Brodhead

Garret Brodhead’s Wheat Plains Farm in Pike Co., PA, needs your support

"Wheat Plains," the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

Circa 1900: “Wheat Plains,” the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

The sad state of the Wheat Plains house

2016: The sad state of the Wheat Plains house – victim of the Tocks Island Dam project

Hello, Brodhead descendants & anyone with an interest in Pennsylvania history! You may not be aware of an important project that could greatly use your support: the restoration of Wheat Plains Farm in Pike County, Pennsylvania, the old Garret Brodhead (1730-1804) family homestead that Brodhead family members were forced to abandon in the 1970s due to the Tocks Island Dam project. Below is a letter just received from James and Barbara Brodhead who are spearheading the DePuy-Brodhead Family Association’s efforts to restore the home (now managed by the National Park Service). So please take a few moments to read the below letter and see if you can lend your support. PS: Next summer’s DePuy-Brodhead Family Association annual reunion is likely to be held there; it would be extremely positive if as many Brodhead descendants as possible made the effort to be there to show the NPS that the home’s fate is of concern to many, not just a few. I hope to be there—a great opportunity to support a great cause and meet cousins of all kinds.

 

Dear Family,

As many of you know, some members of the DePuy/Brodhead Family Association have been working with the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area to preserve the Wheat Plains house. Wheat Plains is the farm started by Garret Brodhead on the land he received as partial payment for his service in the Revolutionary War. From 1790 the farm was owned by the Brodhead family until it was sold to Cornelius Swartout in 1871. Robert Packer Brodhead purchased back the farm in 1896 and his descendants remained there until the 1970’s when the land was acquired by eminent domain as part of the Tocks Island Dam Project. The Army Corp of Engineers headed the project. Later the Army Corp of Engineers determined that the river bed would not support the dam. The land then was transferred to the National Parks Service (NPS) who now manages the property. There are currently about 700 buildings remaining in the park on both sides of the Delaware River. Some have historical significance and most have sentimental value. Many buildings are in poor condition. Wheat Plains is structurally sound and it sits in a prominent place on highway 209.

The Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (DWGNRA) is developing a long range plan to identify which buildings should be restored, maintained, or removed. The NPS has limited funds to do this work. Included in their consideration is the cost of maintenance and what the long term usage of the structure will be. Without a defined usage the preservation efforts will be limited.

Now to get to the purpose of this letter. We have been encouraged to send letters to the Superintendent of the DWGNRA and express our interest and support of preserving Wheat Plains or other structures. Please write a politely worded letter expressing your personal interest in preserving Wheat Plains farmhouse and property. Please include personal memories and historical facts that you have. If you have ideas for the usage for the house, (i.e. museum, vacation rental, etc.) please include that also. These letters need to be sent by the end of the year in order to be included in the evaluation process. The sooner the letters arrive the better. The Association created a good impression when we helped clean the house in 2015. It showed the NPS how much we care and your letter will add to that.

When writing your letter please remember that the NPS had nothing to do with taking the land; they were given the task of maintaining it. Please keep your letter kind and considerate.

Please address your letter to:
John J. Donahue, Superintendent
Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area &
Middle Delaware National Scenic and Recreational River
1978 River Road
Bushkill, PA 18324

Please also send copies of your letter to the following at the address above or email a copy to the addresses
given below:
Judson Kratzer – Judson_Kratzer@NPS.gov
Jennifer Kavanaugh – Jennifer_Kavanaugh@NPS.gov

We are in the initial stages of organizing a “Friends of Wheat Plains” non-profit org. to collect donations to help support the preservation of Wheat Plains. More information coming.

We sincerely thank you,
James and Barbara Brodhead
425-418-4742

Categories: Brodhead, Delaware Water Gap, Pennsylvania, Pike Co. | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

An image of Mrs. Lewis Dingman Brodhead (a.k.a. Mildred Elizabeth Hancock)

Lewis Dingman Brodhead (undated; probably circa 1904)

Lewis Dingman Brodhead (undated; probably circa 1904) – Image copyright James and Barbara Brodhead

As long-time readers of this blog know, Mildred Elizabeth Hancock (1892 – Aft 1940) eloped with my Great Uncle Lewis Dingman Brodhead (1884-1934) on June 23, 1911, at the Church of the Transfiguration in Manhattan.

(My previous blog posts about them include: Another Brodhead elopes, this time in 1911 at NYC’s Little Church Around the Corner; More on Lewis D. Brodhead; and Survived by ‘Mrs. R. J. Cole of Philadelphia’)

Well, some good news! The Baltimore Sun has kindly given me permission to publish the photo of Mildred that appeared on p. 14 of the July 12, 1911, issue of that paper.

Mildred’s hat is pretty fabulous; it’s a shame we can’t see her or her hat in full living color, but under the circumstances, B&W will definitely do!

Below Image: Reprinted with permission from The Baltimore Sun.  All rights reserved.

Mildred

Reprinted with permission from The Baltimore Sun. All rights reserved.

Categories: Brodhead, Hancock, Lutherville, Maryland, New York City | Tags: | 7 Comments

March 1888: Luke Brodhead’s collection of Indian relics stolen

In my travels, I came across the below article about the theft of Luke Wills Brodhead’s collection of Indian artifacts, and it reminded me that I should consolidate some information I’ve gathered about him into a blog post. He was a very interesting man and must have been a powerful presence in his community in and around Delaware Water Gap. Autumn is here and soon the colors will be changing in that neck of the woods—a gorgeous spot on the Delaware River that he and his family held dear. Long gone are the massive summer hotels looking down from high above at the flowing waters and rolling hills. City folk have far more places to vacation now. But, this was once a hugely popular area for tourism, and Luke was in the thick of if. Seeing images from that time and his portrait (he and his brothers were extremely tall), I can almost envision him energetically walking about his hotel’s grounds, chatting with guests, and directing his staff on various matters. And then to think of all his historical interests and writings…he was truly a class act!

Philadelphia Enquirer, Wednesday, 12 September 1888*

Luke Wills Brodhead

Luke Wills Brodhead portrait from History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania, by Alfred Mathews, published by RT Peck & Co., 1886

BRODHEAD’S COLLECTION. Stolen Indian Relics Traced to a European Museum.
TRENTON, Sept. 11.—The most remarkable and curious robbery on record has just been made known. It occurred at the Delaware Water Gap last March, when the celebrated collection of Indian relics and specimens of the stone age, which L. W. Brodhead spent a lifetime in gathering, were carried away. The most peculiar feature about this robbery was the fact that only the most valuable specimens were taken, and that the work was done by a student and expert.

Mr. Brodhead is well known all over the country for his excellent collection, and one that would command an immense sum of money even under a forced sale. Mr. Brodhead keeps a hotel. Adjoining his own private parlor he has a library, the chief decorations of which are his arrow heads, axes, spears, rollers, javelins, pipes and bits of ancient pottery. With much care they have been arranged in groups. The arrow heads are tacked on white boards in groups, according to chronology or topography. He takes much pride in showing them to friends. Last winter the side shutter was forced open and the cases rifled and about one-third of the collection was taken away. The most valuable and rarest pieces were taken.

After the blizzard snow had melted away in a ravine near the house, the boards on which they were fastened were found. A detective was employed on the case, and he enjoined secrecy on all members of the household. The relics have been traced to England and are now thought to be in the possession of the officers of a museum. It is also thought that the man, who sold them for a handsome sum, will soon be apprehended. He is said to be a man well known in scientific circles, who acts as a purchasing agent for several European museums.

Luke Wills Brodhead bio from Transactions of the Moravian Historical Society by Moravian Historical Society, published 1900, pp. 38-39

Luke Wills Brodhead was born Sept. 12, 1821, in Smithfield Township, Monroe County, Penna. His parents were Luke and Elizabeth Wills Brodhead; his grandfather was Luke, one of the sons of Daniel Brodhead and his wife Esther Wyngart, who lived in Dansbury, now East Stroudsburg, whither they had come from Marbletown, N. Y. […]

ny_evening_express_1867

New York Express 1867

Luke Wills Brodhead, at an early age, engaged in mercantile business at White Haven for twelve years ; returning to the Delaware Water Gap, he was appointed Postmaster there and, at the end of his term of office, he shared with his brother the management of the Kittatinny House.

In 1872 he built the Water Gap House, which he conducted until the time of his death.

Kittatinny Hotel, Delaware Water Gap, published by Detroit Publishing Company, 1898 (NYPL collections) - Wikimedia Commons

Kittatinny Hotel, Delaware Water Gap, published by Detroit Publishing Company, 1898 (NYPL collections) – Wikimedia Commons – Public domain in US

He was a man of more than ordinary ability and, by his genial personality, he made his house famous throughout the land.

He devoted much time and energy to the study of the records, historical and geological, of the Minnisink Valley, was a frequent contributor to the public press and in 1862 wrote a volume concerning the Delaware Water Gap.

Water Gap House, Detroit Publishing Company, 1905 (Illinois State Library Collections - non-commercial use permitted)

Water Gap House, Detroit Publishing Company, 1905 (Illinois State Library Collections – non-commercial use permitted)

He was a member of the Moravian Historical Society, the Historical Societies of Pennsylvania, Minnesota, Georgia and Kansas, the Minnisink Historical Society and the Numismatic and the Geographical Societies of Philadelphia. He was also a member of the Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revolution.

Mr. Brodhead was twice married – in October, 1850, to Leonora Snyder, who departed in 1877, and in 1881 to Margaret D. Coolbaugh. His son, Dr. Cicero Brodhead, died in 1884, and two daughters, Mrs. John Ivison, of Coatesville, and Mrs. H. A. Croasdale, of Delaware Water Gap, together with his widow survive him.

He was an active and interested member of the Presbyterian Church and by his modest, generous, unselfish and courteous manner he made hosts of friends.

View on roof of Water Gap House by Albert Graves - stereocard -no known copyright restrictions - Boston Public Library collections

View on roof of Water Gap House by Albert Graves – stereocard -no known copyright restrictions – Boston Public Library collections

For some years he had been suffering from chronic bronchitis, although his final illness was very brief. He died on May 7, 1902, and his remains were laid to rest in the Water Gap Cemetery.

[Find a Grave link to grave site]

Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XXVII, Philadelphia: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1903, p. 447-228

[…] Luke W. Brodhead was a man of more than ordinary ability, and for many years was deeply interested in the history and genealogy of the Upper Delaware and Minisink Valley. His published contributions comprise the following:

The Kittatiny House and the Water Gap House - Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

The Kittatiny House and the Water Gap House – Detroit Publishing Co., ca 1900 – Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

“The Delaware Water Gap: Its Scenery, its Legends, and its Early History;” “The Minisinks and its Early People, the Indians;” “An Ancient Petition;” ” Tatamy;” “Settlement of Smithfield;” “Portals of the Minisink: Tradition and History of the ‘Walking Purchase’ Region and the Gateway of the Delaware;” “Early Frontier Life in Pennsylvania: Efficient Military Service of Four Brothers;” “George Lebar;” “Historical Notes of the Minisinks: Capture of John Hilborn by the Indians on Brodhead’s Creek;” “Pioneer Roads, the Old Mine Road, Early People, etc.;” ” The Old Stone Seminary of Stroudsburg in 1815;” “Indian Trails;” “Soldiers in the War of 1812 from the Townships of Smithfield and Stroud;” “Almost a Cetenarian: The Last of the Soldiers of the War of 1812 in Northern Pennsylvania;” “History of the Old Bell on the School­-House at Delaware Water Gap;” “Indian Graves at Pahaquarra;” “Half-Century of Journalism;” “The Depuy Family;” “Early Settlement of the Delaware: Was the Upper Delaware occupied before Philadelphia? Early Occupation of the Upper Delaware;” “Sketches of the Stroud, Van Campen, McDowell, Hyndshaw, Drake, and Brodhead Families.” He was also associate editor of the “History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties.”

In addition to his connection with the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Mr. Brodhead was a member of the Numismatic and Antiquary Society, the Geographical Society, and the Pennsylvania Society Sons of the Revolution, of Philadelphia; the Minisink Valley Historical Society, the Moravian Historical Society, the Georgia Historical Society, the Kansas Historical Society, and several college literary societies.

*************************************************************************
Links
Antoine Dutot Museum and Gallery
Spanning the GapPDF newsletter – US Dept of the Interior National Park Service
NJ Skylands “Million dollar highway” by Robert Kopenhaven
Pocono history website

*Article from http://www.fultonhistory.com

Categories: Brodhead, Delaware Water Gap, Pennsylvania | Tags: , | 6 Comments

Last group photos of the Woodruff sisters, early 1950s

My garage clear-out yielded these two group photos of my grandmother Fannie B. Woodruff and her five sisters, Jennie, Flora, Mildred, Cecelia, and Bertha—the children of William Earl Woodruff and Wealthy Ann Angus. The photos were damaged and faded, but some “Photoshopping” has helped to revive them a bit. Oldest sister Jennie died in October 1955 so the image was obviously taken sometime prior to that. Sister Flora Ulrich lived out in California, so maybe this photo was taken to commemorate her visit to New Jersey or to mark some other special/solemn occasion, perhaps even the death of one of their spouses. My grandfather died in May 1951 and Jennie’s in December 1953. The location I am not sure of; but I think it may have been my grandmother’s home in Scotch Plains, NJ. I think it’s somewhat sweet that in the top photo they are all looking in different directions as if trying to catch their best sides. In the photos I have of them in their much younger years, all heads were always pointed in the same direction.

woodruff_sisters_group_elderly_2

Front Row: Jennie Bell Woodruff Coleman, Fannie Bishop Woodruff Brodhead, Flora May Woodruff Baker Ulrich /// Back Row: Bertha Winans Woodruff, Wealthy Mildred Woodruff Brown, Cecelia Russum Woodruff Van Horn

woodruff_sisters_group_elderly1

Front Row: Bertha (daughter #6) and Jennie (daughter #1) Back Row: Cecelia (daughter #3), Mildred (daughter #5), Fannie (daughter #4), Flora (daughter #2)

Woodruff_sisters_adults_view2_labelled

Categories: Brodhead, Brown, Coleman, Elizabeth, Union Co., Hillside Union, New Jersey, Russum, Scotch Plains, Ulrich, Van Horn, Winans, Woodruff | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

Linderman children info updated; October 1889: Albert Brodhead Linderman returns from quick trip to London and Paris

Sinking of the Cunrad Line's steamer SS Oregon, 14th march 1886, 15 miles off Long Island.

Sinking of the Cunard Line’s steamer SS Oregon, 14th march 1886, 15 miles off Long Island. Nathaniel Currier & James Meritt Ives, 1886 (Wikimedia Commons – Image in public domain in US due to publication in the US prior to 1923.)

One of this blog’s readers, Steve, is actively engaged in researching his wife’s Linderman & Brodhead ancestors. He recently emailed me some Linderman tree info I was lacking in my post on Rachael Brodhead, wife of John Jordan Linderman. To view that post, click here. Scroll down and you will find Steve’s tree showing the seven children of John and Rachael. Anyone with additional info to share, please, by all means, leave a comment.

Port Jervis Evening Gazette, 9 October 1889 (Credit: Fultonhistory.org)

Port Jervis Evening Gazette, 9 October 1889 (Credit: Fultonhistory.org)

Coincidentally I came upon an October 1889 article about one of the children, Albert Brodhead Linderman, who’d have been about 57 at the time of publication. It’s a brief article but is packed with interesting little details. Albert was just returned from a brief trip to London and Paris, and seems to have been heavily involved in the railway industry. He was described as “a great traveler and a great talker” (the gift of gab always seems to go to at least one member of a family!) and a survivor of an 1886 ship collision off the coast of Long Island, New York. I can imagine that that disaster, only three years in the past, was still very fresh in people’s minds. For a description of the fate of the luxurious 650-passenger SS Oregon whose last journey was from Liverpool, England, to New York, click here. Thankfully, all of the Oregon‘s passengers were rescued.

Yes, Albert definitely got around. Upon further investigation, I found evidence (see article on the right) of his plan to purchase the island of Cuba (!) and his involvement in draining Lake Okeechobee here in South Florida to make way for agricultural expansion:

The State authorities of Florida have entered into a contract with I Coryell of Jacksonville and A B Linderman representing capitalists of Philadelphia and San Francisco to drain Lake Okeechobee in Southern Florida. The scheme if successfully carried out will reclaim millions of acres of excellent sugar lands and result not only in the reclamation of the bed of the lake itself but it is believed in that of the two vast swamps known as the Everglades and the Big Cypress which lie south of the lake and cover the greater portion of the lower end of the peninsula. The Everglades is sixty miles in length and about the same width really constitute a vast lake from one to six in depth studded with thousands of small islands. (From The Friend, Volumes 54-55, The Society of Friends, pub. 1881)

To my knowledge, the lake—the seventh largest freshwater lake in the US—was never drained, however, due to devastation and loss of life in the 1920s as a result of some hurricanes crossing over the lake and creating a storm surge, a dike was built around the lake in the 1930s. I remember setting off with my husband to the east coast 8-9 years ago and deciding to travel in such a way as to travel along the west and north sides of the lake on our trip east and then drive along the east and south sides on our return. We’d no idea the dike existed and were expecting to see some scenic views of the lake on our journey. Boy, were we disappointed for there really were very few places to catch a glimpse of it. You have to climb up to the top of the dike to see down below. A 109-mile walking/cycling trail—the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail—goes around the perimeter of the lake, often on top of the dike, but you are fully exposed to the sun, something to take into consideration especially at the hottest time of year. One of the best viewing spots we found was in the town of Pahokee (with a name like that, you just have to stop to be able to say you have been there), but that is not saying too much since it’s not like you’re climbing up to any great elevation.

The fishing in the lake is supposed to be very good, and it seemed like every home along the water’s edge had a boat, but, of course, there are lots of gators in there too. We were in Boston several months after that trip and were chatting over a B&B breakfast with some German tourists who were heading down to Miami the following day. One of their top priorities was going to be to go off to swim in Lake Okeechobee. We nearly choked on our French toast, and once the powdered sugar dislodged from our throats, strongly advised them against that idea!!!

Anyway, I have gotten way off track… Back to Albert. I don’t know why he is called Colonel. Had he served in the Civil War? Anyone with some thoughts on that or anything else to do with the Linderman children, feel free to comment below. Have a good day, all.
******************************************************************************************************
Update 7/5/16 – Some additional information kindly provided by aforementioned researcher Steve Hatchett:

  • Albert Brodhead Linderman patent1882 patent
  • Article on land deal in Florida involving Linderman and prominent men from Great Britain
  • Part owner of a business enterprise with brother HR Linderman – for the link, click here
  • Chester A. Arthur, 21st President of the United States of America

    Chester A. Arthur, 21st President of the United States of America – Public Domain image

  • Linderman meets President Chester A. Arthur Google Books link – Eve Bacon writes in Orlando: A Centennial History that when Arthur’s train reached Kissimmee, Colonel A.B. Linderman greeted the President and announced, “We flatter ourselves that we have among us not only the president, but the next president.” Arthur, in no mood to make a politcal address, answered, “We are not here to look after the next president. We are here for rest and quiet,” Bacon writes.
  • Hamilton Diston - Image in public domain - Florida Memory Archives call number Rc02832

    Hamilton Diston – Image in public domain – Florida Memory Archives call number Rc02832

  • Although Linderman is not mentioned by name, this Wikipedia article about Linderman’s associate, Hamilton Disston details some of the dealings in which Linderman was involved in Florida. AB Linderman was an agent and business associate of Hamilton Disston. Disston’s agents arranged the purchase of something like 4 million acres in Florida, one of the largest private land purchases at the time. This was related to the draining projects. Disston sold some of the land to Sir Edward James Reed of Great Britain. One of the articles above mentions Linderman involved in land deal with prominent Great Britain people including another Sir that was also an M.P. Reading some of the news articles about the draining made it sound like a flakey thing, but Disston was the real deal, and was moving and shaking in Florida. Note in the Wikipedia article the mention of President Arthur going to Kissimmee. That seems directly tied to the mention above of Linderman meeting Arthur in Kissimme.
  • H.R. Linderman, sometime between 1865-1880. Library of Congress image - No known restrictions on publication

    H.R. Linderman, sometime between 1865-1880. Library of Congress image – No known restrictions on publication

  • There is also a US Mint pamphlet that mentions him helping the Mint in reviewing contract bids during Henry Richard Linderman‘s term there. So ABL had his fingers in a lot of things.
  • Categories: Brodhead, Hamilton Disston, Linderman, President C. Arthur | Tags: , | 6 Comments

    Brodhead family reunion in 1964, celebrating 300th anniversary

    I finally found this photo from the 1964 Brodhead family reunion in Kingston, NY. I know some of you were actually in attendance, so perhaps this will be a stroll down memory lane for you!

    Click on the image, and then on “2818 × 1326” to see it at full size. Double-clicking on the image will achieve the same thing. Perhaps, the Brodheads among this blog’s readers will be able to help with identifications, particularly of those who have since passed away. Feel free to leave comments in the comment box below, or email me at chipsoff at gmail dot com. Also, any Brodhead family members wanting a high-res, watermark-free copy, please email me and I will send one your way. Many thanks, and enjoy your weekend!

    PS: I do have the list of attendees, so I can cross-check names for you.

    1964_Reunion

    Categories: Brodhead, Kingston | Tags: | 9 Comments

    John Romeyn Brodhead (1849-1932) grave

    John Romeyn Brodhead

    John Romeyn Brodhead

    John Romeyn Brodhead grave - images by 'Paul R' - permission granted by way of crediting Paul R for his contributions -- thank you, Paul!)

    John Romeyn Brodhead grave – images by ‘Paul R’ – permission granted by way of crediting Paul R for his contributions — thank you, Paul!

    One of this blog’s readers, Steve, alerted me to an announcement in a New York paper about the death and burial plans for John Romeyn Brodhead whose death date and resting place I had been searching for for quite some time. See 30 Sept 2014 post Trying to ‘find a grave’ for John Romeyn Brodhead.

    According to the paper, John died at home in Denver, Colorado, on 2 October 1932, and his cremated remains were interred in his wife’s family plot (Holbert) in Forrest Home Cemetery, Waverly, Tioga Co., NY. He was 83 at the time of his death and was predeceased by his parents and three of his nine siblings.

    I checked Find a Grave again and discovered that the grave has been on that website since a month before my Sept 2014 post! I don’t know how I missed it.  (Note to self to have head examined 🙂 )

    John’s entry must have been linked quite recently to the rest of the Andrew & Ophelia Brodhead family members since it was not listed with them when I last checked in March. In any event, John is finally linked in with all the family. Many thanks to all who made that possible, especially ‘Paul R’ who made the entry on Find a Grave and took the photos. And thank you, Steve, for alerting me to that article!

    To go to the Find a Grave page for John, click here.

    So, no more brick wall with John’s grave. Case solved! As Fox Mulder would say on The XFiles, “The truth is out there.” We just have to find it or have it find us!

    Categories: Brodhead, Colorado, Tioga Co | Tags: | Leave a comment

    Obits for James Easton Brodhead (1851-1943) & son Nathaniel (1891-1956)

    Brodhead_JE_obit

    James Easton Brodhead

    James Easton Brodhead

    Today I’m posting a couple of obits saved by my grandmother—one for James Easton Brodhead, who lived until the ripe old age of 92, and one for his son Nathaniel Boyd Brodhead (1891-1956) who sadly was not so fortunate in the longevity department. He died at age 64 of a heart attack while aboard a Naples-bound train in Lakeland, Florida.

    Other sons died fairly early as well. John Romeyn Brodhead (1880-1936) died of a heart attack in May 1936 while playing tennis in Flemington, NJ. He was just 55. And brother Walter died in the same year as his father. He was 65. I don’t know the circumstances of his death.

    Please see past post(s) for more about this family.

    Brodhead house

    James Easton Brodhead family residence on Main Street in Flemington, Hunterdon Co., NJ

    Brodhead_NB_obit

    Categories: Brodhead, Connecticut, Death, Flemington, New Jersey, Obituaries, Stamford | 2 Comments

    Andrew Douglas Brodhead obituary

    A. D. Brodhead

    A. D. Brodhead (1853-1917)

    Brodhead_AD

    Obituary, probably from the Elizabeth Daily Journal, May 7, 1917

    My great-grandfather Andrew Douglas Brodhead (known to many as ‘Doug’) passed away 99 years ago today, on May 6, 1917, a day that would have been his father Andrew Jackson Brodhead‘s 94th birthday had he lived long enough.

    When I first started working on our family history 5-6 years ago, I knew hardly anything about Andrew Douglas. Over time, images of him surfaced, as did brief mentions of him in letters and a few articles, but I’d always wondered about the circumstances of his death. Well, the answer came during the “great garage clean-out of 2016” when I discovered this obituary; it describes the very sad circumstances of his passing.

    Brief as it is, the obit speaks volumes as to what kind of man he was and offers insight into his life’s travels—from Mauch Chunk, PA, to Perth Amboy, and then to Elizabeth, with his latest place of employment being in NYC.  Father of Frank, Lewis, and Andrew. Husband of Margaret Lewis Martin. I’m sure this event was a huge shock for all the family, including all of Andrew’s siblings and their families. Thankfully, they were a close-knit bunch and looked after each other, something that makes a big difference in how we get through such things.

    Categories: Brodhead, Death, Elizabeth, Union Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Obituaries, Presbyterian | 9 Comments

    May 6, 1912, poem commemorates Andrew Jackson Brodhead’s 90th birthday

    Andrew Jackson Brodhead

    Andrew Jackson Brodhead

    This coming Friday, May 6, is the anniversary of Andrew Jackson Brodhead‘s birth in 1822. Below is a copy of a poem his daughter Emily wrote for him to mark his 90th birthday, in 1912. By then his wife Ophelia (d. 1905) and son Calvin (d. 1907) had passed away, and she makes reference to them in her verse.

    At the time, Andrew was living with his daughter Mrs. Franklin C. Burk (Charlotte) in Flemington, NJ, the town he and Ophelia had called home since 1884. Many people, including his nine remaining children, paid their respects to him that special day, whether in person or by telegram, letter, or postcard. He was very well known in the community and much admired for his positive outlook on life and cheerful demeanor.

    Brodhead_AJ_90th_birthday2

    Categories: Anniversaries, Brodhead, Flemington | Tags: | 1 Comment

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    Genealogy: Looking For "Dead People"!

    Cemeteries of Brunswick, Maine

    To live in the hearts we leave behind, is not to die. ~ Thomas Campbell

    Heart of a Southern Woman

    A snapshot of life one blog post at a time.

    Zimmerbitch

    age is just a (biggish) number) NUMBER

    The People of Pancho

    At Play In The Archive

    TRACK

    Truth and Reconciliation for the Adoption Community of Korea

    Rose of Sharon Healing

    Healing for the Nations

    DNAeXplained - Genetic Genealogy

    Discovering Your Ancestors - One Gene at a Time

    Monkey Map

    The completed project of three years of mapping monkey puzzle trees

    A SILVER VOICE FROM IRELAND

    An Eclectic mix of items from a 'senior' blogger in Ireland looking at the past and keeping an eye on the present.

    Opening Doors in Brick Walls

    “When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us.” ~ Alexander Graham Bell

    jerseyrootsgenealogy

    A Garden State Journey in Genealogy

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