In answer to this demand, entrepreneurs and others caught up in this trend cobbled together fairly massive parcels of land to establish private hunting and fishing clubs which they hoped would rival the great game parks of Europe that served as private parks for the nobility2, and “by 1878, about 25,000 Americans belonged to 600 of these clubs. Among the leaders was the Blooming Grove Park Association.”3 “Blooming Grove Park,” established in Pike County, Pennsylvania (the county to the north of Monroe County, home of settler Daniel Brodhead’s town of “Dansbury”–a.k.a. East Stroudsburg), in 1870 by the Blooming Grove Park Association, was (and still is) an exclusive hunting and fishing club that has expanded far beyond its initial borders.

Map showing the location of this township within Pike County, Pennsylvania (Credit: Wikimedia Commons - contributed by Rcsprinter123 on Dec 6, 2014)

Map showing the location of Blooming Grove Township within Pike County, Pennsylvania (Credit: Wikimedia Commons – contributed by Rcsprinter123 on Dec 6, 2014)

Initially some 14,000 acres in size, encompassing vast tracts of land, lakes, and trout streams, the members-only Park attracted well-heeled outdoors-people throughout the year—men and women, as the above etching shows. Many were wealthy New Yorkers, searching for supreme experiences in the great outdoors. To cater to their need to keep their fingers on the pulse of the nation’s stock market, the club eventually stretched wire all over the park4 so that interested members could check on their business interests at any time during their nature jaunts. Not surprisingly, the Park was initially very poorly received by locals who had happily hunted these territories for generations before abruptly being shut out by those of wealth and power5.

Junius Brutus Stearns (1810 – 1885)

A Day’s Sport At Blooming Grove Park by Junius Brutus Stearns (1810 – 1885)

When established, the Association was granted the right of ‘self-determination’ by the Pennsylvania General Assembly, whereby it was able to establish and enforce its own game laws as well as propagate fish and game for an improved ‘visitor experience’. The Association later became officially known as the Blooming Grove Hunting and Fishing Club, and it remains to this day a very private and exclusive organization. Over time, the public in general came to appreciate the conservation work done on the Club’s lands much of which had been decimated before 1870 by excessive logging. And today, with development accelerating beyond the Club’s borders, the Club’s lands remain safe and protected with little prospect of that changing. According to the “Blooming Grove Township Comprehensive Plan” produced by Community Planning & Management, LLC, in May 2008, which includes a map of the Club’s lands: “Blooming Grove Township holds less potential for development than many of the other municipalities in Pike County and the Pocono Mountains.” So that’s definitely good news from a conservation standpoint.

Trout Fishing by Junius Brutus Stearns (1810 – 1885)

Trout Fishing by Junius Brutus Stearns (1810 – 1885)

Chapter 13 of The History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania (Mathews, Alfred, Philadelphia, R. T. Peck & Co., 1886), gives some background on Blooming Grove Park, including the following: “The Blooming Grove Park Association was projected by Wm. H. Bell, of Branchville, Sussex County, NJ, and Fayette S. Giles [a gentleman jeweler6] in 1870. [Charles Hallock, future founder of Field and Stream worked with Giles as a promoter7.] John C. Westbrook and Lafayette Westbrook deeded 13,000 acres of land to the association, and they have since purchased 1,000 acres in addition. F.S. Giles was the first president of the association. The stockholders have changed, and most of the stock is now held by New York parties. The lands lie in Blooming Grove, Greene and Porter townships, and include Lakes Beaver, Giles, Scott, Bruce, Westbrook, Laura, Ernest and Belle, according to the names which the association have given them. One square mile of the land is inclosed by a wire fence, as a breeding park, in which they have about 200 deer. The club-house is erected on ground overlooking Giles Lake, or Blooming Grove Pond, as it was formerly called, at a cost of about ten thousand dollars.”

salmon_flies

Salmon and Sea Trout Flies from Fly Fishing (1899), Sir Edward Grey, 1920 edition (Wikimedia – Public domain in US)

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Several months ago, a bit after I finally ‘discovered’ some traces of Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead, my second great grandfather’s brother, and while digging through some search results on the Fulton History website, I came upon an article in the Port Jervis, NY, Evening Gazette, entitled “Home of the Bear and the Deer. What a ‘Gazette’ Man Saw in the Hunting Section of Pike County, PA.” The article is dated November 30, 1891, and it was a fun find because it mentions a hunting party that included both my second great grandfather—Andrew Jackson Brodhead—AND his little brother Abram. Andrew would have been 69 at the time, and Abram 67. And it was even more fun because it described them as “famous sportsmen”: At Blooming Grove, “Moses Westbrook’s”, we found a notable party of hunters, some of whom have followed the hounds in the wilds of Pike for 40 consecutive years. Among them were the famous sportsmen, “Abe” C. Brodhead of Lehighton, Pa., Andrew J. Brodhead and George T. Gray, of Flemington, N.J., W. F. Brodhead of Packerton, Pa., and U. S. Grant Tobias of Mauch Chunk, Pa. They were hourly expecting John C. Westbrook, of Milford, and Captain ” Lafe” Westbrook, of Stroudsburg, the great deer slayers of Pike for the past 40 years, it being a fact that they have to their credit the slaying of over 600 deer during that time. It would be unfair not to mention their brother “Mose” in this connection who, although having no record to exhibit, has without doubt killed nearly as many as his brothers.

Sadly, this may have been one of the last times Abram enjoyed a hunting expedition; a little less than a year later, he fell ill and passed away at his daughter Jennie (Brodhead) Linderman‘s home in Bethlehem, PA. Andrew, meanwhile, was blessed to live another 21 years, dodging the “heart attack alley” that seems to zigzag up the Brodhead family tree, so he probably enjoyed many more such outings before being forced by infirmity to give up such pleasures. Serendipitously to finding the article, I found the above 1870 image in Harper’s Weekly and went so far as to purchase the issue so I could include the image here. Don’t worry, I did not have to rob a bank. ;-)

Please don't rely on my data as being 100% accurate. Mistakes happen along the way! ;-)

Please verify my data before you use it. Mistakes happen along the way! ;-)

p. 103 of The Runkle Family: Being an Account of the Runkels in Europe, and Their Descendants in America by Ben van Doren Fisher (T.A. Wright, 1899) Other members of the hunting party included “George T. Gray, of Flemington, N.J., W. F. Brodhead of Packerton, Pa., and U. S. Grant Tobias of Mauch Chunk, Pa.” Who were these men? Well, I figured out that W. F. Brodhead referred to Colonel William Franklin Brodhead (1842-1932), a cousin of the Brodhead brothers via the Dingman side of the family. William’s mother Jane Dingman was the younger sister of Andrew and Abram’s mother Cornelia Dingman. Jane and Cornelia both married into the Brodhead family.  (See the greatly condensed family tree inset for a visual.) U.S. Grant Tobias (1868-1940), a clergyman, was William’s son-in-law of just six months.  Grant married William’s daughter Edith on May 5, 1891 at the family’s Packerton, PA, home8.  In November 1891, William would have been 49, and Grant9—23. I think George T. Gray must have been a friend of Andrew Jackson Brodhead’s as both men were visiting from Flemington, NJ. I found George and his wife Rachel Ann Cherry in a Runkle family genealogy book10(see clipping inset and end note below). If I have the correct George (and I think I do), he was 66 at the time of this hunting trip.

At first I thought perhaps they were all members of the Blooming Grove Park Association, but when I discovered it was the exclusive preserve of the wealthy, I decided that was unlikely since as far as I know, my second great grandfather, dad to 10 children, was not a wealthy man. Brother Abram, long-time widower and father of one, had been the superintendent of the Lehigh Stove Foundry, and during the Cleveland administration, had held a lucrative position in the Philadelphia mint. Perhaps, he had the means.

Then I looked into what was meant by “Moses Westbrook’s,” and came upon a mention of this location in The Country, Vol. 1-2 (published in 1877; page 369): “Fishing on the Shohola, the large stream which runs through the territory of the Blooming Grove Park Association, is accessible via Lackawaxen, on the Erie Railway. The headquarters are at Moses Westbrook’s hotel at Blooming Grove, an excellent, cheap, comfortable hostelry…” By 1891, the hotel may have had a makeover, but obviously it was still standing, and providing lodging to this hunting party. Whether they were heading to the Association’s lands or other lands within Pike County, once they met up with John C. Westbrook and Captain ”Lafe” Westbrook, I don’t know. But, given the fact that the former had deeded 13,000 acres for the establishment of Blooming Grove Park, it seems likely that he would have been a member there.

John C. Westbrook (Image from The History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Matthews, p. 895)

John C. Westbrook (Image from The History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties by Alfred Matthews, p. 895)

Speaking of the Westbrooks, there were a number of them who married into the Brodhead family, and vice versa, through the years. For example, Andrew and Abram’s aunt Sarah Brodhead (1792-1879) was married to Colonel John Westbrook (1789-1852), and the brothers’ mom Cornelia Dingman Brodhead was the daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851). I have not sufficiently researched the Westbrook tree to know where “John C. Westbrook” fits (or “Lafe” or “Mose”, for that matter). If anyone out there knows, please feel free to give a shout. [Update: There is a bio of John C. Westbrook in The History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties, (RT Peck & Sons, 1886, pp. 894-896); Lafayette (‘Lafe’) was a brother of John C. Westbrook] [Note: See follow-up post on August 5, 2015]

Well, I will close now and leave you with the Evening Gazette article in the event you want to read it in its entirety. For those “scanners” among you, I have highlighted the names of our Brodheads and their friends. When the reporter left Blooming Grove, [the group was] following five deer. No matter what the day’s results were or where exactly their adventures took place, I hope they all enjoyed their time together in the great outdoors.

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PORT JERVIS EVENING GAZETTE, 30 November 1891

HOME OF THE BEAR AND DEER. WHAT A”GAZETTE” MAN SAW IN THE HUNTING SECTION OF PIKE COUNTY, PA

Many Noted Hunters at Present in That Country Searching for the Big Game. Plenty of Deer but Not Many Captured, as Yet—A Brief Mention of Several of the Many Excellent Hunters Homes.

The hunting season of Pike County, Pa., is now at its best, and in all parts of that vast area of wilderness, barrens and swamps lying between the famous valley road and the Paupack country, the birds the deer and the bears are on the alert to escape the death dealing shots of the wily hunters and the keen scent of their swift footed and well trained dogs. When the law is “on” protecting the game, this vast country is nearly as silent as the grave, and the intense quiet is only broken by the occasional sound of the woodman’s axe.

On a recent drive through this section, the writer found many famous hunters at the various “Hunters Homes.” At Sheriff Hoffman’s hospitable home on Sawkill Lake, five miles out from Milford, on the Milford and Owego turnpike, the Hawes Brothers, of Central Valley, NY, men noted in the Adirondacks and in the Maine forests for their skill as hunters, were in full possession and with the Sheriff and his sons were making it lively for the deer and were capturing many birds. We are informed that they took home with them two four-pronged bucks. Mrs. Hoffman, by the way, we found very ill but the honors of the home were excellently carried out by her daughter. The jolly Sheriff laments the fact that he has not this year his usual number of dogs, by death and other causes his kennel is now reduced to sixteen.

At Shohola Falls a party of gentlemen from Nyack, NY, who had been guests of Garry Hart, the owner of the famous Shohola Falls and the adjacent country, had just left and had taken away with them six deer. These gentlemen were assisted in their hunting by the noted Greening Brothers who know every runway and hiding place for deer in that whole country. In this connection we wish to take the liberty of mentioning that Mr. and Mrs. Hart caught the largest trout that were taken in Pike county this season. They caught in the Rattlesnake creek and in the Shohola, in the “Meadows,” seven trout none of which weighed less than 2 ½ pounds and one weighed a trifle over 6 pounds. Mrs. Hart enjoys the reputation of being one of the most expert anglers of that section.

fishing5

Illustration for index page of The Country, Vol 1 & 2, published 1877; find it on Google Books (free) — the index is extensive and there is good reading to be had here. The 19th-century American passion for the great outdoors is on display!

At Blooming Grove, “Moses Westbrook’s”, we found a notable party of hunters, some of whom have followed the hounds in the wilds of Pike for 40 consecutive years. Among them were the famous sportsmen, “Abe” C. Brodhead of Lehighton, Pa., Andrew J. Brodhead and George T. Gray, of Flemington, N.J., W. F. Brodhead of Packerton, Pa., and U. S. Grant Tobias of Mauch Chunk, Pa. They were hourly expecting John C. Westbrook, of Milford, and Captain “Lafe” Westbrook, of Stroudsburg, the great deer slayers of Pike for the past 40 years, it being a fact that they have to their credit the slaying of over 600 deer during that time. It would be unfair not to mention their brother “Mose” in this connection who, although having no record to exhibit, has without doubt killed nearly as many as his brothers.

When the writer left Blooming Grove the party first mentioned were following five deer and we have no doubt that they captured the greater part of them.

Over on the Paupack there were a number of hunters at “Jack” Kimbles and at Marcus Killam’s and all were having fairly good luck. Marcus Killam, now considerably advanced in years, is another of the famous deer hunters of Pike, having killed over 400 deer in the past 60 years. At Dimon’s, also on the Paupack, a number of hunters were gathered. These gentlemen were under the guidance of the noted local guide and deer hunter Henry Quick, and had already started up several deer but, unfortunately, had not been able to get a shot at them. Among the hunters in the Paupack country was a young divine, Rev. F. T. Angevene, of Sharon, Conn. The young clergyman is an ardent sportsman and an excellent shot; although he did miss two deer when out with “Eph” Kimble, of Kimbles, and we do not doubt that he took away with him more game than any other man of the party. The cause of his missing the deer was a peculiar condition of the atmosphere just at sunset and he was not able to correctly estimate distances.

“Sim” Lord, at Lord’s Valley, has also captured several deer but as he was out following a deer the day that we were in his section we did not see him and consequently are not able to mention the hunters that have been making their headquarters at his very hospitable home. We, however, did see his brother Jury Commissioner, Levi Lord, and he stated that game was comparatively plenty at Lord’s Valley and vicinity and the hunters were having excellent sport. [this part was cut off] …but, for some reason explainable only by those who stood on the runways, none of them were stopped. This home is on the head waters of the Rattlesnake creek in the heart of a famous bear, deer, bird and trout section. The great black bear brought to Port Jervis last February, the skin of which was purchased by Counsellor John W. Lyon, of this village, was shot by Dr. Kelly within three quarters of a mile of his residence. Mrs. Kelly, by the way, is an expert shot and on the day of our visit killed a pheasant, or rather ruffed grouse, that will entitle her to take the first premium this year. The bird weighed a trifle over three pounds and was the largest of his species that we had ever seen.

Space will not allow us at this time to mention the bear hunting in Greene township and at the “Knob” and we will rely on our correspondents to give the interesting bear stories to our readers later on.

We would say to our readers who have a love for the sports of the field that there is no better hunting section than Little Pike to gratify their desires in that direction and, more, that the “Hunters Homes” are comfortable and excellent beyond description. You cannot make a mistake, they all, without exception, are ideal ”Hunters’ Paradises.”

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1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 – Page 51 of Better in the Poconos: The Story of Pennsylvania’s Vacationland by Lawrence Squeri (Penn State Press, 2010)
8 – Carbon Advocate wedding announcement, Volume 19, No. 26, Saturday, May 9, 1891
9 – Carbon Advocate, Volume 20, Number 22, Saturday, April 9, 1892:  In A Few Words. We congratulate our popular young friend Grant Tobias, of the County Seat, over the arrival of a bright little son in his family. We hope the little fellow may have a long life and abundant prosperity, while at the same time we feel like closing digits with granddad Brodhead, at Packerton.
10 – Page 103 of The Runkle Family: Being an Account of the Runkels in Europe, and Their Descendants in America by Ben van Doren Fisher (T. A. Wright, 1899)

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1877_PikCo

The cost of a 2-week trip from NYC to Pike Co. in 1877? No more than $30. (The Country, Vol. 1-2; pub. 1877; page 369)

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Fishing, Hobbies, Hunting, Nature, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | 7 Comments

Garret Brodhead’s “Wheat Plains” farmhouse—an August clean-up project. Come join the fun!

“Wheat Plains,” the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

Hear Ye, Hear Ye! The DePuy/Brodhead Family Association is having its annual reunion in the Dingmans Ferry, PA, area on Saturday, August 15, 2015. The actual location of the meeting place is still to be determined. For details, contact the Association at 6566 Skywae Drive, Columbus, Ohio 43229, and/or join the DePuy/Brodhead Family Association “Facebook” group page where you can keep abreast of all Brodhead (and DePuy) reunion developments!

Wheat Plains farmhouse clean-up opportunity!: On Friday, August 14, those who are interested in volunteering with the Wheat Plains Farmhouse clean-up project are welcome to join in. You may contact James Brodhead at “jbbrodheadfamily at hotmail dot com” to have a volunteer form sent to you. The Parks Department (“Wheat Plains” falls within the National Park Service system) would like to have these forms in hand at least four weeks prior to the work date.

According to Barbara and James Brodhead, who have undertaken the cleanup of the nearby Brodhead-Linderman Cemetery in recent years and are spearheading this year’s “Wheat Plains” clean-up effort: “More specific times and locations will be forthcoming. All efforts are greatly appreciated. Please note that we are organizing a tour of the Farm House on Saturday the 15th for all those who attend the Reunion.”

Come enjoy a fun weekend of connecting with family near and far, and giving Garret Brodhead’s homestead a much-needed makeover!

Categories: Brodhead, Dingmans Ferry, Linderman, Monroe Co., Pennsylvania, Pike Co., Stroudsburg | 10 Comments

More traces of Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead & Cornelia M. Ely

Down Among the Coal Mines -- Chutes Loading the Canal-Boats on the Lehigh Canal, a wood engraving published in Harper's Weekly, February 1873. Coal was loaded at Mauch Chunk (Image found on Wikimedia Commons; public domain in the US)

Carbon County Scene: “Down Among the Coal Mines — Chutes Loading the Canal-Boats on the Lehigh Canal,” a wood engraving published in Harper’s Weekly, February 1873. Coal was loaded at Mauch Chunk (Image found on Wikimedia Commons; public domain in the US)

One of this blog’s new readers, whose spouse is a descendant of Abram & Cornelia Brodhead, kindly pointed me in the direction of some wonderful Carbon County resources that are available online thanks to the amazing contributions of a Mr. Tony Bennyhoff.  They reveal some interesting details, and I encourage anyone whose ancestors spent time in Carbon County to check them out. You never know what you may find.

What I found were several newspaper notices related to Abram’s passing, and I am sharing them here:

The Lehighton Press, Volume 2, Number 2, Thursday, October 27, 1892:
Death of A. C. Brodhead. Abram C. Brodhead died on Tuesday morning at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Garrett B. Linderman, South Bethlehem. Mr. Brodhead was 68 years of age, and lived for many years in Lehighton. About two months ago he went to South Bethlehem to visit his daughter, and while there he was taken ill. Mr. Brodhead was the youngest brother of the late Judge A. G. Brodhead , of Mauch Chunk; D. D. Brodhead , of Wilkes-Barre; A. J. Brodhead , of Flemington, N. J., and W. F. Brodhead, of Packerton. He was a staunch Democrat, having held several offices in the gift of his party. He was well known and greatly respected. The funeral of the deceased will take place to-day. Interment at Bridgeport, Conn. [Note: W. F. Brodhead, of Packerton, was a cousin on the Dingman side,  the son of William Franklin Brodhead (b 1807) and Jane Dingman (b 1808; Cornelia Dingman’s younger sister).]

Carbon Advocate, Volume 20, Number 50, Saturday, October 29, 1892:
Death of Abr. Brodhead. After an illness dating back a long time Abraham Brodhead died at the home of his daughter at Bethlehem on Monday night at the age of 68 years. For many years deceased resided in this city and was the superintendent of the Lehigh Stove Foundry. During the Grover Cleveland administration he held a lucrative position in the Philadelphia mint. He was an eccentric character in many ways. The news of his death was heard with regret by many old friends here.

View of Mauch Chunk, Carbon County, Pennsylvania, a wood engraving sketched by Theodore R. Davis and published in Harper's Weekly, September 1869 (Found on Wikimedia Commons; image is in public domain in US)

“View of Mauch Chunk, Carbon County, Pennsylvania,” a wood engraving sketched by Theodore R. Davis and published in Harper’s Weekly, September 1869 (Found on Wikimedia Commons; image is in public domain in US)

The Lehighton Press, Volume 2, Number 3, Thursday, November 3, 1892:
Funeral of A. C. Brodhead – The funeral of A. C. Brodhead, of Lehighton, took place on Thursday morning last from the residence of Mrs. G. B. Linderman, the daughter of the deceased, at South Bethlehem. The services were conducted by Rev. Gilbert H. Sterling, after which the remains were taken to Bridgeport, Conn., and there interred beside Mr. Brodhead’s wife. Mr. Brodhead was born in Pike county, August 6, 1824. In his early years Mr. Brodhead was connected with the Lehigh Valley Railroad and was subsequently in the government employ, in the custom house, in New York, and in later years in the mint, in Philadelphia. He was the youngest son of Garrett Brodhead and his wife, Cornelia Dingman , of Delaware, Pa. He was married January 6, 1862, to Cornelia Ely , of Bridgeport, Conn., but his wife died in the second  year thereafter, leaving but one child, Jennie, wife of Garrett B. Linderman. The funeral was largely attended by relatives and friends of the deceased from Lehighton and Mauch Chunk.

And, I found a morsel about Cornelia M. Ely in George Burritt Vanderpoel’s The Ely ancestry: lineage of Richard Ely of Plymouth, England who came to Boston, Mass., about 1655 & settled at Lyme, Conn, in 1660… (NY: Calumet Press, 1902, p. 369):

137313- Cornelia Maria Ely, b. 1842, d. 1864, dau. of Henry Gideon Ely and Cornelia Maria Whiting; m. 1863, Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead, Lehighton, Carbon Co., Pa., who was b. 1824, son of Garrett Brodhead and Cornelia Dingman. Their children:

1. Jennie S, b. 1863.

So Abram was ‘well known and greatly respected’ and ‘an eccentric character in many ways.’ I enjoy hearing little details like that, don’t you?

I am so grateful for this blog’s readers and appreciate all the feedback and help you so generously provide!

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Pennsylvania | 2 Comments

1805/1806: Luke Brodhead and “The Battle of the Butcher Boys and Delaware River Raftmen”

"The City and Port of Philadelphia, on the River Delaware from Kensington". Frontispiece to The City of Philadelphia..., plate 2. Engraving, hand-colored. Wikimedia Commons: In public domain in US due to publication prior to January 1, 1923. (Image shown has been cropped)

“The City and Port of Philadelphia, on the River Delaware from Kensington”. Frontispiece to The City of Philadelphia…, plate 2. Engraving, hand-colored. Wikimedia Commons: In public domain in US due to publication prior to January 1, 1923. (Image shown has been cropped at the top)

Now here’s an interesting tale dating back to 1805/1806 about a memorable ‘David vs. Goliath’ brawl featuring one Luke Brodhead. I found it in The Evening Gazette (Port Jervis, NY), dated Tuesday, May 28, 1878. The paper is one of thousands archived on the free Fulton History website.

Having checked some Brodhead family genealogies, I believe this Luke was probably the son of Luke Brodhead of Revolutionary War fame (my fifth great-grandfather Garret Brodhead‘s younger brother).  I could be wrong, of course, but there have never been that many Luke Brodheads in the family tree, and age-wise Luke Jr. (1777-1845) is a good fit. He would have been about 28 or 29 at the time of this incident, and still a bachelor. Luke Sr., who was left quite disabled by the war, passed away in 1806 at age 65.

On a side note, you may remember one of last July’s posts: “The 1868 murder of Theodore Brodhead of Delaware Water Gap.” Luke Brodhead Jr. was Theodore’s father. Luke Jr. was married to Elizabeth Wills (1789-1873), and together they had nine children—one girl (b. 1812) and eight boys (born between 1814 and 1831), all very tall in stature. Remember how Elizabeth joked that she had “48 feet of sons”?

Luke Jr. and Elizabeth ran an inn* at the Delaware Water Gap beginning circa 1820 to accommodate the influx of tourists to the area. From the “Theodore” post, you know that some of Luke Jr’s sons carried on this tradition, most notably Luke Wills Brodhead, who is deserving of a separate post of his own.

But, back to the story. It’s quite a tale, and I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. It obviously stood the test of time to be featured in a newspaper article some seven decades later! As always, comments, corrections, suggestions are welcome. And of course if you have different thoughts as to which Luke this was, please let me know.

The Evening Gazette. 28 May 1878

The Evening Gazette. 28 May 1878

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MEMORABLE ENCOUNTER.
BATTLE OF THE BUTCHER BOYS AND DELAWARE RIVER RAFTMEN.
A HAND TO HAND CONTEST IN PHILADELPHIA OVER 70 YEARS AGO—HOW 10 RAFTMEN WHIPPED 30 BUTCHERS—DEATH OF THE LAST RAFTMAN ENGAGED IN THE FIGHT.

In the year of 1805 or 1806 a fierce fight took place in Philadelphia between about 30 butchers and 10 Delaware river raftmen. Some of the latter we have the names of. There was Major Ebeneezer Wheeler, his brother Joseph, Squire Holmes, John Weiss, Rock Run and William Tyler [**], Royal Warner, Luke Brodhead, and Captain C. Fennington of Delhi, N.Y.

Joseph Wheeler owned a very fleet black mare. The spring before the fight truth his horse had a race with one owned by the association of butchers. He won the race, but the butchers refused to give up the stakes, and it was finally agreed to have a second trial the following spring.

When the spring came around the race took place, and again there was a controversy as to which was the winning horse. This dispute led to the memorable conflict. Joseph Wheeler was challenged by the butchers to a single combat. This be declined to accept for the reason, as he said to his brother, that there was no prospect of fair play being shown him, the butchers outnumbering the raftmen three to one.

Ebeneezer Wheeler then stepped forward and accepted the challenge offered to his brother. He is represented to have been a man of wonderful strength and at the same time as fleet as a deer. He was just six feet two. Luke Brodhead was the same height, and was a man of great courage.

It was proposed by the butchers that the fight should take place with a rope between the combatants. To this Major Wheeler would not concede, saying: “Gentlemen, if I fight I fight to win, and want nothing between us.” An adjoining field was selected for the contest. The butcher who was to be Mr. Wheeler’s antagonist put one hand on the fence and as if to show his agility sprang over into the lot with a bound. The Major followed and jumped the fence without touching it.

Luke Brodhead and Mr. Weiss happened at the place by accident, not knowing any of the parties. They were mere spectators and not called upon to form a part of the ring around the fighters. The fight between the two men began. Mr. Wheeler’s antagonist fell at the first blow. He arose and the second blow from Mr. W’s big fist again sent him to the earth.

At this juncture Mr. Brodhead saw a butcher strike Wheeler with a heavy whip. (It afterward appeared that all the butchers were armed with loaded whips.) Mr. Brodhead went to one of the butchers and told him of the occurrence. He was thrust aside and told it was none of his business. But he persisted and said he would not stand by and see such foul play practiced. He had scarcely done speaking when he received a heavy blow on the head with a whip. The blow nearly stunned him.

Delaware River. An extract of an 1806 map of New Jersey, depicting the area around Philadelphia and Trenton. Credit: Wikimedia Commons. Source: Source=http://maps.bpl.org/details_12444/?mti

Delaware River. An extract of an 1806 map of New Jersey, depicting the area around Philadelphia and Trenton. Credit: Wikimedia Commons. Source: Source=http://maps.bpl.org/details_12444/?mti

In the mean time the fight in the field had progressed, and Wheeler had given his antagonist such a blow that it nearly killed him. Of course he retired at once from the contest.

But the fight now became general. The butchers used their loaded whips freely and the numbers being greatly in their favor gave them courage. Unfortunately, however, for the butchers every time one of them received a square blow from the raftmen he was forced to leave the field. Their numbers soon became less, none of them caring to risk a second blow. The contest thus steadily grew in favor of the raftmen, none of them becoming disabled. They stood their ground to the last, the butchers dropping away one by one until the field was cleared and the victory won for the sturdy raftmen, the butchers finally running from the field.

The mistake the butchers made was in using their whips instead of their fists. They were large, strong men, yet they could not strike the whip with sufficient force to prostrate one of the sturdy raftmen. Nevertheless some very severe blows were given them. Messrs. Wheeler, Brodhead, and Fennington were cut badly and were confined to their boarding-houses several days under medical treatment.

It is said that Mr. Eb. Wheeler and Brodhead each disabled five butchers from as many blows. Captain Fennington of Delhi was a giant in strength and rendered very efficient aid to the raftmen. Mr. Weiss was badly scared and climbed a tree when the fight became general. He was not to be blamed, however, for he was a little fellow and would not have stood much of a chance. Royal Warner also showed the white feather. Joseph Wheeler got over the fence to see the fight when he received the blow of a loaded whip. He picked up a new beaver hat and left.

Luke Brodhead and the Wheelers became warm friends after this fight. The latter insisted on his accompanying them home after their recovery, which he did and remained with them several months. He frequently visited them. They afterward presented him with a tract of land on the Delaware river in Delaware county, which he declined to accept.

Brodhead was one of the most peaceable of men, and was esteemed for his good character and sound judgment, integrity and love of justice. The characters of Mr. Fennington and the Wheelers were also beyond reproach. Rock Run Tyler, the last of the survivors of this fight, ever memorable among raftmen, died in November, 1877, at a very old age.

That part of the family tree

How we are related

*Better in the Poconos by Lawrence Squeri (Penn State Press, 2010), p. 23.

**I think they mean “William ‘Rock Run’ Tyler” judging from the brief bio about him on p. 634 in the book History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: RT Peck, 1886)

Categories: Brodhead, Delaware Water Gap, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia | 2 Comments

Remembering the women: Elizabeth Depui Brodhead

1851 print by Nagel & Weingartner: Depiction of the women of Bryan Station getting water while Native Americans, who are about to besiege the settlement, watch. Famous event in Kentucky during the American Revolutionary War.

1851 print by Nagel & Weingartner: Depiction of the women of Bryan Station getting water while Native Americans, who are about to besiege the settlement, watch. Famous event in Kentucky during the American Revolutionary War (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain in USA)

While, the men who served in the Revolutionary War are remembered with profound gratitude for their heroic sacrifices, it’s easy to forget that behind them stood an army of highly productive and devoted women: wives, sisters, grandmothers and daughters—women who strove to support the War efforts of their beloved, while keeping the home fires burning. How comforted the men must have been by this knowledge.

One such woman was Elizabeth Depui Brodhead, wife of the famous Colonel Daniel Brodhead and sister-in-law to my fifth great-grandfather Garret. A wonderful bit of biographical detail about Elizabeth can be found on pages 22-23 of Some Pennsylvania Women during the War of the Revolution, by William Henry Engle, MD (Harrisburg, PA: Harrisburg Publishing Co., 1898), and I am including it below. While much has been written about the Colonel, this is the first information I’ve found that sheds a tiny bit of light on Elizabeth. If you are aware of other examples, please share in the comment box below.

The Birth of Old Glory, painting by Edward Percy Moran, ca. 1917 (Public Domain - Wikimedia Commons)

The Birth of Old Glory, painting by Edward Percy Moran, ca. 1917 (Public Domain – Wikimedia Commons)

Elizabeth Depui, youngest daughter of Nicholas Depui, was born in 1740* in what is now Monroe county Pa. She was a descendant from Nicholas Depui, a Huguenot who fled from France to Holland in the year 1685 at the time of the revocation of the Edict of Nantes. Little is known of her early childhood. She received a pretty fair education at one of the Dutch schools in New York, but the major portion of her youthful days were spent on the frontiers of civilization, the wily savage ever hovering around the settlements of the Minisink. On more than one occasion she was obliged to flee to either the blockhouses or the more populous settlements for safety.

Shortly after her marriage she accompanied her husband to the town of Reading where she made her home until after the promulgation of peace. During that trying period the care of a young family was hers, and yet among that coterie of bright and heroic women of the Revolution who were in exile in Reading she shone with lustre. Nothing was too great for her to undertake and her patriotic ardor was always aroused for the welfare of the soldier of the Declaration. She administered to the comfort of the sick and wounded who found their way after convalescence to their several homes upon the frontiers. In those days, the women kept many in clothing as well as the necessaries of life. Help was needed everywhere, and as we of the present day minister to our troops from our abundance, the women of the Revolution did the same out of their poverty. It is true they accomplished much more than we at this distance of time can either appreciate or calculate. Theirs was a day of self denial.

Thomas Eakins' Homespun, 1881 (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain)

Thomas Eakins’ Homespun, 1881 (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain)

They delighted in homespun dresses while luxuries were prepared only for the sick and loving who were battling for the rights of mankind and the independence of their country. And yet we must honor the women of all crises in the history of our beloved land who lead in every philanthropic work to alleviate distress. Their forbears during the struggle for independence were animated by that enlarged patriotic spirit which will enshrine their names to the latest posterity. It was so eminently characteristic of them that a British officer, a prisoner of war, remarked that no soldiers whose mothers, wives, and daughters were so devoted to the cause and so self sacrificing could ever be conquered. Mrs. Brodhead died in the city of Philadelphia toward the close of the year 1799*, but exact date with place of burial have not been ascertained.

I’d love to find more such biographical detail on other women relevant to the families covered within this blog. If anyone has other examples to share, please get in touch/leave a comment. Meanwhile, you can check the list below to see whether any of your female Pennsylvania ancestors were also featured in this book.

********************************************************************************************************************
*Note: According to p. 74 of The Brodhead Family, Volume I, published by the Brodhead Family Association (Port Ewen, NY: 1986), Elizabeth was born in 1739 and was the daughter of Samuel Depuy and Jane McDowell. Also, per their records, she died sometime before 16 May 1781 at Reading, Berks Co., PA. (Daniel married again–his second wife was Rebecca Edgill Mifflin. She died in Philadelphia and was buried there on 15 February 1788.)

NB: Depui is spelled in many different ways (visit Depuy Surname History for a rundown).

Resources:
Women in the American Revolution
The Roles of Women in the Revolutionary War
The Homespun Movement – interesting PDF

********************************************************************************************************************

Other women featured in this book:
Elizabeth Wilkins Allison, 9; Allison, John 9
Rebecca Lyon Armstrong, 11; Armstrong, John 12
Sarah Richardson Atlee, 15; Atlee, Samuel John 15
Mary Quigley Brady, 18; Brady, John 18
Elizabeth Depui Brodhead, 22; Brodhead, Daniel 23
Eleanor Lytle Brown, 26; Brown, Matthew 26
Mary Phillips Bull, 29; Bull, John 29
Sarah Shippen Burd, 33; Burd, James 34
Katharine Hamilton Chambers, 3; Chambers, James 39
Elizabeth Zane Clark, 42; Clark, John 44
Jane Roan Clingan, 45; Clingan, William Jr 46
Martha Crawford Cook, 47; Cook, Edward 47
Sarah Simpson Cooke, 49; Cooke, William 49
Margaret Cochran Corbin, 58; Corbin, John 52
Mary Kelsey Cutter Covenhoven, 55; Covenhoven, Robert 55
Hannah Vance Crawford, 58; Crawford, William 58
Catharine Martin Davidson, 62; Davidson, James 63
Annie Schenck Davies, 65; Davies, Hezekiah 60
Hannah Blair Foster, 67; Foster, William 67
Anne West Gibson, 70; Gibson, George 70
Rachel Marx Graydon, 73; Graydon, Alexander 74
Catharine Ewing Hand, 78; Hand, Edward 79
Margaret Alexander Hamilton, 81; Hamilton, John 81
Katharine Holtzinger Hartley, 83; Hartley, Thomas 83
Mary Ludwig Hays, 85; Hays, John 85
Ann Wood Henry, 87; Henry, William 87
Crecy Covenhoven Hepburn, 90; Hepburn, William 91
Sarah Harris Irvine, 92; Irvine, James 92
Anne Callender Irvine, 94; Irvine, William 95
Jean McDowell Irwin, 98; Irwin, Archibald 98
Alice Erwin Johnston, 100; Johnston, Francis 100
Martha Beatty Johnston, 103; Johnston, Thomas 103
Ann West Alricks Lowrey, 105; Lowrey, Alexander 105
Sarah Nelson McAlister, 108; McAlister, Hugh 108
Sarah Holmes McClean, 110; McClean, Alexander 112
Martha Sanderson McCormick, 113; McCormick, Robert 113
Margaret Lewis McFarland, 115; McFarland, Andrew 115
Martha Hoge McKee, 117; McKee, Thomas 117
Margaret Stout Macpherson, 119; Macpherson, William 120
Marritie Van Brunt Magaw, 122; Magaw, Robert 122
Susanna Miller Mickley, 124; Mickley, John Jacob 124
Sarah Morris Mifflin, 127; Mifflin, Thomas 128
Rachel Rush Boyce Montgomery, 130; Montgomery, Joseph 1
Elizabeth Thompson Moorhead, I34; Moorhead, Fergus 134
Mary White Morris, 137; Morris, Robert 13s
Margaret Mayes Murray, 140; Murray, James 141
Winifred Oldham Neville, I42; Neville, John 143
Mary Carson O’Hara, 14; O’Hara, James 146
Rosina Kucher Orth, I48; Orth, Balzer I48
Sarah McDowell Piper, 150; Piper, William 151
Margaret Lowrey Plumer, 152; Plumer, George I52
Elizabeth Potter Poe, 157; Poe, James 158
Margaret O Brien Pollock, 160; Pollock, Oliver 161
Elizabeth Parker Porter, I64; Porter, Andrew 166
Elizabeth Myer Kelly, 168; Kelly, John 168
Jane Ralston Rosbrugh, 171; Rosbrugh, John 171
Phoebe Bayard St Clair, 171; St Clair, Arthur 174
Margaret Murray Simpson, 178; Simpson, John 178
Maria Thompson Sproat, 180; Sproat, William 180
Martha Espy Stewart, 182; Stewart, Lazarus 182
Hannah Tiffany Swetland, I84; Swetland, Luke 185
Ursula Muller Thomas, 187; Thomas, Martin 187
Catharine Ross Thompson, I89; Thompson, William 190
Hannah Harrison Thomson, 192; Thomson, Charles 193
Elizabeth Grosz Traill, 195; Traill, Robert 19
Lydia Hollingsworth Wallis, 198; Wallis, Samuel 198
Jean Murray Watts, 201; Watts, Frederick 201
Mary Penrose Wayne, 204; Wayne, Anthony 205
Mary Agneta Bechtel Weygandt, 207; Weygandt, Cornelius 207

Categories: Brodhead, Monroe Co., Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Revolutionary War | 6 Comments

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