Cemeteries

100 years ago: Memorial Day at the Suresnes American Cemetery and Memorial outside Paris

This is quite a poignant photo; the War had ended just 18 months earlier and America had lost 116,000 servicemen—53,000 in combat and 63,000 from disease and influenza. These tragic losses were marked during this Memorial Day ceremony in Suresnes American Cemetery just outside Paris. If you enlarge the image by clicking on it twice, you will become immersed in a very solemn scene.

CLICK to enlarge. Cérémonie du “Memorial Day” au Cimetière Américain de Suresnes, le 30 Mai 1920 (LOC Prints and Photographs Division – No known restrictions on publication)

The NY Tribune, 29 May 1920 (Credit: FultonHistory.com)

MEMORIAL DAY

The circling year again brings round
This proud Memorial Day,
With mingled joy and grief profound,
We deck with wreaths the sacred mound,
Where patriot soldiers lay.

Tis meet that we this honor show,
And pledge this day anew,
Our fadeless faith, that all may know
How strong this faith will ever grow,
In loyal hearts and true.

Our land so broad, so grand, so free,
Pays homage to the band,
Who fought and bled, and died that we
An undivided nation be,
The peer of any land.

Pile granite to the vaulted skies;
Carve words of deathless fame;
Let marble monuments arise
Where’er the soldier-patriot lies,
In honor of his name.

The granite pile may sink to dust,
No more its words be read ;
The marble may forsake its trust;
The nation may, in reckless lust,
Forget the honored dead.

Their fame is fixed beyond the skies,
Their glory is of God ;
Twas not ambition’s sacrifice,
Nor eager gain for worldly prize,
That laid them ‘neath the sod.

They died our nation’s life to save,
Ere it were rent in twain,
For this each fills a soldier’s grave,
For this the glorious flag shall wave,
In honor of the slain.

They died : the clanking shackles fell
From bondman’s fettered hand,
And angels winged their way to tell,
While heavenly choirs the anthem swell,
Of freedom’s happy land.

Z. F. Riley*

*From Holiday Selections for Readings and Recitation compiled by Sarah Sigourney Rice (Philadelphia: The Penn Publishing Company, 1920, pp. 187-188)

Link:
Suresnes American Cemetery – American Battle Monuments Commission

God Bless ALL of Our Fallen Heroes

Categories: Memorial Day, Miscellaneous, Suresnes American Cemetery and Memorial | Tags: | 1 Comment

George Wills’ descendants in the US — another update

George Wills, 1793-1856, Image from our private family archives. George Wills’ original portrait was inherited by his daughter Martha according to his will.

Quite a long time ago, I did a number of posts on Wills family descendants in the US, specifically George and Mary Wills’ daughter and son-in-law Mary and William Sargent (original surname = Slaymaker) and their children: my great grandmother Elizabeth Sargent and her siblings Samuel, Sarah (Sadie) and William.  Of all the children, I knew the least about Sadie. From George Wills’ Descendants in America — An Update:

I discovered some census records that revealed that Sarah went by the name Sadie, and that she was married to Richard O. Hemion, a machinist, who was born in 1857 in Rockland County, NY,  to John and Catharine Hemion. In 1880, he was working as a cigar maker in Jersey City, NJ, and living with an older sister, Amelia Curyansen, and her family.  [I saw some message boards stating the surname was actually Auryansen, and was misspelled in that record. Auryansen is a Dutch surname, and evidently the history of the family in America goes way back.] It is in Jersey City that he must have become acquainted with Sadie. According to the 1900 census, they were married in roughly 1882. The pair settled in East Rutherford, NJ, and had four children: Cora, Mabel, Everett, and Edith (see below for dates). By 1920, Sadie is listed as a widow and living with children Cora and Everett, by then in their thirties.

Several months ago I spotted a public tree for the Hemion family on Ancestry. It had the wrong Sarah Sargent, a mistake that was logical given the family changed their name from Slaymaker before emigrating to the US after the Civil War. I was able to reach the tree’s owner to notify them of the error, and then we started sharing information. Turns out he and his brother are great-grandsons of Sadie and Richard, and they’d had scant information passed down to them about Sadie’s roots. I was able to share all the information in this blog with them.

At some point the brothers hope to locate the photo they have of Sadie; a recent move has temporarily displaced it. They did say that their mother Ruth Ramp remembered her grandmother as having very long waist-length snow-white hair and that she had worked as a pastry chef but had never had enough patience at home to teach her children the craft.

We also managed to find a date of death for Sadie and her husband and find their burial places as well as those of some other family members. Most are in Hillside Cemetery, Lyndhurst, New Jersey.

Below is an updated tree:

1-Sarah (Sadie) Sargent b. Jul 1860, St. Sepulchre, Northampton, 
  Northamptonshire, England, d. 12 Jul 1935, East Rutherford, Bergen, New 
  Jersey, Bur. 15 Jul 1935, Hillside Cemetery, Lyndhurst, Bergen Co., NJ
 + Richard Osborn Hemion b. Feb 1857, Rockland Co., New York, d. 15 Jun 1911, 
  Bur. 18 Jun 1911, Hillside Cemetery, Lyndhurst, Bergen Co., NJ
|-----2-Cora S. Hemion b. May 1883, Middletown, New York, d. 4 Feb 1959, Bergen 
|       Pines Hospital, East Rutherford, Bergen, New Jersey, Bur. Hillside 
|       Cemetery, Lyndhurst, Bergen Co., NJ
|-----2-Mabel Hemion b. 1 Aug 1885, New York, d. Dec 1974, New Jersey
|      + Edward N. De Blayker b. 4 May 1878, Passaic, NJ, d. After 1942
|     |-----3-Edward Harold De Blayker b. 25 Dec 1914, New Jersey, d. 23 Jun 
|     |       1980, East Rutherford, Bergen, New Jersey
|     |-----3-Gladys C. De Blayker b. Abt 1917, New Jersey, d. 5 Nov 1974
|     |      + Vincent H. Krieger 
|     |-----3-Sadie De Blayker b. Cir 1920, New Jersey, d. After 5 Nov 1974
|            + Dietrich 
|-----2-Everett Osborn Hemion b. 9 Nov 1887, East Rutherford, New Jersey, d. 7 
|       Nov 1940, Bur. Hillside Cemetery, Rutherford, Bergen Co., NJ
|-----2-Edith Amelia Hemion b. Aug 1889, New Jersey, d. 15 Apr 1948, 
|       Rutherford, Bergen, New Jersey, Bur. 19 Apr 1948, Hillside Cemetery, 
|       Lyndhurst, Bergen Co., NJ
       + Frederick Sampson Ramp b. 30 Jan 1895, New York, d. 9 Apr 1967, East 
        Rutherford, Bergen, New Jersey, USA, Bur. 11 Apr 1967, Hillside 
        Cemetery, Lyndhurst, Bergen Co., NJ
      |-----3-Edith A. Ramp b. 1919, d. 16 Oct 1924, Bur. Hillside Cemetery, 
      |       Lyndhurst, Bergen Co., NJ
      |-----3-Ramp b. 1922, d. 13 Apr 1922, Bur. 20 Apr 1922, Hillside 
      |       Cemetery, Lyndhurst, Bergen Co., NJ
      |-----3-Frederick Ramp III 
      |-----3-Ruth Hemion Ramp b. 4 Sep 1927, East Rutherford, New Jersey, d. 7 
      |       Jul 2017, Low Moor, VA
             + William David Jeffery b. 13 Jul 1922, White Plains, NY, d. 4 Jan 
              1967, Wingdale, Dutchess, NY
             + Rev. Robert Wanstall
Categories: Hemion, Hillside Cemetery Lyndhurst NJ, Lyndhurst, New Jersey, Sargent, Slaymaker, Trewin, Wills | Leave a comment

112-year-old Brodhead family guestbook — Post IV

Richard H. Brodhead, Sr.

Yet another two pages from my grandparents’ guestbook. We are still in July 1908, and here we find some Brodheads visiting from Greenville, Pennsylvania, a small town located in the northwestern part of that state.

Jennie & Richard Brodhead at his brother’s Golden Wedding Anniversary gathering on September 17, 1922 (Photo Credit: Michelle Causton)

This is my grandfather’s aunt by marriage, Jennie Vanderveer Smock Brodhead (1861-1938), and her son Richard Henry Brodhead Jr. (1900-1966), on July 21, and her two daughters Mary Ophelia Brodhead (b. 1892) and Estelle Smock Brodhead (b. 1890) on July 31. The family resided at 118 Clinton Street in Greenville. (A third daughter Jean Blakslee Brodhead was born in 1893 but only survived 24 days.)

Richard H. Brodhead Sr. was my great-grandfather Andrew Douglas Brodhead’s youngest brother (he had 6 of them and 3 sisters—the children of AJ Brodhead and Ophelia Easton). There were 11 years between the two, so Richard and Jennie’s children were about a decade younger than my grandfather Frank M. Brodhead and his siblings Lewis and Andrew.

Visiting with Jennie and her kids was Elizabeth Smock Ketcham, Jennie’s older sister, of 224 Summer Avenue in Newark. I found her on Find a Grave and evidently she remarried in later life and lived to a ripe old age of 94.

Among the other visitors, I see my grandfather’s younger brother, Lewis Dingman Brodhead (1884-1933), and possibly a girlfriend (Lina Ryan) on July 24. He’d have been 23 at that time, and this was three years before he eloped with Mildred Hancock.

Top: Parents Andrew D. Brodhead and Margaret Lewis Martin Brodhead. Their three sons: Frank Martin (seated left), Lewis Dingman (right), and Andrew Jackson (standing in rear) (PHOTO of the three brothers courtesy of James & Barbara Brodhead)

The name Hefley (December 13, but for some reason on this page of July and early August visitors) sounded very familiar to me so I asked my Mom about them. She says the Hefleys, who gave their address here as 515 Chilton Street, Elizabeth, NJ, were good friends of my grandparents and that they were a very nice family. He, Morris Hefley, was a stock broker who lost everything during the Great Depression. She, Mabel Hefley, was a happy homemaker who was known for the great cakes she used to bake. They were members of the First Presbyterian Church and had six daughters, but had always hoped for a son. Daughter #6 Wilma was my mother’s age—Mom says they’d hoped for a William, but ended up with Wilma.

As for the other names, I’ll have to do a bit of sleuthing.  Florence A. Earl of Conant Street, visiting on August 2, 1908, was probably one of my grandmother’s cousins on her father’s side of the family (William Earl Woodruff).

Elizabeth Daily Journal on January 20, 1909. Page 3.

Thomas A. Kidd, who visited on July 25, lived at 225 Milton Avenue in Rahway, which seems to be the same address given by Alvira Anness earlier in the month (see last post). I found the small obituary shown here for someone with this name; if this was indeed the same person, perhaps he was boarding with Alvira and her family. Sounds like he experienced a great deal of tragedy in his life, poor man.

If/when I learn more, I will add the info to this page.

Categories: 1st Presbyterian Elizabeth NJ, Brodhead, Elizabeth, Union Co., Greenville, New Jersey | Tags: , , | 6 Comments

Summer 1904 cemetery photos of family marking the placement of the headstone for Wm Sargent Jr. & Sarah Jane Bowley graves

While going through my grandmother Zillah Trewin’s photo album, I came across these images taken in Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, during the summer of 1904 at what I presume was a small gathering to mark the placement of the gravestone for William Sargent (1861-1896) and his wife Sarah Jane Bowley (1849-1904) who died earlier that year, in January. What’s most interesting to me is the fact that the tiny elderly woman in the photo may actually be Mary Bowley Pitt, older sister of Sarah Bowley and second wife of William Sargent (Zillah’s grandfather and my 2nd-great-grandfather; 1st wife was Mary Wills, daughter of George and Mary Wills of Northamptonshire, England). You may recall the post where it was revealed that father and son (both named William) married sisters Mary Bowley Pitt and Sarah Bowley! Based on 1880 census records, Mary Bowley (1st marriage to ? Pitt) was born in 1839 in England; in 1904 she would have been 64, and I am trying to figure out if the mystery woman pictured could be around that age.  Thoughts anyone?

sargent_wm_grave_4

Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ. new headstone for Sarah Bowley and William Sargent, 1904

sargent_wm_grave_1904_1

Elizabeth Sargent Trewin (b. 1854) at grave of her brother William Sargent and sister-in-law Sarah Bowley, 1904

sargent_wm_grave_2

Zillah Trewin (left) at grave of her uncle William Sargent

sargent_wm_grave_3

Unknown woman (left) and Elizabeth Sargent Trewin standing behind gravestone of her brother and sister-in-law, 1904

Categories: Elizabeth, Union Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Hillside Union, New Jersey, Sargent, Slaymaker, Trewin | Tags: , | 5 Comments

Andrew Douglas Brodhead obituary

A. D. Brodhead

A. D. Brodhead (1853-1917)

Brodhead_AD

Obituary, probably from the Elizabeth Daily Journal, May 7, 1917

My great-grandfather Andrew Douglas Brodhead (known to many as ‘Doug’) passed away 99 years ago today, on May 6, 1917, a day that would have been his father Andrew Jackson Brodhead‘s 94th birthday had he lived long enough.

When I first started working on our family history 5-6 years ago, I knew hardly anything about Andrew Douglas. Over time, images of him surfaced, as did brief mentions of him in letters and a few articles, but I’d always wondered about the circumstances of his death. Well, the answer came during the “great garage clean-out of 2016” when I discovered this obituary; it describes the very sad circumstances of his passing.

Brief as it is, the obit speaks volumes as to what kind of man he was and offers insight into his life’s travels—from Mauch Chunk, PA, to Perth Amboy, and then to Elizabeth, with his latest place of employment being in NYC.  Father of Frank, Lewis, and Andrew. Husband of Margaret Lewis Martin. I’m sure this event was a huge shock for all the family, including all of Andrew’s siblings and their families. Thankfully, they were a close-knit bunch and looked after each other, something that makes a big difference in how we get through such things.

Categories: Brodhead, Death, Elizabeth, Union Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Obituaries, Presbyterian | 9 Comments

Frank M. Brodhead, Jr. (1913-1914)

Brodhead_FMJr

Frank Martin Brodhead, Jr. – age 11 months

To my knowledge, this is the only photo we have of my Uncle Frank (1913-1914, son of Frank & Fannie Brodhead) who at 11 months of age died suddenly in the family’s Elizabeth, NJ, home. The photo, a recent discovery of mine, was mixed in with old newspaper clippings, and I was very grateful to come across it.

I’ve never been able to find the exact birth and death dates for Frank, and the little obit that was saved by my grandmother is undated. I think it probably appeared in the Elizabeth Daily Journal whose issues, I believe, are only available in certain libraries, on microfilm. The loss of Frank was sudden and the grief, perhaps, too deep to make note of dates. In any event, I will keep looking for them—the cemetery must have a record—but, more important, I want to get this little image posted so that Uncle Frank is not forgotten.

Frank was buried in Evergreen Cemetery in neighboring Hillside (Find a Grave). A second obituary appears below his. It is for James M. Hefley, son of Morris and Mabel Hefley. I think it’s likely that my grandparents knew this family and saved the two as one clipping.

Tiny obituary, probably in the Elizabeth Daily Journal

The tiny obituary, clipped by my grandmother, probably appeared in the Elizabeth Daily Journal

*****************************************

‘One morn I left him in his bed’
Elizabeth Drew Barstow Stoddard (1823–1902)

One morn I left him in his bed;
A moment after some one said,
‘Your child is dying – he is dead.’

We made him ready for his rest,
Flowers in his hair, and on his breast
His little hands together prest.

We sailed by night across the sea;
So, floating from the world were we,
Apart from sympathy, we Three.

The wild sea moaned, the black clouds spread
Moving shadows on its bed,
But one of us lay midship dead.

I saw his coffin sliding down
The yellow sand in yonder town,
Where I put on my sorrow’s crown.

And we returned; in this drear place
Never to see him face to face,
I thrust aside the living race.

Mothers, who mourn with me today,
Oh, understand me, when I say,
I cannot weep, I cannot pray;

I gaze upon a hidden store,
His books, his toys, the clothes he wore,
And cry, ‘Once more, to me, once more!’

Then take, from me, this simple verse,
That you may know what I rehearse—
A grief – your and my Universe!

Categories: Brodhead, Death, Elizabeth, Union Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, New Jersey, Obituaries | Tags: | 2 Comments

Pvt. Samuel Kendall Angus (b. 1918) – killed in Italy on 28 July 1944

Angus_WWII_obit_EDJ

Among my grandmother’s belongings: A news clipping that most likely appeared in the Elizabeth Daily Journal, end of July/August 1944

Among my grandmother’s collection of news clippings was this small mention of the death of Pvt. Samuel Kendall Angus from bullet wounds received in the line of duty somewhere in Italy on 28 July 1944. Samuel enlisted in the Army in February 1942, and served with Headquarters Battery, 13th Field Artillery Brigade. He was buried in Florence American Cemetery outside of Florence, Italy. For links to his grave information, click: Find a Grave and American Battle Monuments Commission.

Samuel was the grandson of Job Winans Angus whose “letters from Texas” and obituary notice appear elsewhere in this blog. Samuel had one sibling named Betty. The two were the children of Grace Kendall and Rev. Harry Baremore Angus, an ordained Presbyterian minister who died of influenza on 30 April 1919 at the young age of 35. Grace, who incidentally lived to be 100, and daughter Betty must have been terribly devastated by Samuel’s loss. And I’m sure it sent shock-waves through the extended family, especially given the fact that some of Samuel’s cousins were also still in service, in harm’s way.

Thank you, Samuel Kendall Angus, for your service and for paying the ultimate sacrifice for our country. You are remembered and deeply appreciated.

Update 3/11/17:

I found a mention of Kendall in a letter written by Lavinia Angus Marthaler (his grandfather’s sister) to my grandmother Fannie Woodruff Brodhead. The letter was dated 29 Dec 1943: …I received a “V” from Kendall this Monday, from Italy, written Dec. 1.

Update 11/4/19:
Photograph of grave marker is now on Find a Grave. Click here.

Navy Junior Reserve Officers Corps cadets from Naples American High School prepare to lay flowered wreathes at the Tablets of the Missing in The Florence American Cemetery as part of Veterans Day ceremonies in Florence, Italy, Nov. 11, 2011. The tablets are inscribed with 1,409 names of U.S. soldiers, sailors and airmen that have been missing in action since World War II. The cemetery is the final resting place for 4,402 American service members killed during the Italian Campaign. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class John Queen

Wikimedia Commons – no copyright restrictions – released by US government – “Navy Junior Reserve Officers Corps cadets from Naples American High School prepare to lay flowered wreathes at the Tablets of the Missing in The Florence American Cemetery as part of Veterans Day ceremonies in Florence, Italy, Nov. 11, 2011. The tablets are inscribed with 1,409 names of U.S. soldiers, sailors and airmen that have been missing in action since World War II. The cemetery is the final resting place for 4,402 American service members killed during the Italian Campaign. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class John Queen”

== Summary == The Florence American World War II Cemetery and Memorial site in Italy. From the [http://www.abmc.gov American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) web site] per their [http://www.abmc.gov/copyright.php copyright info]. [[Category:American Ba

The Florence American World War II Cemetery and Memorial site in Italy.  US government image – no copyright restrictions – public domain

Contributed to Wikimedia Commons by Vignaccia76 - Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

Florence American Cemetery – Contributed to Wikimedia Commons by Vignaccia76 – Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

 {{flickr| |title=DCP_3156 |description=American soldier cimitery, Tavarnuzze, Italy |photographer=Hannes Reich |photographer_location= |photographer_url=http://flickr.com/photos/ern |flickr_url=http://www.flickr.com/photos/ern/51062188/ |taken=2005-10-09 Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

Wikimedia Commons – American soldier cemetery, Tavarnuzze, Italy |photographer=Hannes Reich |url=http://flickr.com/photos/ern |flickr_url=http://www.flickr.com/photos/ern/51062188/ |taken=2005-10-09; Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

Categories: Angus, Death, Florence American Cemetery Italy, Obituaries, Presbyterian, WWII | Tags: , | 6 Comments

The grave situation

Well, time marches on and I don’t always remember to do updates on previous posts and my ‘brick walls,’ so I will take the time to do this today, at least with regards to ‘grave’ news—no not bad news, just cemetery news!

Sargent / Wills: I have located the final resting places of William Sargent and his first wife (my second great-grandmother Mary Wills Sargent) and his second wife (Mary Bowley Pitt). Their surname was Slaymaker until they changed it to Sargent when moving to the US after the Civil War. I was correct to think that they were in or around Hudson County, New Jersey—they are in what is known today as Bayview-New York Bay Cemetery. I have requested photos on Find a Grave, but that can take time. (For a past post on the family: click here)

Trewin: Also located (no thanks to me) was the grave location for William Clarence Trewin (my grandmother’s step-brother): Locustwood Memorial Park, Cherry Hill, Camden County, New Jersey. According to the descendants who discovered it, the grave is unmarked. (For a past post mentioning William Clarence, click here.)

De La Flechelle: I was delighted that a volunteer found the time to photograph the De La Flechelle graves in the churchyard of the First Presbyterian Church in Woodbridge, NJ. I spent a lot of time researching this family (past post is here), so it’s nice to see them all together and permanently memorialized on Find a Grave.

Still looking for:

  • John Romeyn Brodhead and wife – final resting place – this is the son of Andrew Jackson Brodhead and Ophelia Easton (not the historian John Romeyn Brodhead) – graves are possibly in Buffalo, NY area.
  • Final resting place of Juebb (Jacob) Lewis — husband of Margaret Wait Lewis; father of Sarah Augusta Lewis who married Moses Martin.
Categories: Cemeteries, de la Flechelle, Sargent, Trewin, Wills | Tags: , | 6 Comments

Job W. Angus obit reveals Mayflower connection

Angus_Job_W_obit 002

Elizabeth Daily Journal clipping from my family’s archives

Some of you may recall my Job Angus “Letters from Texas” posts. There were four of them altogether. Well, my grandmother saved Job’s Elizabeth Daily Journal obituary, offering me a bit of biography—and a photo to boot. The obit was published on 3 April 1936. This Job Angus was my grandmother’s uncle. He was the cousin of Nettie Angus Moulden from my last post, and was named after Nettie’s dad, Job Angus—the one with the connection to Lincoln’s White House and Washington, DC, building projects.

I suppose the biggest surprise in the obit was the reference to the Mayflower. I’d NEVER heard that before. Needless to say I was excited but skeptical. However, it seems like the connection may well be valid as I found some handwritten notes left behind by other relatives who were also interested in establishing the exact links. So, I just need (in my spare time, ha ha) to find them. [If anyone out there has made this connection already, by all means please let me—and this blog’s readers—know.]

The connection is purported to be with Mary Allerton, one of the 106 Mayflower passengers. She was four at the time and traveling with her parents Isaac and Mary Allerton. Little Mary grew up to marry Thomas Cushman whose father Robert Cushman was one of the organizers of the Mayflower expedition.

I need to connect Mary and Thomas Cushman with the known Cushman in my family tree: Wealthy Cushman of Hartford, Connecticut, who married Isaac Jaques. Apparently Wealthy’s father’s name was Eleazer Cushman and her mother’s name was Mary. After Eleazer died (circa 1795), Mary remarried and had two more children.

I’m afraid that is all I know at this point, but thought I would pass it along.

Update (5/20): Please use Archive Index at top of page to search for additional Mayflower-related posts.

Links:
Job Winans Angus on Find a Grave
Jeanette “Nettie” Tillou Angus on Find a Grave
Son – Samuel Kendall Angus

Categories: Angus, Cushman, Death, Elizabeth, Union Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Mayflower 1620, Obituaries | Tags: , | 10 Comments

‘Brodhead Memorial Gateway,’ Evergreen Cemetery – Jim Thorpe, PA

Brodhead_Gate_EvergreenCemetery_JimThorpePA

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in Flemington, NJ, 1904

This pretty entrance with its ornate, wrought-iron arch overhead greets visitors to Evergreen Cemetery in Jim Thorpe (formerly known as Mauch Chunk), Carbon Co., Pennsylvania. And what special gates they are. I am missing page 1 of the accompanying article, but if you read down you will come to discover that these distinctive pillars and gates were given to the cemetery in 1913 by the nine surviving Brodhead children to honor the memory of their parents, Andrew Jackson Brodhead & Ophelia Easton.

A plaque on the left pillar says ‘Brodhead Memorial Gateway, erected 1913.’ (For a close-up look at the plaque, you can view this Instagram image.) If page 1 of the article ever surfaces, I will include it here; unfortunately I don’t know what paper it appeared in—the two pieces I do have are very old and beginning to disintegrate.

Enjoy the article and learning more about how these gates came to be. And, have a good Monday!
Brodhead_Cemetery_gatesBrodhead_cemetery_gates_2

Categories: Brodhead, Evergreen Cemetery Jim Thorpe PA, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Pennsylvania | 2 Comments

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