Jaques

Calling card left for Mr. & Mrs. Isaac Jaques

Isaac Jaques (1791-1880) Courtesy of San Benito County Historical Society

A calling card left for Mr. & Mrs. Isaac Jaques by Mr. & Mrs. John A. Gunn. Given it is undated, the Mrs. Jaques could have been Isaac’s first wife Wealthy Ann Cushman (1793-1856; m. 1812) or his second wife, widow Rebecca Gold Robinson (1804-1886; m. between 1856-1860).

We know nothing of the circumstances, obviously, but after reading up on calling card etiquette, I believe this may have been an invitation to some sort of party / special social gathering. The envelope is quite decorative. Experts, feel free to weigh in.

I looked for a John A. Gunn and came up with one born in New York in 1820, so perhaps this was a friend of Isaac’s from his days in Manhattan where he was once a well-known and highly successful tailor before retiring across the Hudson River to his Elizabethtown country estate. (For more on Isaac, visit this past post.)

Below are some calling card etiquette resources, in case you want to brush up 🙂 — our ancestors who lived during the 19th century when they were in custom would have been well versed in all the nuances of their use. Personally I find it quite fascinating. It was indeed a much different time–no doubt they would find today’s varied forms of communicating and interacting rather head-spinning to say the least!  Bonne fin de semaine!

Calling Cards for LadiesMass historia website
Calling Cards for GentlemenMass historia website
The Gentleman’s Guide to Calling CardsThe Art of Manliness blog

Advertisements
Categories: Elizabeth, Union Co., Jaques | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

Wealthy Ann Cushman Jaques and the possible Mayflower connection

View of Plymouth Harbor fall or spring of 1973

Happy Thanksgiving to all this blog’s readers! Thank you for your support and encouragement this past year, and thanks to all of you who have shared information, supplied material for guest posts, or written guest posts yourself.  I have seen this blog continue to help people connect with family members near and far, and for that I am also very grateful.

Today’s post may be of interest to descendants of Isaac Jaques and Wealthy Ann Cushman and it concerns the possible familial link between Wealthy and the youngest of the Mayflower’s 102 passengers—Mary Allerton. (Anyone out there with information on that link, please do get in touch via the comment box below or my email address which appears on the ‘About’ page.)

I had absolutely no idea when I visited Plimoth Plantation at age 12 that I may be related Mary Allerton. I recall wandering that open-air museum on a very cold and raw day, thinking about what it must have been like to get through just one day of life in the 1620s, let alone entire months and years. Brrr—just thinking about it makes me cold. (Ever see the episode of Colonial House where Oprah and her friend Gayle “go back in time” 400 years to experience life in a Maine settlement? See https://vimeo.com/2811969. Again, all I can say is Brrrrrrrrrrr….) Our foreparents were made of extremely tough stuff! (Four hundred years from now, they may be saying that about us, which is hard to imagine given how comfortable life is today, compared to 400 years ago.)

Angus_Job_W_obit 002

Elizabeth Daily Journal obit for Job Winans Angus Jr.

Forward to 2016. You may recall that I was somewhat flabbergasted this past summer to come across an obit for Job Winans Angus Jr. in which it was stated that Job had an ancestor who came over on the Mayflower. A little hand-written note I found from Job’s nephew Thomas Russum seemed to confirm that this was indeed something worth exploring even if it was, perhaps, wishful thinking on their part. The ancestor on whom all this hinged was Wealthy Ann Cushman: wife of Isaac Jaques, mother of Wealthy (Jaques) Angus, and my third-great-grandmother. Thomas’s note mentioned a father Eleazer and a mother Mary Zooker/s with a question mark next to her first and last names. The year of death for Eleazer was given as 1792, again with a question mark. The mother “Mary? Zooker/s?” was noted as having remarried someone named Keeney and having had two children with him: Aaron and Jane. I did find a death record for a Mercy Keeney who was presumably born around 1779. If the circa 1779 birth date is accurate, she would have given birth at age 14/15, so this may be a red herring; if the date is off and she was older when Wealthy was born, this could be the correct Mercy.

I subsequently found, on page 206 of Families of Early Hartford, an Eleasur Cushman listed as having been buried in the Center Church Ancient Burying Ground in Hartford, Connecticut: “Eleasur Cushman died Aug 9, 1795 ae 27 bur Center Church. Widow Mercy Cushman.”  I believe this Eleasur may very well be the father of Wealthy Ann Cushman, who was born in Hartford, CT, on November 11, 1793, and that “Mary? Zooker/s?” was Mercy Cushman, but proving that is an entirely different thing. (Wealthy Ann Cushman married Isaac Jaques on Feb 4, 1812, and they named their second son Eleazer (b. 1820), which may be more than coincidence).

Another thing to prove is the link back from Eleasur Cushman of Hartford to his parents—possibly Seth Cushman (1734-1771) and Abiah Allen. They had a son named Eleazer, born July 17, 1768 in Dartmouth, Massachusetts. If you add 27 years to 1768, you come up with 1795, the year of death of Hartford’s Eleasur Cushman.

life_1904

Life Magazine 1904

The links between Seth Cushman and Mary Allerton (1616-1699; wife of Thomas Cushman, 1608-1691) have all been proven and are all documented.

So the challenge is to definitively connect Wealthy Ann Cushman with Eleasur Cushman and Eleasur Cushman to Seth Cushman. If those connections don’t exist, it will be back to square one. I contacted the Connecticut State Archives hoping for some clues about the Cushman family of Hartford, but they had nothing new to tell me. I also contacted the Mayflower Society (MS), but they had no information on anyone using Seth and Abiah Cushman’s son Eleazer to prove Mayflower ancestry. It is up to us descendants to do it. The MS was very helpful and supportive, so as time goes on, maybe they will help steer me in some fruitful directions.

I know from reading some letters that Wealthy’s daughter Wealthy (Jaques) Angus of Elizabeth, NJ, stayed in contact with Hartford relatives and visited them periodically, but I have found no new clues that would better ID them. Perhaps, someone out there has a box of old letters that contains some answers?

Anyway, we are standing before a brick wall of sorts and hopefully, we’ll figure it all out. Perhaps, in time for next Thanksgiving – 2017? It would be fun to be able to pass this info on to the little ones in the family. We shall see!

Again, best wishes to you all for a very blessed Thanksgiving 2016.

Categories: Angus, Connecticut, Cushman, Elizabeth, Union Co., Hartford, Jaques, Mayflower 1620, New Jersey | Tags: , , | 7 Comments

Photograph of Isaac Jaques (1791-1880) of Elizabeth, NJ

Courtesy of San Benito County Historical Society

Isaac Jaques (1791-1880) –  Courtesy of San Benito County Historical Society

An amazing discovery: the existence of an image of Isaac Jaques of Elizabeth, New Jersey, father of my second-great-grandmother Wealthy Jaques (wife of James W. Angus).

I have written rather extensively about Isaac and some of his family members, as you know. First wife Wealthy Cushman of Hartford, CT, died in 1856; and he and Wealthy had nine children: Jane (1814-1843), Wealthy (1815-1892), Isaac (1817-bef. 1880), Eleazer (1820-?), John (1822-1895), Samuel (1824-1858), Walter (1826-1850), Christopher (1831-1851), and Charles (1834-1866).

Isaac’s second wife was Rebecca Ann Gold Robinson (widow of William J. Robinson); and, at some point, descendants of one of Rebecca’s sisters donated an album containing old Gold family photos to the San Benito County [California] Historical Society. In the album was this image of “Uncle Isaac,” as well as one of Rebecca.  I am indebted to an Ancestry dot come member for telling me about the image. She is a descendant of one of Rebecca’s sisters.

The photo of Isaac is not dated, but it must have been taken not too long before he passed away, in August 1880 at the age of 89.

Note: I had to pay a small fee to acquire this low-resolution image and get permission to publish it on this blog. If you want a high-resolution copy for your personal use (no sharing via email, no posting on Ancestry, social media, etc.), you can contact the San Benito Historical Society directly and officially request one (for a fee). You can also request an image of Rebecca Robinson Jaques. I paid for the high-res image of her but did not pay the extra fee to be able to post a low-res image here.

Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., Jaques, New Jersey | Tags: , | 2 Comments

Image of Dr. Charles Berry Jaques, Civil War surgeon for Union Army

Surgeon, Harpers Weekly, July 12, 1862

Surgeon, Harpers Weekly, July 12, 1862

I just noticed that a Find a Grave contributor has uploaded a carte de visite of Charles Berry Jaques to that website. It is different from the other two images I have seen. To view the Find a Grave image, click here. You may recall I published a three-part series on Charles a while back. To view the first post, click here. That one will take you to the others.

Update 5.31.16: Permission granted by Find a Grave contributor Russ Kasper to include the image here. Thanks, Russ!

Jaques_Charles_B_2

Categories: Civil War, Jaques | 3 Comments

Early-20th-century newspaper discussions about the Jaques family of Woodbridge, New Jersey

I’ve written about various members of the Jaques family before; and have learned never to get too cocky about the family tree I’ve put together for them. Whenever I think I have things wrapped up in a pretty little bow, something inevitably comes along that knocks me off my pedestal.

But, it’s good to know I am not the first, nor probably the last, to be stumped about certain aspects of the family tree; I have letters written by grandchildren of James Angus and Wealthy Jaques Angus in which information is shared, sifted, and sorted through, and questions are raised.

One area of confusion concerned Wealthy’s grandfather Samuel Barron Jaques (1730-1799) and who exactly his parents were. I did a post on that in March 2013 (see: “Samuel B. Jaques (d. 1798/9) of Woodbridge, New Jersey“) and seemed to be able to draw a few conclusions there.

From Samuel on down, things seem pretty clear; see my post “Striking gold: Gleanings from the Samuel Barron Jaques family Bible” which includes a clipping from the Newark News containing information written by James Angus Knowles, a grandson of Wealthy’s. The family Bible information is fantastic, of course, but if the information in the clipping is indeed correct, it indicates (as I’ve remarked before) that Samuel and his wife Mary Coddington had a 39-year age difference and that their children started arriving when Samuel was in his early sixties. (Wealthy & James Angus’s grandchildren found that remarkable as well.) So, perhaps, someday evidence of a 1st marriage will surface.

In any event, I’ve come across more Newark News communications regarding the Jaques Family history. So, evidently the clipping I found almost two years ago and put in that “Striking gold” post was one of a number of “back and forths” James Angus Knowles had via the paper’s “Jersey Genealogy” column, circa 1914-1915. Some entry numbers mentioned are not in my possession (i.e., 4912 and 4938) so I can’t include them here, obviously.

I’ve had a quick look through them and nothing is popping out at me with regards to figuring out Samuel Barron Jaques’ possible other marriage(s). But I know a few of this blog’s readers are hot on the trail of different lines of the Jaques family, so rather than take the time to dissect all the information in these additional two clippings, I am just going to post them here on the off chance they may be of use to someone. There is a lot of non-Jaques info as well (Docherty; Applegate; Wainwright; Hull; Coleman; Whitehead; Roll; Winans; Denham; Ball; Mead; Keeler;  and Sutton; Salem County Church Inscriptions for Trullender, Watson, Wood, and Woodruff), so who knows?—maybe someone will find an interesting morsel there, too.

As always, comments, corrections, additions, etc., are always welcome.

NO. 4920—FIRST SETTLERS OF PISCATAWAY AND WOODBRIDGE—JAQUES FAMILY—Continued from No. 4912 in issue of Saturday last.
Jersey_Genealogy2_date_unknown_EDJ 2b

No. 4965 JAQUES (Referring to No. 4938, by JAK, in issue of January 2, 1915)
Jersey_Genealogy_date_unknown_EDJ 1a

No. 4995—JAQUES—Referring to No. 4965, by FWG, in relation to No. 4938 of JAK)
Jersey_Genealogy_date_unknown_EDJ 3a

Categories: Angus, Jaques, Knowles, New Jersey, Newark, Essex Co., Woodbridge | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Isaac G. de G. Angus (1840-1885)

James W. Angus

James W. Angusimage from my family’s private collection

Wealthy Ann (Jaques) Angus

Wealthy Ann (Jaques) Angusimage from my family’s private collection

Isaac Gabriel de Guadaloupe Angus1,the eldest child of James Winans Angus and Wealthy Ann Jaques (married 26 January 1839) was born on 12 January 1840². In terms of his first name, little Isaac was likely named after Wealthy’s father, Isaac Jaques, but I have no idea where the very unusual “Gabriel de Guadaloupe” comes from. There are a number of places in Mexico with Guadalupe (alternate spelling: Guadaloupe) in their name, including an area of Mexico City, apparently. As Isaac’s birth preceded James and Wealthy’s relocation to Mexico before the Mexican-American War, perhaps Gabriel was someone they met in New Jersey or someone in Mexico with whom they corresponded who was of such great assistance to the family in making arrangements for their upcoming move to Mexico that they decided to name their first-born child after him. While it could be completely off the mark, that’s my best theory at this point. If anyone reading this has other thoughts on the matter, please chime in.

Norwich Harbor, 1906

Norwich Harbor, 1906 (Credit: Wikimedia)

There was about a 22-year span between Isaac G. de G. Angus’s birth and the birth of James and Wealthy’s 11th, and youngest, child Walter Prince Angus. Some sources say Isaac was born in Norwich, CT, but the family Bible indicated that the birth took place in ‘Elizabeth Town, New Jersey’, and I am more inclined to believe the latter.  Then, the young family moved to Norwich, where second child James was born.

Fall of Mexico City during the Mexican-American War, painting by Carl Nebel. Published in the 1851 book "The War Between the United States and Mexico, Illustrated".  (Public Domain - Wikipedia)

Fall of Mexico City during the Mexican-American War, painting by Carl Nebel. Published in the 1851 book “The War Between the United States and Mexico, Illustrated”. (Public Domain – Wikipedia)

NY Tribune, Thursday, 28 Jun 1860

The New York Tribune, Thursday, 28 Jun 1860, courtesy of http://www.fultonhistory.com

James Angus was an entrepreneur. Attracted to Mexico’s affordable labor and high-quality coach-making materials, he went to Mexico City in 1842/early 1843, and Wealthy joined him with their two boys (Isaac and James Jr.) some time later.³ The family’s residence there coincided with the tumult of the Mexican-American War, in which James and Wealthy played a role. All survived the experience, and the family departed Mexico in early 1849, when James’ health problems forced them to head home to New Jersey.  Returning with them were two more children, both born in Mexico: Jacob Baker Angus and Mary Martha Angus4. [More on the Mexico years in an upcoming post]

Some six to seven years after returning to NJ, Isaac entered Princeton University. He graduated on 27 June 1860 with an AB degree5 and went on to be employed as a clerk in the Union County Surrogate’s Office, a position he held for many years6.

In 1862, the Angus family’s world was shattered when James W. Angus died of erysipelas7, also known as St. Anthony’s Fire ( disease that was dreaded in the Middle Ages), a bacterial infection of the upper dermis and superficial lymphatics. I found one website that describes the disease as being caused by the consumption of ergot (a fungus that contaminates grains such as rye). It’s not usually fatal unless there are complications, so James’ case must have been particularly severe. He was only 52. Wealthy was left a widower with a very large brood of children, aged 1 – 22, to tend to. In the years ahead, her home became the anchor for some of her children (or their spouses) after losing their life partner and needing a place for themselves and their children to stay. It’s no wonder she had to slowly peel off and sell real estate holdings to keep her household going8.

"New Jersey, County Marriages, 1682-1956," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VWR3-3R8 : accessed 17 April 2015), Isaac G Angus and Susan M Robinson, 08 Jun 1865; citing Union, New Jersey, New Jersey State Archives, Trenton; FHL microfilm 1,301,706.

“New Jersey, County Marriages, 1682-1956,” index and images, FamilySearch (https: //familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VWR3-3R8 : accessed 17 April 2015), Isaac G Angus and Susan M Robinson, 08 Jun 1865; citing Union, New Jersey, New Jersey State Archives, Trenton; FHL microfilm 1,301,706.

On June 8, 1865, in Elizabeth City, NJ9, Isaac married Susan Maria Robinson (b. 5 Aug 1837 in Brookfield, Worcester, MA10), the daughter of Jeremiah and Julia Robinson, who were both originally from Massachusetts.

(According to the 1850 census11, Susan (age 12) and the rest of the Robinson family were living in Elizabeth, NJ. Jeremiah was listed as a merchant with real estate holdings valued at $6,500 (almost $192,000 in today’s currency).

Among Susan’s siblings were Oscar B. Robinson and Zachary T. Robinson.) A first child, James W. Angus, was born to Isaac G. de. G. Angus and Susan Robinson on 22 Jun 186612. On 22 Jan 186713 (according to NJ Births and Christening Records), a male child was born, but that birth is not recorded in the family Bible, so I am not sure what to make of this record. Did this child die a short time after birth? Or was this James, and the DOB was recorded incorrectly in the Bible? The former seems more probable to me.

Almost exactly nine months later, another son was born, Isaac Jaques Angus14 (30 Oct 1867)—named after his paternal grandfather. And yet another son, George Belcher Angus, was born on 5 Nov 186915, in Elizabeth, NJ.

The 1870 census16 shows the Isaac and Susan Angus household consisting of:
Isaac Angus, M, 30  – birthplace New Jersey
Susan Angus, F, 30 – birthplace Massachusetts
Isaac Angus, M, 2 – birthplace New Jersey
George Angus, M, 0 – birthplace New Jersey
Joshua Robinson, M, 20 – birthplace New Jersey [a brother of Susan’s?]

Son James, who would have been four at the time, is not present. Had he passed away?

Two years passed, and tragedy struck. That summer, little Isaac died on 1 August 187217, just shy of his sixth birthday. He was followed four days later by little George, who died on 5 August 187218. It goes without saying that this must have been a devastating blow to the parents and the extended family; especially if they had indeed lost little James too. A worldwide smallpox epidemic that began in 1871 claimed eight million lives; had this been the cause of death for Isaac and George?

It must have been a joyous day when Isaac and Susan’s welcomed their last child Addison Clark Angus on 17 December 187519.

In 1880, the Census20 shows the family residing at 848 Second Avenue, Elizabeth, NJ, and consisting of:
Household     Gender     Age     Birthplace
Isaac G Angus     M     40     New Jersey, United States
Susan M Angus   F     40     Massachusetts, United States
Adison Angus     M     4     New Jersey, United States

Five years later, Isaac G. de G. Angus died—on 9 May 188521 at 44 years and four months. Subsequently, it appears that Susan and Addison moved in, at least temporarily, with mother-in-law Wealthy Ann (Jaques) Angus, because the 1885 NJ Census22 shows Wealthy’s household consisting of the following:

Wealthy Angus   F  [over 60 yrs; family matriarch Wealthy Jaques Angus, widow of James Winans Angus Sr.]
Walter Angus     M  [age 20-60; Wealthy’s youngest son, b. 1861)
Lavinia Angus     F  [age 20-60; Wealthy’s daughter, b. 1858)
James Angus     M  [age 20-60; likely James Winans Angus Jr, widower, b. 1841)
James Angus     M  [age 20-60; duplicate entry?]
Alfred Angus     M  [age 5-20; likely Alfred Carpenter Angus, b. 1873, son of James Winans Angus Jr.)
Christopher Angus  M [age 0-4; likely Christopher Angus, b. 1880, son of James Winans Angus Jr., died of hydrocephalus, buried 30 Sept 1885)
Susan Angus     F [age 20-60; widow of Isaac G. de G. Angus]
Addison Clark Angus     M [age 5-20; surviving son of Susan Angus and the late Isaac G. de G. Angus]

Addison was so young at the time of his father’s death, he may have grown up without any real recollections of him. And then at age 14, he lost Susan as well. She was  51. According to Evergreen Cemetery records, she died in February 1889 and was buried on the 25th of that month. The cause of death was given as ‘mania’.

I can’t help but wonder what happened to Susan and how long she had been experiencing problems. What must Addison have gone through? ‘Mania’ back then indicated “insanity” or “madness”. The Michigan Family History website has a page on the topic of medical terms used long ago. The entry for mania says: Any of the forms of mental illness, or dementia. May also mean, along with the term “vapors” that the individual died from acute alcohol ingestion, or the DTs. In the 1800s it was defined as severe insanity. Acute mania was used as a term for death when the patient had been hospitalized in a mental institution. It would be hard to say exactly what the mental illness was. The topic was covered in the article “Lunacy in the 19th Century: Women’s Admission to Asylums in United States of America” (click here to view).  And often it did not take much to be locked up back then, as you can see from this Slate article, “Those Funny 19th-Century Reasons for Admission to Mental Institutions” (to view it, click here.)

Isaac and their two little sons were disinterred from the churchyard of the First Presbyterian Church of Elizabeth and removed to Evergreen on 13 February 1890 to be buried next to Susan. I asked a Find a Grave volunteer to locate the graves for me (Plot 207, Section F), but they could not find any Angus markers in that vicinity.

Addison certainly was faced with challenges in his young life, losing both parents the way he did.  His entry in a college yearbook23 indicates he spent time in Oakham, MA—perhaps with grandparents or other relatives. He went on to attend Oberlin Academy24 in the mid-1890s and Yale25 (graduated 1901; 1913-1915, MA History), and lived a very long life. He died in 1970, having made it into his mid 90’s26.

1909 U.S. print advertisement. Scanned from Early American Automobiles (out of print). Previously uploaded to en:Wikipedia by Richardj311 (Public domain in USA)

1909 U.S. print advertisement. Scanned from Early American Automobiles (out of print). Previously uploaded to en:Wikipedia by Richardj311 (Public domain in USA)

I found out a bit more information about him, including evidence of three marriages. One of them, which involved a whirlwind wedding in an automobile, to a wealthy new divorcée, Mrs. Elsie Brinkerhoff Sanford (a daughter of the Fargo family—as in Wells Fargo), was quite amusing—so amusing, in fact, that the story ended up in newspapers all over the country and even halfway around the world in New Zealand!!! Some clippings are below, Each one varies slightly; clues are sprinkled throughout. One article—in the Mathews Journal of Virginia—says the groom gave his age as 26 and the bride said she was 34, and both said they’d been married previously. Perhaps his merry mood made Addison say he was 26. Born in 1875, he would have been 37 at the time! Another article said the couple had just wrapped up an auto tour of Maine and were on their way back to NYC (The Springfield Union (MA), 18 Sept. 1912; available through Genealogy Bank); Addison is buried in Maine, so perhaps that was the trip that first introduced him to the extraordinary beauty of that state. The other details I’ve discovered about Addison I will keep under my hat since they are of a more recent nature, relatively speaking.

My great-grandmother Wealthy (Angus) Woodruff was one of Isaac G. de G. Angus’s little sisters; they were about 10 years apart. Their two families no doubt interacted frequently given they all lived in Elizabeth, not too far from each other. I have a few very old letters somewhere that reference Isaac’s family and will put them on my list of things to scan and share in a future post. As always, corrections, comments, additions, etc., are very welcome.

Addison_Clark_Angus_marriage2_Trove_httpnla.gov.aunla.news-article33416747

Auckland Star, Volume XLIII, Issue 276, 9 November 1912, Page 18

Addison_Clark_Angus_marriage

San Francisco Call, Vol. 112, No. 109, 17 September 1912 – California Digital Newspaper Collection – “A Freely Accessible Repository of Digitized California Newspapers from 1846 to the Present” – California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, <http://cdnc.ucr.edu&gt;. All newspapers published before January 1, 1923 are in the public domain and therefore have no restrictions on use.

New York Telegram, 16 September 1912 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

New York Telegram, 16 September 1912 (Credit: fultonhistory.com)

Mathews Journal (VA), Vol. 9, No. 32, 26 September 1912 (Credit: Library of Virginia Digital Archives)

Mathews Journal (VA), Vol. 9, No. 32, 26 September 1912 (Credit: Library of Virginia Digital Archives)

New York Times, 21 June 1912

The New York Times, 21 June 1912 – Elsie was a divorcée, not a widow as one article suggests.

Notes:

  1. Angus family Bible
  2. Angus family Bible
  3. One Line of Descendants of James Angus, 1751-1896 compiled by Harriet Stryker-Rodda and published in 1969, p. 9.
  4. One Line of Descendants of James Angus, 1751-1896 compiled by Harriet Stryker-Rodda and published in 1969, p. 9
  5. New York Tribune, Thursday, 28 Jun 1860
  6. One Line of Descendants of James Angus, 1751-1896 compiled by Harriet Stryker-Rodda and published in 1969, p. 13
  7. One Line of Descendants of James Angus, 1751-1896 compiled by Harriet Stryker-Rodda and published in 1969, p. 11
  8. One Line of Descendants of James Angus, 1751-1896 compiled by Harriet Stryker-Rodda and published in 1969, p. 12
  9. “New Jersey, County Marriages, 1682-1956,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VWR3-3R8 : accessed 17 April 2015), Isaac G Angus and Susan M Robinson, 08 Jun 1865; citing Union, New Jersey, New Jersey State Archives, Trenton; FHL microfilm 1,301,706.
  10. “Massachusetts, Births and Christenings, 1639-1915,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VQ6J-CNL : accessed 17 April 2015), Susan Maria Robinson, 05 Aug 1837; citing BROOKFIELD,WORCESTER,MASSACHUSETTS, ; FHL microfilm 0547195 IT 1.
  11. “United States Census, 1850,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M6MX-6P2 : accessed 17 April 2015), Susan M Robinson in household of Jeremiah Robinson, Elizabeth, Essex, New Jersey, United States; citing family 964, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  12. Angus family Bible
  13. “New Jersey, Births and Christenings, 1660-1980,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FCTD-955 : accessed 16 April 2015), Isaac Angus in entry for Angus, 22 Jan 1867; citing Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey, reference v AG p 203B; FHL microfilm 584,583.
  14. “New Jersey, Births and Christenings, 1660-1980,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FC2X-SZR : accessed 16 April 2015), Isaac Angus in entry for Isaac J. Angus, 30 Oct 1867; citing Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey, reference v BV 2 p 998; FHL microfilm 494,163.
  15. Angus family Bible
  16. “United States Census, 1870,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MN68-PYJ : accessed 16 April 2015), Isaac Angus, New Jersey, United States; citing p. 29, family 236, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,389.
  17. “New Jersey Deaths and Burials, 1720-1988,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FZ8S-DX7 : accessed 16 April 2015), Isaac Angus in entry for Isaac G. Angus, 01 Aug 1872; citing Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey, reference v A-V p 319; FHL microfilm 584,595.
  18. “New Jersey Deaths and Burials, 1720-1988,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FZ8S-DXH : accessed 16 April 2015), Isaac Angus in entry for George B. Angus0, 05 Aug 1872; citing Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey, reference v A-V p 319; FHL microfilm 584,595.
  19. “New Jersey, Births and Christenings, 1660-1980,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FCG8-6D9 : accessed 17 April 2015), Addison C. Angus, 17 Dec 1875; citing Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey, reference v CL p 461; FHL microfilm 494,180.
  20. “United States Census, 1880,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MNDS-VLF : accessed 17 April 2015), Adison Angus in household of Isaac G Angus, Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey, United States; citing enumeration district 167, sheet 114A, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 0800; FHL microfilm 1,254,800.
  21. Evergreen Cemetery records
  22. “New Jersey, State Census, 1885,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:6BFT-JT2 : accessed 17 April 2015), Susan Angus in household of Wealthy Angus, Elizabeth, Ward 03, Union, New Jersey; citing p. , Department of State, Trenton; FHL microfilm .
  23. The 1901 entry for him in the Yale yearbook reads: ADDISON CLARK ANGUS ‘Agnes’  – ‘Began his career at Elizabeth, N.J. The record of his life has been carelessly kept, for he does not know when he was born nor his father’s name and occupation. He does know, however, that he himself has lived not only in Elizabeth but also in Oakham, Mass., and that his paternal ancestor graduated from Princeton in ’63. We guess that the date of his birth was …. and have ascertained that his father, …. is a …. Prepared at Oberlin Academy, Oberlin, O.
  24. Source: ‘Cl.’ in Catalogue of Oberlin College for the year 1896.
  25. “United States Census, 1900,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M97Q-LBW : accessed 14 Dec 2013), Addison Angus, Yale University Ward 1, New Haven, Connecticut, United States; citing sheet , family , NARA microfilm publication T623, FHL microfilm 1240144.
  26. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=41155314
Categories: Angus, Jaques, New Jersey 1885, Norwich, Robinson, US Federal 1850, US Federal 1870, US Federal 1880 | Tags: | 7 Comments

Dr. Charles B. Jaques, assistant surgeon during the Civil War for 7th Regiment New Jersey (Post III)

Scan of the cover of my personal copy of the book

Scan of the cover of my personal copy of the book

In my first post on Charles B. Jaques, I wrote in paragraph #12 that the 1863 publication Report of Major-General John Pope. Letter from the secretary of war, in answer to resolution of the House of 18th ultimo, transmitting copy of report of Major General John Pope described Charles as being ‘missing’, last seen on the battlefield near Centreville, Virginia, tending to the wounded on August 29, 1862.

Well, I have since learned why Charles was described as missing thanks to the marvelous book Give It to Them, Jersey Blues! by John Hayward (Hightstown, NJ, Longstreet House, 1998, 355 pages—available on Amazon).

Page 69: “Assistant Surgeon Charles Jaques also returned after being captured at Bull Run. During the battle, Jaques had positioned himself just behind the firing line. When the Regiment withdrew, he elected to stay with the wounded who could not be brought back. … Lieutenant Colonel Francine thought that Jaques was wrong in staying behind, so he arrested the doctor upon his return. Francine felt that the doctor should have helped tend to the seventeen wounded men that had been brought from the field. No charges were ever brought against Jaques and he was released  after only a few days.”

Imagine positioning yourself just behind a firing line…I can’t imagine the courage that took.

Charles in mentioned fleetingly several more times in the book (pp. 91, 93, 151), and his photo appears on p. 209. (I have written to the publishers to request permission to include the image in this blog, but have not gotten a response yet.)

In one case (pp. 91, 93), Charles and Lt. Col. Price observe that Francine appears “so dry and parched that he could barely speak above a whisper.” On Charles’ advice, Francine turned the Regiment over to Price and moved to the rear.  In another (p. 151), when the number of sick men in the regiment was rising alarmingly, Charles is noted as expressing great concern about the lack of fresh water and fruits and vegetables for the men.

The book is a marvelous tribute to the men of NJ’s Seventh Regiment. It contains a wealth of information and a large photo gallery. If you have an ancestor who served in this regiment, you just may find their image here.

Categories: Civil War, Jaques, New Jersey | Leave a comment

Dr. Charles B. Jaques, assistant surgeon during the Civil War for 7th Regiment New Jersey (Post II)

I love middle names. They can be so helpful when researching family members who were actually given a middle name, a practice that started in the US in the first half of the 19th century. Even a middle initial can be very useful.

Once armed with the middle name “Berry” (see last post) for Civil War assistant surgeon Dr. Charles B. Jaques (my second great-grandmother Wealthy Jaques Angus’s youngest sibling), I was able to find his cause of death.

The book Catalogue of the Alumni, Officers and Fellow, 1807-1891, published by Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons (NY: Bradstreet Press, 1891, p. 79) states that Charles (Class of 1856) died from cardiac disease. Born on Valentine’s Day 1834, Charles was just 32 at the time of his death. He’d saved many lives during his Civil War years with New Jersey’s 7th Regiment, yet his own life could not be saved. Perhaps, some childhood illness finally took its toll.

p. 37

(Note: they have a typo in his year of death, which was 1866 (vice 1876) according to his obituary notice and grave marker.)

If you would like to view a carte de visite of Charles, one is currently on display on the Heritage Auction website. Copyright restrictions prohibit me from showing the photo here, but you can view it yourself. Just click on this link—he is in the top row, third from the left.

Categories: Brooklyn, Civil War, Death, Jaques, New York City, Old Somerville Cemetery NJ | Leave a comment

Striking gold: Gleanings from the Samuel Barron Jaques family Bible

p. 253 The Book of Family Crests, London: Henry Washbourne & Co., 1951

p. 253 The Book of Family Crests, London: Henry Washbourne & Co., 1851

A year plus ago, I did a post on Samuel Barron Jaques (1730-1798/9), a fourth great-grandfather, who lived on the Jaques (pronounced “Jay-quiss”) family farm in Locust Grove, which was just north of Woodbridge, New Jersey, as I recall. There were numerous subsequent posts about his son Isaac (1791-1880), my third great-grandfather, a Manhattan tailor who removed to Elizabeth, NJ) and the children of Isaac I’d managed to discover: Jane, John, Isaac, Walter, Christopher, and Charles. All of them came as a surprise to me since we’d always believed my second great-grandmother Wealthy Jaques Angus (b. 1815) was the only child of Isaac and wife Wealthy Ann Cushman of Hartford, CT, a circumstance seemingly corroborated by the voluminous Jaques Family Genealogy (ed. by Roger Jaques and Patricia Jaques for the Jaques Family Association, published 1995): on page 457 the book describes Wealthy Ann Jaques as being the …only child of Isaac and Wealthy A. (Cushman) Jaques….

Well, as Sod’s law would have it, I’ve just now come across a thin, browned Newark News clipping from 13 March 1915 (according to the handwriting en verso) that was stuffed in an old envelope with a bunch of other papers. I sure wish I’d come upon this clipping a long time ago, but better late than never, as the saying goes. But, those of us researching our family trees would probably all agree that we’ll take gold whenever we can get it, and gold for me was learning names and dates contained in the Samuel Barron Jaques family Bible. It doesn’t get much better than this.

The clipping, which must have been taken from a newspaper column that focused on family history, gives the names and birth dates of all of Samuel Barron and Mary (Coddington) Jaques’s children, as well as all the names and birth dates for Isaac and Wealthy (Cushman) Jaques’s children.

I discovered that—after all my research—I’d still missed two of their children: Eleazer Jaques (b. 1820) and Samuel Barron Jaques (b. 1824). But, nonetheless, the fact that I had managed to nail the others into place prior to this with varying degrees of biographical detail brought some satisfaction. Significantly, the Family Bible provides middle names, and those can be very valuable when researching an individual. Of course, they can also lead to new questions such as why this or that name? For example, I learned that dentist son Walter’s full name was Walter Madison Smith Jaques, and Christopher P. Jaques was Christopher Prince Jaques. The Prince middle name was familiar to me. Walter and Christopher’s sister Wealthy Jaques Angus (my ssecond great-grandmother) had named her youngest son Walter Prince Angus (b. 1861). I believe Christopher (b. 1831) and Walter (b. 1826) died while still in their 20’s/30’s, though I have yet to find exact death dates for them. But Wealthy’s decision to name her youngest Walter Prince may have been to honor her late brothers. In addition, a long while ago, I discovered that one of the siblings’ brothers, John Barron Jaques (b. 1822), named his youngest child (b. 1853) Walter M. S. Jaques, and now I think I can guess what those middle initials stand for!

The clipping starts off mentioning the initials of F. W. G. and J. A. K. I have no idea who F. W. G. was, but feel quite certain that the latter was James Angus Knowles, son of Mary Martha Angus Knowles (b. 1846, a daughter of the aforementioned Wealthy Jaques Angus and James Angus) and Austin Fellows Knowles. James Angus Knowles was a great-grandson of Isaac Jaques, and evidence I’ve seen (in the form of genealogical details written on his letterhead) suggests he had a strong interest in the Angus/Jaques family history. I assume that the Samuel Barron Jaques family Bible may have been passed down along his Knowles family line, or perhaps it is now with the descendants of one of James’s siblings.

Dr. Moses Jaques bio from p. 126, History of Union and Middlesex Counties, New Jersey with Biographical Sketches of many of their Prominent Men (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1882)

Dr. Moses Jaques bio from p. 126, History of Union and Middlesex Counties, New Jersey with Biographical Sketches of many of their Prominent Men (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1882)

Also of interest are the final details mentioned of the Jaques’s family coat of arms, which was then apparently likely in the possession of the descendants of Dr. Moses Jaques (1770-1858), a nephew of Samuel Barron Jaques: The Jaques family is of French descent, the name originally spelled Jacques; of Huguenot origin, fled to England during the fifteenth century. The arms in shield is a fer-de-neorelin (a mill iron), with five stars. Crest: A horse’s head and neck stuck with a tilting spear. Motto: Detur forti palma (the reward given to the brave).

So, to close, below are my updated family tree for these three generations of the Samuel Barron Jaques family and a photo copy of the clipping.

As always, comments, corrections, and additions are most welcome!

1-Samuel Barron Jaques b. 1730, Woodbridge, Middlesex Co., NJ, d. 26 Jul 
  1798/9, Gravel Hill, near Rahway, called Milton, NJ, bur. Locust Grove 
  Cemetery, Woodbridge, Middlesex Co., NJ
 +Mary Coddington, bur. Woodbridge, Middlesex, NJ
|-----2-Hannah Jaques b. 17 Aug 1782, d. 17 Aug 1783
|-----2-John Jaques b. 15 Oct 1783, d. Bef Sep 1798
|-----2-David Jaques b. 9 Oct 1784
|-----2-Ziporah Jaques b. 31 Mar 1787
|-----2-Nansey Jaques b. 25 Apr 1789
|-----2-Isaac Jaques b. 9 Aug 1791, Woodbridge Neck, NJ, d. 24 Aug 1880, 
|       Elizabethtown, NJ, bur. 27 Aug 1880, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ
|      +Wealthy Ann Cushman b. 11 Nov 1793, Hartford, CT, d. 11 Apr 1856, 
|       Elizabeth, Union Co, NJ, bur. 13 Apr 1856, Evergreen Cemetery, 
|       Hillside, NJ
|     |-----3-Jane F. Jaques b. 9 Jan 1814, New York, d. 1 Aug 1843, Brooklyn, 
|     |       Kings Co., New York, bur. 3 Aug 1843
|     |-----3-Wealthy Ann Jaques b. 15 Dec 1815, New York City, New York. NY, 
|     |       d. 7 Mar 1892, At Home, 25 Reid Street, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, 
|     |       bur. First Presbyterian Church yard of Elizabeth, NJ
|     |-----3-Isaac Jaques b. 15 Nov 1817, d. Prob bef 24 Aug 1880
|     |-----3-Eleazer Jaques b. 7 Mar 1820
|     |-----3-John Barron Jaques b. 12 Sep 1822, New York or New Jersey, USA, 
|     |       d. 19 Dec 1895, St. Michael's Hospital, Newark, Essex Co., NJ, 
|     |       bur. Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union, NJ
|     |-----3-Samuel Barron Jaques b. 12 Oct 1824, d. poss 27 May 1858
|     |-----3-Walter Madison Smith Jaques b. 28 Jul 1826, New York City, New 
|     |       York USA, d. Bef 22 Oct 1863
|     |-----3-Christopher Prince Jaques b. 6 Jan 1831, New York City, New York 
|     |       USA, d. Bef 24 Aug 1880
|     |-----3-Dr. Charles Berry Jaques b. 14 Feb 1834, New York City, New York 
|     |       USA, d. 2 Nov 1866, Brooklyn, Kings Co., NY, bur. 5 Nov 1866, Old 
|     |       Somerville Cemetery, Somerville, Somerset Co., NJ, USA
|      +Rebecca A. Robinson b. 1804, CT, d. 29 Dec 1886, bur. Evergreen 
|       Cemetery, Hillside, Union Co., NJ
|-----2-Mary Jaques b. 23 Sep 1793
|-----2-Jane F. Jaques b. 26 Jan 1796, d. 27 Aug 1880, bur. St. Paul's Church 
|       Cemetery, Mt. Vernon, Westchester Co., NY
|      +John B. Quinn d. 20 May 1860, bur. St. Paul's Church Cemetery, Mt. 
|       Vernon, Westchester Co., NY
|-----2-John Morris Jaques b. 21 Sep 1798
Newark News clipping, supposedly from 13 March 1915

Newark News clipping, supposedly from 13 March 1915

Categories: Angus, Barron, Coddington, Cushman, Elizabeth, Family Bible, Jaques, Knowles, Locust Grove Middx Co, New Jersey, Woodbridge | Leave a comment

Dr. Charles B. Jaques, assistant surgeon during the Civil War for 7th Regiment New Jersey (Post I)

Surgeon, Harpers Weekly, July 12, 1862 (Public domain due to expired copyright in the US)

Winslow Homer illustration of surgeons at work on the battlefield, Harper’s Weekly, July 12, 1862

Today, I’d like to highlight one of our family tree’s true heroes Dr. Charles B. Jaques, who was commissioned an officer in New Jersey’s Seventh Regiment on July 19, 1862. He was mustered in on July 31, 1862, and served as an assistant surgeon in Company F and Company S (NB: Staff officers were generally listed under Company S, per Wikipedia). As an assistant surgeon, his rank would have been the equivalent of captain.

7th New Jersey Infantry Monument, Gettysburg Battlefield. Final Report of the Gettysburg Battle-Field Commission of New Jersey (Trenton, NJ: John L. Murphy Publishing Company, 1891), opp. p. 104. (Public domain due to expired copyright in the US)

7th New Jersey Infantry Monument, Gettysburg Battlefield. Final Report of the Gettysburg Battle-Field Commission of New Jersey (Trenton, NJ: John L. Murphy Publishing Company, 1891), opp. p. 104. (Public domain due to expired copyright in the US)

During his 21-month term of service, Charles’s regiment took part in the battles at Bull Run, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg, among many others. For full regiment information, visit the National Park Service website.

Born 14 February 1834 in New York City to prominent Manhattan tailor Isaac Jaques and his wife Wealthy Ann Cushman, Charles was the youngest of  at least seven children. His siblings included Jane, Wealthy, Isaac, John, Walter, and Christopher. My second great grandmother, Wealthy Ann Jaques, was one of Charles’s two older sisters. She was nearly two decades his senior  and married James Winans Angus when Charles would have been just about five years old. Wealthy’s oldest son Isaac was born when Charles was just six.

By the time of the 1850 census, the family was living in Elizabeth, NJ, where Isaac Jaques had invested in real estate. Charles was 16 and working as a clerk.

At age 22, Charles graduated from the New York College of Physicians on March 13, 1856, according to a small announcement that appeared in the Newark Daily Advertiser the next day: The following Jerseymen graduated from the New York College of Physicians last evening: — LC Bowlby, JA Freeman, CB Jaques, CFJ Lehlback, JC Thompson.

Roughly six years later, at 28 years of age, Charles married Katherine Louise De Forrest, daughter of John L. De Forrest, on 26 March 1862, in Somerset, New Jersey.

Four months later, Charles had to bid goodbye to his wife and family and join his regiment. If you would like to view a carte de visite of Charles, one is currently on display on the Heritage Auction website. Copyright restrictions prohibit me from showing the photo here, but you can view it yourself. Just click on this link—he is in LOT #49487, third from the left.

Harpers Weekly, July 12, 1862

Harper’s Weekly, July 12, 1862 (Credit: http://www.sonofthesouth.net)

In its July 12, 1862, issue, published one week before Charles was commissioned, Harper’s Weekly carried the article and illustration (by Winslow Homer) included in this post about the life of the Civil War surgeon.

Given Harper’s Weekly was the most widely read publication of its kind during the Civil War, Charles himself may well have perused this issue.

How proud the entire family must have been of Charles and the life-saving role he was about to play in service to his fellow soldiers. But by then, the realities of the battlegrounds were well known, and their pride must certainly have been mixed with deep concern for Charles’s safety.

From p. 10 of the Register of the Commissioned Officers and Privates of the New Jersey Volunteers in the Service of the United States (image inset), we know that Charles served with Dr. Luther Foster Halsey. Halsey’s memorial appears on the Find a Grave website.

Charles’s name appears twice in the 1863 publication Report of Major-General John Pope. Letter from the secretary of war, in answer to resolution of the House of 18th ultimo, transmitting copy of report of Major General John Pope (see pages included below). He is described as missing (a condition that obviously proved to be temporary), last seen on the battlefield near Centreville, Virginia, tending to the wounded on August 29, 1862. Colonel Louis R. Francine, who signed one of these reports, was mortally wounded at Gettysburg the following summer.

Charles is mentioned in the diary of 7th Regiment NJ Private Heyward Emell (The Civil War Journal of Private Heyward Emmell, Ambulance and Infantry Corps by Jim Malcolm, pub. 2011 – see Chapter 5 “Second Bull Run”, p. 30): Camp near Ft. Lyon near Alexandria Va., September 4th [1862]. We have been in 3 battles since I last wrote, but I am glad to be able to say that Co. K had only one killed and two wounded in all of them. And we had one die of sickness on the march his name was Wm. Long & John Lyon was wounded at Bull Run & soon died. Charlie Johnson got wounded Bristow Station & so did Archer. Wm. Long was burried at Fairfax Court House. John Lyon was not dead when we left or we would have buried him. Dr. Jaques stayed with our wounded for several days & was paroled on account of his being a doctor & has just returned & tells that Lyon did not live long after the battle. I suppose this battle will be called Bull Run No. 2. …

Harper's Weekly

Harper’s Weekly, April 4, 1863, illustration by A. B. Waud – Wedding of Captain Hart and Miss Lammond

Another interesting thing we know about Charles is that he is listed as having been a witness at the March 12, 1863, wedding ceremony of Captain Daniel Hart and Miss Ellen (“Nellie”) Lammond at the 7th Regiment’s military encampment, then located in the vicinity of Falmouth, Virginia. Charles’s signature appears on the Harts’ wedding certificate, a copy of which is presently stored in the National Archives.

The October 12, 2006, issue of the Old Baldy Civil War Round Table of Philadelphia (pp. 3-5) has an interesting article about the event, and describes how Miss Lammond and her entire wedding party traveled down from Phillipsburg, NJ, to the encampment, since Captain Hart was unable to get leave to go home for the ceremony. To view a PDF of the newsletter, click here.

The wedding was highlighted by Harper’s Weekly in its April 4, 1863, issue. This blessed event must have been a rare moment of “normalcy” experienced by many of these men during the course of their service.

Civil War surgeon's kit, Wikimedia Commons image by 'quadell'

Civil War surgeon’s kit, Wikimedia Commons image by ‘quadell’

I can’t begin to imagine the day to day of what Charles and his fellow surgeons and soldiers went through, and I won’t make any attempt to describe it here. Instead, I will provide links to just a few of the resources available where you can learn more about the realities of a soldier’s life during the Civil War:
The Truth About Civil War Surgery by Alfred J. Bollet, published June 12, 2006
“Maimed Men: The Toll of the American Civil War” on the US National Library of Medicine website
“Medicine in the Civil War” on AmericanCivilWar.com
Winslow Homer Civil War illustrations
Civil War Rx – The Source Guide to Civil War Medicine
Civil War Surgeons Memorial website

Some old calling cards

Some old calling card envelopes addressed to Charles Jaques. The card from Mr. J. Besancomb came in the second envelope. The upper envelope was empty when I came across it.

Charles was mustered out on October 7, 1864, and returned home to his family. I wish I could tell you that he went on to live a very long and happy life–for he certainly deserved one. Unfortunately, for reasons I have yet to discover, he died on May 2, 1866, at home in Brooklyn, NY, where he and his wife must have settled after he got home. He’d been home just about 18 months and was only some 32 years of age.

Charles was buried in the Old Somerville Cemetery in Somerville, NJ. The Find a Grave site has images of the memorial that marks his resting place.

I am immensely grateful to Charles for his service. I hope by publishing this post here, other family members will learn of his life’s work and feel as proud as I do to have him in our family tree.

If anyone reading this has additional information to share about Charles or a photographic image of him, such as the CDV mentioned above, please get in touch.

***********************

Charles’s Family

Charles and Katherine had one son Charles B. Jaques Jr. who was born on March 24, 1864. So obviously, Charles Sr. made it home on furlough some nine months prior to that. Charles Jr. would probably not have had any recollection of his father as he was just a toddler when Charles Sr. died. When Charles Jr. was eight, Katherine married a second time–to Rufus R. Sewall (January 2, 1872).

Sadly, on May 10, 1886, Charles Jr. died at just 22 years of age, in Enterprise, Florida, which is on the other side of Lake Monroe from Sanford, Florida. What he was doing there, I do not know. This was two years before an enormous yellow fever epidemic swept through the state, killing many. Perhaps a disease like that took him or some sort of accident (the 1880s was a time in Florida when there was major railroad construction going on, tourism was getting underway, and logging was big business). For whatever reason, it took six months before the family was able to have a funeral and bury him. He was interred at Old Somerville Cemetery next to his father on November 12, 1886.

According to http://www.sewellgenealogy.com/p473.htm#i1234, Rufus Sewall died on April 14, 1889. Katherine married a third time, to Charles E. Jenkins on June 2, 1891. She died on May 11, 1931, and was also interred at Old Somerville Cemetery.

***********************

p. 10, Register of the Commissioned Officers and Privates of the New Jersey Volunteers in the Service of the United States (pub. 1863)

p. 10, Register of the Commissioned Officers and Privates of the New Jersey Volunteers in the Service of the United States (pub. 1863)

Report of Major-General John Pope. Letter from the secretary of War, pub. 1863; pp 178-179

CLICK TO ENLARGE – Report of Major-General John Pope. Letter from the secretary of War, pub. 1863; pp 178-179 (In public domain in US due to expired copyright)

Report of Major-General John Pope. Letter from the secretary of War, pub. 1863; pp 190-191

CLICK TO ENLARGE – Report of Major-General John Pope. Letter from the secretary of War, pub. 1863; pp 190-191(In public domain in US  due to expired copyright)

Harpers Weekly, April 4, 1863, illustration

Harper’s Weekly, April 4, 1863 (Credit: http://www.sonofthesouth.net)

Troy Daily Times, Tues. March 24, 1863 (Credit: www.fultonhistory.com)

Troy Daily Times, Tues. March 24, 1863 (Credit: http://www.fultonhistory.com)

Troy Daily Times, Tues. March 24, 1863 (Credit: www.fultonhistory.com)

Troy Daily Times, Tues. March 24, 1863 (Credit: http://www.fultonhistory.com)

Death Notices, Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Saturday, November 3, 1866 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Death Notices, Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Saturday, November 3, 1866 (Credit: http://www.fultonhistory.com)

NY Herald, May 13, 1886 (www.fultonhistory.com)

NY Herald, May 13, 1886 (Credit: http://www.fultonhistory.com)

NY Herald, November 11, 1886 (www.fultonhistory.com)

NY Herald, November 11, 1886 (Credit: http://www.fultonhistory.com)

Categories: Angus, Brooklyn, Bull Run VA, Chancellorsville VA, Civil War, Cushman, De Forrest, Elizabeth, Enterprise Volusia Co, Fredericksburg VA, Gettysburg PA, Homer, Jaques, Old Somerville Cemetery NJ, Veteran's Day, Winslow | 2 Comments

Powered by WordPress.com.

Hello Hygge

Finding hygge everywhere

Well, That Was Different

Travel Stories, Expatriate Life, Undiplomatic Commentary and Some Pretty Good Photos

Sketching Family

Urban Sketching

Observaterry

Terry's view on things

Giselle Potter

Illustrator

Emma

Politics, things that make you think, and recreational breaks

The Sketchbook

MOSTLY MONTREAL, MOST OF THE TIME

Smart Veg Recipes

Welcome to home made, vegeterian, healthy & kids friendly recipes

Jane Austen's World

This Jane Austen blog brings Jane Austen, her novels, and the Regency Period alive through food, dress, social customs, and other 19th C. historical details related to this topic.

Travels with Janet

Just another WordPress.com weblog

Do Svidanya Dad

Exploring Dad's Unusual Story From NJ to the USSR

La Audacia de Aquiles

"El Mundo Visible es Sólo un Pretexto" / "The Visible World is Just a Pretext".-

TOWER AND FLIGHTS

In The Beginning Man Tried Ascending To Heaven via The Tower Of Babel. Now He Tries To Elevate His Existence Using Hallucinogenic Drugs. And, Since The 20th Century, He Continually Voyages Into Outer Space Using Spacecrafts. Prayer Thru Christ Is The Only Way To Reach Heaven.

London, Hollywood

I'm Dominic Wells, an ex-Time Out Editor. I used to write about films. Now I write them.

Uma Familia Portuguesa

A história da nossa família

Trkingmomoe's Blog

Low Budget Meals for the New Normal

The Good, the Bad and the Italian

food/films/families and more

dvn ms kmz time travel

This is all about my travels to the past... my reflections and musings about yesteryear, as I find the stories of a people passed away and learn how to tell them.

newarkpoems

350 years of Newark in verse 1666-2016

Russian Universe

Understanding Russia with a Russian

Bulldog Travels

Everything and Nothing Plus Some Pretty Photos

Dances with Wools

knitting, spinning, dyeing, and related fiber arts

Life After Caregiving

On caregivers, faith, family, and writing...

Why'd You Eat That?

Food Folklore for the everyday scholar. These are the stories behind the foods we eat.

Cooking Without Limits

Food Photography & Recipes

The Pioneer Woman

Plowing through Life in the Country...One Calf Nut at a Time

Almost Home

Genealogy Research and Consulting

Old Bones Genealogy of New England

Genealogy and Family History Research

ferrebeekeeper

Reflections Concerning Art, Nature, and the Affairs of Humankind (also some gardening anecdotes)

Map of Time | A Trip Into the Past

Navigating Through Someplace Called History

Out Here Studying Stones

Cemeteries & Genealogy

WeGoBack

family research ... discover your ancestry

the Victorian era

Did I misplace my pince-nez again? Light reading on the 19th century.

"Greatest Generation" Life Lessons

This is the story of an ordinary family, trying to live an ordinary life during an extraordinary time frame, and the lessons they learn through experience.

Moore Genealogy

Fun With Genealogy

Meeting my family

RESEARCHING MY FAMILY TREE

Shaking the tree

musings on the journey towards knowing and sharing my family's stories

A Hundred Years Ago

Food and More

Scots Roots

Helping you dig up your Scots roots.

Root To Tip

Not just a list of names and dates

%d bloggers like this: