Kentucky

Henry Conrad Brodhead & Eva Wilder McGlasson: late 19th- / early 20th-century “power couple”

Eva Wilder Brodhead (The Book Buyer: A Summary of American and Foreign Literature, Volume XIII, February 1896 – January 1897 (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons) - page 457)

Eva Wilder Brodhead (Image from The Book Buyer: A Summary of American and Foreign Literature, Volume XIII, February 1896 – January 1897 (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons) – page 457)

Two families came together in Manhattan, New York, on 5 December 1894, to celebrate the marriage of Henry Conrad Brodhead, a wealthy, never-before-married, 46-year-old mining engineer, and the adored and admired Eva Wilder McGlasson, a 24-year-old Kentucky woman widely regarded as one of the most accomplished young literary talents of her era, said to be the youngest magazinist in the country*. She was especially known for her short stories and her use of dialect.

This marriage was mentioned in fleeting in a past post on Henry’s brother William H. Brodhead‘s elopement, which took place on that very same day, Henry’s wedding serving as just the diversion William needed to go off and marry his beloved, and much younger, Mary Van Tassel. (I know the age difference between Mary and William appalled their parents, but the age gap between Henry and Eva was even more vast–granted Eva was 24, but she was still very much old enough to be Henry’s daughter.) The brothers were two of the six sons of Daniel Dingman Brodhead (b. 1818) and Mary Ann Brodrick (b. cir. 1826), and nephews of my second great grandfather, Andrew Jackson Brodhead, and cousins of my great grandfather, Andrew Douglas Brodhead.

Henry C. Brodhead (image from Wyoming Valley in the 19th Century. Art Edition by SR Smith, Vol I, Wilkes-Barre Leader Print, 1894)

Henry C. Brodhead (image from Wyoming Valley in the 19th Century. Art Edition by SR Smith, Vol I, Wilkes-Barre Leader Print, 1894)

From Manhattan, Henry and Eva embarked on a lengthy European honeymoon tour that included a Mediterranean cruise.

Their 21-year journey of marriage was set against the backdrop of Colorado’s mountains, bustling Manhattan, and European cities. How and where did they meet? What led them to each other?

Their relationship must have been the source of tremendous curiosity for Eva’s multitude of fans, and I must admit that even all these years later, I myself am intrigued to know how, where, and when their paths first crossed. At the time of their marriage, they must have been viewed as a sort of “power couple”—one whose movements and activities were traced and actively talked about as much as that would have been possible back then.

Impending wedding news from the New York Times, 2 December 1894

Impending wedding news from the New York Times, 2 December 1894

H.C. Brodhead
Henry was not exactly a spring chicken when he finally took the plunge into marriage, but the wait was likely well worth it—he would have been hard-pressed up to that point to have found a prettier, more intelligent, and more accomplished wife than Eva. Perhaps, his maturity, rich life experience, acquired wisdom, passionate work ethic, and financial security provided Eva with the valued partner she needed personally, as well as the freedom she needed spiritually and artistically, to pursue her talents and career to the fullest.

The 1894 book The Wyoming Valley in the Nineteenth Century. Art Edition offers this about Henry’s pre-marriage years: H. C. Brodhead, born at Mauch Chunk and educated in Philadelphia. Began his mining career at Wanamie in the early 70’s for the Lehigh Coal and Navigation Company. Upon their purchase of the Red Ash collieries in Plymouth, he was made engineer in charge and served in such capacity for several years. When the same collieries were absorbed into the Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company, he was made a Division Superintendent of said Company, and after a time was transferred to Sugar Notch, at that time the most difficult division in the company’s possession. After several years service there he was in 1883, promoted to the Assistant General Outside Superintendency, which place he held till his resignation in 1888. His large experience obtained in early life he has been able to utilize profitably in the care of his individual interests in several collieries, all of which have been successful. The 1860 and 1870 census records corroborate the Philadelphia location, and 1880 census record confirms Henry’s residence as being located in Sugar Notch, Luzerne Co., PA.

A later publication, the 1906 book Genealogical and Family History of the Wyoming and Lackawanna Valleys, Pennsylvania provides a few more clues about those early years: …Henry was educated in Philadelphia. He graduated at the Philadelphia high school, A. B., and later A. M. He began his business career as civil engineer, later became a mining engineer, and was for several years in the employ of the Lehigh Coal and Navigation Company and afterward with the Lehigh and Wilkes-Barre Coal Company. Still later he began operating in his own behalf, developing coal lands and organizing companies for mining operations…

(Image from the Los Angeles Herald, March 3, 1895; California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu>. All newspapers published before January 1, 1923 are in the public domain and therefore have no restrictions on use)

CLICK to ENLARGE (Image from the Los Angeles Herald, March 3, 1895; California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu>. All newspapers published before January 1, 1923 are in the public domain and therefore have no restrictions on use)

Eva Wilder McGlasson
Henry’s young bride Eva had accomplished much in her 24 years. At the time of her wedding, she was a celebrated young writer and an object of fascination for her adoring readers. Snippets appeared about her in various newspapers and other publications:

In the Montreal Herald on September 8, 1892: Mrs. Eva Wilder McGlasson the author of Diana’s Livery and An Earthly Paragon (which was written in three weeks), is probably the youngest writer before the public who has attained as much reputation and accomplished as remarkable work. Mrs. McGlasson is Kentuckian, and began to write a few years ago, when she was eighteen. Her stories are strong and vivid, and her dialogue is especially dramatic without being untrue. She has devoted herself almost entirely to describing the “life of her native State,” but her friends have advised her broadening her field of observation by going to New York to live, which she will probably do.

In the Patterson Daily Press on May 6, 1893: Mrs. Eva Wilder McGlasson is one of the most remarkable women of the age, Not only is she remarkable for her brilliancy, but on account of her extreme youth and the ease with which she has attained the pinnacle of fame. Mrs. McGlasson is still less than 24, and yet she has written and published two successful books. She is petite and pretty and exhibits the fresh, ingenuous charm of an extremely bright schoolgirl.

In the New York Times on July 30, 1893: Mrs. Eva Wilder McGlasson, whose writings are as delicate and artistic as the frostwork one finds on the Winter window pane, confesses to her impossibility to produce more than six short stories in a year’s time.

Eva Wilder McGlasson

Eva Wilder McGlasson (Image from the Los Angeles Herald, March 3, 1895; California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, http://cdnc.ucr.edu>. All newspapers published before January 1, 1923 are in the public domain and therefore have no restrictions on use)

The article “Women of the Authors’ Club”, published by the New York Times on January 21, 1894, gave this wonderful description of Eva: Mrs. Eva Wilder McGlasson, who, shy, tiny, and looking very young in a dainty pink gown, with a great cluster of pink roses at her belt, no one would suspect of being one of the most powerful fiction writers now contributing to the magazines.

And, from the April 7, 1895, New York Times article “Woman’s Sense of Humor: It is Frequently Alleged that She Does Not Possess Any. American Facts to Contradict This”: Eva Wilder McGlasson has interwoven much that is delightfully funny with the somberer tints of her stories. A Monument to Corder is likewise a monument to humor.

Born in Covington, Kentucky, to a mother and father hailing from Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and Nova Scotia, Canada, respectively, Eva was educated in Covington and later in New York. According to the 1914 book Kentucky in American Letters: 1784–1912:

Featured with other women writers, the Los Angeles Herald (see image above for source details)

Featured with other women writers, the Los Angeles Herald (see Eva’s image above for source details)

She began to write when but eighteen years of age, and a short time thereafter her first novel appeared, Diana’s Livery (New York, 1891). This was set against a background most alluring: the Shaker settlement at Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, into which a young man of the world enters and falls in love with a pretty Shakeress, Her second story, An Earthly Paragon (New York, 1892), which was written in three weeks, ran through Harper’s Weekly before being published in book form. It was a romance of the Kentucky mountains, laid around Chamoum, the novelist’s name for Yosemite, Kentucky. It was followed by a novelette of love set amidst the salt-sea atmosphere of an eastern watering place, Ministers of Grace (New York, 1894). Hildreth, the scene of this little story, is anywhere along the Jersey coast from Atlantic City to Long Branch. Ministers of Grace also appeared serially in Harper’s Weekly, and when it was issued in book form Col. Henry Watterson called the attention of Richard Mansfield to it as a proper vehicle for him, and the actor promptly secured the dramatic rights, hoping to present it upon the stage; but his untimely death prevented the dramatization of the tale under highly favorable auspices. It was the last to be published under the name of Eva Wilder McGlasson, as this writer was first known to the public, for on December 5, 1894, she was married in New York to Mr. Henry C. Brodhead, a civil and mining engineer of Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania.

Colorado

Rand, McNally & Co.'s Colorado. Rand McNally & Co., Map Publishers and Engravers, Chicago, 1912  (Source: www.davidrumsey.com)

Part of a 1912 map of Colorado, showing Brodhead in Las Animas County, just outside the town of Aguilar (look to middle of the map);  Rand, McNally & Co.’s Colorado. Rand McNally & Co., Map Publishers and Engravers, Chicago, 1912 (Source: http://www.davidrumsey.com)

Two years before marrying Eva, Henry’s business interests had shifted from Pennsylvania to Colorado—he and his two younger brothers, Albert Gallatin Brodhead and Robert Sayre Brodhead, had set their sights on the coal riches of that state, ultimately founding the town of Brodhead, Las Animas County, Colorado (today a ghost town), and locating several mines in and around that place. Close to Brodhead is the small town of Aguilar (“Gateway to the Spanish Peaks”); if you look it up on Google maps you will see ‘Brodhead Canyon’ nearby. Aguilar is 178 miles south of Denver.

Trinidad, Colorado, to the south of Aguilar and the Brodhead mines, 1905 (Wikipedia: Public domain image)

Trinidad, Colorado, to the south of Aguilar and the Brodhead mines, 1905 (Wikipedia: Public domain image)

Genealogical and Family History of the Wyoming and Lackawanna Valleys, Pennsylvania (1906) offers some insight into the brothers’ activities out West: In October of the same year [1893] Albert Gallatin Brodhead and his brothers, Henry C. and Robert S. Brodhead, journeyed through Colorado, making careful investigation of its mineral resources. Having prospected coal lands in Las Animas county, they purchased two large tracts, one of four thousand acres at Brodhead, Colorado, and six hundred acres at Walsenburg, near the foot of the Spanish Peaks, which rise to an altitude of nearly fourteen thousand feet. The Brodheads have leased both their coal tracts, one to the Green Canon Coal Company, and the other to the Las Animas Coal Company. They market their output in South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Texas, Oklahoma and Indian Territory. Expert authority has passed upon the quality of the coal, and grade it as semi-anthracite. It is distributed in six workable veins, and the quantity capable of being mined is estimated at millions of tons. The Brodhead properties are held by an incorporated company, of which the officers are: Henry C. Brodhead, president; Robert S. Brodhead, vice-president; and Albert G. Brodhead, secretary and general manager, with the principal office in Denver, Colorado.

So, those of you in Colorado today may be curious to pass through Aguilar if you are ever in that area to check out what, if anything, remains of the ghost town of Brodhead, Colorado!

I will continue this post another day. Meanwhile, I will leave you with a poem* by Eva that was published in Harper’s Weekly on May 14, 1892:

The Daguerreotype

You
hev to hold it sidewise
Fer to make the lightness show,
‘Cuz its sort uh dim an’ shifty
Till you git it right—’bout
so!
An’ then the eyes winks at yeh,
An’ the mouth is cherry ripe
Law! it beats your new-style picters,
This old digerrytype!
Thar’s a blush across the dimples
Thet burrows in the cheeks;
F’om out them clumps o’ ringlets
Two little small ears peeks,
Thet brooch thet jines her neck-gear
Is what they used to wear;
A big gold frame thet sprawled around
A lock of ‘o—some ones hair.
‘Twas took ‘fore we was married,
Thet there—your maw an’ me.
An’ time I study on it,
Why, ‘t fazes me to see
Thet fifty year ‘aint teched her
A lick! She’s jest the same
She was when Susie Scriggens
Took Boone C. Curd’s name.
The hair is mebby white
‘An it was in ’41.
But her cheeks is jest as pinky.
An’ her smiles ‘ain’t slacked up none.
I reckon—love—er somethin’
Yerluminates her face,
Like the crimsont velvet linin’
Warms up the picter-case.
‘S I say, these cyard boa’d portraits,
They make me sort uh tired ,
A-grinnin’ forf upun yeh
Like their very lips was wired!
Give me the old digerrytype,
Whar the face steals on your sight
Like a dream that comes by night-time
When your supper’s actin’ right!

 

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*Mansfield Daily Shield, February 17, 1895

References:

Hayden, Rev. Horace Edwin Hayden, Hon. Alfred Hand, and John W. Jordan, eds. 1906. Genealogical and Family History of the Wyoming and Lackawanna Valleys, Pennsylvania,  Vol. I. New York/Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Co. (pp. 202-203).

McGlasson, Eva Wilder. 1892. “The Daguerreotype” Harper’s Weekly: A Journal of Civilization 36(1847): 463.

Smith, S. R. 1894. The Wyoming Valley in the Nineteenth Century. Art edition Vol I. Wilkes-Barre, PA: Wilkes-Barre Leader Print  (p. 78).

Townsend, John Wilson. 1913. Kentucky in American Letters: 1784–1912 Vol. II. Cedar Rapids: The Torch Press (pp. 267–69).

Pennsylvania Mines

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See additional posts:

June 24, 2014

July 15, 2014

Categories: Brodhead, Brodhead, Colorado, Denver, Fairmount Cem Denver CO, Kentucky, Manhattan, McGlasson, New York, New York City, Sugar Notch Luzerne Co, US Federal 1860, US Federal 1870, US Federal 1880 | Leave a comment

Daniel Brodhead Jr.: A Timeline of Life Events

Philadelphia's Ancient Town Hall, Second and Market Streets, 1829.

Philadelphia’s Ancient Town Hall, Second and Market Streets, 1829, from America’s Most Historic Highway: Market Street Philadelphia.

One little sentence can open up a whole can of worms, and I’ve found myself wallowing in a can of big, fat, juicy ones this past week. And all because of two little words: “William Baker”.

Following Daniel Brodhead Jr.’s death on the February 2, 1831, at age 75, a little funeral announcement appeared the next day in The Philadelphia Inquirer:

DIED: On Wednesday morning, the 2nd inst. Mr. Daniel Brodhead, in the 76th year of his age, who served as a Lieutenant in the revolutionary war.

His friends and acquaintances are particularly invited to attend his funeral, from the residence of his son-in-law, William Baker, in Buttonwood Street, above Tenth, tomorrow afternoon, at 2 o’clock.

That name (William Baker) was new to me. Daniel had five daughters, and I only knew the name of two of the daughters’ spouses, so I set out to try to figure out which of the remaining three daughters had been married to ‘William Baker’. This took some doing; in fact, it was only after I figured out some of the other spouses that I finally had a feeling about William Baker. And along the way, I unearthed all sorts of other things about Daniel. Isn’t that always the way? That’s what I meant about the can of worms. But, as exhausting as it was, now I have a decent tree fleshed out for Daniel Jr.’s line and have unearthed a bit more about him. So below is a timeline that offers a possible glimpse into some of his activities; I say “possible” because there is no way to know with 100% certainty, without doing much more research, that ALL references to Daniel Jr. herein actually refer to Colonel Brodhead’s son and not some other Daniel.

Robert Morris, painted by Robert Edge Pine, ca. 1785

Robert Morris, painted by Robert Edge Pine, ca. 1785 (Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license)

1776 (age 20): Rank of 1st Lieutenant attained on January 6. Unit: 3rd Pennsylvania Battalion. Captured at the surrender of Fort Washington on November 16.

1777 (age 21): POW throughout the year. Rank of Captain attained on Sept. 1.

1778 (age 22): Exchanged on August 26. Worked as a supernumerary officer.

Gen. Daniel Brodhead Portrait

Gen. Daniel Brodhead Portrait

1779 (age 23): Daniel Brodhead Jr. is mentioned in a letter (Fitzpatrick, pp. 480-481) from General George Washington to Colonel Daniel Brodhead (Sr.) in response to the latter’s attempt to secure a military post for Daniel Jr. (at Daniel Jr.’s request according to one of Fitzpatrick’s footnotes): ...It has been the misfortune of Many Officers in captivity to have been overlooked by their States, who had the power of all regimental appointments, which seems to have been the case with respect to Mr. Broadhead. Had he been appointed in the line, after so long an absence from you, I should not have refused him the opportunity of paying you a visit but as he has not, there cannot be a possibility of objection on my part.

From the book History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties (p. 935): [Col. Daniel Brodhead] …had only one son, also named Daniel (by his first wife, Elizabeth De Pue), who was also an officer during the Revolution. He was sent to Virginia in 1779, in charge of the prisoners of General Burgoyne’s army. If this is true, he could not have been in Virginia for long in that capacity as he retired from the military that year.

1781 (age 25): From the diary of Robert Morris, US Superintendent of Finance, on August 28: Mr. Danl. Brodhead entered in this Office as one of my Clerks (Morris, Aug-Sept 1781, p. 119, 121).

1782 (age 26): On May 29, Daniel Jr. was fired from his position by Robert Morris (Morris, April 16 – June 20, 1782, p. 280) – note: the spelling is Morris’s: …The Pennsylvania Commissioners for fitting out the Ships to defend the Bay and River Delaware called and executed the Contract for the Ship Washington Capt Barney. These gentleman informed me that Mr. Daniel Brodhead, one of the Clerks in this Office, had mentioned the Destination of that Ship, whereupon I sent for him and told him before them what was said. He very candidly acknowledged the Fact, alledging in excuse that he had heard it mentioned by other Persons before and therefore conceiving the thing to be known he had inadvertantly mentioned the matter in a Company, that it is the only time and the only thing he ever did mention out of this Office. Mr. Brodhead being a modest, well disposed young Man I am perswaded that this was an act of meer inadvertency, but the Consequences of imprudence or indiscretion in things of this nature may be as pernicious as if they proceeded from bad designs, therefore I dismissed him instantly from this office — sorry however for the Necessity he has laid me under to do so.

Also in 1782: Possibly living at his father’s home in Reading, PA, Daniel described the July 12, 1782, suicide that took place there of Captain Charles Craig, an intelligence officer during the Revolutionary War, who had a major disagreement with his father-in-law that turned ugly. In a letter written to a Walter Stone in Maryland, Daniel wrote: After taking such precautions as were requisite to prevent detection, he laid himself on the bed, raising his head, with several pillows, to a convenient height; He placed a muzzle of the pistol under one ear, and discharged its contents, which went thro’ his head. The report of the pistol brought up his brother Colonel Thomas Craig, who immediately burst open the door (he having had the precaution to bolt it on the inner side) But the unfortunate Charles was already quite dead.——-I ought here to take notice, that, least (sic) the pistol should by any means have proved ineffectual, he had provided his sword, which lay across his breast when his brother entered the room. So determined was he, on the preparation of this shocking deed. (Rubicam, Milton)

Land claims, 1783 (credit: Florida Center for Instructional Technology at the University of South Florida-website below)

Land claims, 1783 (credit: Florida Center for Instructional Technology at the University of South Florida-website below)

1783 (age 27): Daniel was the first merchant to arrive in the new frontier town of Louisville, Kentucky. At that time, there was no state of Kentucky. Virginia extended westward as the map of land claims indicates. I found mention of Daniel Jr. in a number of books, including one on the life of Daniel Boone: In 1783 Daniel Brodhead astonished the settlers by offering for sale goods from Philadelphia, having succeeded in freighting them from thence to Pittsburgh in wagons, and down the river in flat-boats. Even upon those days of simplicity arose the radiance of gaudy calico and overshadowing wool hats. It was a time of serious innovation. (Bogart, p. 305).

George Rogers Clark (Public Domain, expired copyright*)

George Rogers Clark, painted by Matthew Harris Jouett in 1825 (Public Domain, expired copyright*)

In a book on Chesapeake politics (Risjord, p. 236), I found the following on Daniel: Merchants who established themselves in Kentucky at the end of the war augmented the ranks of the court party, though few of them could claim Virginia ancestry. The first merchant in the newly erected town of Louisville at the falls of Ohio was Daniel Brodhead, Jr., son of the Pennsylvania colonel who had commanded at Pittsburgh in the last years of the war. Arriving in 1783, Brodhead established a commercial contact with George Rogers Clark and his cousin William, who were then surveying the Virginia military district across the river. These men, in turn, had interests in the down-river trade with New Orleans, and they had contacts with New Orleans merchants as a result of Clark’s military expeditions. Before long, Brodhead too had mercantile acquaintances in Spanish Louisiana.

On the Kentucky Educational Television site under the topic of Louisville Life, I found the following: According to “The Encyclopedia of Louisville”, the first dry goods store opened in Louisville in 1783. It was basically a double-sized log cabin with glass pane windows, featuring merchandise from Pittsburgh and Philadelphia. The store was located on the north side of Main St. between Fifth and Sixth Streets and was owned by Daniel Brodhead. This mercantile outlet was the precursor to department stores.

Another reference to Daniel’s store is contained in the book, A History of Ohio Falls Cities and Their Counties (p. 189): Another notable commercial event occurred after navigation opened this year — the opening of the first general store in Louisville, and the second in what is now the State of Kentucky, the first having been started at Boonesborough in April, 1775, by Messrs. Henderson & Co., the would-be founders of “the Province of Transylvania.” Mr. Daniel Brodhead was the happy man to expose, first amid the wildness of the Louisville plateau, the beautiful fabrics of the East to the linsey-clad dames and belles of the Falls city. Mr. Butler, in his History of Kentucky, says “it is believed that Mr. Broadhead’s was the first store in the State for the sale of foreign merchandise.” He transported his moderate stock in wagons from Philadelphia to Pittsburg, and thence on flat-boats they were floated down to Louisville. Mr. Collins says : ” The belles of our forest land’ then began to shine in all the magnificence of calico, and the beaux in the luxury of wool hats.” We add the following from Casseday’s History: The young ladies could now throw aside all the homely products of their own looms, take the wooden skewers from their ill-bound tresses, and on festive occasions shine in all the glories of flowered calico and real horn-combs.

It is not known whether it was this worthy Mr. Brodhead who was the first to introduce the luxury of glass window-lights, but it is certain that previous to this time such an extravagance was unknown, and there is an incident connected with the first window-pane which deserves a place here, and which is recorded in the words of an author who is not more celebrated for his many public virtues, than for his unceasing and incurable exercise of the private vice of punning. After referring to the introduction of this innovation, this gentleman says : “A young urchin who had seen glass spectacles on the noses of his elders, saw this spectacle with astonishment, and running home to his mother exclaimed, ‘O, Ma! there’s a house down here with specs on!”…

1784 (age 28): Daniel was still active in Louisville as is evidenced by the insurance he took out for some of his freighted goods (see article inset, The Baltimore Underwriter, p. 344).

Daniel Brodhead, Jr. insurance policy, 1784

Daniel Brodhead, Jr. insurance policy, 1784

1785 (age 29): From the History of Ohio Falls Cities and Their Counties (p. 183-184), came more information on Daniel Jr. On October 6th of that year James Sullivan and James Patton were appointed to superintend the sales of lots. Captain Daniel Brodhead was subsequently appointed in place of Patton. The superintendents of sales were authorized to bid on lots “as far as they may think necessary, or nearly their value, which purchases are to be considered as subject to the further direction of the trustees.” December 9, 1785, it was resolved “that all the land from Preston’s line to the mouth of Beargrass [Daniel Jr. owned the “point over Beargrass” according to p. 149 of this book] and up said creek to said line be sold to the highest bidder, and also all the land that remains on this side of said creek at the mouth, thereof, exclusive of the thirty feet allowed for a road between the Bottom squares and the Ohio.” All the remaining land of the one thousand acre tract, formerly Connolly’s, was ordered sold the next February to “the highest bidder for ready cash.”

1788 (age 32): Daniel sold all of his Jefferson Co., Kentucky, goods (Early Kentucky Settlers, p. 374): Daniel Brodhead, Jr. of Jefferson Co. sold to Richard Jones Waters of said county his goods, chattels, and all his personal property, farm implements, cattle, sheep, a negro woman, also horses, including young stallion purchased from John Severns, his interest in a stud horse late the property of Samuel Boon purchased at Sheriff’s sale by Brodhead in partnership with Samuel Wells, 4 wagons, gears for 16 horses, etc., log chains and trace chains, stock of all kinds, timbers belonging to Brodhead, in Louisville or elsewhere, his furniture, rifle-gun, rugs, cherry cupboard, one chocolate pot, pewter ware, etc. August 4, 1788. Recorded September 2, 1788.

Also in 1788: (Early Kentucky Settlers, p. 375) Daniel Brodhead [the father] of the Burrough of Reading, Berks Co., Pa. appoints his son Daniel Brodhead Jr., his lawful attorney to collect from James Francis Moore and James Sullivan of Kentucky, his former agents, all money and all such other matters as they had in trust for him. March 1, 1787. Witnesses: Charles Jno. Biddle, John Christian Hondebier. Recorded September 2, 1788. Father and son, evidently, still in good rapport.

1790 (age 34): (Early Kentucky Settlers, p. 383) Elijah Logan Hall [Hale?] of Louisville, now intending a journey to Fauquier Co., in the Old Settlement, appoints his friend Benjamin Johnston, his lawful attorney, to represent him in all matters of business. Revokes all other powers of attorney, especially the one to Daniel Brodhead Jr. to transact business with Colo Harry Lee of Virginia. August 24, 1790.  The emphatic “especially” is particularly intriguing.

1790-1797 (age 34-41): After Daniel Jr. left Kentucky, he spent time living in Richmond, Virginia (Goodwill & Smith, p. 136). So he must have spent at least some of these years there.

1798 (age 42): Daniel is listed on p. 59 of the book Centennial anniversary of the Pennsylvania Society, for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage: And for Improving the Condition of the African Race published by the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery. Philadelphia is given as his place of residence. C.W. Stafford’s Philadelphia Directory lists his place of residence as: 214 High Street (later known as Market Street; current location of Campo’s Philadelphia Deli). His father lived steps away at 226 High Street, current home of Mac’s Tavern.

PA Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery

PA Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery

1799: Stafford’s City Directory still shows the father and son living at their respective residences on High (Market) Street.

1800 (age 44): Daniel’s father, former General Daniel Brodhead who served as Surveyor-General from 1789-1800, retired to Milford, Pennsylvania, after spending the previous decade in Philadelphia. In 1795 he is known to have lived next to the southeast corner of Seventh and Market Streets (Jackson, p. 194). It was on the southwest corner of that intersection that Thomas Jefferson had written the Declaration of Independence between June 11-28, 1776.

SW corner of Seventh and Market Streets in Philadelphia. General Brodhead lived nearby in 1795. Photo from 1858.

SW corner of Seventh and Market Streets in Philadelphia where the Declaration of Independence was written. General Brodhead lived steps away in 1795. Photo from 1858. America’s Most Historic Highway: Market Street Philadelphia.

Stafford’s 1800 city directory still shows the pair at their respective residences, the only change is that Daniel Jr.’s occupation (not listed in the previous two year’s editions) is “tanner” (Merriam-Webster’s definition #1: “one who tans hides” as opposed to definition #2: “one who acquires or seeks to acquire a suntan” – injecting some levity here!).

Once Daniel Jr. relocated to Philadelphia in cir. 1898 (when he surfaces in the city directory listings), were father and son on good terms? I would think so given that they lived in such close proximity to each other. But something must have happened between then in the course of the next few years because the fallout was certain in August of 1803 when the General set his hand to his last will and testament and omitted Daniel Jr.

1800-1802: The son appears to have finally taken a stab at married life, and he did it in a pretty big way. Some family trees I’ve seen have listed Daniel Jr.’s wife as “Christian Abel”; that may well have been her name, but I have yet to see any proof of that. In any case, I must say that I feel slightly suspicious that “Christian” may have been a second wife since Daniel Jr. would have been between the ages of 47-58 when his six known children were born: Ellen (1803), Juliana (1805), Amanda (b. Phila., cir 1807), Evelina (1809), Mira (1812), and Daniel (1814) .

1801-1808: Daniel Jr. is absent from the Philadelphia City Directory. Was he no longer in the city or just living in someone else’s household?

1808 (age 52): The Tickler article of October 5 alluded to Daniel Jr. as having married a woman in Virginia and abandoning her and their small children. Had that been a first wife? Or is that a reference to ‘Christian Abel’ and her first 3 children born between 1803 and 1807? (The problem with that is that all of ‘Christian’ and Daniel’s children were born in Pennsylvania, not Virginia.) The article also alleges Daniel Jr. to have been Daniel Sr’s illegitimate son. Was that the public’s assumption regarding Daniel Jr. after he was omitted from his father’s will? That said, the General did not die until November 15, 1809; would the will have been made public prior to that for people to have been able to draw such a conclusion? Or was this gossip that had been tossed about for a long time?

Another Tickler article appeared a month later on November 9: A fellow called major Brodhead, who frequently boasted since the governor’s election, that he was one who had assisted in naturalizing the 500 aliens, recently solicited alms, in a certain billiard room, for one of the new made citizens, under the plea that he was a seafaring man thrown out of employ by the embargo. Now, although we do not know by what right Brodhead claims the title of major, we wish major Wash-tub to inform the public, whether the man for whom he solicited alms, is a seaman ; or whether he does not keep a sailor’s boarding house in Southwark. Further — major Wash-tub is requested to state, whether he ever received favors, similar to those he solicited for his protegee?

1809 (age 53): Daniel Sr. dies in Milford, Pike Co., PA, on November 15, and is buried in the Milford Cemetery. Daniel Jr. is listed in Robinson’s Philadelphia Directory: Broadhead, Danl., accomptant, N. Broad.

1810 (age 54): Daniel Jr. is again listed in Robinson’s Philadelphia Directory: Broadhead, Daniel, accomptant, North Broad. The 1810 Census shows the family living in South Mulberry Ward, Philadelphia. The household included 1 male under 10, 1 male aged 10-16, and 1 male aged 45 and older (Daniel Sr.). I don’t know who the 2 male children could have been because presumably son Daniel was not born until 1814. There were 5 girls under the age of 10,  1 between the age of 10-16, and 1 aged 26-44 (‘Christian Abel’). I don’t know who the 5th girl under the age of 10 could have been since Mira was born in 1812, nor do I know who the girl aged 10-16 could have been.

1813 (age 57): Daniel Brodhead Jr. is listed among numerous insolvent debtors in a newspaper notice that appeared in Daniel Poulson’s American Daily Advertiser (Philadelphia) on Wednesday, March 3, 1813. His profession is listed as “Accomptant” (an accountant). His creditors are listed as M. Randall, Henry Sparks, and Benjamin Noner.  Kite’s Philadelphia Directory for 1814 lists Daniel: Brodhead Daniel, accomptant north Broad and 24 Strawberry.

1814 (age 58): Kite’s Philadelphia Directory carries the same listing: Brodhead Daniel, accomptant north Broad and 24 Strawberry.

1816 (age 60): Robinson’s Philadelphia Directory lists Daniel Jr.: Broadhead, Daniel, accomptant, North Broad. Daniel offers bail for Jane Baker, mother of the notorious Ann Carson. Mrs. Baker had been implicated in her daughter’s attempted kidnapping of Governor Simon Snyder. See New York Evening Post article – October 31, 1816. Was Jane Baker, perhaps, related to Daniel’s aforementioned son-in-law William Baker? This was a huge scandal worthy of its own blog post, but for a quick synopsis, click here. For the whole story, click here. Update 6/13/13: Daniel’s role was that of professional bail bondsman. (Branson, p. 62)

New York Evening Post, 1816 (Credit: www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Evening Post, 1816 (Credit: http://www.fultonhistory.com)

Pennsylvania Governor Simon Snyder, ca. 1815 (Wikimedia Commons - image in public domain)

Pennsylvania Governor Simon Snyder, ca. 1815 (Wikimedia Commons – image in public domain)

1817 (age 61): Per Robinson’s Philadelphia Directory he is still at the same location: Broadhead, Daniel, accomptant, North Broad.

1818 (age 62): On March 27, Daniel Jr. appeared in District Court in Philadelphia to confirm his identity as a veteran of the Revolutionary War and to request a pension due to his “reduced circumstances in life”. (Goodwill and Smith, p. 136) Paxton’s Philadelphia Directory shows a change of address: Brodhead, Daniel, accomptant, 17 Arch.

1819 (age 63): According to Paxton’s Philadelphia Directory, Daniel is now several doors away: Brodhead, Daniel, accountant, 12 Arch.

1820 (age 64): On August 11, Daniel appeared in Court again to affirm his identity and to demand Bounty Land promised to him by the US for having served as an officer in the War. (Goodwill and Smith, pp. 137-138)

The 1820 Census shows the family living in Philadelphia’s High Street Ward. But now there are only 7 in the household: 1 male over 45 (Daniel Jr), 1 female under 10 (must be Mira), 3 females aged 10-16 (presumably Juliana, Amanda, and Evelina), and 2 females aged 16-26 (one was probably Ellen, but who was the 2nd?). It appears that ‘Christian Abel’ and young son Daniel may have passed away by then, but I have not yet found proof of that. Whitely’s Philadelphia Directory shows an additional occupation (scrivener – a.k.a. notary): Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener and accountant, 12 Arch.

First Presbyterian Church, Market Street, East of Third, in 1800

First Presbyterian Church, Market Street, East of Third, in 1800

1821 (age 65): M’Carty Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener and accountant, 12 Arch.

1822 (age 66): M’Carty Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener and accountant, 12 Arch.

1823 (age 67): Desilver’s Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener and accountant, 12 Arch.

1824 (age 68): Desilver’s Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, accountant, 12 Arch.

1825 (age 69): Wilson’s Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, conveyancer and accountant, 12 Mulberry.

1828 (age 72): Desilver’s Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener, 12 Mulberry.

1829 (age 73): Desilver’s Philadelphia Directory: Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener, 12 Mulberry.

1830 (age 74): I could not find the family in the 1830 Census, but Desilver’s Philadelphia Directory carried this listing: Brodhead, Daniel, scrivener, 12 Mulberry.

1831 (age 75): Dies on February 2 in Philadelphia. Funeral procession departing from son-in-law William Baker’s home on Buttonwood Street. Burial place not stated.

1835: His estate is appraised on January 8. It consists of acreage in Henderson Co., Kentucky, transferred to him by “Military Warrant No. 3490”: …2666-2/3 acres — 766-2/3 ares of which remain unallocated and which we value at ——— $600. (Goodwill and Smith, p. 139).

So all of that research was triggered by those two little words “William Baker”– so whose husband was he? Juliana’s.

If you’ve made it this far, thanks for reading, and as always, your comments, corrections, and suggestions are welcome!

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Update 4/28/14: From the book History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties, p. 935:

[Col. Daniel Brodhead] …had only one son, also named Daniel (by his first wife, Elizabeth De Pue), who was also an officer during the Revolution. He was sent to Virginia in 1779, in charge of the prisoners of General Burgoyne’s army. He subsequently settled in Virgina and raised a family. Colonel James O. Brodhead, of St. Louis, MO, who has achieved a national reputation, is a grandson of his.

This obviously raises more questions that need to be looked into. Daniel Jr. supposedly retired in 1779, so if in fact he was sent to Va., he must not have been there that long. On the surface, this does seem to corroborate other sources alleging that a wife existed in KY/VA, at a time prior to when Daniel Jr. established a family in Philadelphia ca 1800-1802.

Note: It would seem that History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties is incorrect about James O. Brodhead being one of Daniel Jr.’s grandsons, unless there is another James O. Brodhead that was born in St. Louis. This is the only one I have found: James Overton Broadhead; born in Charlottesville, VA, 29 May 1819; died 7 Aug 1898 in St. Louis. The article ‘Ardent Unionist, Unrepentant Slaveholder’ contains a wealth of information about this James including that he was the son of Achilles Brodhead, who was ‘commissioned by Thomas Jefferson to survey the grounds that became the University of Virginia.’ After a bit of digging, I learned that Achilles’ father was a Jonathan Broadhead (from A History of the City of St. Louis and Vicinity, The Pioneers and Their Successors compiled and published by John Devoy, St. Louis, 1898: “Mr. Broadhead’s grandfather, Jonathan Broadhead, came to this country from Yorkshire, England, during the Revolutionary War and settled in Albemarle County”).

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References:

  • The Baltimore Underwriter: A Weekly Journal Devoted to the Interests of Insurance in All Its Branches, Vol. XIII, January – June 1875 (Baltimore: Bombaugh & Ransom Publishers and Proprietors).
  • Bogart, William Henry. Daniel Boone And The Hunters Of Kentucky (New York and Auburn: Miller, Orton & Mulligan, 1856).
  • Susan Branson. Dangerous to Know: Women, Crime, and Notoriety in the Early Republic. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008).
  • Early Kentucky Settlers: The Records of Jefferson County, Kentucky from the Filson Club History Quarterly (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. for Clearfield Co., 2007).
  • Fitzpatrick, John C., editor.The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799, Volume 14 (January 12, 1779 – May 5, 1779) by George Washington, John Clement Fitzpatrick, David Maydole Matteson. United States George Washington Bicentennial Commission.
  • Goodwill, Anne, and Jean Smith. The Brodhead Family: The Story of Captain Daniel Brodhead, His Wife Ann Tye, and Their Descendants, Vol. II (Port Ewen, NY: Brodhead Family Association, 1988).
  • The History of Ohio Falls Cities and Their Counties: Illustrations and Biographical Sketches, Vol. I (Cleveland: L.A. Williams and Co., 1882).
  • Jackson, Joseph. America’s Most Historic Highway: Market Street Philadelphia (Philadelphia & NY: Wannamaker, 1926).
  • Mathews, Alfred. History of Wayne, Pike, and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania (Philadelphia: R. T. Peck and Co., 1886).
  • Morris, Robert. The Papers of Robert Morris, 1781-1784: August-September 1781 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1975).
  • Morris, Robert. The Papers of Robert Morris, 1781-1784: April 16-July 20, 1782 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1980).
  • Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery. Centennial anniversary of the Pennsylvania Society, for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage: And for Improving the Condition of the African Race (Philadelphia: Grant, Faires & Rodgers, Printers, 1875).
  • Risjord, Norman K. Chesapeake Politics: 1781-1800 (New York: Columbia University Press, 1978).
  • Rubicam, Milton. Evidence: An Exemplary Study, A Craig Family Case History. Special Publication No. 49. (Washington DC: National Genealogical Society, 1981).

Philadelphia Directory Listings:

Philadelphia city directories

Philadelphia city directories

Resources on Ann Carson:

  • The trials of Richard Smith, late lieutenant in the 23d Regiment U. States infantry, as principal, and Ann Carson, alias Ann Smith, as accessory, for the murder of Captain John Carson, on the 20th day of January 1816. Ebook on  openlibrary.org
  • Susan Branson. Dangerous to Know: Women, Crime, and Notoriety in the Early Republic. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008. ISBN 978-0-8122-4088-7
  • Essay: Crime, Class Consciousness and Narrative in the Early Republic

Map Credit: Florida Center for Instructional Technology at University of South Florida: http://etc.usf.edu/maps.

G. R. Clark image: This media file is in the public domain in the United States. This applies to U.S. works where the copyright has expired, often because its first publication occurred prior to January 1, 1923. See [http://copyright.cornell.edu/resources/publicdomain.cfm this page] for further explanation. This image might not be in the public domain outside of the United States; this especially applies in the countries and areas that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works, such as Canada, mainland China (not Hong Kong nor Macao), Germany, Mexico, and Switzerland.

Categories: Abel, Baker, Brodhead, Kentucky, Milford Cemetery Milford PA, Obituaries, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Scandal, US Federal 1810, US Federal 1820, Virginia, Washington, President George | 2 Comments

The Daniel Jr. Puzzle

In the last post, I said I’d leave Daniel Brodhead Jr. (son of Brig. General Daniel Brodhead of Revolutionary War fame) who “died when young” to another post since there is a bit of a story there.  I’d always assumed “died when young” meant that young Daniel was a child when he died. Then one day I read on Wikipedia that he died of wounds he suffered in 1776 at the Battle of Long Island during the Revolutionary War. He was in the 8th Pennsylvania Regiment and had been wounded and captured. He was quickly exchanged, but died of his wounds shortly after being released. He’d have been just 20. And I found information on page 986 of Armstrong County Pennsylvania: Her People, Past and Present, Vol II, Chicago: J.H. Beers & Co., 1914, to corroborate that version of events: “The son, Daniel, Jr., was wounded at the Battle of Long Island and captured, was exchanged and died soon afterward.”

I thought that was the end of that mystery, but then I made a few new discoveries that made me question Daniel Jr.’s fate once again:

  • In his article “General Daniel Brodhead” Patriot in War, Civil Servant in Peace” (Milestones Vol. 17, No. 2), Dr. John C. Appel, a history professor at East Stroudsburg State College, stated: “Colonel Brodhead had seen very little of his family during the war. A son, Daniel, saw military service until captured by the British. After release he entered business in Philadelphia.” Hmmm…
  • Volume II of the book, Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania, edited by John W. Jordan, LLD, and published by The Lewis Publishing Company of New York and Chicago in 1911, makes no mention of Brig. Gen. Daniel Brodhead’s children, Daniel Jr. and Ann Garton. See pages 906-911. However on page 907, we read that Luke Brodhead (1737-1806; Brig. Gen. Daniel Brodhead’s brother) enlisted in the Revolutionary War in “the spring of 1776 as a third lieutenant, First American Rifle Regiment, Colonel William Thompson commanding. He was appointed second lieutenant, October 24, 1776, in Major Simon Williams’ regiment. He was wounded and taken prisoner at battle of Long Island (italics mine). Later he was commissioned captain of the Sixth Pennsylvania Regiment under Colonel Magaw in Continental service.” Could Luke have been confused with Daniel Jr? Or were both men indeed wounded and taken prisoner in the same battle?
  • Most surprising, I came upon a World Connect Project genealogy showing Daniel Jr. as having married someone named Christian Abel. Together they produced six children. But as there was only one person showing such a genealogy, I had my doubts.

Then I re-read the excerpt mentioning Daniel Jr. in Dr. John C. Appel’s article, “General Daniel Brodhead: Patriot in War, Civil Servant in Peace” (Milestones Vol. 17, No. 2): “Colonel Brodhead had seen very little of his family during the war. A son, Daniel, saw military service until captured by the British. After release he entered business in Philadelphia.” I wondered about the pronoun “he” in that last sentence. Perhaps, the “release” referred to Brig. Gen. Daniel Brodhead’s exit from the military because he did indeed wind up in Philadelphia…. But that seemed a bit of a stretch.

Well, through the Brodhead Family Association of Port Ewen, NY, I learned that, indeed, Daniel Jr. did survive the Revolutionary War and did go on to marry and have children! Wow–that was quite a surprise! The reason they are sure about this is that at some point this Daniel Jr. applied for a pension and when doing so submitted an affidavit of his service and identity-related documentation. So the World Connect Project listing, it would seem, is correct: Daniel Jr.’s dates are listed as 1756 – 2 Feb 1831; he was married to ‘Christian Abel’ (have not found anything to verify) and fathered six children (Ellen, Julianna, Amanda, Evelina, Mira, and Daniel). Other evidence of this Daniel Jr. exists in Genealogical Abstracts Revolutionary War Veterans Scrip Act 1852 by Margie G. Brown. (6/7/2011 Follow-up Note: In checking Brodhead Family History (Vol. IV, page 295) published by the Brodhead Family Association, I discovered that they do not show the identity of Daniel Jr.’s spouse; as that volume appeared in 1986, they could have issued an amendment at some point, so this is something I’ll have to look into).

In my last post, I shared that I’d read that Brig. General Daniel Brodhead left all his lands to his daughter Ann Garton Brodhead Heiner, and from her the lands all went to her son, John. That made me wonder what kind of relationship existed between Daniel Sr. and Daniel Jr. We know they saw very little of each other given Daniel Sr.’s extensive military service and travels. Were they pretty much estranged? Somewhere along the way, I’d heard/read that Daniel Jr. had business dealings out in Kentucky, buying and selling land. Apparently he was not a great success at it. Did Daniel Sr. see the way his son operated out in KY and then decide not to trust him with his belongings and property? And why was Daniel Jr. dropped from family descriptions (e.g. the previously mentioned Luke W. Brodhead’s book)? I’d love to know the answers to these questions some day.

Update 5/30/13: Daniel Jr.’s military service dates as a 1st Lieutenant and then a Captain can be found on the State Society of the Cincinnati of Pennsylvania website.  Also, this recent post may hold some clues about the Daniel Sr./Daniel Jr. relationship.

Categories: Brodhead, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia | 6 Comments

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