Knowles

Obit for Mary Jane Woodruff (1833-1916)

Grave of Mary Jane Woodruff (and her younger brother William Henry) in First Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ; Creative commons attribution license cc-by-2.5, attribution ‘R.E.H.’.

Grave of Mary Jane Woodruff (and her younger brother William Henry) in First Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ; Creative commons attribution license cc-by-2.5, attribution ‘R.E.H.’.

Just a brief post today: the nearly 100-year-old obituary notice for Mary Jane Woodruff, daughter of Henry King Woodruff and Abby Winans Angus Woodruff, which was saved along with a bunch of other clippings by my grandmother.

Mary Jane (single, never married) died on November 30, 1916, at age 84, at the home of her cousin Mary Martha Angus Knowles (1846-1922) and Mary Martha’s husband Austin Fellows Knowles (d. 1924). (Their beautiful house located at 924 Elizabeth Avenue, Elizabeth, NJ, was featured in a previous post.)

Below is a tree showing how they were related. My great-grandmother Wealthy Angus Woodruff, one of Mary Martha’s sisters, was a cousin as well. She lived a little less than 3 miles away on the Woodruff family farmhouse located on Conant Street and was probably a frequent guest in the Knowles’ home.

Mary Jane was buried in the First Presbyterian Churchyard. She shares a gravestone with her younger brother William Henry Woodruff (1836-1913).

I have another Woodruff obit to share, but will do so in a separate post. Have a great day, all.

1-Jacob Baker Angus b. possibly 13 Oct 1786, c. 26 Nov 1786, First 
  Presbyterian Church, Albany, NY, d. 27 Mar 1828, Hester Street, New York 
  City, New York USA, bur. Methodist Society Cemetery, New York, NY
 +Mary Winans b. 1784, Elizabethtown, NJ, d. 27 Nov 1824, New York City, Kings 
  County, NY, bur. Stone #1249, First Presbyterian Church yard, Elizabeth, 
  Union Co., NJ
|--2-James Winans Angus b. 10 May 1810, New York City, New York USA, d. 23 
|    Dec 1862, Elizabeth, Union Co, NJ, bur. First Presbyterian Church yard of 
|    Elizabeth, NJ
|   +Wealthy Ann Jaques b. 15 Dec 1815, New York City, New York. NY, d. 7 Mar 
|    1892, At Home, 25 Reid Street, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, bur. First 
|    Presbyterian Church yard of Elizabeth, NJ
|  |--3-Mary Martha Winans Angus b. 20 Aug 1846, Mexico City, Mexico, d. 16 Jan 
|  |    1922, Elizabeth, Union Co, NJ
|  |   +Austin Fellows Knowles b. Mauch Chunk, Carbon Co., PA (Jim Thorpe, PA), 
|  |    d. 20 Aug 1924
|--2-Abigail Winans Angus b. 16 Jul 1812, Albany, New York, USA, d. 16 Mar 
|    1905, 1177 S. Chestnut St., Elizabeth, Union Co, NJ, bur. First 
|    Presbyterian Church yard of Elizabeth, NJ
|   +Henry King Woodruff b. 1806, New York, USA, d. 1852, Elizabeth, New 
|    Jersey, USA
|  |--3-Mary Jane Woodruff b. 1833, New York, NY, d. 30 Nov 1916, Home of Mrs. 
|  |    AF Knowles, 924 Elizabeth Ave, Elizabeth, Union, NJ, bur. First Pres. 
|  |    Church of Elizabeth, Union, NJ

Angus_MaryJaneWoodruff_obit
Knowles_house_924ElizAve


			
Categories: Angus, Death, Elizabeth, Union Co., Knowles, Obituaries, Presbyterian, Woodruff | Tags: , | 4 Comments

Early-20th-century newspaper discussions about the Jaques family of Woodbridge, New Jersey

I’ve written about various members of the Jaques family before; and have learned never to get too cocky about the family tree I’ve put together for them. Whenever I think I have things wrapped up in a pretty little bow, something inevitably comes along that knocks me off my pedestal.

But, it’s good to know I am not the first, nor probably the last, to be stumped about certain aspects of the family tree; I have letters written by grandchildren of James Angus and Wealthy Jaques Angus in which information is shared, sifted, and sorted through, and questions are raised.

One area of confusion concerned Wealthy’s grandfather Samuel Barron Jaques (1730-1799) and who exactly his parents were. I did a post on that in March 2013 (see: “Samuel B. Jaques (d. 1798/9) of Woodbridge, New Jersey“) and seemed to be able to draw a few conclusions there.

From Samuel on down, things seem pretty clear; see my post “Striking gold: Gleanings from the Samuel Barron Jaques family Bible” which includes a clipping from the Newark News containing information written by James Angus Knowles, a grandson of Wealthy’s. The family Bible information is fantastic, of course, but if the information in the clipping is indeed correct, it indicates (as I’ve remarked before) that Samuel and his wife Mary Coddington had a 39-year age difference and that their children started arriving when Samuel was in his early sixties. (Wealthy & James Angus’s grandchildren found that remarkable as well.) So, perhaps, someday evidence of a 1st marriage will surface.

In any event, I’ve come across more Newark News communications regarding the Jaques Family history. So, evidently the clipping I found almost two years ago and put in that “Striking gold” post was one of a number of “back and forths” James Angus Knowles had via the paper’s “Jersey Genealogy” column, circa 1914-1915. Some entry numbers mentioned are not in my possession (i.e., 4912 and 4938) so I can’t include them here, obviously.

I’ve had a quick look through them and nothing is popping out at me with regards to figuring out Samuel Barron Jaques’ possible other marriage(s). But I know a few of this blog’s readers are hot on the trail of different lines of the Jaques family, so rather than take the time to dissect all the information in these additional two clippings, I am just going to post them here on the off chance they may be of use to someone. There is a lot of non-Jaques info as well (Docherty; Applegate; Wainwright; Hull; Coleman; Whitehead; Roll; Winans; Denham; Ball; Mead; Keeler;  and Sutton; Salem County Church Inscriptions for Trullender, Watson, Wood, and Woodruff), so who knows?—maybe someone will find an interesting morsel there, too.

As always, comments, corrections, additions, etc., are always welcome.

NO. 4920—FIRST SETTLERS OF PISCATAWAY AND WOODBRIDGE—JAQUES FAMILY—Continued from No. 4912 in issue of Saturday last.
Jersey_Genealogy2_date_unknown_EDJ 2b

No. 4965 JAQUES (Referring to No. 4938, by JAK, in issue of January 2, 1915)
Jersey_Genealogy_date_unknown_EDJ 1a

No. 4995—JAQUES—Referring to No. 4965, by FWG, in relation to No. 4938 of JAK)
Jersey_Genealogy_date_unknown_EDJ 3a

Categories: Angus, Jaques, Knowles, New Jersey, Newark, Essex Co., Woodbridge | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Home of Mary Martha W. Angus and Austin F. Knowles in Elizabeth, New Jersey

Knowles_house_924ElizAve

Home of Mary Martha Angus and Austin F. Knowles, 924 Elizabeth Avenue, Elizabeth, NJ (Image is 1/2 of a stereoview card)

I love this image of the house at 924 Elizabeth Avenue, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ. It belonged to Mary Martha Winans Angus (1846-1922) and Austin Fellows Knowles (d. 1924), who were married on 4 September 1867. They had seven (?) children. The names I have at the moment are: Walter, James, Austin, Watts, Marie Gertrude, William, and Lawrence.

It must have been a wonderful home to grow up in. Sadly, this location is now covered by a rather ugly-looking parking lot where trees no longer line the streets.

The photo is undated, but I am thinking 1880s/early 1890s? The Knowles were married in 1867, so perhaps the older woman in black is Mary. As for the others, I don’t know. The younger woman to her right looks a bit too old to be daughter Marie Gertrude Knowles Chamberlain. (Thoughts, anyone?)

My previous post on the Knowles included an article about the 1917 golden wedding anniversary celebrated in the house. I have since found two other mentions of the home, the first of which warrants further research. Hopefully the son mentioned survived:

  • New York Times, November 22, 1893: Risked Smallpox for His Boy. Austen F. Knowles of Elizabeth Goes with His Son to a Pesthouse. Elizabeth NJ, Nov. 21 – The Board of Health was forced to admit today that smallpox has become epidemic. During the past twelve hours four new cases have been reported. The malady is no longer confined to Italian families. […] A son of Austen F. Knowles was attacked by the disease at his home, 924 Elizabeth Avenue. Mr. Knowles is the agent at Perth Amboy and Port Johnson for the Reading Coal Company. He insisted upon going to the pesthouse with his boy to take care of him. Much sympathy is felt for the family. Their home is one of the prettiest in the city
  • New York Herald, Sunday, June 16, 1889: Mr. William F. Knowles, son of Austin F. Knowles, celebrated on Monday night his 21st birthday. Many of his friends assembled at his father’s house, No. 924 Elizabeth Ave., Elizabeth, and tendered their congratulations.

As always, additions, comments, corrections, clarifications are welcome. Have a great weekend, all. Thanks for stopping by.

Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., Knowles | 4 Comments

Striking gold: Gleanings from the Samuel Barron Jaques family Bible

p. 253 The Book of Family Crests, London: Henry Washbourne & Co., 1951

p. 253 The Book of Family Crests, London: Henry Washbourne & Co., 1851

A year plus ago, I did a post on Samuel Barron Jaques (1730-1798/9), a fourth great-grandfather, who lived on the Jaques (pronounced “Jay-quiss”) family farm in Locust Grove, which was just north of Woodbridge, New Jersey, as I recall. There were numerous subsequent posts about his son Isaac (1791-1880), my third great-grandfather, a Manhattan tailor who removed to Elizabeth, NJ) and the children of Isaac I’d managed to discover: Jane, John, Isaac, Walter, Christopher, and Charles. All of them came as a surprise to me since we’d always believed my second great-grandmother Wealthy Jaques Angus (b. 1815) was the only child of Isaac and wife Wealthy Ann Cushman of Hartford, CT, a circumstance seemingly corroborated by the voluminous Jaques Family Genealogy (ed. by Roger Jaques and Patricia Jaques for the Jaques Family Association, published 1995): on page 457 the book describes Wealthy Ann Jaques as being the …only child of Isaac and Wealthy A. (Cushman) Jaques….

Well, as Sod’s law would have it, I’ve just now come across a thin, browned Newark News clipping from 13 March 1915 (according to the handwriting en verso) that was stuffed in an old envelope with a bunch of other papers. I sure wish I’d come upon this clipping a long time ago, but better late than never, as the saying goes. But, those of us researching our family trees would probably all agree that we’ll take gold whenever we can get it, and gold for me was learning names and dates contained in the Samuel Barron Jaques family Bible. It doesn’t get much better than this.

The clipping, which must have been taken from a newspaper column that focused on family history, gives the names and birth dates of all of Samuel Barron and Mary (Coddington) Jaques’s children, as well as all the names and birth dates for Isaac and Wealthy (Cushman) Jaques’s children.

I discovered that—after all my research—I’d still missed two of their children: Eleazer Jaques (b. 1820) and Samuel Barron Jaques (b. 1824). But, nonetheless, the fact that I had managed to nail the others into place prior to this with varying degrees of biographical detail brought some satisfaction. Significantly, the Family Bible provides middle names, and those can be very valuable when researching an individual. Of course, they can also lead to new questions such as why this or that name? For example, I learned that dentist son Walter’s full name was Walter Madison Smith Jaques, and Christopher P. Jaques was Christopher Prince Jaques. The Prince middle name was familiar to me. Walter and Christopher’s sister Wealthy Jaques Angus (my ssecond great-grandmother) had named her youngest son Walter Prince Angus (b. 1861). I believe Christopher (b. 1831) and Walter (b. 1826) died while still in their 20’s/30’s, though I have yet to find exact death dates for them. But Wealthy’s decision to name her youngest Walter Prince may have been to honor her late brothers. In addition, a long while ago, I discovered that one of the siblings’ brothers, John Barron Jaques (b. 1822), named his youngest child (b. 1853) Walter M. S. Jaques, and now I think I can guess what those middle initials stand for!

The clipping starts off mentioning the initials of F. W. G. and J. A. K. I have no idea who F. W. G. was, but feel quite certain that the latter was James Angus Knowles, son of Mary Martha Angus Knowles (b. 1846, a daughter of the aforementioned Wealthy Jaques Angus and James Angus) and Austin Fellows Knowles. James Angus Knowles was a great-grandson of Isaac Jaques, and evidence I’ve seen (in the form of genealogical details written on his letterhead) suggests he had a strong interest in the Angus/Jaques family history. I assume that the Samuel Barron Jaques family Bible may have been passed down along his Knowles family line, or perhaps it is now with the descendants of one of James’s siblings.

Dr. Moses Jaques bio from p. 126, History of Union and Middlesex Counties, New Jersey with Biographical Sketches of many of their Prominent Men (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1882)

Dr. Moses Jaques bio from p. 126, History of Union and Middlesex Counties, New Jersey with Biographical Sketches of many of their Prominent Men (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1882)

Also of interest are the final details mentioned of the Jaques’s family coat of arms, which was then apparently likely in the possession of the descendants of Dr. Moses Jaques (1770-1858), a nephew of Samuel Barron Jaques: The Jaques family is of French descent, the name originally spelled Jacques; of Huguenot origin, fled to England during the fifteenth century. The arms in shield is a fer-de-neorelin (a mill iron), with five stars. Crest: A horse’s head and neck stuck with a tilting spear. Motto: Detur forti palma (the reward given to the brave).

So, to close, below are my updated family tree for these three generations of the Samuel Barron Jaques family and a photo copy of the clipping.

As always, comments, corrections, and additions are most welcome!

1-Samuel Barron Jaques b. 1730, Woodbridge, Middlesex Co., NJ, d. 26 Jul 
  1798/9, Gravel Hill, near Rahway, called Milton, NJ, bur. Locust Grove 
  Cemetery, Woodbridge, Middlesex Co., NJ
 +Mary Coddington, bur. Woodbridge, Middlesex, NJ
|-----2-Hannah Jaques b. 17 Aug 1782, d. 17 Aug 1783
|-----2-John Jaques b. 15 Oct 1783, d. Bef Sep 1798
|-----2-David Jaques b. 9 Oct 1784
|-----2-Ziporah Jaques b. 31 Mar 1787
|-----2-Nansey Jaques b. 25 Apr 1789
|-----2-Isaac Jaques b. 9 Aug 1791, Woodbridge Neck, NJ, d. 24 Aug 1880, 
|       Elizabethtown, NJ, bur. 27 Aug 1880, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ
|      +Wealthy Ann Cushman b. 11 Nov 1793, Hartford, CT, d. 11 Apr 1856, 
|       Elizabeth, Union Co, NJ, bur. 13 Apr 1856, Evergreen Cemetery, 
|       Hillside, NJ
|     |-----3-Jane F. Jaques b. 9 Jan 1814, New York, d. 1 Aug 1843, Brooklyn, 
|     |       Kings Co., New York, bur. 3 Aug 1843
|     |-----3-Wealthy Ann Jaques b. 15 Dec 1815, New York City, New York. NY, 
|     |       d. 7 Mar 1892, At Home, 25 Reid Street, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, 
|     |       bur. First Presbyterian Church yard of Elizabeth, NJ
|     |-----3-Isaac Jaques b. 15 Nov 1817, d. Prob bef 24 Aug 1880
|     |-----3-Eleazer Jaques b. 7 Mar 1820
|     |-----3-John Barron Jaques b. 12 Sep 1822, New York or New Jersey, USA, 
|     |       d. 19 Dec 1895, St. Michael's Hospital, Newark, Essex Co., NJ, 
|     |       bur. Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union, NJ
|     |-----3-Samuel Barron Jaques b. 12 Oct 1824, d. poss 27 May 1858
|     |-----3-Walter Madison Smith Jaques b. 28 Jul 1826, New York City, New 
|     |       York USA, d. Bef 22 Oct 1863
|     |-----3-Christopher Prince Jaques b. 6 Jan 1831, New York City, New York 
|     |       USA, d. Bef 24 Aug 1880
|     |-----3-Dr. Charles Berry Jaques b. 14 Feb 1834, New York City, New York 
|     |       USA, d. 2 Nov 1866, Brooklyn, Kings Co., NY, bur. 5 Nov 1866, Old 
|     |       Somerville Cemetery, Somerville, Somerset Co., NJ, USA
|      +Rebecca A. Robinson b. 1804, CT, d. 29 Dec 1886, bur. Evergreen 
|       Cemetery, Hillside, Union Co., NJ
|-----2-Mary Jaques b. 23 Sep 1793
|-----2-Jane F. Jaques b. 26 Jan 1796, d. 27 Aug 1880, bur. St. Paul's Church 
|       Cemetery, Mt. Vernon, Westchester Co., NY
|      +John B. Quinn d. 20 May 1860, bur. St. Paul's Church Cemetery, Mt. 
|       Vernon, Westchester Co., NY
|-----2-John Morris Jaques b. 21 Sep 1798
Newark News clipping, supposedly from 13 March 1915

Newark News clipping, supposedly from 13 March 1915

Categories: Angus, Barron, Coddington, Cushman, Elizabeth, Family Bible, Jaques, Knowles, Locust Grove Middx Co, New Jersey, Woodbridge | Leave a comment

Mary Martha Angus Knowles (1846-1922)

Lawrence D. Knowles

Lawrence D. Knowles

Newspaper clippings on weddings, anniversaries, engagements, and funerals can contain a goldmine of family information. Here’s one we’ve kept all these years about the 50th wedding anniversary of Mary Martha Angus (fourth child of James Winans Angus and Wealthy Ann Jaques) and Austin F. Knowles. The article is not dated but it must have been from 4 September 1917, which would have been 50 years from their wedding day.

Marie Gertrude Knowles, married Edward Chamberlain

Marie Gertrude Knowles married Edward Chamberlain

I’ve already mentioned some of Mary Martha’s siblings in this blog: James Winans Angus Jr., Wealthy Ann Angus (my great grandmother), Charles Dujah Angus, Job Winans Angus, Lavinia P. Angus, and Walter P. Angus. (There were 11 children in all). Both Martha (b. 1846) and her older brother Jacob (died in 1850 at age 6, buried in First Presbyterian Church of Elizabeth churchyard) were born in Pueblo, Mexico, while their father was working there, handing supplies for the troops taking part in the Mexican-American War. Their mom Wealthy was quite a pistol and had her share of adventures in that city. More on them both in an upcoming post.

A long news item outlining Mary Martha’s life and activities appeared in the Elizabeth Daily Journal on 17 January 1922, the day after passed away. Unfortunately, I don’t have that article, but if I get hold of it at some point I will post it here.

The Knowles had six children: William H. Knowles, James A. Knowles, Austin F. Knowles Jr., Watts T. R. Knowles (initial T. may be incorrect, another source says it’s ‘J.’),  Marie Gertrude Knowles (married Edward Chamberlain) and Lawrence D. Knowles.  Photos of Marie Gertrude and Lawrence as children are shown here. I’ll let you read the article; if you are an Angus/Knowles descendant, perhaps, you’ll find out something new! As always, corrections, additions, updates, etc. always welcome.

wedding_anniversary

Knowles’ 50th Wedding Anniversary, probably clipped from the Elizabeth Daily Journal, September 1917

Categories: Angus, Anniversaries, Elizabeth, Union Co., Knowles, New Jersey | 3 Comments

1918 Summons Notice – Angus & Jaques Family Clues

Portion of Plan of New York and Brooklyn. (Atlas of New York and vicinity ... by F.W. Beers ... published by Beers, Ellis & Soule, New York, 1868) - David Rumsey Historical Map Collection - link below.

Portion of Plan of New York and Brooklyn. (Atlas of New York and vicinity … by F.W. Beers … published by Beers, Ellis & Soule, New York, 1868) – David Rumsey Historical Map Collection – link below. ROSS STREET is in Ward 19.

Below is a Summons Notice that appeared multiple times in 1918 New York newspapers. It comes from the Brooklyn NY Daily Standard Union, Friday, 15 March 1918, and contains a ton of names of people who are in some way related to James W. Angus, one of my 2nd great grandfathers. He died of erysipelas (acute streptococcus bacterial infection of the upper dermis and superficial lymphatics) on 23 December 1862, over 50 years prior to this notice’s publication.

Angus_JamesW

James W. Angus

James Angus business card, side 2

James Angus business card, side 2

James Angus business card, side 1

James Angus business card, side 1

I am slowly chipping away at a lot of these names, partly thanks to the recent discovery of Jane Jaques Birch and John B. Jaques and their offspring. I have no idea what the kerfuffle was, who the plaintiff was, etc. It appears to have something to do with James W. Angus’s estate and property at 17 Ross Street, Brooklyn (visible in the upper left of Ward 19 in the attached map).

You may find some names of interest, too, if you are researching these families, so I am publishing the notice here. Thank you, Fulton History website, for allowing articles to be snipped and published elsewhere!

MAP LINK: Plan of New York and Brooklyn. (Atlas of New York and vicinity … by F.W. Beers … published by Beers, Ellis & Soule, New York, 1868) – David Rumsey Historical Map Collection.

Categories: Angus, Apperson, Birch, Brooklyn, Jaques, Knowles, Legal, Russum, Seaman, Stansbury, Woodruff | 2 Comments

The Pre-1900s Weekday Wedding – Past Wedding Traditions

Dress, Evening; 1850-1855; silk, cotton; Metropolitan Museum of Art (accession no. 2009.300.921a, b); visit http://www.metmuseum.org

A while back I read an article on pre-twentieth-century weddings and how the bride would not wear white or have a special dress made, but would appear in her very best dress, whatever color of dress that may have been–black, brown, dark green, and so on. Black would have been handy because it could do double duty as mourning attire. Plaids and florals were also very popular at one time. The idea of purchasing a dress that would only be worn once would have seemed very wasteful, apart from probably being prohibitively expensive (a white dress even more so–imagine trying to clean it without today’s technologies).

Wedding Ensemble, 1878, American, silk, Metropolitan Museum of Art (accession no. 2009.300.18a, b); visit http://www.metmuseum.org

It was only when Queen Victoria married Prince Albert in 1840 in a white satin gown specially made for the occasion, that brides began clamoring for white gowns, but a trend did not really come about until the late 1800s when such dresses could be better produced, transported, and marketed to the public, and were more affordable for the everyday woman.

Weddings often took place in the evening at the home of the bride, often on weekdays, particularly on Thursday evenings. This allowed the work of the day (weekends included), whether on the farm or elsewhere, to be accomplished and livelihoods thus maintained.

Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

A handy day of week calendar allows you to take any date in history and find out what day of the week it was.  I decided to randomly check on some wedding dates I have in my database to see on which days weddings most often fell. As you can see, at least in my little random sample, they fell on all days of the week apart from Friday, with Thursday edging out the other days. And, while June is now the most popular month for weddings, I only found three ceremonies that fell in that month.

Sunday
John Woodruff and Mary Ogden Earl, 2/16/1817
Thomas Trewin and Mary Anne Phillips, 1/27/1839
James W. Angus and Anna Carpenter, 2/27/1870

Monday
John Woodruff and Sarah Cooper, 10/25/1683

Tuesday
George Wills and Mary Pitt Capon, 4/14/1812
Capt. Daniel Brodhead and Hester Wyngart, 9/19/1719
Calvin Easton Brodhead and Laura Leisenring, 12/6/1870
James Easton Brodhead and Harriet Boyd, 5/1/1877
Sampson Wills and Ann Gadsden, 9/22/1789

Wednesday
Francis Woodruff and Mary Jane Trowbridge, 11/12/1845
AJ Brodhead and Ophelia Easton, 12/31/1845
Austin F. Knowles and Mary M. Angus, 9/4/1867

Thursday
Henry Jaques, Sr. and Anna Knight, 10/8/1648
Henry Jaques, Jr. and Hannah Trueman, 4/10/1670
Lt. Garret Brodhead and Jane Davis, 3/15/1759
Garret Brodhead and Cornelia Dingman, 11/25/1813
William Earl Woodruff and Wealthy Ann Angus, 6/20/1872
Robert Packer Brodhead and Frances Loveland, 5/23/1889
Frank Ludey and Metta Ryman, 6/18/1896
Minnie Ludey and Herbert Duryea Crane, 9/24/1897

Saturday
Capt. Richard Brodhead and Magdalena Jansen, 4/19/1692
Timothy Woodruff and Elizabeth Parsons, 9/25/1739
James Winans Angus and Wealthy Ann Jaques, 1/26/1839
Frank Brodhead and Fannie Woodruff, 6/6/1908

For an interesting article on wedding fashions, visit the Monroe County [PA] Historical Society’s site.

I’ll close by including some wedding announcements of various family members. Two have appeared in previous posts, but the other two (of the Ludey siblings) are appearing in this blog for the first time. Wish we had some photos!

Brodhead-Woodruff Wedding Announcement (Probably clipped from the Elizabeth Daily Journal) - from our family's private archives

Brodhead-Woodruff Wedding Announcement (Probably clipped from the Elizabeth Daily Journal) – from our family’s private archives

Brodhead-Loveland Marriage Announcement, 1889

Frank T. Ludey Jr. (1871-1900), age 21  (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Frank T. Ludey Jr. (1871-1900), age 21 (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Ludey-Ryman Wedding, The New York Times, 6/19/1896

Mary ("Minnie") Emma Ludey (1873-1938), age 21 (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Mary (“Minnie”) Emma Ludey (1873-1938), age 21 (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Herbert Duryea Crane  (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Herbert Duryea Crane (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Ludey-Crane Marriage, Jersey City, The Evening Journal, 9/24/1897

Ludey-Crane Marriage, Jersey City, The Evening Journal, 9/24/1897

Categories: Angus, Brodhead, Crane, Dingman, Easton, Jaques, Knowles, Ludey, Phillips, Ryman, Trewin, Trowbridge, Weddings, Woodruff | Leave a comment

Two Angus Daughters, Early 1890s

(Photo from my family's personal archives)

(Photo from my family’s personal archives)

I just love this photo and wish I had more like this one. Thankfully it was labelled (but not dated) when I found it buried with all sorts of family papers. It was in bad shape so I spent a lot of time on Photoshop getting rid of distracting specks, spots, and tears. Seated are the moms, two of James and Wealthy Angus‘s daughters, Cecelia Bensey (Angus) Russum and Wealthy Ann (Angus) Woodruff. Standing are their spouses, Thomas B. Russum (left) and William Earl Woodruff (right). (Wealthy and William Woodruff were my great grandparents. William, son of Mary Jane Trowbridge and Francis Woodruff, was the one who was mentioned in previous posts as having received letters from his uncles, Henry and Uzal Trowbridge, during the Civil War.) The photo was taken in the early 1890s, perhaps on the occasion of Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus’ death in March 1892 (both sisters dressed in black). Little Bertha Woodruff was born in 1888; I’d say she looks about four here. Anyone with a stronger opinion on her age, please let me know your thoughts.

With the moms and dads are some of their children and some children of another Angus sister, Mary Martha (married to Austin F. Knowles). I have labelled the photo so I won’t repeat names here. Suffice it to say that I have quite an abundance of material on this side of the family and will be working to assemble it to include as much as possible of it in this blog in the upcoming year.

On a side note, I am probably going to be reducing my blog posting to once per week as other commitments will be taking up more of my time in the coming months. That may change when summer comes as I should have a bit more time on my hands.

I welcome hearing from any Angus descendants who have any information or photos to share or who simply want to get in touch.

Update 5/16/12: Photos have been added to the memorial on Find-a-Grave for Rev. William Russum, who appears in the photo as a small chubby boy.

Categories: Angus, Elizabeth, Union Co., Knowles, Russum, Woodruff | Leave a comment

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dvn ms kmz time travel

This is all about my travels to the past... my reflections and musings about yesteryear, as I find the stories of a people passed away and learn how to tell them.

newarkpoems

350 years of Newark in verse 1666-2016

Russian Universe

Understanding Russia with a Russian

Bulldog Travels

Everything and Nothing Plus Some Pretty Photos

Dances with Wools

knitting, spinning, dyeing, and related fiber arts

Life After Caregiving

On caregivers, faith, family, and writing...

Why'd You Eat That?

Food Folklore for the everyday scholar. These are the stories behind the foods we eat.

Cooking without Limits

Food Photography & Recipes

The Pioneer Woman

Plowing through Life in the Country...One Calf Nut at a Time

Almost Home

Genealogy Research and Consulting

Old Bones Genealogy of New England

Genealogy and Family History Research

ferrebeekeeper

Reflections Concerning Art, Nature, and the Affairs of Humankind (also some gardening anecdotes)

Map of Time | A Trip Into the Past

Navigating Through Someplace Called History

Out Here Studying Stones

Cemeteries & Genealogy

WeGoBack

family research ... discover your ancestry

the Victorian era

Did I misplace my pince-nez again? Light reading on the 19th century.

"Greatest Generation" Life Lessons

This is the story of an ordinary family, trying to live an ordinary life during an extraordinary time frame, and the lessons they learn through experience.

Moore Genealogy

Fun With Genealogy

Meeting my family

RESEARCHING MY FAMILY TREE

Shaking the tree

musings on the journey towards knowing and sharing my family's stories

A Hundred Years Ago

Food and More

Scots Roots

Helping you dig up your Scots roots.

Root To Tip

Not just a list of names and dates

Food Perestroika

Adventures in Eastern Bloc Cuisine

My Aunt the WAC

Marian Solomon's midlife transition from the farm to the Women's Army Corps (WACs)

Being Em | From Busan to America

this journey is my own, but i'm happy to share.

Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter

The Daily Online Genealogy Newsletter

Irish in the American Civil War

Exploring Irish Emigration & Irish Involvement in the American Civil War

TWISTED LIMBS & CROOKED BRANCHES

Genealogy: Looking For "Dead People"!

Cemeteries of Brunswick, Maine

To live in the hearts we leave behind, is not to die. ~ Thomas Campbell

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