Easton

New Year’s Eve 1895: An Unbroken Family Celebrates a 50th Wedding Anniversary

James E. Brodhead's palatial home in Flemington, NJ, where celebrations took place on New Year's Eve

James E. Brodhead’s palatial home in Flemington, NJ, where celebrations took place on New Year’s Eve

After bombarding my readers with posts on a variety of disasters, tragedies, and scandals (please accept my apologies!), finally some good news. I’ve come upon a little news brief marking the 50th wedding anniversary of my 2nd great grandparents, Andrew Jackson Brodhead and Ophelia Easton Brodhead. It was a remarkable gathering in that all 10 of their children were present—quite a feat considering all the illnesses around back then that could easily have diminished the family’s size. The article described the odds of such a gathering as being one in 100,000. Of the 12 family members, mother Ophelia was the first to pass away–on 26 April 1904. Had she made it another 20 months, the family would have achieved an astounding 60 years of togetherness, but 58 years is still pretty darned good!

(Note: The article incorrectly states that Andrew J. Brodhead was a direct descendant of Gen. Daniel Brodhead of Revolutionary fame. He was a direct descendant of the General’s brother, Garret.)

New York Press, 2 January 1896 (credit: www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Press, 2 January 1896 (credit: http://www.fultonhistory.com)

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904 (Names and dates added by me)

Categories: Anniversaries wedding, Brodhead, Easton, Flemington, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe) | 5 Comments

Our Ancestors Who Fought for Independence

Washington at the Battle of Trenton. An engraving by Illman Brothers. From a painting by. E.L. Henry, 1870. Image in public domain due to expired copyright.

This 4th of July, we remember our ancestors who served in the Revolutionary War and, if they were married at that time, the wives who supported them in their service. Yes, nieces and nephews, these patriots are all directly related to you! They are your fifth/sixth great grandfathers!

      • James Angus (b. 1751 in Scotland; d. 14 Mar 1806) Served in Albany County (NY) militia under Colonel Philip P. Schuyler (DAR ancestor no A002822); married Mary Magdaline Baker after the War (in 1781)
      • Lt. Garrett Brodhead (b. 1733 Marbletown, NY; d. 1804 Stroudsburg, PA), served in the Northampton County, PA militia under Col. Brinigh, and served on the frontier. Somewhere I remember reading that he was friends with Gen. LaFayette, but I can’t remember where; I’ll try to search that out. Married to Jane Davis whose father Frederick also served in the War. Garret signed oath of allegiance. (DAR ancestor no. AO14785). Garrett was the brother of Brig. General Daniel Brodhead whose exploits are well documented. The brothers and their siblings and parents were among the earliest settlers of Pennsylvania’s Minisink Valley, having moved there in 1737 from Marbletown, NY, to settle 1000 acres of purchased land. Stroudsburg was initially known as Dansbury, after Garrett’s father Daniel. Another brother, Luke, also served in the Revolutionary War, attaining the rank of captain and serving on the staff of General Lafayette. From the book Colonial Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania: “He [Luke]enlisted in the spring of 1776 as third lieutenant. First American Rifle Regiment, Colonel William Thompson commanding. He was appointed second lieutenant, October 24, 1776, in Major Simon Williams’ regiment. He was wounded and taken prisoner at battle of Long Island. Later he was commissioned captain of the Sixth Pennsylvania Regiment under Colonel Magaw in Continental service. He retired in 1778 incapacitated by wounds received in battle.”

Brigadier General Daniel Brodhead (1736-1809)

      • Lt. Col. Samuel Crow, b. 1741, Woodbridge, NJ; d. 1801 Woodbridge, NJ; Service in NJ militia. (DAR Ancestor no: A028247); married to Elizabeth Potter.
      • Frederick Davis b. 1701, Marbletown, NY; d. 1804 Stroudsburg, PA; Per Sylvester’s History of Ulster Co., NY, p. 74, Frederick signed articles of association for Ulster Co. (DAR Ancestor no: A030300); married to Margerie Van Leuven.
      • Andrew Dingman Jr. b. 1752 Northampton Co., PA; d. 1839 Pike Co., PA. Served in the NJ militia as a staff officer with Captains Van Etten, Nelson, Homer, Westbrook; Took oath of allegiance in 1777. (DAR ancestor no. A032282).  Married to Jane Westbrook. Father of Daniel Westbrook Dingman whose daughter Cornelia was married to Garret Brodhead (1793-1872).
      • Andrew Dingman Sr. b. 1711 Kinderhook, Albany Co. NY; d. 1796 Dingman’s Ferry, Northampton Co., PA. Signed oath of allegiance in 1777; suffered depredations (DAR ancestor no. A032281). Married to Cornelia Kermer. Father of the aforementioned Andrew Dingman Jr.
      • Capt. Samuel Drake, b. 1740 New Jersey; d. 1789 Lower Smithfield, Northampton Co., PA. Served in Capt. Jacob Stroud’s company (4th Battalion) of Pennsylvania militia, 1775, and as captain, 1776. (DAR ancestor no. A033472); married to Sarah Handy.
      • Colonel James Easton (1728-96), was with Ethan Allen at Ticonderoga; commanded a Berkshire County regiment in the Canadian expedition, 1775.  B. Hartford, CT; d. Pittsfield, MA. (DAR ancestor no. A035836); married to Eunice Pomeroy.
      • Normand Easton b. 25 Jun 1758, Litchfield, CT; d. 1806, Greenville, NY; Private; served under Capt. Hine, Lt. Wm Preston, 13th Regiment Militia (DAR Ancestor no: A035842); married Merab Perry after the war.
      • Pvt. Hezekiah Hand, b. cir 1730, d. ante 28 April 1800 in Westfield, NJ; private in the Essex Co., NJ militia, serving under Captain Benjamin Laing. (DAR ancestor no. A050961); married to Nancy.
      • Samuel Barron Jaques, b. abt. 1740, d. 1798 Woodbridge, Middlesex Co., NJ; commanded Rahway Company during the Revolutionary War; married to Mary Coddington.
      • Pvt. Isaac Newman (1731-1808), served as a private in the Associated Exempts of Westchester County at the battle of White Plains. b. Stamford, CT., d. Charlton, N. Y. (DAR ancestor no. A082986); married to Abigail Webb.

Campaigns of the American Revolution 1775-1781 (copyright-free image from Ookaboo)

      • Shubael Trowbridge, b. 1739 Morristown, NJ; d. 1782 Hanover, Morris Co., NJ. Served as a private in Capt. James Keene’s Company, Eastern Battalion, Morris County (NJ) Militia (also known as “The Rams Horns Brigades” (DAR ancestor no. A116272); married to Mary Bayles.
      • David Wait, b. 1754 Edinburgh, Scotland; d. 1810 Perth Amboy, NJ. According to the 1893 Biographical and portrait cyclopedia of the Third congressional district of New Jersey, he came to the colonies as a British soldier, took part in an engagement at Manhattan Island, and was taken prisoner by Americans and retained as a POW in Jamestown, VA, until peace was proclaimed. He then went to Sussex, Essex Co., NJ, and finally settled in Perth Amboy, where he began working as a carpenter in the building known as the “Old Castle” on Water Street, the oldest building in the city. An entirely different account was offered by Harlan Mendenhall in his 1903 book, Presbyterianism in Perth Amboy, New Jersey: “He ran away from his native land to escape service in the army, but the troublous times in America aroused his sympathy and he enlisted in the Continental army. He was captured by the British forces and incarcerated in the Barracks. When peace was declared he became a resident in the city and his descendants are now on the rolls of our church.” Married Irene Bell after the war (in 1784).
      • Johannis Westbrook (DAR Ancestor no: A123311); married to Marie.
      • Capt. Martinus Westbrook, b. 1754, Sussex Co., NJ; d. 1813, Sussex Co., NJ. Served as a captain, 3rd Regiment, Sussex Co., NJ, Militia. (DAR ancestor no. A123311); married to Margaret Lowe.
      • Lt. Elias Winans, b. 1742, Elizabethtown, NJ; d. 1789, Elizabethtown, NJ. Service: New Jersey (DAR ancestor no. A128111); married to Esther Perlee.
      • Pvt. Enos Woodruff, b. 1749 Elizabethtown, NJ; d. 1821 Elizabethtown, NJ; served as a private in the Essex Co., NJ, militia. (DAR ancestor no. A128636); married to Charity Ogden.
      • Major Reuben Potter, b. 1717 Woodbridge, NJ; d. 1799 Woodbridge, NJ; served under Col. Nathaniel Heard, lst Regiment, New Jersey Militia; married to Deborah (last name?, d. Oct 1, 1762).

Happy 4th of July!

Categories: Angus, Brodhead, Crow, DAR numbers, Dingman, Drake, Easton, Fourth of July, Gen. Lafayette, Hand, Jaques, Newman, Revolutionary War, Trowbridge, Veteran's Day, Westbrook, Winans, Woodruff | 1 Comment

The Pre-1900s Weekday Wedding – Past Wedding Traditions

Dress, Evening; 1850-1855; silk, cotton; Metropolitan Museum of Art (accession no. 2009.300.921a, b); visit http://www.metmuseum.org

A while back I read an article on pre-twentieth-century weddings and how the bride would not wear white or have a special dress made, but would appear in her very best dress, whatever color of dress that may have been–black, brown, dark green, and so on. Black would have been handy because it could do double duty as mourning attire. Plaids and florals were also very popular at one time. The idea of purchasing a dress that would only be worn once would have seemed very wasteful, apart from probably being prohibitively expensive (a white dress even more so–imagine trying to clean it without today’s technologies).

Wedding Ensemble, 1878, American, silk, Metropolitan Museum of Art (accession no. 2009.300.18a, b); visit http://www.metmuseum.org

It was only when Queen Victoria married Prince Albert in 1840 in a white satin gown specially made for the occasion, that brides began clamoring for white gowns, but a trend did not really come about until the late 1800s when such dresses could be better produced, transported, and marketed to the public, and were more affordable for the everyday woman.

Weddings often took place in the evening at the home of the bride, often on weekdays, particularly on Thursday evenings. This allowed the work of the day (weekends included), whether on the farm or elsewhere, to be accomplished and livelihoods thus maintained.

Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

Honeymoon photo, Frank M. Brodhead and Fannie Bishop Woodruff, married June 6, 1908

A handy day of week calendar allows you to take any date in history and find out what day of the week it was.  I decided to randomly check on some wedding dates I have in my database to see on which days weddings most often fell. As you can see, at least in my little random sample, they fell on all days of the week apart from Friday, with Thursday edging out the other days. And, while June is now the most popular month for weddings, I only found three ceremonies that fell in that month.

Sunday
John Woodruff and Mary Ogden Earl, 2/16/1817
Thomas Trewin and Mary Anne Phillips, 1/27/1839
James W. Angus and Anna Carpenter, 2/27/1870

Monday
John Woodruff and Sarah Cooper, 10/25/1683

Tuesday
George Wills and Mary Pitt Capon, 4/14/1812
Capt. Daniel Brodhead and Hester Wyngart, 9/19/1719
Calvin Easton Brodhead and Laura Leisenring, 12/6/1870
James Easton Brodhead and Harriet Boyd, 5/1/1877
Sampson Wills and Ann Gadsden, 9/22/1789

Wednesday
Francis Woodruff and Mary Jane Trowbridge, 11/12/1845
AJ Brodhead and Ophelia Easton, 12/31/1845
Austin F. Knowles and Mary M. Angus, 9/4/1867

Thursday
Henry Jaques, Sr. and Anna Knight, 10/8/1648
Henry Jaques, Jr. and Hannah Trueman, 4/10/1670
Lt. Garret Brodhead and Jane Davis, 3/15/1759
Garret Brodhead and Cornelia Dingman, 11/25/1813
William Earl Woodruff and Wealthy Ann Angus, 6/20/1872
Robert Packer Brodhead and Frances Loveland, 5/23/1889
Frank Ludey and Metta Ryman, 6/18/1896
Minnie Ludey and Herbert Duryea Crane, 9/24/1897

Saturday
Capt. Richard Brodhead and Magdalena Jansen, 4/19/1692
Timothy Woodruff and Elizabeth Parsons, 9/25/1739
James Winans Angus and Wealthy Ann Jaques, 1/26/1839
Frank Brodhead and Fannie Woodruff, 6/6/1908

For an interesting article on wedding fashions, visit the Monroe County [PA] Historical Society’s site.

I’ll close by including some wedding announcements of various family members. Two have appeared in previous posts, but the other two (of the Ludey siblings) are appearing in this blog for the first time. Wish we had some photos!

Brodhead-Woodruff Wedding Announcement (Probably clipped from the Elizabeth Daily Journal) - from our family's private archives

Brodhead-Woodruff Wedding Announcement (Probably clipped from the Elizabeth Daily Journal) – from our family’s private archives

Brodhead-Loveland Marriage Announcement, 1889

Frank T. Ludey Jr. (1871-1900), age 21  (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Frank T. Ludey Jr. (1871-1900), age 21 (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Ludey-Ryman Wedding, The New York Times, 6/19/1896

Mary ("Minnie") Emma Ludey (1873-1938), age 21 (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Mary (“Minnie”) Emma Ludey (1873-1938), age 21 (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Herbert Duryea Crane  (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Herbert Duryea Crane (Courtesy of Ruth Kirby Dean, great granddaughter)

Ludey-Crane Marriage, Jersey City, The Evening Journal, 9/24/1897

Ludey-Crane Marriage, Jersey City, The Evening Journal, 9/24/1897

Categories: Angus, Brodhead, Crane, Dingman, Easton, Jaques, Knowles, Ludey, Phillips, Ryman, Trewin, Trowbridge, Weddings, Woodruff | Leave a comment

Sweet Little Edith Easton Brodhead

Brodhead_Edith_Easton_wm

Edith Easton Brodhead

The recent post of the Andrew Jackson Brodhead family reminded me of this sweet little angel, Edith Easton Brodhead, who was born in Perth Amboy, NJ, on November 3, 1879. Both the assembly of photos of the A. J. Brodhead family and this portrait of Edith are in nearly identical frames. And both frames are quite large.

Brodhead_MargaretLewisMartin

Margaret Lewis (Martin) Brodhead

Edith passed away just shy of age 2 years and 5 months. She was the firstborn child of Andrew Douglas Brodhead and Margaret Lewis (Martin) Brodhead who had married the year before Edith was born, in 1878. At the time of Edith’s passing, Andrew Douglas Brodhead was 29, and wife Margaret was 21. The second Brodhead child, Frank Martin Brodhead (my grandfather), was seven weeks old. Two other brothers would follow not long thereafter: Lewis Dingman Brodhead in 1884, and Andrew Jackson Brodhead in 1886.  All of the Brodhead-Martin children were born in Perth Amboy, NJ. (At some point, the family relocated to Elizabeth, which as just up the pike, but I am not sure exactly when that was.)

Brodhead_Andrew_D_old_PS1

Andrew Douglas Brodhead

The portrait of Edith is unsigned; there may be a clue under the mat, but because the frame is very old and the portrait is under glass, I don’t think we’ll be taking it apart any time soon. I plan to write away to the NJ archives to see if I can find out her cause of death. I can’t imagine how sadly her loss must have been felt by the young couple. Perhaps the arrival of baby Frank the preceding month helped them cope with their grief. If Edith was taken by a serious childhood illness, thankfully it did not take Frank as well.

Over the years, I’ve often looked at Edith’s little face and felt sad to think of her loss at such a young age. Makes one appreciate one’s own survival of childhood. There was a time–not all that long ago–when such losses were very common. Little Edith must have brought great joy to those around her during her brief time on earth. That is what I now try to remember whenever  I see her precious little face.

Categories: Brodhead, Easton, Lewis, Martin, Perth Amboy | 3 Comments

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904

Andrew Jackson Brodhead Family, composite framed in 1904, (watermark and labeling added by me)

You may recall a previous post about Robert Packer Brodhead in which I related that much material was available about the Brodhead family from the book Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania. We are very fortunate to have a large framed photo display of Robert’s father and mother, Andrew Jackson Brodhead and Ophelia Easton, together with Robert’s nine siblings. The display was assembled in Flemington, NJ, in 1904, and must have been compiled in the early part of the year since Ophelia passed away that April, some 18 months shy of what would have been her and her husband’s 60th wedding anniversary. Son Calvin died several years later, in 1907, from gastritis*. Andrew Jackson Brodhead died at 91 in 1913. So this assembly of photos is a wonderful thing to have.  My great grandmother Margaret Lewis Martin can be credited with identifying each person. She died in the mid-1940s but at some point before then created a diagram showing who was who, and attached it in an envelope to the reverse side of the frame.

Andrew Jackson Brodhead

Andrew Jackson Brodhead

Brodhead_Ophelia_Easton

Ophelia Easton Brodhead

Below in italics is material on the Andrew Jackson & Ophelia (Easton) Brodhead family excerpted from John W. Jordan’s 1911 book, Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania, in three volumes, published by Lewis Publishers of New York. Note: I cropped the individual photos from the compiled version above; also, please note that Mauch Chunk in Carbon County, Pennsylvania, is now known as the town of Jim Thorpe. Click the preceding link to peruse the interesting materials on the Mauch Chunk Historical Society’s website.

Andrew Jackson Brodhead, third son of Garret and Cornelia (Dingman) Brodhead, was born in Northampton (now Pike county), Pennsylvania, May 6, 1822. He received his early education in the common schools of the towns in which his parents lived, at the Dingman Academy, and a term at the Stroudsburg Academic School. He taught school one year, and in 1850 began working in Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania, where he removed his family in 1851. From 1851 to 1857 he was employed as clerk and bookkeeper, and for five years was in business with a partner, repairing cars used by the pioneer coal company of that region. About 1861 Mr. Brodhead began shipping coal for other producers, and in 1877 opened a general store at Hickory Run, Pennsylvania, where he lived until 1883, when he returned to Mauch Chunk. In 1884 he removed to Flemington, New Jersey, his present home. In 1868-69 he was treasurer of Carbon county, Pennsylvania, for several years he was school director of East Mauch Chunk, and served as justice of the peace.

Calvin Easton Brodhead

Calvin Easton Brodhead

1. Calvin Easton, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, December 27, 1846; married (first) December 6, 1870, Laura Clewell Leisenring, born at Mauch Chunk, August 9, 1848, daughter of Alexander William and Ann (Ruddle) Leisenring.  They had Anna Leisenring, born November 12, 1871; Emily Easton, born November 3, 1872; Alexander William, January 1, 1874; married (second) at Oakville, Canada, Mary Lewis, who died March 31, 1905.

.

.

.

Garret Brodhead

Garret Brodhead

2. Garret, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, February 11, 1848; married, September 17, 1872, Annie Kocher, born in Mauch Chunk, August 25, 1849, daughter of Conrad and Catherine (Wasser) Kocher.  Seven children: Conrad and Andrew Jackson (twins), born July 19, 1873; Alonzo Blakeslee, December 26, 1875; Calvin Easton and Laura Leisenring (twins), born September 21, 1878; Ruth Randall, born March 7, 1884; and Garrett, born January 3, 1888.

.

.

John Romeyn Brodhead

John Romeyn Brodhead

3. John Romeyn, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, June 11, 1849; married, November 13, 1882, Mary Martha Holbert, born in Chemung, New York, March 22, 1858, daughter of Joshua Sayre and Catherine Van Houton (Ryerson) Holbert.  They had Henry Holbert, born September 29, 1883, and Arthur Sayre, born November 26, 1886.

.

.

.

.

James Easton Brodhead

James Easton Brodhead

4. James Easton, born in Pike county, Pennsylvania, February 22, 1851; married, May 1, 1877, Hattie Lochlin Boyd, born July 11, 1852, daughter of Nathaniel and Jane (Curran) Boyd.  They have Walter, born March 9, 1878; John Romeyn, born September 25, 1880; Frederick Moon, born July 31, 1883; and Nathaniel Boyd, born June 22, 1891.

.

.

.

.

Andrew Douglas Brodhead

Andrew Douglas Brodhead

5. Andrew Douglass [misspelling by author, should be Douglas], born in Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania, August 17, 1852; married Margaret Lewis Martin, born January 15, 1859, daughter of Moses and Sarah Augusta (Lewis) Martin.  They have Edith Easton, born November 3, 1879; Frank Martin, born February 5, 1882; Lewis Dingman, born October 5, 1884; Andrew Jackson, born October 3, 1886.

.

.

.

Charlotte E. Brodhead

Charlotte E. Brodhead

6. Charlotte Easton, born in Mauch Chunk, December 11, 1855; married, October 5, 1887, Franklin Clark Burk, born in Flemington, New Jersey, April 8, 1853, son of Peter Wilson and Clarinda (Bellis) Burk.

.

.

.

.

.

Jean Struthers Brodhead

Jean Struthers Brodhead

7. Jean Struthers, born in Mauch Chunk, November 21, 1857; married, October 15, 1885, Charles Ashley Blakslee, born in Mauch Chunk, July 4, 1859, son of James Irwin and Caroline Jones (Ashley) Blakslee.  They have Gertrude Easton, born June 21, 1887, and Ophelia Easton Blakslee, born January 9, 1895.
.

.

.

.

Robert Packer Brodhead

Robert Packer Brodhead

8. Robert Packer, see forward [of book].

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Emily L. Brodhead

Emily L. Brodhead

9. Emily Linderman, born in East Mauch Chunk, June 1, 1862; married Frederick Moon, born September 30, 1851, son of Samuel and Matilda White Moon. They have Frederick Wiles Moon, born July 27, 1882.

.

.

.

.

Richard H. Brodhead

Richard H. Brodhead

10. Richard Henry, born in East Mauch Chunk, November 4, 1864; married, March 6, 1890, Jane Vanderveer Smock, born October 15, 1861, daughter of Daniel Polheim and Sarah Jane Smock. They have Estelle Smock, born November 26, 1890; Mary Ophelia, born April 2, 1892; Jean Blakslee, born July 3, 1893, died July 27, 1893, and Richard Henry.

.

.

.

.

Quite a few of their resting places have been documented, and in some cases photographed, on Find a Grave’s website. If you go to Andrew Jackson Brodhead’s entry (click here), you can click on links to others of the family who have been documented.

*Note re: Calvin Easton Brodhead, his May, 1, 1907, obituary in The Reading Eagle stated: Calvin E. Brodhead died suddenly in New York City of gastritis. He was born in Pike County in 1846. He was widely known in contract affairs, having served as chief engineer of the Lehigh Valley Railroad for some time. In 1872 he supervised the construction of the Easton and Amboy division of the road. He was well known in Flemington, NJ, where he lived before locating at Mauch Chunk.

Categories: Brodhead, Dingman, Easton, Flemington, Lewis, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Obituaries | 8 Comments

Powered by WordPress.com.

Nothing Gilded, Nothing Gained-Period Drama on Paper at Middlemay Farm

Fiction Books, History, Memoir by Adrienne Morris

Jane Austen's World

This Jane Austen blog brings Jane Austen, her novels, and the Regency Period alive through food, dress, social customs, and other 19th C. historical details related to this topic.

Travels with Janet

Just another WordPress.com weblog

Do Svidanya Dad

Exploring Dad's Unusual Story From NJ to the USSR

La Audacia de Aquiles

"El Mundo Visible es Sólo un Pretexto" / "The Visible World is Just a Pretext".-

Spared & Shared 2

-- rescuing history from old letters one page at a time

Parrotfish Journey

I travel , YOU should too...

TOWER AND FLIGHTS

In The Beginning Man Tried Ascending To Heaven via The Tower Of Babel. Now He Tries To Elevate His Existence Using Hallucinogenic Drugs. And, Since The 20th Century, He Continually Voyages Into Outer Space Using Spacecrafts. Prayer Thru Christ Is The Only Way To Reach Heaven.

London, Hollywood

I'm Dominic Wells, an ex-Time Out Editor. I used to write about films. Now I write them.

Uma Familia Portuguesa

A história da nossa família

Trkingmomoe's Blog

Low Budget Meals for the New Normal

The Good, the Bad and the Italian

food/films/families and more

dvn ms kmz time travel

This is all about my travels to the past... my reflections and musings about yesteryear, as I find the stories of a people passed away and learn how to tell them.

newarkpoems

350 years of Newark in verse 1666-2016

Russian Universe

Understanding Russia with a Russian

Bulldog Travels

Everything and Nothing Plus Some Pretty Photos

Dances with Wools

knitting, spinning, dyeing, and related fiber arts

Life After Caregiving

On caregivers, faith, family, and writing...

Why'd You Eat That?

Food Folklore for the everyday scholar. These are the stories behind the foods we eat.

Cooking without Limits

Food Photography & Recipes

The Pioneer Woman

Plowing through Life in the Country...One Calf Nut at a Time

Almost Home

Genealogy Research and Consulting

Old Bones Genealogy of New England

Genealogy and Family History Research

ferrebeekeeper

Reflections Concerning Art, Nature, and the Affairs of Humankind (also some gardening anecdotes)

Map of Time | A Trip Into the Past

Navigating Through Someplace Called History

Out Here Studying Stones

Cemeteries & Genealogy

WeGoBack

family research ... discover your ancestry

the Victorian era

Did I misplace my pince-nez again? Light reading on the 19th century.

"Greatest Generation" Life Lessons

This is the story of an ordinary family, trying to live an ordinary life during an extraordinary time frame, and the lessons they learn through experience.

Moore Genealogy

Fun With Genealogy

Meeting my family

RESEARCHING MY FAMILY TREE

Shaking the tree

musings on the journey towards knowing and sharing my family's stories

A Hundred Years Ago

Food and More

Scots Roots

Helping you dig up your Scots roots.

Root To Tip

Not just a list of names and dates

Food Perestroika

Adventures in Eastern Bloc Cuisine

My Aunt the WAC

Marian Solomon's midlife transition from the farm to the Women's Army Corps (WACs)

Being Em | From Busan to America

this journey is my own, but i'm happy to share.

Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter

The Daily Online Genealogy Newsletter

Irish in the American Civil War

Exploring Irish Emigration & Irish Involvement in the American Civil War

TWISTED LIMBS & CROOKED BRANCHES

Genealogy: Looking For "Dead People"!

Cemeteries of Brunswick, Maine

To live in the hearts we leave behind, is not to die. ~ Thomas Campbell

%d bloggers like this: